Page 1

Molesey

Putting Local Business First

June 2017

EE FR

Matters

Keeping a Community Together

Issue 9

FREE to 9000 Homes and Businesses in East and West Molesey

rday u t a S 10th ! June

Wallis, Freda and The Duke

:

Wimbledon

:

Anne Poyntz

:

Mezzet Review


FR EE


Welcome! It’s June! Let’s have some sun. The Molesey Carnival is upon us again on Saturday June 10th! Best wishes from Molesey Matters to all involved. Personally I am really looking forward to having a go at the Zorb racing - just what I need for my bad back! The front cover is obviously Mr Mole, taken last year by Ted Palmer. If the sun is out, that’s one hot costume. In this months issue the Molesey Local History Society informs us of the origins of the Molesey Hurst Golf Club. We look at the love life of the Duke of Windsor with a local socialite, and is the Poyntz Arms named after a local resident? We review local restaurant Mezzet and

June 2017 ask for help to solve the mystery of the boat “The Jane Scott” Della Reynolds continues her ever popular Urban Wildlife Blog and the Molesey Residents Association updates us on all things Molesey. Once again best wishes from us for the Carnival. Have a fantastic day everyone. Until July.

Reader Offers Village Windows - 20% off until 30th June Esher Tyres - 15% off until 30th June Mezzet - Free delivery on Takeaways within 3 miles The Stables - Thursday Steak £300 for 2 plus wine Spine Central - Qoute the code for massive discount

Published by:

Village Matters Ltd

Contents

Molesey Director: Paul Chard Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematters.co.uk Website :www.villagematters.co.uk

Molesey Local History Society 4 Wallis, Freda and The Duke 6 Wimbledon Fortnight 8 Trooping The Colour 12 Anne Poyntz 14 Mezzet Review 16/17 The Mystery of the ‘Jane Scott’ 20 Father’s Day 22 Recipe of The Month 28 Wellbeing 30 Urban Wildlife Blog 34 Molesey Residents Association 37 Why we need Bees 39 Events we Like 45 Index of Advertisers 46

Front Cover: The Molesey Carnival Mole © Edward (Ted) Palmer 2016 phototed.co.uk@gmail.com Send any photos (300dpi) for consideration to: paul@villagematters.co.uk We are now on Facebook. Check us out : @moleseymattersmagazine

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

3

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


“He had told us to bring golf clubs and balls that we might play at that game on Molesey Hurst…” By Anthony Barnes, Molesey Local History Society In a previous issue we learnt that the earliest recorded golf match on Molesey Hurst was played in 1758. David Garrick, the actor, organised a game for a group of Scottish friends staying with him at Hampton. Almost 150 years later, a group of local sportsmen got together to set up a club. This was at the height of the golf boom in London and the south-east. Clubs established locally included Thames Ditton and Esher (1891), Richmond (Sudbrook Park, 1891), Woking (Hook Heath, 1893), Surbiton (1895), Home Park at Hampton Court (1895), West Byfleet (New Zealand Golf Club, 1895), Molesey Hurst (1906) and Burhill (1907). The course was laid out in two stages by James Hepburn, a Scottish professional – first as a ninehole course in May 1907 and five months later as an eighteen-hole golf course complete with pot bunkers. The club house was opened on Saturday 10th August 1907 by the local MP, Mr William Keswick. The Surrey Comet tells us that Mr Keswick said that “to him as a Scotsman, it was very satisfactory to see that golf had taken such a deep root in England” and that “he hoped the members would continue to find amusement, interest and satisfaction on these links.” The newspaper described the new club house as being built “entirely of wood, and is of the bungalow type, the entrance being in Hurst Lane at the end of Vine Road. It is a very suitable and convenient structure, and the cost has been nearly £500. It contains a room 30ft. by 18ft., opening on to a veranda, and overlooking the whole of the links.” The guest list at the opening luncheon reads like a Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

4

veritable ‘Who’s Who’ of the great and the good in Molesey at the time. It included Mr Julius Vogel, Chairman of the Club Committee, who was the second son of Sir Julius Vogel, former Prime Minister of New Zealand who lived at Hillersdon House on the corner of Church Road and Vine Road. Also present was the well-known Molesey cricketer, William Graburn, of Keble Cottage in Spencer Road who was also the Club secretary. On the eve of the Great War, the entry fee for gents was £2/2/0 and for ladies £1/1/0. Subs for gents were £5/5/6 and for ladies £3/3/6. Visitors’ fees were 2/- a day, and at weekends and on Bank Holidays they were 5/-. On Sundays and Bank holidays players were allowed to have caddies. A club car service was operated to and from Hampton Court Station. Molesey Hurst Golf Club appeared to thrive. Membership grew from 180 to about 400; but its position was precarious. The land was in a zone earmarked by the old Molesey Council for residential development. The club could not afford to buy the land on which the course was built that had leapt in value from £100 to £700 per acre. So, in 1935, when their lease expired, the land was sold to Lavender and Farrell, estate developers from Worcester Park for £44,100 and compensation was paid to the club. A petition was organised in a last ditch effort to save the land as an open space for the residents of Molesey but it was not enough to persuade Esher Council to buy back the land from the developers. Older residents will remember that for some years afterwards the club-house was utilised as an infants’ school and they still refer to the houses that were built on that part of Molesey Hurst as the golfBy course estate. Local History Society the Molesey

www.villagematters.co.uk


EE FR

Visit our stunning newly refurbished showroom in Ashford!


Wallis, Freda and the Duke Source: Various Most of us living in Molesey will know about our connection with the Duke and his love of racing at Kempton Park. He also had a special reason to be in the surrounding areas. He frequently visited local socialite Freda Dudley Ward. Freda lived in Monksbridge, in Lower Sunbury with her husband who chose to turn a blind eye to the affair with the Prince of Wales which started when Freda was only 23. The prince was a regular visitor to Sunbury and there is still evidence of the affair in the form of a topiary teddy (short for Edward of course) in the riverside garden of Monksbridge, which was apparently a gift from the prince. The affair lasted 17 years, although it was by no means his only affair. In 1929 Wallis came on the scene. She met Thelma, Lady Furness, the then-mistress of Edward, Prince of Wales. On 10 January 1931, Lady Furness introduced Wallis to the Prince. In January 1934, while Lady Furness was MOUSE away in New York City, Wallis allegedly became the Prince's mistress. By the end of 1934, Edward was irretrievably besotted with Wallis, finding her domineering manner and abrasive irreverence toward his position appealing; in the words of his official biographer, he became "slavishly dependent" on her. At an evening party in Buckingham Palace, he introduced her to his parents. His father was outraged because of her marital history, as divorced people were generally excluded from court. Edward showered Wallis with money and jewels, and in February 1935, and again later in the year, he holidayed with her in Europe.

www.villagematters.co.uk

6

His courtiers became increasingly alarmed as the affair began to interfere with his official duties. Shortly after his coronation, the king created a constitutional crisis by proposing to Mrs Simpson, Source Various/Paul Chard scandalous as her divorcee status. As Edward was head of the Church of England, their marriage was forbidden, leading to the king’s controversial abdication in December 1936. Edward was the first king since 1399 to relinquish the throne, and his decision recognised by the British government as the appropriate decision to make in the circumstances. After abdicating, the former king was created Duke of Windsor by his brother and successor, King George V. Wallis and Edward married on 3 June 1937 at the Château de Candé, loaned to them by French millionaire Charles Bedaux. After the wedding, Wallis was formally known as the Duchess of Windsor, without the title "Her Royal Highness". She was instead styled as "Her Grace", a style normally reserved for non-royal dukes and duchesses. The Duchess of Windsor died on 24 April 1986 at her home in the Bois de Boulogne, Paris. Her funeral was held at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, attended by her two surviving sisters-inlaw – the Queen Mother and Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester – and other members of the royal family. The Queen, Prince Philip, and the Prince and Princess of Wales attended both the funeral ceremony and the burial. She was buried next to Edward in the Royal Burial Ground near Windsor Castle, as "Wallis, Duchess of Windsor

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

7

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Wimbledon Fortnight Monday 3 July – Sunday 16 July Source: Sarah Davey Wimbledon fortnight may be as British as summer rain but it originated across the English Channel. It derives from a French handball game called jeu de paume, or ‘game

of the palm’ which was played in the 12th century in French Monasteries. Even the name derives from the French expression ‘tenez-vous prêt, which means ‘get ready’ and was called by the player about the serve the ball. The game was first recorded in English as ‘tenetz’, by the poet John Gower in 1399. The game was very popular with French royalty and it was they who introduced it to the rest of Europe. In 1414 Henry V received a gift of tennis balls from the future king of France, Charles Vll. Henry then initiated the tradition of aristocratic play in Britain. Early players hit the balls with their bare hands but soon large gloves were preferred, and by the early 16th century short-handled racquets had appeared. The first world tennis championships were held in the mid 18th century and was recognisably the game we know today, played in an enclosed court. The rules were different though as the ball was

www.villagematters.co.uk

8

allowed to bounce off a wall. Two inventions transformed the game: the first was the invention of the rubber ball, which could bounce on grass, and the second was the lawnmower and roller, which allowed a smooth outdoor surface to be created. By the mid 19th century tennis was being played regularly on grass, and at the same time more powerful racquets with longer handles were produced. The first lawn tennis club was founded in 1872 in Leamington, Warwickshire. In 1875 J. M. Heathcote asked his wife to cover a ball in flannel to make it easier to hit on wet grass. His idea was a success and quickly caught on. Lawn tennis became increasingly popular and the management of The All-England Croquet Club, at Wimbledon in London, was persuaded to set aside one of their lawns for the game. In 1877 it changed its name to the All-England Croquet and Lawn Tennis Club and organised the first Wimbledon Tennis Championships. There were 22 entrants, all men and the winner was Spencer Gore. A separate women’s championship ran for the first time in 1884 and was won by Maud Watson.

Spencer Gore

Maud Watson

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

9

www.villagematters.co.uk


At Elmbridge Borough Councils Annual Meeting held on Wednesday May 17th, councillor Rachael Lake was formally elected to serve as the Mayor of Elmbridge for the Municipal Year or 2017 – 2018. Rachael was elected as an Elmbridge Councillor in 2006 and feels honoured to have been able to serve the ward of Walton North ever since. I went along the next day to a suite at Mercedes Benz World, to meet the new Mayor at the launch of her chosen charity of the year.

Caroline Edwards form Oasis and our new Mayor Rachael Lake

vulnerable children and families for the last 21 years. Oasis have a strong track record of providing services for families in crisis and By Tracey Anderson for implementing preventative services to stop families going into crisis. The circumstances of many of the families are often symptomatic of years of unresolved issues for the parents and the family unit as a whole. Issues such as domestic violence, drug or alcohol abuse. Oasis work to build a relationship of trust with these families who often feel isolated and let down. Oasis’s strapline is “Touching People’s Lives”, a sentiment that Rachael believes is an integral part of all those in local organisations look to achieve. Rachael said, “There are no boundaries to the type of abuse that Oasis handles and no class distinction. I chose to support the charity because of the important work that Oasis does, often unseen .www.oasischildcare.co.uk

The chosen charity for 2017 – 2018 is Oasis childcare. Oasis have been assisting

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

10

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

11

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Trooping The Colour Saturday 17th June By Tom Hancock

The custom of Trooping the Colour dates back to the time of Charles II in the 17th. Century.

an annual event since.

Although I know about the parades which mark the Queen’s official birthday I have never really known what the phrase ‘Trooping the Colours’ actually means. In fact The Colours carry upon them all the battle honours of a Regiment and as such have major significance for each and every soldier serving in that Regiment. In olden days they were hung outside the Battalion or Regimental headquarters after a good day's battle, so The Colours identified their headquarters. They were carried into battle so that in the fog of war, if a soldier was lost, he knew to search for the colours to locate the rest of his Regiment. Hence each day The Colours were trooped in front of the soldiers to make sure that they would always recognise them. In London, the Foot Guards used to do this as part of their daily Guard Mounting on Horse Guards and the modern Trooping the Colour parade is along similar lines. The Grenadier Guards first began to mark The Sovereign’s Official Birthday under the reign of Charles ll in 1748. When George III became King in 1760, it was ordered that parades should mark the King's Birthday. With only a few breaks, most notably for the two World Wars, The Trooping of the Colours has been Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

12

The impressive ceremony is now held on the occasion of our own Queen's Official Birthday. The precise date varies but it takes place in June. It is carried out by her personal troops, the Household Division, on Horse Guards Parade, with the Queen herself attending and taking the salute. The Queen used to ride her own horse, side saddle, wearing the uniform of the regiment whose colour was being trooped. Since 1987, she has attended in a carriage. Regiments take their turn for this honour in rotation depending on their operational commitments. Over 1000 officers and men, and 200 horses take part in the parade, together with 200 musicians from six bands and corps of drums. The parade route extends from Buckingham Palace along The Mall to Horse Guards Parade, Whitehall and back again. As the clock on the Horse Guards Building strikes 11am, the Royal Procession arrives and The Queen takes the Royal Salute. The parade begins with the Inspection, The Queen driving slowly down the ranks of all six Guards and then past the Household Cavalry. After the event, the Royal Family gathers on the balcony of Buckingham Palace to watch the RAF flypast.

www.villagematters.co.uk


Valid until 30th June 2017

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

13

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Sir Thomas Heneage and Anne Poyntz Source: Various Sir Thomas Heneage (b. before 1482, d. 1553) was Cardinal Wolsey's gentleman usher at Hampton Court, and then courtier to Henry VIII. In 1519 he acquired an estate in East

Molesey and erected a mansion to be near Hampton Court. When Wolsey fell from power Heneage retained his post in Henry's privy chamber and was one of the few courtiers present when Henry married Anne Boleyn on 25th January 1533. By the 1540s he headed the privy chamber at all official functions, such as the reception of Anne of Cleves, and Henry's marriage to Katherine Parr. In 1554 Heneage married Anne Poyntz, daughter of Sir Nicholas Poyntz and Joan Berkeley. Was this where the name of our very own pub in

www.villagematters.co.uk

14

Walton Road came from? We cannot be sure, but it looks possible. In 1866 a Mr Francis Bowry, a cab proprietor, living in Pemberton Road, opened a new public house. After many attempts to get a licence he received help form dowager Lady Clinton of Molesey Park. He was so grateful that he wanted to call the pub, The Clinton Arms. Her family however hated the thought of their name being associated with a pub, so she offered up her maiden name, Poyntz. Was Lady Clinton a descendent of Sir Thomas and Anne Poyntz? In 1555 Heneage’s father gave him and his wife Anne the site of Legbourne priory with

extensive lands in Lincolnshire, and on the father’s death in the following year Heneage succeeded to property in Yorkshire and to the leasehold house in Lincoln in which his uncle George and his father had lived. He was to enjoy the favour of Elizabeth, under whom he attained high office at court and in government. After becoming a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber around 1565, she flirted with him, making her favourite, Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester extremely jealous He died on 17 October 1594 and is buried in St Pauls.

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Halloween 31st October

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

15

By Monica Chard

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Mezzet - Restaurant Review By Paul Chard Recently, my wife Monica and I, (Mrs C), were treated to a gastronomic delight. In all honesty, some of the best food we have ever tasted. Fadi Kesserwany had invited us both for lunch at his wonderful restaurant, Mezzet, in Bridge Road East Molesey. I knew it was going to be good as I had read a review by one of my favourite journalists, the late AA Gill who called it “one of the best three Lebanese restaurants”. Boy, was he right! Fadi greeted us with a smile and a glass of champagne and before we started our meal we had a chance to chat together. Fadi has always wanted to own his own restaurant. As a child, he literally grew up around the table. It wasn’t unusual to have up to 30 people to lunch. Uncles, aunties, cousins, friends. His love of food is apparent and he is justifying proud of the restaurant. The success of Mezzet, led 3 years ago to the opening of Mezzet Dar a couple of doors down. Dar concentrates on tapas and is inspired by both Lebanon and Spain. Fadi has also recently opened up in Selfridges, a sure testament to just how excellent the food really is. Around seven months ago Fadi also brought in a new Head Chef, Tony Esber. Tony and his team are truly brilliant. A CV that includes, Executive Chef at Maroush in London, alludes to the experience ahead. So, back to the food! Mrs C and I love grazing. Mezzet is a heavenly place to do it. You can order a selection of starters to share to give you a flavour of the Lebanese wonders

www.villagematters.co.uk

16

on offer. You could equally order and reorder from the fabulous choices available. What you will be sure of is an awakening of the senses, or little surprises that slap your taste buds and widen your eyes. Make sure you go with a big appetite to make the most of the temptations! Lebanese cuisine manages to take humble ingredients and elevate them to rock star status. Amongst other things on the cold mezze menu is a veritable cornucopia of hummus dishes. Hummus is of course made from the lowly chick pea, but by the time it has been beaten and whipped with tahini and some lemon juice the creamy dish is a delight which works well with a variety of flavours and accompaniments. Mezzet offers a choice. You can have the perfectly wonderful basic version, served with pine nuts and olive oil. Or add chillies for the Beiruty version. Or how about some pieces of tender grilled lamb? We

sampled both fig hummus, made with roast figs and walnuts, topped with fresh and dried fig slices – it was a beautiful mix of both flavours and textures. Also, the king prawn hummus which had the addition of some chilli kick and some succulent king prawns, cooked to perfection. Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


The range of cold mezze offers something for everyone; vegans, vegetarians and meat eaters alike. But even if you are a carnivore, how could you not enjoy what is on offer from the vegetarian selection? Moutabal, the creamy smoked aubergine dip, Muhamara, the nutty, crunchy mix with a light kick of chilli, or the ubiquitous Tabouleh, the fresh salad of parsley, onion and tomato with crushed wheat and lemon. Fresh stuffed vine leaves were light and Moorish, rather like a vegetarian sushi. Do try the falafel, which is unlike any other version I have tried. Hollowed out to make it lighter, it is filled with little cubes of pickled turnip which Mrs C found to be quite extraordinary, and served with a light tahini dressing and rocket. Or how about dandelion greens? We had not come across this on a menu before. Another humble ingredient elevated to kingly status. Mixed with garlic and onion and strewn with fried onions, light as a feather, it was finished off with a squeeze of zingy lemon. Definitely worth a try! Try the Manakish Zaatar, a stone baked pastry with zaatar – a mix of wild thyme, sesame and olive oil, eaten with thin slices of tomato, cucumber and a mint leaf. Another version offers the addition of halloumi and mozzarella with poppy seeds. It is a favourite breakfast snack in Lebanon and truly tasty. Kibbeh is a little package of crushed wheat with lamb mince and pine nuts served with a tahini dip. Or select the little spicy lamb sausages, packed full of

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

flavour with a Batata Harra on the side, spicy potato cubes served with sumac. The selection of mains is huge, but you can rest assured that everything is prepared fresh and to order. Select from chargrilled meats, baked fish or tagines with accompanying sides of veg, salad or rice. The 5 Spice Lamb is a choice piece of fillet, slow cooked and served with a rich intoxicating gravy. It is one of the most popular mains at the moment. There is plenty of choice for vegetarians too, with artichoke hearts, halloumi, aubergine and okra dishes featuring. Give your stomach a brief respite, but don’t leave without sampling the desserts. They are unlike anything we have seen any other menu. Yes you can have baklava and fresh fruit, but you could also opt for Knafeh, a syrup soaked cheese dessert with a semolina base, topped with rose and pistachio. It was a delightful surprise. Mrs C was in raptures about yummy vermicelli/cream sweet which was light as a feather and melt in the mouth. Mezzet is also happy to serve its customers who are not able to eat in the restaurant. They offer take away food With *Free Delivery* (Within a 3 mile radius only) or for collection from Bridge Road East Molesey.

17

www.villagematters.co.uk


Sudoku 7

Solution on Page 41

4

5 How to play Sudoku

5 5 8 4 2 9 8 7 4 9 6 3 2 8 7 1 6 4 4 7 2 2 9 8

Have your say on the issues that matter in Elmbridge. Elmbridge Borough Council would like to hear from residents, businesses and community and voluntary organisations to help them agree the Overview and Scrutiny work programme for the forthcoming year. Overview and Scrutiny has an important role in influencing and contributing to the development of the Council’s policies and services. It can also scrutinise decisions that have been taken and the way that current policies work. It does not examine individual problems or complaints but focuses instead on strategic issues and policies. In fact, this role is not confined to the work of Elmbridge Borough Council but extends to anything that affects what it is like to live and work in the Borough. If you would like to propose a topic for the Overview and Scrutiny Committee to consider there is a form on the Council’s website (elmbridge.gov.uk). Alternatively, you can email your ideas to overviewandscrutiny@elmbridge.gov.uk or write to: Overview and Scrutiny, Elmbridge Borough

To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

18

It’s simple! Fill in the grid so that each row, column and 3x3 box, contains the numbers 1 through to 9 with no repetition. You don’t need to be a genius. These puzzles use logic alone. Watch out! Sudoku is highly addictive.

Council, Civic Centre, High Street, Esher, Surrey KT10 9SD. Suggestions can be made by both individuals and organisations and must be received by Monday, 5 June 2017. The Overview and Scrutiny Committee will then discuss your suggestions for possible inclusion in the work programme which will be agreed at its meeting on 15 June 2017, at 7.45pm. The Overview and Scrutiny Committee meetings are held in public and you are welcome to attend. Overview and Scrutiny Committee meetings are webcast live, and accessible from https://elmbridge.public-i.tv/ core/portal/home. Further information is available on the Elmbridge Borough Council website along with the Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report for 2016/17 to give a flavour of the types of issues and topics that have recently been considered. By seeking your views and then acting on the results, the Overview and Scrutiny Committee can work towards ensuring the decisions made in Elmbridge better reflect your needs and aspirations.

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

19

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


The Mystery of the Molesey Boat ‘Jane Scott’ By Monica Chard Two years ago Jane Scott Ellingham's cousin Judith was exploring the local area having recently moved to Hampton. She discovered the Walled Garden in Sunbury and went in for a look at the Gallery. Her jaw dropped when she saw one of the embroideries featuring the ‘Jane Scott’, the boat built by her grandfather and named after his mother Jane Scott Percival. She rang her cousin Jane saying “Our grandfather’s boat is here come and see”. Various members of the family quickly made their way to the Walled Garden and looked with amazement at it, wondering where this image had came from and if by any chance the boat still exists. Their grandfather George Frederick Percival moved from Putney with his wife Irene and 7 children to a house called Belfair in Spencer Road, East Molesey in the late 1920's and the children grew up there. George was a resourceful man and enjoyed making things so for a fun project he built the boat in the garden of the Spencer Road house and launched it nearby. Many years of weekend fun followed. All the family were enthusiastic about water. They sailed, joined the Sea Scouts, rowed and generally messed about in boats and spent every summer holiday at Seaview on the Isle of Wight sailing their own boats that they towed down, or Seaview dinghies. Jane's father Harold told her before he died that in his holidays as a boy he often earned extra pocket money helping the man in Bushy Park who rented out rowing boats on the pond ....come in number 4 your time is up! Long gone now, but did this actually ever

www.villagematters.co.uk

20

happen? Two of the Percival boys died in childhood leaving 2 girls and 3 boys. When they grew up and WW2 broke out the 3 boys joined the Royal Navy, one daughter joined the WRAF and the younger girl June (Judith's mother) joined the WRNS and ended up at Bletchley Park, but that's another story. During the war the Thames was patrolled by a ‘Dad’s Army’ of private vessels, cabin cruisers and the like which was known as the Upper Thames Patrol. It was also fondly known as Up The Pub (UTP), so maybe they did not get much action! There were over 1000 volunteers and George and the ‘Jane Scott’ were among them . Could it be that this gathering featured in the photo here was of the local branch? The ‘Jane Scott’ and Jane’s father were certainly among the crowd. But where was the photo taken? It was one of many photos in Jane Ellingham’s old photo albums inherited from her father, Harold George Reginald Percival. Jane was always told she was named after the boat although possibly her great grandmother was the real reason. George and Irene died in the early 1950's and so unfortunately have all their children now. But does the ‘Jane Scott’ live on? How good a boat builder would George Percival have been if it does!! A large family of grandchildren and great grandchildren and great great grandchildren would love to know. Why was this particular vessel used to illustrate the UTP on the panel in the Embroidery Gallery in Sunbury? We know that the embroiderer was Jo Fuller, but she tells us she was given the image to produce as part of the millennium project. As the boat was built in Molesey, if you know anything about the ‘Jane Scott’ do get in touch: Email paul@vllagematters.co.uk Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

21

www.villagematters.co.uk


Father’s Day Sunday 18th June By Sarah Davey

At a social gathering recently someone mentioned Fathers’ Day and immediately there was a chorus of, ‘Made up day!’ and ‘Invented by greeting card companies!’ That seemed to be the general consensus, but I got to wondering whether Fathers’ Day really was just the product of a boardroom meeting at Hallmark, so I set out to investigate. There is evidence that a Babylonian boy named Elmesu, carved some sort of greeting on a clay tablet 4000 years ago wishing his father health and long life, but I don’t think we can say Fathers’ Day started there mostly because that’s pretty much it for the evidence until about 100 years ago. The most common theory about modern Fathers’ Day is that it originated in the US, and with one particular lady, a Mrs. Sonora Louise Smart Dodd. She felt that just as we dedicate a special day to mothers, so we should do the same for fathers. It meant a lot to her, because she and her siblings were raised in a loving manner by her own father after her mother died in childbirth. So she began a campaign, and the first Fathers’ Day was held on June 19th (her father’s birthday) in 1910. It grew in popularity and in 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed a proclamation declaring that the third Sunday in June would be Fathers’ Day. Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

22

Now the waters become murky. How did Fathers’ Day make the leap across the Atlantic? No-one seems to know, but it’s likely that – in the manner of other American traditions - it gradually seeped into the British consciousness. Greetings cards manufacturers definitely played their part though. Never ones to miss a trick, they began producing cards and we bought them. It seems that in the UK, Fathers’ Day really took off in the 1970s but, unlike in the US, it’s never been declared an ‘official’ day. Still, as traditions go it’s a nice one. The role of dads has changed a lot in a generation. Most now take on a substantial amount of child care and are much more hands-on than their own dads were. Research shows that dads who are involved in day-to-day childcare are key figures in helping their children develop good self-esteem and selfconfidence. Their rough-play helps children learn a sense of control and independence. Crucially, dads who get involved when their children are young, are much more likely to stay involved and in touch if their marriage breaks down. Dads are important, so let yours know how much you love him this Fathers’ Day.

www.villagematters.co.uk


Advertorial

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

23

www.villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

26

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

27

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Recipe of The Month Grown Up Milk Shakes Magical Mint Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 0 mins Serves: 2 Ingredients 150ml / 5 fl oz milk 2 tbsp peppermint syrup OR 2 tbsp mint liqueur 400g / 14 oz peppermint ice cream

Marvellous Mocha

Sprigs of fresh mint to garnish

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Method

Cooking time: 0 mins

Pour the milk and peppermint syrup into a food processor or blender and use a slow setting to combine them.

Serves: 2 Ingredients:

Add the peppermint ice cream and blend until smooth.

120ml/ 4fl oz milk

Pour the mixture into tall glasses and decorate with sprigs of fresh mint.

1 tsp instant espresso powder 4 tbsps good quality chocolate syrup 6 tbsp caramel sauce, plus more for garnish if required 300g / 11oz good quality vanilla ice cream

It’s really that simple! It also works brilliantly with mint and choc chip ice cream. Grate dark chocolate curls over the top before serving.

4 tbsp Coffee liqueur (optional) Fresh whipped cream Chocolate-covered espresso beans to garnish Method Combine milk espresso powder, chocolate syrup, caramel and liqueur (if using) into a blender and mix. Add ice cream and blend until smooth. Garnish with whipped cream and espresso beans (and caramel sauce if desired).

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

28

www.villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

29

www.villagematters.co.uk


Wellbeing: Remembering Names to Build Self-esteem and Rapport When we are anxious our mind seems to lose its way….we feel overwhelmed with often negative and catastrophising (‘awfulising’) thoughts. Our memory and thinking processes seem ‘hijacked’: decision-making seems an impossible task and we fall into procrastinating and ‘avoidance strategies’. Memory of simple facts, such as names, seems impossible so we no longer try. We meet people and we hope our open smile and open body language will disguise our inability to remember their name. This is hard work and taps into our own lack of self-esteem “I am hopeless with names, I don’t even bother any more’. Phones remember names, using Siri, because this is an important part of how machines build up a relationship with the user. Similarly remembering names builds a rapport with others, in a genuine and interested way. We all want to be ‘seen’ and ‘remembered’ and our name, being one of the first things we are given, is such a key to this process. Wellbeing is about trying to nourish how we relate to ourselves, and others. Learning also helps in terms of self-esteem, engagement and feeling we are achieving something by building a rapport with those we connect with. Remembering someone’s name can feel like a real achievement and at the same time reinforces your bond with that other person. Change the self-professing prophesy of “I never remember names” – create a new way of relating by using techniques to help link someone to a name and power boost your own mental memory stick! Some people find using Darren Brown-style “memory palaces” works or partnering a name with an object or rhyme or song. This can be effective especially when linked with your way of learning i.e. if you are a visual learner you may find you can boost your memory by linking a name with an image, for example “Rachel in the red dress”. If auditory learning seems to suit you more you might find it helps to link the name with a rhyme or song, for example “Lucy in the sky with diamonds”. Memory and learning requires Attention/Focus, Interest and Practice. Emotion and Feeling (either positive or negative) also strengthen the develop-

www.villagematters.co.uk

30

ment of memories, for example how we remember the perfume of a significant person in our life. Here are some other, hopefully useful, tips for remembering names: Engage your headspace to think: slow down, breath, focus on the person’s face, personality and name. When you met them first you may have been socially anxious for example at a party so your anxiety might have taken over your mind. Breath, try to be mindful for the moment and focus on their face and repeat their name in your head. Call them by their name. Avoid jumping into “lovely to meet you? Avoid obviously over-using their name but check you are pronouncing it properly and include it within your conversation to help reinforce the learning of it Repetition: repeat the name while you are looking at them in a thoughtful way. Think about the mane and find meaning in it. Have you met them before? Do you know someone else with that name? Make connections Learn the name: especially if it is an unfamiliar one or difficult to pronounce. In our diverse world we are often introduced to words which are new to our vocabulary to try to learn them and check the pronunciation. Show your interest in them and learning their name: a vital part of who they are. Ask questions: people generally like to be shown interest in who they are. Try to show an interest and learn something about them. Repeat their story in your mind together with their name to link their story with their name. Please feel free to contact me if you would like further information on our Wellbeing Programme which supports positive mental health. Email: karen@mind-care.uk Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

31

www.villagematters.co.uk


Run Safely in Summer Dress appropriately - Loose-fitting clothes help take advantage of any breeze. Investigate techno fabrics which allow sweat to pass through them and evaporate, keeping your core temperature lower. Use sunglasses and waterproof sunscreen. A visor to protect your face is a good idea but not a tight-fitting hat because the head is wear we lose the most heat. Choose the right time - Avoid midday and 3pm when the sun is at its strongest. If you're training in a city air quality is best in the morning, and try to choose a route which provides a lot of shade.

www.villagematters.co.uk

32

Keep hydrated - Hydrate well about two hours before a run, even if you don't feel thirsty. For shorter runs of less than 45 minutes, drink water throughout. For longer runs use drinks which help maintain electrolyte levels. Start slower, stop sooner - Start your run a bit slower than usual. Know when to stop, because heat-induced illness is serious. Signs to watch for are headaches, confusion, loss of muscle control, hot and cold flushes, clammy skin and an upset stomach. If you experience any of these, seek shade, a drink and transport home. Use waterways - If possible try to choose a route that passes near water because it's usually cooler and breezier which will help keep your core temperature down. You can make use of rivers, streams, a lake or the sea. If you can finish your run with a brief swim it's a great way to cool down quickly.

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

33

www.villagematters.co.uk


'

Urban Wildlife Garden You don’t need to live in the country to enjoy wildlife A blog by Molesey Resident - Della Reynolds Apologies for the squeamish but this month’s blog is all about slugs and snails. I knew there was going to be a fatality as soon as I saw the lid of the compost bin fly up into the air propelled by the hose pipe which I had just vigorously jerked in order to reach the plants at the bottom of the garden. Two slugs, who had been sitting cosily in the curve of the lid, flew up into the air and whilst one of them was thrown free the other was unfortunately pinned beneath the heavy plastic lid as it came crashing to the ground. I turned off the tap to inspect the damage. As I removed the lid, I could tell that the slug had been fatally wounded. The other managed to pick itself up and make a full recovery. Once it found its bearings, the survivor slug slowly rushed to the aid of his companion. I then witnessed a fascinating event. The survivor circled the now prostrate slug several times as if in grave concern. I only watched a few of these circuits as they took some time to complete, but when I came back to check a few hours later there were a large number of silver trail lines weaving an intricate pattern around the dead slug. Others had come out to see what all the fuss was about, but unable to revive their colleague they started to eat him instead. Some slugs are carnivorous. The survivor companion however, did not share in this meal, but watched from a distance until well into the night. To me this appeared to be a perfect example of slug affection, although I know that some of you will doubt the truth of this. You can probably guess that I don’t kill my slugs and snails, well only accidentally. I abhor slug pellets as they cause a painful death and put toxins into the environment for years to come. If birds or hedgehogs eat slugs which have consumed pellets then the poison passes through to them. Even dogs have died if they have eaten a sufficient number of the ‘blueys’ Gastropods serve a useful function in the great balance of nature and they are expert at

www.villagematters.co.uk

34

recycling debris. Unfortunately, they can’t always distinguish between decaying items and your freshly grown vegetables! A recent visitor to my bathroom, with an eye on my hanging basket, reminded me how acrobatic snails can be, even with their cumbersome shell on board. One warm summer’s evening last year I went out into the garden with a torch to check on the wildlife. The quiet daytime garden had turned into a melee of slugs and snails all sliding in different directions, climbing over each other, in search of food. Careful not to tread on anybody I made my way to the bird feeding area where a large number of molluscs were in search of bird seed. One particular character had a novel idea. He had climbed up the metal pole on which the seed tube was hanging. He must have started at first dusk because he was now at the top of the pole. He just had to make the stretch across the chasm between the pole and the base of the tube. You will never do it, I thought to myself as I watched him reach out into open space. When his head finally touched the base of the tube he was clinging to the metal pole by just the tip of his tail. The weight of his shell was now in the balance as slowly it moved from rear end to front end. The snail did not look the least bit fearful as he let go with his tail and his shell swung to join his upper body which was now attached to the feeder tube. From this position he was able to enjoy an exclusive feast. Being a snail lover I pick up any I find round the bins and pop them into my garden. I was surprise to see this duo which turned out to be a snail saddled with the broken shell of a deceased companion. It seemed pretty unfair to leave him in this state so I carefully took off the empty shell which must have been a great weight off his shoulders.

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


By Nicola Morgan/Author

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

35

www.villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

36

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


NEWS FROM THE MOLESEY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Public Conveniences Local residents have reported that the public toilets by Molesey Lock have been closed on a number of occasions when they should have been open. The MRA has taken this up once again with the officers at Elmbridge Council, and is seeking assurances that the contractors who are responsible for opening and closing these facilities will in future comply with the correct opening hours. Boats Moored on the Thames We are continuing to see an unwanted increase in the number of boats being moored without permission along the River Thames, and there have been reports of waste associated with some of these boats dumped in the river. MRA Councillors are continuing to press for action, but progress has been frustrating. Only the owners of the land the boats are moored on can take action against illegal moorings, and a number of landowners have been affected, including the Environment Agency and Network Rail. Legal action inevitably takes time, however, and in a recent case where Elmbridge Council instigated action to remove a boat from Cigarette Island, it had moved before the hearing could take place. We have been assured that the Environment Agency (EA) will take action in response to any reports of pollution into the river that are reported to them, so if residents witness any dumping of sewage or waste into the river the best course of action is to ring the EA urgently on their hotline 0800 807060 and the EA will investigate. More information is published on the Elmbridge Council website at: http://www.elmbridge.gov.uk/moorings/ Surrey County Council (SCC) elections The County Council elections happen every four years, with Elmbridge Council elections in each of the three years in between. Whereas there are 6 local Councillors representing at Elmbridge Council, there are just two for SCC, and East Molesey is combined with Esher for the purposes of the SCC elections. In the recent May elections for SCC, MRA Councillor Ernest Mallett was re-elected in West Molesey, while Peter Szanto was successful for the Conservatives in East Molesey and Esher.

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

37

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Word Search

Solution on Page 41

Can you find all of the computer-related words hidden in the grid? R O U T E R E B A C K U P M O

F I L E U M A I N F R A M E P

U B I N A R Y P D U N I X B E

D P B I F I L J P I R A C Y R

E U L B C O C P F K S H P T A

S C R O L L R O O D H K U E T

K V N O A O D M P P N T E T I

T X O T J D G A A Y U S M O N

O S P A M P M I T T S P A L G

P C V E R S I O N A E Y L I S

M A M O U S E P V N R W W N Y

O C O M P I L E O A N A A K S

D H A C K E R D U L A R R W T

www.villagematters.co.uk

E E S E R V E R K O M E E O E

M E D I A K H B U G E B F L M

38

analog app backup binary boot bug bus byte cache compile copy CPU data desktop disk DNS email file format hacker html icon Java link

login mainframe malware media modem mouse node operating system piracy pop-up ROM router save scroll server spam spyware Unix upload URL username version web

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Why we need Bees By Sally Pemberton I’ve kept bees for 28 years; looking at bees getting on with things as they have for 65+ million years, hearing their buzz with the roar of the M3 half a mile away gives a certain perspective on bees and humans! Where we live is a great area for bees to live, because there is plenty of forage for them in the large undeveloped areas around the lakes and by the rivers, and there is little intensive agriculture or monoculture. The only shame is that beehives are not allowed on allotments as they used to be, because they pollinate the variety of fruit and vegetables grown there and increase their yield and quality. Bees are in decline, along with other pollinating insects. Their problems are overwhelmingly man-made, for instance loss of habitat: bees live in holes in trees in the wild, and trees with holes are seen as diseased and tend to get felled. Loss of diversity is another reason: 97% of wild flower meadow has been lost, ploughed up to grow our crops, and flowers in parks and gardens tend to be limited, and many are sterile and have no value to bees. Remember that we have bees to thank for the existence of flowers: they evolved about 65m years ago to attract bees to their pollen, giving them nectar in return. Another aspect of loss of diversity is monoculture – bees are made to pollinate crops like oil seed rape for us. a monotonous diet is not healthy for us or bees.

They originally coexisted with Asian honeybees, Apis Cerana, but migrated onto Apis mellifera, the European honeybee via beekeepers. The irony is that we depend on the bees for our own survival. We can live without honey but we can’t survive without bees pollinating much of the food we eat. Did you know that all the commercially grown tomatoes you eat are pollinated by bumble bees? How can you help bees? Perhaps the best answer is what not to do:

Don’t use Insecticides and herbicides in the garden.

Don’t pave over your garden; there are plenty of low maintenance, bee friendly plants like sedum and chamomile that don’t mind footfall or car tyres.

Don’t cut down mature trees – new trees will take 50+ years to replace them.

You don’t have to have wild areas of nettle and bramble in your garden to attract insects. Planting bee friendly hardy perennials and shrubs is good, but in built up areas planting trees is ideal: they are a major source of forage for bees. In a built up area, they are like an acre in the sky, with only the size of the trunk on the ground. The bees keep out of your way up there too. Various acers like sycamore and field maple are good, and trees like amanchelier, hawthorn and willow.

As you can see, you don’t need to keep bees to help them, but gaining an understanding of these amazing creatures is a way to learn something about ourselves and our relationship to the environment. Bees show what’s important in life.

Insecticides and herbicides are obvious culprits, but the most common cause of death of a colony are Varroa mites that kill our European honeybees. Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

39

www.villagematters.co.uk


The friends of Fleetside have been at it again. This time we have created a new path along the Mole on Molesey Heath. This old path was completely covered in brambles and undergrowth. After a couple of hours and a lot of hard work by the volunteers you can now walk from the entrance by the seat that overlooks the river all the way to the end by a very old willow. There is also a seat you can rest about half way round. Sisters Wendy and Gail with the help of Mary also cleared an area so you can sit on a branch of a willow to watch the kingfisher as it flies down the Mole. Any one can become a Friend of Fleetside you don't have to live there. In fact we have

www.villagematters.co.uk

40

people who live near Hampton Court and Walton. All you need is enthusiasm & sense of humour. It has been proven that being outside & mixing with like minded people is good for your wellbeing so what are you waiting for come & join us you would be most welcome. Proposed events to enhance the area where we live will include:17th June summer planting, 15th July litter pick, 19th August a picnic. We look forward to welcoming you. For more information contact: friendsoffleetside@gmail.com

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Whilst we are delighted that we have a thriving Girlguiding community in Molesey, we also have long waiting lists for girls waiting to join Rainbows, Brownies and Guides. We are looking for volunteers to join us - no matter how much time you have to give there's an opportunity for you. Join our team of inspirational leaders, provide occasional support or simply share a skill or passion with girls in a local unit, all while benefitting from the adventures and opportunities that Guiding has to offer. You choose the volunteer role that matches your skills and time, then we'll help you build skills with training opportunities suited

8 5 1 9 2 6 7 4 3

7 4 9 8 3 5 1 6 2

2 3 6 4 1 7 8 5 9

1 9 7 5 4 3 2 8 6

4 8 3 6 9 2 5 1 7

6 2 5 7 8 1 3 9 4

3 1 8 2 6 4 9 7 5

9 7 4 3 5 8 6 2 1

Solution to June Sudoku

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

5 6 2 1 7 9 4 3 8

to that role that could make your CV stand out. Take our Leadership Qualification, become a trained first-aider or get qualified for outdoor activities such as climbing and kayaking. You can volunteer by going to the Girlguiding UK Website, www.girlguiding.org.uk, click on ‘get involved’ select ‘ become a volunteer’ and then ‘Register your interest’. Your details will then be forwarded to the local District Commissioner who will make contact with you.

Alison Evans District Commissioner – Molesey

R O U T E R E B A C K U P M O

F I L E U M A I N F R A M E P

U B I N A R Y P D U N I X B E

D P B I F I L J P I R A C Y R

E U L B C O C P F K S H P T A

S C R O L L R O O D H K U E T

K V N O A O D M P P N T E T I

T X O T J D G A A Y U S M O N

O S P A M P M I T T S P A L G

P C V E R S I O N A E Y L I S

M A M O U S E P V N R W W N Y

O C O M P I L E O A N A A K S

D H A C K E R D U L A R R W T

Solution June Word Search

41 Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk

E E S E R V E R K O M E E O E

M E D I A K H B U G E B F L M


Dominic Raab

Dear Resident, There is a lot at stake in this election for families living in Molesey. Every vote counts on June 8. I work hard with a great local Molesey team – in particular, Steve Bax and Peter Szanto - to deliver on the bread and butter issues that brighten up our local quality of life. I helped secure a new secondary school in the Molesey/Walton area by 2020, as part of our school expansion plan – to provide the places we need at excellent local schools. We have liaised with local doctors and the NHS Clinical Commissioning Group, not just to save Molesey community hospital from closure, but to get behind plans to strengthen the local health services that can be provided on site for the community. I secured commitments to extra carriages on our local commuter rail services, to ease overcrowding, under the new rail operator First MTR - which takes over from South West Trains later this year. I know how frustrating the noise levels are from Heathrow airport. I live under one of the flight paths, and appreciate some residents are totally fed up with the situation. So, I have set out in Parliament plainly and robustly the local guarantees we need on noise levels and air quality – and their independent monitoring - before the expansion of the third runway can proceed. I have established a dialogue with government Ministers and Heathrow to nail down these assurances. At a national level, we face real challenges too. I voted for Brexit, and I believe it is the right thing to do. However, I know many locally voted Remain, and are anxious about the path ahead. The government has set out an ambitious and positive plan for Britain’s future relationship with our EU friends. There will be challenges during the negotiations with Brussels. In reality, only Theresa May and the Conservatives can provide the strength of leadership to navigate the difficult path ahead – and secure the best deal for the whole UK. Likewise, only the Conservatives can keep the economy firing on all cylinders. We have created the climate which has produced record levels of people in work, and delivered a cut in income tax worth £1,000 to the typical basic rate taxpayer. We have steered the economy through the period after the Brexit vote. When many predicted a nose-dive, economic growth in fact got faster. Finally, there is a range of burning social issues we want to address. A big local and national issue is social care for our elderly residents. We have a plan and a commitment to fixing this problem, so that social care and our NHS are placed on a sustainable footing. I work hard to champion our local community, and I stand up for my convictions in Westminster. I am confident that, in the future, we can make Molesey an ever better place to call home – and see Britain go from strength to strength. Best wishes, Dominic Raab

www.villagematters.co.uk

42

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


The Hurst Park Residents Association, which represents the residents of Hurst Park, now has an active website full of useful local information on subjects such as buses and trains, doctors and dentists, waste collection times (Local Amenities page), Hampton Court, Local Weather, and much more. It is also possible now to pay the £3 yearly membership subscription online, via our HPRA Membership page. This will save many hours of collection time and shoe leather if you do. Notification will come through to us and save you receiving a visit from one of our collectors. Hopefully this

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

arrival into the 21st century will be as useful to all of you as it will be to us. We also would welcome any suggestions that you may have as to useful content on the website, or events that you would like to see happen here. You can make suggestions via the Contact Us page, and we will get back to you. We are hoping that, over time, this will draw us all closer together as a community. We are also always on the lookout for new HPRA Committee members. No experience is necessary, just a care and concern for where we live. The time required is less than a couple of hours each month.” Contact Us if you are interested.”

www.hurstparkra.org.uk

43

www.villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

44

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Events Coming Up Some we like... Hampton Court Palace Festival 2017 Hampton Court Palace Festival is a highlight of the UK summer festival calendar, running from Wednesday 7th - Saturday 24th June 2017. Bringing world-class acts to a spectacular setting, Hampton Court Palace Festival gives its guests a truly memorable and unique experience. Artists will perform to a beautiful backdrop in Henry VIII's open air Base Court for an intimate audience of 3,000.Hampton Court Palace Surrey KT8 9AU Wed 7 Jun, Thu 8 Jun, Thu 15 Jun to Sat 17 Jun, Wed 21 Jun to Sat 24 June www.hamptoncourtpalacefestival.com Great Taste Market at RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show Nestled beyond the blossoms, borders and butterflies, there will be a host of award-winning food and drink as the Great Taste Market comes to RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show. Bringing everything from juice and gin to cheese and chutney, the Great Taste Market will be the only food offering at these shows this year and promises to tantalise taste buds with recent winners from Great Taste, the world’s most coveted food awards. . Tuesday Saturday 10:00 - 19:30 Sunday 10:00 - 17:30 Hampton Court Palace, East Molesey, Surrey, Surrey KT8 9AU Tuesday 4 Jul 2017 to Sunday 9 Jul 2017 Elmbridge Dance Showcase, International Youth Arts Festival Elmbridge Dance Showcase 2017 will be a fantastic mix from Tap to Street Dance, from Ballet to Contemporary with a bit of musical theatre mixed in. It showcases the wealth of talent in the schools of Elmbridge, Dance and Mainstream.19:30 - 21:30 £5£15 All ages welcome Rose Theatre Kingston, 24-26 High Street, Kingston, Surrey KT1 1HL Wednesday 12 Jul 2017 Contact telephone: 02085492120. Garsons Food Fair 2017 Food lovers from across Surrey and beyond will be flocking to Garsons of Esher on Saturday 10th and Sunday 11th June as the Garsons Food Fair returns for a weekend of delicious food and drink. Featuring a hand-picked group of speciality producers, the popular summer event will give visitors a chance to meet the people who make some of the gourmet goodies available all year round from Garsons Farm Shop. The Garsons Food Fair will be open from 10am to 4pm on Saturday 10th June, and from 11am to 4pm on Sunday 11th June. Parking and entrance to the Food Fair are free. GARSONS ESHER Surrey KT10 8LS Saturday 10 Jun 2017 and Sunday 11 Jun 2017 Contact telephone: 01372 460181. Molesey WI meets at Imber Court on the first Wednesday of every month 7.30pm for 8pm, where we have a guest speaker or activity. Visitors are welcome for a £5 fee. First visit is free with a copy of Molesey Matters. Follow us on Facebook - Molesey Women's Institute (Molesey Crafty Ladies). Molesey Photographic Club 5th - 7th June 2017 Annual Exhibition held at Molesey Methodist Church. Molesey Musical Theatre invite you to a musical caper of fun and frolics on the French Riviera in our latest production Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Come and tap your toes and laugh out loud as you discover who the glamourous Christine really is. Will the smooth Lawrence finally be outwitted by Freddy, the new man in town and do Andre and Muriel find true love? Find out at Cecil Hepworth Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames 7th-10th June at 7.30pm plus a Saturday matinee. Tickets £13-£16 available from boxoffice@moleseymusicaltheatre.com or 020 8941 3255. Swan Upping Bike Tour inc bike hire Join us to watch this amazing historic event of Swan Upping, marking of new cygnets on the River Thames. We will enjoy parts of the first day of this annual week long event meeting at Shepperton Train Station at 10.30am and finishing at Staines where we will enjoy lunch Train Station. www.merrypedallerbiketours.co.uk/index.php/swan-upping-bike-ride 10.30am £35 inc bike Shepperton Train Station Middlesex TW17 8ANMonday 17 Jul 2017 Contact telephone: 07795977644 Molesey Local History Society Tuesday 6 June 2017, 8 pm Anne Boleyn: A King’s Obsession Talk by Alison Weir, Clore Centre, Hampton Court Palace, KT8 9AU Ticketed event, details to be announced We are delighted that Hampton Court Palace has agreed to allow us to hold a meeting at the Clore Centre. Alison will be talking about her new novel ‘Anne Boleyn: A King's Obsession’, which was published on 18 May and will be on sale to members at the meeting. To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

45 Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


FR EE

Index of Advertisers

House of Surrey Bathrooms Walton Bathrooms 2 Peco’s of Hampton Village Windows Building W Brown and Son 40 Health Spine Central Car/Repairs/MOT Esher Tyres and Exhausts 13 Heating/Plumbing Progas Cleaning Services Nick Lewis Cleaning 10 Home Care Moor House Care Home Decorating A&K Decorating 19 Independent Candidate Della Reynolds Dentists Gentle Dental Practice 47 Insurance Smilessence 24/25 Hard To Insure Estate Agents Ironing Services Dowling Styles 48 Hate Ironing? Events Kitchens Hampton Court Palace 9 Ashford Kitchens Hampton Pool Summer Oven Cleaning Concerts 33 Ovenclean Hanworth Classic 43 Podiatrists Imber Court Open Day 11 John P Beal Kempton Steam Museum 31 Restaurants/Bars/Pubs Molesey Carnival 15 Mezzet TW12 Jazz Festival 7 The Stables Fencing and Paving Roofing J Penycate 40 Good Roofs Foot Care Security Foot Help 43 Unrivalled Security Funeral Services Schools Alan Greenwood 27 Kingston University Garden Services/Supplies Sell for Cash Easicut Mowers 32 JC Stamps Holley Designs 21 Venues Molesey Boat Club Glazing/Windows/Doors

35 29 7 36 32 27 26 38 44 5

July 2017 Issue Closing on 20th June paul@villagematters.co.uk Or call

07946 494288 Or now book online

44 36 16/17 19 23 27 7 19 36

Molesey Advertising Rates (Ex VAT) 1/8th page Quarter page Half page Full Page

£35 £65 £110 £210

10% off for 3 months for quarter page or larger

We are now on Facebook. Check us out : @moleseymattersmagazine

Disclaimer: Whilst every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information included in this publication, neither the publisher nor the editorial contributors can accept any liability to any party for loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. Molesey Matters does not endorse any advertising material included in this publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval systems or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the publisher.


EE FR


FR EE

Molesey Matters June 2017  

The local community magazine for both East and West Molesey KT8

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you