Page 1

Molesey

Matters

Putting Local Business First Keeping a Community Together

March 2017 Issue 6

FREE to Homes and Businesses in East and West Molesey

FREE TO 9000 HOMES EVERY MONTH


Welcome! Welcome to the March edition of Molesey Matters. March for me is always a fantastic month, as it's when we all put our clocks forward an hour. Spring and Summer are on their way, and the evenings will stay lighter for longer. Don’t forget to wind them forward an hour on Sunday March 26th at 1am in the morning, The cover photo is again from me this month. A lovely morning stroll outside Hampton Court Palace. Please do send in your own for consideration. Also this month is Mother’s Day, so do take time to think about our mothers, whether they are with us or indeed departed. We wouldn’t be who we are without them. In this months issue we learn about Molesey’s Mills , Royal artist Terence Cuneo and take a dip into the history of Medieval Fish Ponds.

March 2017 St Peter’s Church also features and we look into both the origins of Mother’s Day and St Patrick's Day, which also falls this month. We learn of the Molesey armed burglar, William Banks (don’t worry, it was over a century ago). Della Reynolds continues her urban wildlife blog, and for the first time we hear from our local MP, Dominic Raab. Dominic will be writing a regular piece for the magazine. We are also updated on all things Molesey by the Molesey Residents Association. Until next time.

Reader Offers The Stables - 2 for 1 Sunday Carvery Esher Tyres - 15% off until 31st March Lodge Bros - £100 pre paid funeral plan Village Windows - 20% off until 31st March

Published by:

Contents

Village Matters Ltd Molesey Director: Paul Char d Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematter s.co.uk Website :www.villagematter s.co.uk

Molesey Mills Terence Cuneo Medieval Fish Ponds St Peter’s Church Origins of Mother’s Day Spring into Fitness Why do we change the Clocks St Patrick’s Day William Banks Recipe of the Month Composting Urban Wildlife Garden Dominic Raab MP Molesey Residents Association Events Coming Up Index of Advertisers

Front Cover: A beautiful crisp morning at Hampton Court Palace by Paul Chard Send any photos (300dpi) for consideration to: paul@villagematters.co.uk

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

3

4 6 8 10 14 16 18 22 28 32 36 38 40 43 45 46

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Molesey Mills By The Molesey Local History Society There were three mills in Molesey; two on the Mole, the Upper Mill (near Molesey Park Road) and the Lower (or Sterte) Mill near to Hampton Court station. A future article in Molesey Matters will talk about third mill, Ember Mill on the River Ember at the end of Orchard Lane. There appear to have been no mills in Molesey at the time of the Domesday Survey. However within a hundred years there were two mills on the River Mole. These were the Sterte Mill (or Lower Mill) in the manor of Molesey Prior and the Upper Mill in the manor of Molesey Matham. In 1649 a man named John Samyne took over both the mills on the Mole to make gunpowder for which there was a great demand from the war with Holland in the 1650s and in Scotland. Samyne was not originally a miller but a “Peterman”, a man who collected the farmyard manure to turn into Saltpetre which was then ground up with Sulphur and Charcoal and milled to a fine powder at the two Molesey mills or as “corning” which allowed guns to have a much quicker firing time. At one time Samyne was the second largest supplier of gunpowder in the Kingdom. Gunpowder milling was not popular - not just because of the risk of explosions but also because of the smell associated with the manufacture of the saltpetre. Metal nitrates (a.k.a. saltpeter) being extracted by a "saltpeter man"or "peterman"

There was a petition to stop gunpowder milling at Mole mills in 1666 and the process was stopped at Sterte Mill at around that time though it is not clear if the petition had any effect – possible damage to Hampton Court Palace may have been a more Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

4

important consideration. The Upper Mill continued making gunpowder until 1780. There was a fire in 1669 and several explosions, some fatal. Lord Hotham took over the property in 1780, dismantled the mill and built a grand country house – the waterways were converted into a garden (the Wilderness). The Sterte Mill reverted to flour milling plus some lead milling (around 1700). In 1692 the mill was taken over by the Martin family and prospered during the 18th Century. Four generations of the family were millers and they were important local dignitaries and acquired much land in Molesey and the surrounding areas. They gave up the lease in 1816 and the Crown tenants – Lord Hotham and Sir George Berkely decided to construct a new brick built mill. This was taken over by another successful local family, the Andrews. The 1820 rebuilding showed clearly that it was still profitable to operate a flour mill, and Thomas Andrews added a saw mill in 1846 and a slate cutting mill alongside the flour mill. Flour milling stopped in the 1890s and the saw mill finally shut down in 1907. It is likely that many of the houses built in Molesey after the coming of the railway in 1849 used wood sawn at the Molesey Mill. The Mill site was taken over for other industrial uses during the 20th Century – notably the Zenith Motor Cycle Company and then by Neilsons for their marquee and other work. The weir and channels of the Upper Mill can still be seen from the bridge over the Mole leading to the children’s playground on Neilson’s field. The location of the mill itself is not known but the main mill channel can be seen flowing away into the housing on the Wilderness site. The “drop” in water levels over the weir is quite impressive and would have been quite a powerful flow when the mill was in use. The Sterte Mill building can still be seen, in part, from the BP garage on Hampton Court Way to the right of the M & S franchised store. It can still be seen from inside the estate. The channels have largely disappeared following the flood prevention works of the 1980s.

By the Molesey Local History Society

www.villagematters.co.uk


Visit our stunning newly refurbished showroom in Ashford!


Terence Cuneo The Molesey Mouse Man and Founding President of the Molesey Art Society

Terence Cuneo (1907–1996) was an English painter famous for his scenes of railways, horses, ceremonies, and military action. He was not only one of the world’s greatest military painters, he was also one of the top railway artists as well. Terence Cuneo lived Molesey for nearly 50 years, at 201 Ember Lane in East Molesey during which time he was commissioned to paint the portraits of Queen Elizabeth II and King Hussein of Jordan. Terence Cuneo was born in London on November 1st 1907. His parents Cyrus and Nell were both artists who met while studying with Whistler in Paris. Terence studied at the Chelsea Polytechnic and Slade School of Art. He became an illustrator for several magazines and book publishers. During

MOUSE

some of his portraits of the famous contain a mouse. His work has been used in a variety of manners, from book jackets and model railway catalogues to posters and jigsaws and even Royal Mail postage stamps. His paintings have appeared on both Great Britain and Isle of Man stamps. His work can also be found in many museums and galleries, including Guildhall Art Gallery, Lloyd's of London and the Royal Institution. Sadly in 1996 Terence Cuneo passed away, but he has left us with a fantastic collection of fine paintings of military history and steam locomotive paintings, which are collected around the world and are very sought after. Terence Cuneo was admired and respected by his peers and public. Cuneo was awarded the OBE and was a CVO. A 1.5 times life size bronze memorial statue of Cuneo, by Philip Jackson, stood in the main concourse at Waterloo station in London for many years, but has now been relocated to Brompton Barracks, Chatham. In tribute to Cuneo's trademark, the statue includes a hidden mouse peering from under a book by the artist's feet, and another carved into the statue's plinth near the ground. It was commissioned by the Terence Cuneo Memorial Trust (established March 2002) to create a permanent memorial to the artist, together with an annual prize at the Slade School of Art, given by the Trust.

Sources: Various

World War Two he joined the army and became a sapper but also worked with the War Artists Advisory Committee, and in this role, he produced illustrations of various factories during wartime and other wartime events. Soon after the end of the war he was commissioned to produce a series of paintings of railways and their locomotives. And this was followed by being appointed the official artist for the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, which helped promote Terence Cuneo to a worldwide audience and several major commissions followed. Many of these works include a small mouse (sometimes lifelike, sometimes cartoon-like), his trademark after 1956. They can be difficult to detect, and many people enjoy scouring his paintings to find one. Even Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

6

Molesey Art Society will be holding its annual spring exhibition 6th – 11th April 2017, at St Alban’s Primary School, Beauchamp Road, East Molesey, KT8 2PG. Our invited artist this year is Frances Jordan who finds inspiration from the natural world for her vibrant paintings both in oils and watercolours.

www.francisjordan.com www.moleseyartsociety.co.uk

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

7

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Medieval Fish Ponds There are many types of historic pond. Some pond types are far better researched than others. Fish ponds, for example, are often well documented. Marl pits, on the other hand, are incredibly common in some parts of the country, yet little is known about them. Analysis of the 2500 records including the term ‘pond’ in the National Monuments Record (NMR) for England and Wales indicates that the majority (89%) fall into two classes: ‘fishponds’ and unspecified ‘ponds’. The remaining 11% of records are largely made up by pond bays, dewponds, ornamental ponds, decoy ponds, ducking ponds and mast ponds During the winter, supplying fresh food was a constant struggle. Although meat would be available from deer parks, this couldn't supply the needs of the whole household. A fish pond provided an elegant solution. If there was a natural flow of water into the pond, fish required no feeding and were available all year round. There would usually be a series of ponds, with fish being moved between them as they grew. At Hampton Court, the elaborate Tudor gardens are no longer recognizable today, having been replaced by later monarchs. However, Chapel Court holds a recreated Tudor garden, complete with green and

Sunken Gardens Hampton Court

white striped fencing (Tudor colours) and heraldic beasts on poles. The current court, which is still in use today, was built during the reign of Charles I. Continuing the garden walk, one will come across the sunken

www.villagematters.co.uk

8

gardens. These were originally fish ponds where Wolsey kept his stock of fish and prawn. They were in such demand that Anne Boleyn wrote a letter to the Cardinal in 1528 asking for some fish to be sent to her. Fish ponds and stew ponds (where fish were purged of muddy water before cooking) were necessary to ensure a regular supply of protein during the many fast days of the Christian calendar. Today, their original walls remain but have been converted into “sunken” gardens. In Bushy Park, Charles I, in 1638 ordered a canal to be dug from the River Colne at Longford to Hampton Court Palace. Cromwell was responsible for the digging of ponds to stock with fish and to cater for the new sport of angling. As well as feeding the new ponds, this waterway serviced the circular basin and fountain terminating today's 'Chestnut Avenue', and was later diverted by Lord Halifax into a high pond at Upper Lodge to feed his ornamental cascade. The fountain and statue of Diana by Le Sueur were placed in the basin in the centre of the round pond later. A less regal but equally interesting example is Marney's Pond outside the pub of the same name in Esher. At one time there were some 16 ponds in the area, which were mostly let by the lord of the manor for fishing rights, part of the rent being paid in the fish netted. This one is named from a family who for many years carried on a timber business in the yard opposite. Holly Cottages, in one of which the family lived, were demolished in 1967 after being declared unfit by the local council. The woodyard was quite a sight, with the timber stacked roof high. Mrs. Marney was the last person to exercise the right to graze animals on the nearby common. .

Sources : Various Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Hampton Court Bridge Lights I was walking across the bridge the other week, luckily with my camera, and managed to take some shots of the famous bridge lights going up after being repaired. Baring in mind that we wont be to see them close up (at floor level) after they have gone back up, I thought I would capture them for us all to see. The bridge was one of three authorised by Parliament in 1928 (the others being Twickenham Bridge and Chiswick Bridge). It was designed by the Surrey county engineer W. P. Robinson and the architect Sir Edwin Lutyens to reflect the style of the portions of Hampton Court Palace designed by Sir Christopher Wren. The wrought iron lanterns are an integral feature of Sir Edwin Lutyen’s design.

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

9

www.villagematters.co.uk


Take Time to Visit:

St Peters Church There has been a church on or near the site of St Peters for hundreds of years, West Molesey being mentioned in the Domesday Book. It replaced a much earlier building and there are many memorials and other artefacts which are older than the building. The parish church of St Peter (formerly St Margaret) was probably originally built in the late twelfth century, probably as a watchtower, and is said to be the oldest building in Molesey. It was extended in the early fifteenth century, around 1440; and subsequently it was substantially rebuilt in the early nineteenth, around 1820. Essentially only the fifteenth-century tower survives of the external structure of the Medieval church. In the interior, the font is Medieval, fifteenth-century, and the pulpit post-Medieval, early seventeenth (Jacobean). There are also some surviving post-Medieval memorials, including one to Thomas Brende (d. 1598), his two wives and eighteen children, and one to Thomas Thorowgood (d. 1634). Behind the church is a large cemetery. This site was chosen when the graveyards of the Parish Church became full and could hold no more bodies. The present church was completed in 1820, replacing a previous building, one of a series on the site. As the oldest building in Molesey, being in place during the Wars of the Roses. Henry VIII would have known it well, as it stood in the middle of his deer park to Hampton Court Palace. As a church, the Parish is thought to have originally been part of the foundation of St Peter’s Priory in Chertsey, and later became a Chapel of Ease to the Parish of Walton. It is thought to have been originally dedicated to St Margaret, but this seems to have lapsed by the 20th century, the present dedication to St Peter dating to the time of

To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

10

Sources : Various

Revd. A. Sydenham (1927-1942). The west window appears to be a slightly later, post-Medieval, insertion, bearing at its apex the sculpted pelican badge of Richard Fox, Bishop of Winchester and founder of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, who was Lord of the Manor here in the early sixteenth century, around 1511. Among the memorials is one for Admiral Sir George Cranfield Berkeley, a member of the Berkeley family who, along with the Hotham family, were one-time Lords of the Manors of Molesey, and another for the Right Honourable John Wilson Croker who was a Member of Parliament for 25 years and chiefly responsible for the re-building of the church in 1843. http://www.stpeterswestmolesey.co.uk/

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

11

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


The Royal Cambridge Home

Home to provide a full diary of events amidst much laughter and atmosphere.

Originally founded in 1851 and having seen many changes over the years, including a move in 1944 from Norbiton to its current position on the Hurst Road in East Molesey, the Royal Cambridge is certainly a well-known fixture in the local area and is still going strong after all these changes. Looking back, it would be hard to imagine the residents of the original home participating in indoor netball, parachuting, inflatable target practice, Home Olympics and boat cruises on the river to name but a few activities, which take place today. The Activities Manager is supported by visiting professional musicians and arts and crafts specialists which enables the

By Monica Chard

With the support of its Trustees and the long standing affiliations with organisations such as The Royal Hospital Chelsea, who provide the brilliant Chelsea Pensioners’ Band, the Home is a unique place to live and work and their original ethos as a charity and not for profit organisation still remains today.

Founded in memory of the first Duke of Cambridge, the Home is located at East Molesey in Surrey, very close to Hampton Court and the River Thames. Up to 28 residents are accommodated in a range of comfortable single rooms, suites or double rooms with telephone and television facilities. The Royal Cambridge can provide permanent or respite care for ladies, gentlemen and couples, subject to availability. Residents can take part in a variety of daily activities and excursions should they wish or simply relax in the beautiful communal lounges. There is also a chapel and large, well maintained and attractive south facing gardens.

The Royal Cambridge Home 82-84 Hurst Road East Molesey Surrey KT8 9AH Tel: 020 8979 3788 Email: rch@royalcambridgehome.org www.royalcambridgehome.org Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

12

www.villagematters.co.uk


Valid until 31st March 2017

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

13

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


The Origin of Mother’s Day Sunday March 26th The origin of Mother's Day goes back to the era of ancient Greek and Romans. The earliest history of Mother’s Day dates to the ancient annual spring festival the Greeks dedicated to maternal goddesses. The Greeks used the occasion to honour Rhea, wife of Cronus and the mother of many deities of Greek mythology. Ancient Romans, too, celebrated a spring festival, called Hilaria dedicated to Cybele, a mother goddess. The celebration made on the Ides of March by making offerings in the temple of Cybele lasted for three days and included parades, games and masquerades. Early Christians celebrated a Mother's Day of sorts during the festival on the fourth Sunday of Lent in honour of the Virgin Mary, the Mother of Christ. In England, the holiday was expanded to include all mothers. The more recent history of Mother’s Day dates to 1600s in England. Here a Mothering Sunday was celebrated annually on the fourth Sunday of Lent (the 40-day period leading up to Easter) to honour mothers. After a prayer service in church to honour Virgin Mary, children brought gifts and flowers to pay tribute to their own mothers. It was then called Mothering Sunday. However, Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

14

the celebration of the festival as it is seen today is a recent phenomenon and not even a hundred years old. Every year, people point out that the mid Sunday in Lent is not “Mother’s Day” but “Mothering Sunday”. Many blame America for introducing the former and making it commercial. In America, of course, Mother’s Day is the second Sunday in May, as proclaimed by President Woodrow Wilson in 1914. It is marked on that day because it was the result of a campaign by Anna Jarvis (1864-1948), whose own mother had died on May 9. This is where the British tradition grows a little complicated. For the revival of Mothering Sunday must be attributed to Constance Smith (1878-1938), and she was inspired in 1913 by reading a newspaper report of Anna Jarvis’s campaign in America. Neither Constance Smith nor Anna Jarvis ever became mothers themselves. Anna Jarvis regretted the growing commercialisation of the day, even to disapproving of pre-printed Mother’s Day cards. “A printed card means nothing,” she said, “except that you are too lazy to write to the woman who has done more for you than anyone in the world.” Today the festival of Mother’s Day is celebrated across 46 countries (though on different dates) and is a hugely popular affair. Millions of people across the globe take the day as an opportunity to honour their mothers, thanking them for their efforts in giving them life, raising them and being their constant support.

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

15

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Spring Into Fitness After New Year resolutions about getting into shape start to fade away and we wake up to cold, dark mornings, it can be difficult to maintain the early optimism of getting fit again. But there is light on the horizon with British Summer Time arriving on March 26 th. The days are becoming brighter and temperatures are rising. And with summer holidays just around the corner the arrival of Spring is a big motivator to get back to working out again. Angela Hartley (32), a cardiac nurse and personal trainer from East Molesey, states “The winter can have a negative effect on your schedule with dark nights and dark mornings, the cold and rainy weather puts a downer on your energy levels and all you want to do is stay inside were it's warm and cosy and you put off working-out so much that it becomes the norm”. “All that inactivity during the winter will make you put on a few pounds and make it harder to get back into the swing of things but there are some cheats you can deploy to get used to working out again”, says Angela. Find a friend to work out with Having a workout buddy helps you to stay motivated during your workouts. It also means that you won’t want to let each other down by not turning up – make it the same time each week for your weekly ‘workout and chat’. Try a new class Starting a new class keeps you from getting stuck in a rut and just going through the motions - your body will be tested by trying new exercises and you can get great results by keeping your body on it’s toes. Get outdoors Now the summer is coming the weather is more welcoming for walks around the parks or Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

16

river. Why not try something new like a bike ride at the weekend, badminton or tennis at Hampton Court? Early morning exercise to set you up for the day Now that the mornings are brighter there’s more encouragement to throw back the duvet and get out there for a workout. It then sets you up nicely for the day with more energy. You’re also more likely to eat healthier if you’ve exercised as you won’t want to ‘undo’ your hard work. Water workout What could be better when the heat picks up than to take a refreshing swim – try the Hampton outdoor pool or the local council pools, all of which are great and you can ‘pay as you go’. Choose summer foods When the weather gets warmer, you will naturally gravitate away from the heavier, ‘warming’ comfort foods and more towards lighter meals. Choose salads, stir fry’s or fish dishes for your main meals. Try vegetable crudités with hummus, edamame beans or an apple for a tasty and nutritious snack. Have a health ‘Spring clean’ If you haven’t had a health check in a while, give your body a MOT this Spring. Have your blood pressure, resting heart rate, weight, waist circumference, blood sugar level and cholesterol checked. This will give you a good baseline of where you are now. You can then move each of your health markers towards the healthy range over the coming warmer months. For more details on how to get back into fitness contact Angela Hartley on 07918788347. angela.hartley@clinicalexercise.co.uk https://www.gov.uk/when-do-the-clockschange

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

17

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Why Do We Change The Clocks? ByBy Nicola Morgan/Author Susan Brookes-Morris It’s time to turn the clocks forward an hour at 1 am on 26th March. This time, when sunrise and sunset are one hour later on the clock, is known as British Summer Time or Daylight Saving Time. It is believed that the concept was first proposed by Benjamin Franklin in 1784 in an essay entitled; ‘A n Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light.’

Daylight Saving Time is now utilised in over 70 countries world wide although dates of implementation and clock adjustments vary. The main benefits of Daylight Saving Time are said to be: The opportunity to make better use of natural daylight The ability to conserve energy that would otherwise be used on artificial light A decrease in road accidents because roads are naturally lit during the time when most vehicles are using them

Benjamin Franklin

Ancient civilisations had already been adopting similar concepts however, by adjusting their routines in accordance with the sun’s schedules. The first official modern use of Daylight Saving Time was in Ontario in 1908, and several other Canadian cities followed. At around the same time MP Robert Pearce proposed a bill in the House of Commons based on work done by British builder William Willett around moving the clocks eight times a year to achieve similar results. This was rejected. Germany became the first European country to introduce Daylight Saving Time in April 1916. Its rationale was that the use of artificial light would be reduced and thus there would be more fuel for the war effort. Britain followed shortly after in May 1916.

www.villagematters.co.uk

18

Some studies such as one carried out by the Belfast Telegraph also claim that the extra hour of daylight means that tourists stay out longer and spend more money - an extra £6.34 million in Northern Ireland alone. Some are not in favour though. For example, traditional dairy farmers claim Daylight Saving Time disrupts milking routines. This mainly affects developing countries as elsewhere milking is automated. Some research has also shown that there is a greater risk of people having accidents or being the victims of crime because they leave their houses in the morning when it’s still dark. Some studies have suggested that in the first few days after the clocks go forward there are more heart attacks too. Finally for those of us who struggle to remember when we turn the clocks forward and when they go back, this little phrase may help: ‘Spring Forward, Fall Back,’ as the time when clocks go back always happens in the Autumn. This year in the UK, the date when Greenwich Mean Time will begin again is 29th October. Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Kempton Steam Museum reopens on 18-20 March for its first steaming weekend with a fascinating exhibition of artifacts and collectables amassed over the years by the museum’s volunteers. Plus an added attraction, on Sunday only, will be a display by the Spring Grove and Kingston Morris Dancers making a popular return to Kempton. The April steaming on 22nd-23rd features the museum’s annual model railway weekend, a must for every train spotter, young and old. Stationary engines take centre stage for the 20-21 May weekend and why not celebrate Father’s Day on 17-18 June? Enjoy a ride on the narrow-gauge railway, tuck into some delicious home-made cakes and see the magnificent Triple – the world’s largest working steam engine of its

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

kind – in action! For information, call 01568 720571 or visit.kemptonsteam.org.

19

www.villagematters.co.uk


Friends of Fleetside Last month I was invited to meet members of the “Friends of Fleetside” voluntary group, hard at work. And hard at work they were! Although it was a freezing cold and snowy Saturday morning, nothing deterred the group from donning their coats, hats, gloves and wellies to clear a sizeable area of Molesey Heath and plant quince and mulberry trees, which in time will bear fruit for us all to enjoy. The group was set up around 3 years ago, by local resident Wendy Guest to improve parts of our local community. After dropping leaflets through hundreds of doors, ‘Friends of Fleetside’ was born and meets regularly in the area around Molesey Heath to conduct practical countryside management for the benefit of the landscape, wildlife and residents, with a selection tools provided by a grant from the Lower Mole Countryside

www.villagematters.co.uk

20

Trust. ‘Friends of Fleetside’ are however, always on the lookout for new volunteers, and donations of good quality garden tools to aid them in their work. No power tools please! If you would like to help out you can contact the group by email at: friendsoffleetside@gmail.com

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

21

www.villagematters.co.uk


St Patricks Day Friday March 17th Shamrocks, leprechauns and gallons of Guinness – St Patrick’s Day is nearly here. But why has this saint’s day become so popular? And who was Saint Patrick? Well, it may surprise you to hear that Saint Patrick (or Padraig to use the Irish spelling) wasn’t actually Irish. He’s believed to have been born to Roman parents, in Scotland or Wales, in the fifth century AD. At the age of 16, Patrick was captured and taken to Ireland to live as a slave. For six years, he herded sheep on Slemish Mountain, until he managed to escape and flee Ireland. A dream led Patrick to dedicate his life to converting people to Christianity. He returned to Ireland and began to spread his message. Today, St Patrick is regarded as the founder of Christianity in Ireland.

It’s believed that St Patrick’s Day was first celebrated back in the 17th century. Held to mark St Patrick’s death, it was a humble, religious celebration up until the 1920s. An annual military parade started in Dublin in 1931, but the day remained mainly a time for religious reflection, rather than painting oneself green and donning a funny hat. Bars were even closed on St Patrick’s Day, as a

www.villagematters.co.uk

22

By Kate Duggan

mark of respect, right up until the 1960s. Across the pond, in America, it was a different matter. There, St Patrick’s Day became a day for Irish immigrants to celebrate their heritage. By the mid-19th century, parades and festivities were being held in major cities across the US. According to author and university professor Mike Cronin, ‘St. Patrick’s Day was a public declaration of a hybrid identity—a belief in the future of Ireland as a nation free from British rule, and a strict adherence to the values and liberties that the U.S. offered them.’ In the 20th century, corporations started to pay attention, and figure out how to take advantage of the celebrations. Pretty soon, Tshirts with embroidered shamrocks, inflatable bottles of Guinness, and even green McDonald’s milkshakes, started to become synonymous with St Patrick’s Day, at least in America. As with most American exports, some of these products have now become popular in the UK (though not, thankfully, green milkshakes), and in other countries across the globe. St Patrick’s Day is now celebrated in pubs, shops and student halls across the world. This year, Greening the City will see iconic landmarks across Ireland, from Trinity College, to Donegal Castle, go green on 17th March . If you’re lucky enough to be heading to Ireland for St Patrick’s Day this year, you’ll certainly have plenty of choices for where to celebrate. Beannachtaí Lá Fhéile Phádraig daoibh go léir – Happy St Patrick’s Day! Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Halloween 31st October

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

23

By Monica Chard

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Sudoku 5

Solution on Page 41

1 8

1

3

7 3 4 7 7 1 6 5 8 2 9 7 8 3 2 6 2 5 4 3 3 6 1 5 1 3 8 6 2

Word Search

How to play Sudoku It’s simple! Fill in the grid so that each row, column and 3x3 box, contains the numbers 1 through to 9 with no repetition. You don’t need to be a genius. These puzzles use logic alone. Watch out! Sudoku is highly addictive.

Solution on Page 41

Can you find all of the palindromic words hidden in the grid? P P P E W S O L O S Q P P O P

D E W H S O V R O T A T O R L

P E E R E Y W D R T Y S E Y E

M P I L E Q C E R E P A P E R

K A J F S D V E T N G G B I B

A I D J I I D D M E R A D A R

Y W I A V E V E Z T F S K V O

A Q U E M Z D R R F U M U M T

K L R F S U P R A C E C A R A

O M K G T R S P C R D S N T V

E W E T A E Z U I I S I O U A

C B O E T F S T V V D S O T T

V C U O S E T O I D G D N G O

P H O B F R H T C I A A W V R

P T U R E D I V I D E R G S P

Palindromic words are those which read the same forwards as they do backwards!

To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

26

bib bub civic dad deed deified did eve ewe eye gag kayak madam mum noon peep pep pop racecar

radar redder redivider refer repaper reviver rotator rotavator sagas sees sis solos stats succus tenet toot tot tut wow

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

27

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


WILLIAM BANKS Executed at Horsemonger Lane Jail, 11th of January, 1830 Source: www.britishexecutions.co.uk

The Reverend William Warrington was a gentleman of large property, who lived at Grove Cottage, West Moulsey. On the night of Wednesday, the 19th of November, 1828, his house was entered by four burglars, and a great quantity of valuable property was stolen. Mr Warrington's house was next to that of Mr Jeffs, a magistrate of the county. Mr Jeffs accidentally left a ladder out in his garden and the thieves used it to enter the house which they were determined to rob. Between one and two o'clock on Wednesday morning Mrs Warrington was in her bedroom, engaged in writing, and Mr Warrington was in the same room in bed asleep, when the former was terrified by hearing some persons at the back part of the house attempting to force a window on the first floor, which opened on to a staircase and to a passage which led to the bedroom. Before she had time to alarm her husband, the fastenings of the window were wrenched off, without breaking the glass, and as she opened her bedroom door she saw four men, who had entered by the window by means of the ladder, in the act of ascending the stairs and approaching her bedroom. Her fears were so excessive that she was struck speechless for a few seconds. When she recovered, she shrieked, and exclaimed: "Good God, we shall Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

28

be murdered; there are thieves in the house!" After the thieves had escaped, Mr Warrington found that not only all his portable property of value had been carried off, but that the villains had stolen a horse, valued at eighty guineas, from the stable, and had taken his carriage. Mr Cooke, constable of Kingston, set off in pursuit of the robbers. All efforts were made to catch the robbers but they unsuccessful. In July 1829, however the mystery was solved. A man named Barnett, had been convicted of a burglary in the house of Mr Colebatch, in Thames Street, for which he had been sentenced to life; but, anxious to save himself, he gave up information of the men who made up “The Moulsey Gang.� He immediately impeached Banks and four other men, named John Smith, William Johnson, James Taylor and William Potts -- alias Emery. Cragg, a resolute officer of Bow Street, was directed to proceed in search of Banks. Many days elapsed before he could find him; but at length he met with him and, rushing at him, presented a pistol at his head, and called upon him to surrender himself a prisoner, Banks appeared astounded at this salutation, and made no resistance, but exclaimed "I am a dead man." Both Mr and Mrs Warrington identified him as one of the persons who had entered their house. Banks alone was committed for trial upon the charge of burglary at Mr Warrington's house and was sentenced to death at Surrey Assizes. He was hanged at Horsemonger Lane jail on the 11th of January, 1830.

www.villagematters.co.uk


Crossword 1

2

7

3

8

4

6

9

10

12

Solution on Page 41

5

11

13

14

15

16

17 18

19

20

22

24

21

23

25

Down 1 Supported, sustained (7) 2 Decorative breast pin (5) 3 Tropical bird with large colourful beak (6) 4 Mistake (5)

5 6 8 13 15

Across 1 Nightclub entertainment (7) 4 Strange and frightening (5) 7 System for detecting aircraft (5) 9 Vertical, erect (7) 10 Passivity, paralysis (7) 11 Emperor, king, monarch (5) 12 Tyrannical dictator (6) 14 Priest or religious leader (6) 18 Plentiful (5) 20 Gaunt, exhausted (7) 22 Scottish pouch worn with a kilt (7) 23 Ceremonial headdress (5) 24 Item in a diary, or notebook (5) 25 Spiny Australian egg-laying mammal! (7)

Constant, uniform (7) Go inside (5) Relative size of two values (5) Assist financially (7) Strict reason (5)

16 17 18 19 21

Intricate musical solo (7) Become different (6) Passage in supermarket (5) Before the expected time (5) Keep away from (5)

Thinking of Selling your Stamp Collection? Cut out the commissions and sell direct to the dealer! Home Call 01932 785635 www.jcstamps.co.uk

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

29

www.villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

30

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Advertorial

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

31

www.villagematters.co.uk


Recipe of The Month Garlic and Herb Prawns

Preparation time: 25 minutes + marinating time

head end to tail and remove the thin black intestine.

Cooking Time: 5-6 minutes

Mix the lemon juice with the garlic, herbs and butter to form a paste. Season well with salt and pepper and spread the paste over the prawns. Leave to marinate for 30 minutes.

Serves: 2 Ingredients 12 Raw prawns in their shells Juice of half a lemon 2 Garlic cloves - crushed 3 tbsp Chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 1 tbsp chopped fresh dill 3 tbsp softened butter Salt and pepper

Preheat a frying pan. Fry the prawns until cooked, tossing them several times to distribute the heat evenly. Turn out on to warm plates and drizzle with the juices from the pan. Serve with lemon wedges and crusty bread..

Method Rinse the prawns. Use a sharp knife to slice along the back of each prawn from Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

32

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

34

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


Elmbridge Borough Council signs a pledge to change how we all think and act about mental health Elmbridge Borough Council has signed an employer pledge with Time to Change, the growing social movement run by charities Mind and Rethink Mental Illness which supports people to open up to mental health problems. By signing, Elmbridge is committing to changing the way we all think and act about mental health in the workplace. The signing ceremony took place with Councillor Mary Marshall, Portfolio Holder for Corporate and Community Development and Councillor Janet Turner, Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Cultural Services pledging their support to Time to Change with an action plan of activity that will help to break the silence that surrounds mental health in the workplace. Councillor Mary Marshall, said: “Elmbridge Borough Council takes the health and wellbeing of its staff extremely seriously and is proud to support the aims of Time to Change. We have committed to focusing on the health and wellbeing of employees, particularly around mental health and stress awareness. I would encourage other organisations to pledge support to this initiative.’’ Elmbridge joins the wide movement of over 450 organisations that have signed up to the Time to Change pledge, including E.ON, British Gas, Ernst & Young, Transport for London, Royal Mail, Barclays, Shell, Pepsico, the Church of England, Sunday Mirror, Marks and Spencer, and many NHS trusts, universities, and local authorities. To raise awareness Elmbridge Borough Council staff have also undertaken a number of activities to encourage conversations about mental health, including a number of #runandtalk sessions at lunchtime. Sue Baker, Director of Time to Change, said: Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

“We know it can be hard to talk about mental health, which is why we’re supporting employers to open up; to talk and to listen. Too many people with mental health problems are made to feel isolated, ashamed and worthless, but with the right support, those of us with mental health problems can recover and have equal opportunities in all areas of life. Everyone’s attitude makes a

difference and it’s fantastic to see organisations like Elmbridge Borough Council taking the lead. Many leading employers have found that making a strategic commitment to the mental wellbeing of their workforce not only benefits their staff but also their bottom-line, improving productivity and staff retention. With one in six British workers experiencing mental illness it's time for businesses to make a change and start creating more mentally healthy workplaces." Time to Change is funded by the Department of Health, Comic Relief and the Big Lottery Fund. Set up to create a positive shift in public attitudes towards mental health problems, Time to Change supports communities, schools and workplaces to open up to mental health problems; to talk and to listen.

35

www.villagematters.co.uk


Composting Angst Home-made compost is a thing of wonder…...when all goes well! But too often it goes wrong and instead of rich, sweet, crumbly stuff we end up with a putrefying heap.. For a long time I believed making great compost was beyond me. There are so many methods and myths, it all seemed too complicated. Well, good news...it isn’t!

By Rachel Leverton

grandfather’s which involved careful layers of various ingredients and sprinkling on lime at intervals. It worked, but I’m a lazy gardener really and can’t be bothered with all the faff.. This is my method, worked out

Compost containers You can make your own container. It’s easy apparently, using old floorboards, posts and wire netting. Unfortunately I am to DIY what elephants are to hang gliding so I opt for ready made bins. Surrey County Council work Getcomposting.com to offer discounted composting bins from £13. Info on www.recycleforsurrey.org.uk/homecomposting. Size matters! A container should be 3 ft / 1m square minimum, preferably larger. This allows heat to build up inside the heap which aids the decay process. Position it out of the main line of sight, behind a shed or some tall plants. Compost materials Fruit and veg scraps. coffee grounds and tea bags, old flowers and bedding plants, garden clippings, egg shells, small animal bedding (e.g. rabbit, hamster), shredded cardboard, egg cartons and lawn mowings You can’t use food waste (br ead, meat etc), evergreen leaves or thick rooted perennial weeds. How to make compost I’ve tried several methods, including my late Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

36

through a combination of trial error (lots of error!) · Mix all material together so there is no concentration of any one sort · Firm it all down, · Moisten it · Cover it with some old carpet to keep heat in and prevent evaporation . Turn it from time to time as the heap decomposes much faster when air is introduced. Keep it moist or it will not decompose. If you start the process now, by Autumn you’ll be digging in your very own wonderful compost, dragged from the bottom of your heap. You’ll have done your bit for recycling and best of all...it’s free! If you don’t fancy composting though you can still recycle it. There is a fortnightly garden waste collection service for a small annual fee. Or of course take it to the community recycling centre for free. Whatever you do, don’t put it in your main bin.

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

37 Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


'

Urban Wildlife Garden You don’t need to live in the country to enjoy wildlife A blog by Molesey Resident - Della Reynolds When Mother Nature designed perennial plants I’m sure she didn’t have a pair of secateurs in mind. The pruning we do, with the best of intentions, is quite often ignorant vandalism; at least that’s true on my part. I have no idea how to prune, when to prune or where to prune. I simply get the secateurs out in Autumn and Spring and chop away at ‘dead stuff’. I have a beautiful flowering cherry in my front garden and after the blooms fade in late May they leave behind a brown mush which is just begging to be cut out and binned. Last Spring I fetched the secateurs from the shed and began to give this plant a serious haircut, all the time thinking how it was going to thank me for removing all this dead wood. As I cut away I noticed a small, almost insignificant green shoot appearing from the base of each ‘dead’ stem. I continued to chop at it merrily until something told me to stop. Well, actually the voice said, ‘You idiot you’re chopping out all the new growth,’ and sure enough that is exactly what I was doing. So my poor cherry bush is now half cut with a distinctive bare patch where I performed surgery and wonderful new growth where Mother Nature took control. So many times I’ve come to realise that my attempts at gardening are really just interfering with what She knows best. With this in mind I considered my over-wintered lavender. They were all bushy and brittle. No signs of life here. Uncertain what to do I decided to apply science in the form of a controlled experiment. On the small one which had struggled all year to grow beneath the mallow on the rockery, I was brutal, chopping back to basics. On the next I cut only the most wild and woody branches and on the last, my main lavender bush which had already survived two winters, I showed the respect it was due and left it completely alone. The results so far are that

www.villagematters.co.uk

38

the trimmed to the ground lavender has given up any attempt at rejuvenation. ‘First she puts me in the dark all summer, then she cuts away any chance of life I ever had,’ it sulks. In revenge it just sits there, an accusing bunch of sticks, unable to produce a single glimmer of green hope. My own fault. The other two have worked the miracle of turning death into life which comes every Spring if you just trust nature. The brown branches have grown new green shoots and the more dead branches saved from the secateurs, the more new life there is to savour. Working on the principle that in nature the dead are only dormant, I have kept two spindly geranium spikes which look as deceased as a brown plant can look. I water them, talk to them and regularly move the soil round their roots in the hope of finding a tiny speck of green. So far nothing. The Bear Grylls prize for surviving against the odds has to go this year to my winter pansies. Bought half-dead from the Tesco bargain shelf at the end of summer they were in great need of room to spread their roots. Once they stretched their toes into some fresh compost they rewarded my faith by continuing to flower through the coldest winter months. Hanging just outside my back door their hopeful faces shook off the morning frost each day showing a gritty determination to survive the winter with panache. I love to see my ‘rescue’ plants thrive with a bit of love and attention. I regularly look for the most bedraggled specimens, re-pot them; then allow Mother Nature to do the rest, safe in the knowledge that where my garden is concerned, Mother knows best. Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

39

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Dominic Raab, our local MP In February, the government set out its draft airports national policy, building on the decision to approve a third runway at Heathrow. Whilst I support the decision based on the economic benefits, the government must deliver assurances for us in Molesey and wider Elmbridge - to reduce aircraft noise and protect air quality. I have written to the Transport Secretary, Chris Grayling, to nail down these local guarantees. I have also raised the issue with Mr Grayling in the House of Commons. Those of us who live under the current flight paths know the detrimental impact that aircraft noise has on daily life. It is essential that the government provides assurances in three areas. First, the government has already said that Heathrow will face legally binding noise targets. However, they have not yet committed to an independent body to monitor the noise levels. I have urged the government to back the creation of this vital independent monitoring body before the expansion takes place. Second, I have called on the government to endorse the policy of “dispersal” so that flight paths are spread over a wider area, spreading the noise impact more evenly, rather than the current policy of “concentration” which routes the majority of flights over one, narrower, route. I also want to see the current ‘stacking’ of flights, which adversely affects us, addressed too. Third, on air quality, The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), the UK regulator, has statPlease mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

40

ed that there will be no negative environmental impact in Elmbridge from increased number of flights. However, they caution that an increase in road traffic caused by the expanded airport could have a negative impact on air quality. Heathrow have pledged to keep airport related traffic at the current level. But this needs to be independently verified in. In order to monitor this pledge, I have asked the government to ensure that the independent Environment Agency is empowered to monitor the impact of both the increased number of aircraft and the amount of road traffic. Responding to me in Parliament on 2 February, Mr Grayling said: “I am happy to give … those assurances. The thing that we share in particular across our two constituencies is the stack south-west of London. The changes that the airspace consultation heralds will change that fundamentally, leading to much less stacking and fuel wastage over south-east England. As a result, there will be less emissions from the aviation flying over south-east England, and I think that there will be a much better experience for my Honorable Friend’s constituents.” I will now follow up by applying for a specific debate on the detail of the assurances I am seeking for Elmbridge. Best wishes,

Dominic Raab, MP for Esher & Walton

www.villagematters.co.uk


C A R R I E D

A B A R E A A D A R G A N E R T I I E S P O T U M P L E P A P O R R A R L N T R Y

A I S L E

T E E R O R E U P R I G C O U A R U L N A C L E R C O H A G G A A I V N C R O G I E C H I D

I E N H T E E R

5 4 9 7 2 8 6 3 1

I C A R D E W N Z N A

D E W H S O V R O T A T O R L

P E E R E Y W D R T Y S E Y E

M P I L E Q C E R E P A P E R

K A J F S D V E T N G G B I B

A I D J I I D D M E R A D A R

Y W I A V E V E Z T F S K V O

A Q U E M Z D R R F U M U M T

K L R F S U P R A C E C A R A

O M K G T R S P C R D S N T V

E W E T A E Z U I I S I O U A

C B O E T F S T V V D S O T T

V C U O S E T O I D G D N G O

7 1 8 6 5 3 2 4 9

8 2 3 5 9 4 1 6 7

9 7 4 8 1 6 5 2 3

6 5 1 2 3 7 4 9 8

1 8 2 9 6 5 3 7 4

4 9 5 3 7 2 8 1 6

3 6 7 4 8 1 9 5 2

Solution to March Sudoku

Solution to March Quick Crossword

P P P E W S O L O S Q P P O P

2 3 6 1 4 9 7 8 5

P H O B F R H T C I A A W V R

P T U R E D I V I D E R G S P

Solution March Word Search

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

41

www.villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

42

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


NEWS FROM THE MOLESEY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION

Council Tax: Sur r ey County Council (SCC) had initially announced plans to incr ease its share of Council Tax bills for 2016/17 by 15%. This would have added nearly £200 to a Band D bill, but under Government rules would have triggered a local referendum. Following talks involving the Government, SCC subsequently abandoned this plan, and has instead opted for a rise of just under 5%. What was agreed in these talks is not entirely clear, but SCC finances will remain under serious pressure, and this could have serious implications for the ongoing provision of some current services. Walton Road Car Park: The MRA, with the suppor t of other Councillor s at Elmbr idge, has been successful in obtaining agreement to a period of up to 3 hours free parking on Saturdays in the Walton Road car park. We hope this will encourage more people to shop locally, and support our excellent variety of small independent traders. Molesey Hospital: In J uly 2016 The Sur r ey Downs Clinical Commissioning Gr oup (CCG) announced the outcome of its review of local community hospital provision, and confirmed that services would continue at Molesey Hospital, which had been under threat of closure. The CCG is now working with NHS Property Services on how to make best use of its sites in the East Elmbridge area, including at Molesey, and we understand that more information about this will be available later this year. Bridge Road: Elmbr idge Council’s Economic Development Team has been wor king with the Molesey Business Association & Bridge Road Traders to progress a new initiative, the Destination Bridge Road Project. This will aim to raise the profile of the Bridge Road area as a quality location for independent retailers and restaurants. Pavilion Site: A fur ther application to build houses on the grounds of the Pavilion, adjacent to Hurst Road and Hurst Lane, has been rejected by Elmbridge Council. This land was designated as recreational land as a planning condition when the Kings Chase estate was built, and allowing developers to overturn such conditions simply by waiting a few years would set a worrying precedent. AGM: The MRA’s Annual Gener al Meeting will take place at the Molesey Community Centre in West Molesey on 27 March, starting at 8pm. This is a chance for members to hear about the work of the Association over the last year, and to talk to Councillors and Committee Members. Non-members can attend if they join the Association and pay the small £3 membership fee on the door.

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

43

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

44

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Events Coming Up Some we like...

Lidl Kingston Breakfast Run. The per fect mar athon tr aining r un! The Kingston Br eakfast Run is back for another year with Lidl at its helm. Starting and finishing in the historic Kingston-upon-Thames market square and taking in the river down to Hampton Court, the 20.1 and 16.2 mile routes are perfect preparation for your marathon and the 8.2 mile race is a perfect step up from the traditional 10k distance. Sunday 26 Mar 2017 Market Place, Kingston-uponThames, Surrey KT1 1JPContact telephone: 02083913913 Claremont Landscape Garden - The Garden of Charlotte and Leopold - guided walk. Join Claremont gardener George to take a closer look at the garden of Princess Charlotte and Prince Leopold. Find out about the gardening style of Claremont's forgotten princess and her husband. Booking Essential. Phone: 01372 467 806. Dogs on leads welcome. Gates open 10:00. Start 11:00. End 12:30. Claremont Landscape Garden, Portsmouth Road, Esher, Surrey KT10 9JG Wednesday 8 Mar 2017 Contact telephone: 01372 467806 London Potters Local For the first time, 21 members of London Potters, the Society was founded 30 years ago, in order to promote the knowledge and appreciation of Studio Ceramics, will be showing at the Normansfield Theatre, during the weekend of March 4-5, 2017. Price: FREE 11am to 5pm on both days. Normansfield Theatre, 2a Langdon Park, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 9PS Saturday 4 Mar 2017 and Sunday 5 Mar 2017 The Chinese State Circus The incomparable Chinese State Circus will be playing at Sandown Park from Thursday 30th March to Sunday 2nd April in its fully heated big top venue. “Never has such excitement been generated in a theatre. The whole audience hangs breathless” Manchester Evening News. Stunning world class Chinese acrobats, aerial artistes and jugglers interact with the super-human physical skills and dexterity of the masters of martial arts – the legendary Shaolin Warriors. Sandown Park Surrey KT10 9AJ Thursday 30 Mar 2017 to Sunday 2 Apr 2017 www.chinesestatecircus.com Molesey WI meets at Imber Cour t on the fir st Wednesday of ever y month 7.30pm for 8pm, where we have a guest speaker or activity. Visitors are welcome for a £5 fee. First visit is free with a copy of Molesey Matters. Follow us on Facebook - Molesey Women's Institute (Molesey Crafty Ladies) Molesey Art Society Mar ch 10th Fr i 7.45pm Demonstr ation, Hashim Akib: Acr ylic cityscape March 11th Sat 2.00pm Workshop, Marcia Hughes: Watercolour and flowers. April 6th – 11th SPRING EXHIBITION Private view April 5th 7.30-10.00pm All events are held at St Alban’s Catholic Primary School, Beauchamp Road, East Molesey Surrey KT8 2PG Molesey Local History Society Thur sday 9 Mar ch 2017, 8 pm Kenneth Wood, Molesey Architect ‘A Modernist in Suburbia’ Talk by Dr Fiona Fisher Hurst Park School, Hurst Road, KT8 1QS Wednesday 26 April 2017, 8 pm ‘Painshill The Restoration Story’ Talk by Cherrill Sands St Lawrence School, Church Road, KT8 9DR

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

45 Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Index of Advertisers Bathrooms Walton Bathrooms 47 Car/Repairs/MOT Esher Tyres and Exhausts 13 Care for the Elderly Royal Cambridge Home 12 Surrey CC Care 33 Cleaning Services Nick Lewis Cleaning Services 42 Lane Associates 41 Curtains and Blinds Decorama 17 Dentists Gentle Dental Practice 2 Smilessence 24/25 Driveways SJL Paving 29 Estate Agents/Letting Agents Miles and Bird 20 Tudor and Co 7 Events Kempton Steam Museum 19 Kensington Palace /Diana 11 Funeral Services Alan Greenwood 34 Lodge Brothers 27 Garden Services/Supplies Easicut Mowers 34

Longacres Holley Designs SJL Paving Surrey CC Composting Glazing/Windows/Doors House of Surrey Novaglass Peco’s of Hampton Village Windows Health/Fitness Jo James Wellbeing Heating/Plumbing Progas Insurance Hard to Insure Kitchens Ashford Kitchens Legal/Law Perfectly Legal Oven Cleaning Ovenclean Restaurants/Bars/Pubs The Stables Roofing Good Roofs Sell for Cash JC Stamps

15 39 29 37 44 48 23 30 17 17

April 2017 Issue Closing on 21st March paul@villagematters.co.uk Or call

07946 494288 Or now book online

42 5 21 30 9 31 29

Molesey Advertising Rates (Ex VAT) 1/8th page Quarter page Half page Full Page

£35 £65 £110 £210

10% off for 3 months for quarter page or larger Disclaimer: Whilst every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information included in this publication, neither the publisher nor the editorial contributors can accept any liability to any party for loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. Molesey Matters does not endorse any advertising material included in this publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval systems or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the publisher.


Mar 2017 fri molesey  

Local Community Magazine for both East and West Molesey

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you