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Molesey

Matters

Putting Local Business First Keeping a Community Together

February 2017 Issue 5

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Welcome!

February 2017

I know its February but seeing as this is also about Alfred Sisley, who painted the first issue of Molesey Matters in beautiful scenes around Molesey. 2017, HAPPY NEW YEAR!! February is the month of David Garrick's 300th birthday, so we take a Here we all go again! look at his life, and of course celebrate Having spent Christmas and New Year Valentines Day. abroad, and although coming home to far colder temperatures, I can honestly Della Reynolds continues the Urban say it is lovely to be home. We live in a Wildlife garden blog, we hear from the special place. The river, the parks, the news from the Residents Association palace and each of us in the community and we are updated on the River make up a wonderful cocktail. Thames Scheme. Having only just taken up photography, Have a great month, stay warm, and see the front cover this month, is believe it you again in March. or not, from me! I got very lucky with the light! Bushy park really is beautiful. Reader Offers Do help me out though, and send in your own photos for consideration. Hampton Court — Half Price Entry

The Stables — 2 for 1 Sunday Carvery Angela Charles Interiors — Free Linings Esher Tyres — 15% off until 28th Feb Longacres — 12 roses for £19.99 Time For You — 15% off with advert Curves — 2 for 1 joining together Village Windows— 20% off until 28th Feb

In this months issue we learn about Molesey’s first cottage hospital and

Published by:

Village Matters Ltd

Contents

Molesey Director: Paul Char d Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematter s.co.uk Website :www.villagematter s.co.uk

Molesey’s First Cottage Hospital Alfred Sisley Our High Sheriff David Garrick's 300th Birthday History of Valentines Pancake Day – A History Food Allergies and Intolerances Recipe of The Month Gardening Tips for Spring Urban Wildlife Garden River Thames Scheme Update Molesey Residents Association Molesey Events We Like Index of Advertisers

Front Cover: Heron in Bushy Park. Taken by yours truly, your editor , Paul Chard Send any photos (300dpi) for consideration to: paul@villagematters.co.uk

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Molesey's First Cottage Hospital By the Molesey Local History Society With the NHS constantly in the news at this time of year, and the ever-present threat of the closure of Molesey Hospital, we thought you might be interested in knowing about the first Cottage Hospital in Molesey. This report is based on part of a talk given by Dr Ken Brown to the Society a few years ago, and he wishes to acknowledge Rowland Baker’s booklet entitled “The Story of Molesey Hospital”, There have been three Cottage Hospitals in Molesey: the first, in Manor Road, served the community for four years from 1890; the second, in Pemberton Road, served for the next 42 years, from 1894 to 1936; the third and present Molesey Hospital, in High Street, West Molesey, opened in 1936 and hopefully will remain for many years to come. There was also a Molesey Isolation Hospital from 1911 to 1933. The first cottage hospital in England opened in Cranleigh, Surrey, in 1859. In 1874 an attempt was made to provide a cottage hospital in Molesey, and Lady Harriet Hoste, who lived at Hampton Court Palace, promised a rent-free house. The proposal was rejected, opposed by local property owners including Francis Jackson Kent, who owned over 100 acres in East Molesey – they feared that such an establishment in a respectable area would reduce property values. In 1889 a second attempt was made, and met the same opposition, but this time the campaign was saved from collapse by the Dowager Lady Barrow. Although nearly 80, she had sufficient social and political clout to get the project through. She was an interesting lady! Her name was Rosamond and she was the 21st Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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child of William Pennell, who had been Consul-General in Brazil and later lived at "Green Arden" in Spencer Road. Her eldest sister was married to John Wilson Croker, and lived at The Grove, West Molesey. The couple’s only child had died aged three, and Rosamond was brought up as her eldest sister’s child. John Wilson Croker was a prominent Tory MP, Principal Secretary to the Admiralty for twelve years and a Privy Councillor. He had been responsible for the Tory Party changing its name to the Conservative Party. He moved in exalted circles and Rosamond is reported to have played with the future Queen Victoria when they were both children. In 1827, when she was 17 years old, her portrait was painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence. The picture caused a sensation and she became known as “The Beautiful Miss Croker”. With her formidable support, the East and West Molesey and Hampton Court Cottage Hospital was opened in May 1890. It was at Waverley Cottage, 19 Manor Road. The building had a lane leading to it, and backed onto the Methodist Church Hall. The name plate on the corner of the lane and Manor Road can still be seen. There is no record of the number of beds, but in less than two years from its opening, some 70 patients had been treated there. The building was proving too small for the work being carried out there, and in 1894 the Cottage Hospital was transferred to 55 Pemberton Road. Read about that in a future edition of Molesey Matters.

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Alfred Sisley The Molesey Impressionist Just before Christmas, Molesey Matters reader, Jacqueline Martin, contacted us regarding the artist Alfred Sisley. A few years ago, Jacqueline conducted some research for the Alfred Sisley Museum in Moret-sur-Loing outside Paris where the artist spent most of his life. As an artist who both came to Molesey and painted here I felt compelled to find out more. Sisley was born in Paris to affluent British parents. His father, William Sisley, was in the silk business, and his mother Felicia Sell was a cultivated music connoisseur. In 1857 at the age of 18, Sisley was sent to London to study for a career in business, but he abandoned it after four years and returned to Paris in 1861. From 1862, he studied at the Paris where he became acquainted with Monet and Renoir Together they would paint landscapes “en plein air� rather than in the studio, so as to realistically capture the transient effects of sunlight. This approach, Molesey weir 1874 innovative at the time, resulted in paintings more colourful and more broadly painted than the public was accustomed to seeing. Consequently, Sisley and his friends initially had few opportunities to exhibit or sell their work. Their works were usually rejected by the jury of the most important exhibition in France, the annual Salon. In 1870 the Franco Prussian Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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Source : Various

war began, and as a result Sisley's father's business failed and the painter's sole means of support became the sale of his works. For the remainder of his life he would live in poverty, as his paintings did not rise significantly in monetary value until after his death. Occasionally, however, Sisley would be backed by patrons; and this allowed him, among other things, to make a few brief trips to Britain. The first of these occurred in 1874 after the first independent Molesey Regatta 1874 Impressionist exhibition. The result of a few months spent near London was a series of nearly twenty paintings of the Upper Thames near Molesey which was later described by an eminent art historian as "a perfect moment of Impressionism." While there, he painted a series of canvases at Hampton Court, including "Molesey Weir, Hampton Court" (1874; Edinburgh), which has been deemed remarkably fresh and spontaneous. "Molesey Weir" appears relaxed and informal, with its portrayal of naked bathers having been executed with great economy of means. In 1897 Sisley and his partner visited Britain again, and were finally married in Cardiff Register Office on 5 August. They stayed at Penarth where Sisley painted at least six oils of the sea and the cliffs. In mid-August, they moved to the Osborne Hotel on the Gower Peninsula, where he produced at least eleven oil paintings in and around Langland Bay They returned to France in October. The painter died on 29 January 1899 in Moret-sur-Loing at the age of 59, a few months after the death of his wife.

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Our High Sheriff By Monica Chard We are lucky enough at Village Matters to meet some truly remarkable people and be able to share some of our stories with readers. We recently interviewed the High Sheriff of Surrey, Richard Whittington, to hear how his year is going since he took over the role earlier in 2016. The position is by invitation only and is an appointment by the Queen for a term of one year. Whereas the High Sheriff used to be the King’s enforcer and tax collector and used to raising armies, it is somewhat different today. The responsibility of High Sheriff is to support all organisations that uphold law and order, including the courts, police, prisons, emergency services and voluntary bodies. But it is also the chance to champion causes, particularly within the youth sector. There is no salary but the position is an immense honour and a chance to leave a legacy within the community. Supporting the young comes naturally to Richard. He is chairman of the board of governors at Gordon’s School, Chobham which has a strong tradition of the STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths). Following a conversation with a local engineering business owner who had invited a group of local school children to visit his business and only two had turned up, Richard decided he wanted to use his position to engender connections between youngsters and Business by establishing apprenticeships and work experience. There is huge pressure on the young today, faced with vast university fees and employment challenges thereafter, so it felt natural to promote STEM subjects and give youngsters opportunities to

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use those skills to get into the work place. Richard’s interest in supporting the young extends to many areas and he is continuing the work of his predecessor Elizabeth Kennedy, in supporting youth restorative justice. This involves young offenders following a rehabilitation programme rather than a custodial sentence. Not only is a restorative justice programme about a quarter of the cost but it sees reoffending rates fall by up to 80%. Richard is planning a visit to one project where youths are helping repair one of the banks of the Thames in this area. Other activities have seen our High Sheriff sit in on anger management classes with a EIKON, a Surrey youth charity partly funded by the High Sheriff Youth Awards, where teens are coached in techniques to help volatile behaviour. He has also attended a Safe Drive/Stay Alive workshop run by Surrey Fire and Rescue, where 16/17 year olds from Surrey schools are given a very sobering and hard-hitting presentation about the dangers of drink and drug driving. The High Sheriff Youth Awards have supported 5000 young people in the county. Grants are awarded for a wide range of youth projects in Surrey. Donations and grants are available from £100 -£5000. For information log on to the website www.surreyhighsheriff.org. By the way, and in case you were wondering about the name (Richard Whittington is indeed a distant relative of Dick Whittington, the 14th century Lord Mayor of London, and later Sheriff of London. Yes really!

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Happy 300th Birthday - David Garrick David Garrick, the second son and third child of Peter and Arabella Garrick, was born at the Angel Inn, Hereford, on 19 February 1717. David's grandfather, David de la Garrique, was a Huguenot who fled France in 1685, and David's father Peter was brought to England in 1687. Our David was for a while one of Samuel Johnson's pupils at the little school near Lichfield. Later, in 1737 David Garrick moved to Hampton House, now known as Garrick’s Villa, in 1754. He had been born into a Huguenot family, in Hereford though most of his early life was spent in Lichfield. He attended the local grammar school and then a short-lived school run by his friend Samuel Johnson, the great man of letters, who was the son of a Lichfield bookseller. He intended to study law and set out with Johnson in 1737 to seek a career. He was coached at Rochester for a time and on his father's death came to London and founded a wine merchant's business with his brother, off the Strand. He had been involved in family theatricals as a child and through selling wine to coffee houses, in Covent Garden, became acquainted with theatre managers and actors. Starting by writing plays he progressed to acting. His performance as Richard III, in 1741, took London by storm. By 1747 he had earned enough to buy a half-share in managing Drury Lane Theatre. To escape the pressure of London theatrical life he came to Hampton in 1754, first renting and then buying the copyhold of the property known as Hampton House. Garrick employed the Adam brothers to improve the house, in two distinct phases

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(1755-56 and 1772-74). The house was an amalgamation of some old cottages, unified by the addition of its distinctive portico as well as what looks like yellow facing brick (in fact mathematical tiles that imitate brick). Capability Brown was consulted over the grounds and suggested building the, still existing, grotto-like tunnel under the road joining the house to the riverside part of the grounds. He also suggested the building of serpentine paths, as recently reconstructed in the Temple Lawn gardens. In 1755-6 the octagonal Temple was constructed, possibly modelled on Lord Burlington's temple at Chiswick House, to entertain visitors and also to house some of the mementos to his beloved Shakespeare. He also commissioned Roubiliac to make a portrait bust of Shakespeare for a large niche in the Temple, a replica of which has been installed in the Temple, which is now open to the public. Naturally, as a Hampton resident Garrick was noticed by Walpole who rather disparaged his social standing as a wine merchant turned actor. He enjoyed professional and friendly relations for many years with the actress Kitty Clive, Walpole's neighbour and friend at Little Strawberry Hill. Garrick promoted the Shakespeare Jubilee in 1769, which lost money but probably marked the beginning of the Shakespeare industry. It also left Garrick very firmly linked with Shakespeare. In 1776, mainly due to ill health, he retired and sold his share in Drury Lane to Richard Brinsley Sheridan. He died in 1779 at his London house in the Adelphi and is buried in Westminster Abbey. Sources: Various Or call Paul on 07946 494288


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Originally a home for soldiers’ widows The Royal Cambridge was founded in 1851 and was situated in Norbiton Park in Kingston. Seventy years and a lot of changes later the Home is still going strong and has recently had approval from the Charity Commission to accept gentlemen residents as well as ladies and is now called The Royal Cambridge Home. Who would have thought all those years ago that the residents of the original home would be participating in indoor netball, inflatable target practice, Home Olympics, boat cruises on the river to name but a few activities. Alongside visits from many varied and exotic animals such as large

tropical snails and miniature house trained ponies, there truly is something for everyone. To celebrate the recent changes, including the latest phase of By Monica Chardheld its refurbishment works, the Home first ever Open Day, which proved hugely successful. Decked out with balloons and bunting visitors were invited to participate in some of the activities, which included keep fit and professional entertainment from Music In Hospitals. Home Manager, Rory Belfield, says “It’s an absolute privilege working in this historic home and we seem to be going from strength to strength. The atmosphere is always one of great fun and laughter. With the support of our Chairman and Trustees and our long standing affiliations with organisations such as The Royal Hospital Chelsea we really are unique and our original ethos as a charity and not for profit organisation still remains today “

Founded in memory of the first Duke of Cambridge, the Home is located at East Molesey in Surrey, very close to Hampton Court and the River Thames. Up to 28 residents are accommodated in a range of comfortable single rooms, suites or double rooms with telephone and television facilities. The Royal Cambridge can provide permanent or respite care for ladies, gentlemen and couples, subject to availability. Residents can take part in a variety of daily activities and excursions should they wish or simply relax in the beautiful communal lounges. There is also a chapel and large, well maintained and attractive south facing gardens.

The Royal Cambridge Home 82-84 Hurst Road East Molesey Surrey KT8 9AH Tel: 020 8979 3788 Email: rch@royalcambridgehome.org www.royalcambridgehome.org Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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Valid until 28th February 2017

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The History of Valentines Day Sources: Various

We do know that February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and that St. Valentine’s Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred. One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons, where they were often beaten and tortured. According to one legend, an imprisoned Valentine sent the first “valentine” greeting himself after he fell in love with a young girl–possibly his jailor’s daughter–who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter signed “From your Valentine,” an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories all emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic and–most importantly–romantic figure. By the Middle Ages, perhaps thanks to this reputation, Valentine would become one of the most popular saints in England and France. The Christian church may have decided to place St. Valentine’s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia. Celebrated at Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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the ides of February, or February 15, Lupercalia was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman god of agriculture, as well as to the Roman founders Romulus and Remus. To begin the festival, members of the Luperci, an order of Roman priests, would gather at a sacred cave where the infants Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were believed to have been cared for by a she-wolf or lupa. The priests would sacrifice a goat, for fertility, and a dog, for purification. They would then strip the goat’s hide into strips, dip them into the sacrificial blood and take to the streets, gently slapping both women and crop fields with the goat hide. Far from being fearful, Roman women welcomed the touch of the hides because it was believed to make them more fertile in the coming year. Later in the day, according to legend, all the young women in the city would place their names in a big urn. The city’s bachelors would each choose a name and become paired for the year with his chosen woman. Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages, though written Valentine’s didn’t begin to appear until after 1400. The oldest known valentine still in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt. Valentine’s Day began to be popularly celebrated around the 17th century. By the middle of the 18th, it was common for friends and lovers of all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection.

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Happy New Year from The Team at The Gentle Dental Advertorial We are already a few weeks into the New Year and it’s likely that some of us have already slacked off our New Year’s resolution. However, we believe that improving your dental health should be one resolution to stick to. The state of your dental health makes a significant contribution to your overall health and well-being. Good teeth ensure that you can eat healthy foods, enhance social interaction and promote self-esteem and feelings of well-being. The mouth serves as a “window” to the rest of the body, providing signals of general health disorders. For example, aphthous ulcers are occasionally a manifestation of Coeliac disease or Crohn’s disease, pale and bleeding gums can be a marker for blood disorders, bone loss in the lower jaw can be an early indicator of skeletal osteoporosis, and changes in tooth appearance can indicate bulimia or anorexia. The presence of many compounds (e.g., alcohol, nicotine, opiates, drugs, hormones, environmental toxins, antibodies) in the body can also be detected in the saliva. Oral conditions have an impact on overall health and disease. Bacteria from the mouth can cause infection in other parts of the body when the immune system has been compromised by disease or medical treatments (e.g., infective endocarditis). Systemic conditions and their treatment are also known to impact on oral health (e.g., reduced saliva flow). Periodontal (gum) disease has been associated with a number of systemic conditions including diabetes and heart disease. This can lead to tooth loss in severe cases. Untreated dental decay can spread within the tooth into the nerve. This can lead to infections in the jaw, and if untreated can spread and can present as swellings in the face and mouth. Treating such issues can be expensive or even lead to tooth loss. The loss of a tooth or multiple teeth can compromise eating and certainly the type of food one can eat. To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. For example: Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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Brush your teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste.

Floss daily.

Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.

Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed.

Schedule regular dental check-ups and cleanings.

Avoid tobacco use.

Dr Ali Rifai and his team at The Gentle Dental Practice believe in a strong preventive bias that allows us to deliver the latest dental treatments and care to ensure your optimal dental health. We believe that great dental health in turn helps promote great overall health and well-being.Our ethos for dentistry is clear and simple. As a team we will always come together to produce a treatment plan that suits your individual requirements. As part of this ethos we encourage our patients to be well informed and active in their own health care activities. Oral health check ups at The Gentle Dental start at £55. Contact us to arrange your appointment today. You can call us on 0208 224 7562 or email on hello@thegentledental.co.uk. We look forward to meeting you.

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CREATING GOOD STUDY HABITS FOR YOUR CHILDREN The kids have been back at school for some time now and you may have noticed old battles over homework and study resurfacing. Now is a great time to introduce good study habits to your child, which will pay off throughout their educational journey. Routine: Get into a homewor k r outine as soon as possible. Immediately after school is good, after they’ve had a snack and a drink, as they will still be in the right frame of mind. Find out what works best for your child though. Some may need to expend pent-up energy first, others may need to chill for twenty minutes.

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‘Worst first’: When mental ener gy is high work on the most difficult subject. Don’t try to cram too many subjects into one session. Talk: Encour age your child to talk thr ough the project with you first. Your child is then more likely to get the work right and won’t get frustrated. Gently ask questions about any areas they seem unsure about. Study station: Designate an ar ea for home learning. Make it as uncluttered and distractionfree as possible. Ensure all equipment required is nearby, so there’s no stalling. No TV: Switch off TVs and phones until after studying. Use it as a bribe if necessary. No games, texting or TV until homework is completed! The earlier your child gets into a routine the easier homework will become, for the whole family. By Louise Addison

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1st Molesey Scout Group help Joel St. Peter’s Night Shelter put the Home back into Homelessness 1st Molesey Scout Group are proud to have helped those without homes this festive season. The Scout Group helped to facilitate a soup kitchen and activities for guests at the Joel St. Peter’s Night Shelter and provided transport to the Christmas Centres set up by national homeless charity Crisis. Crisis Christmas Centres are safe, warm and lively places run by volunteers. Guests can enjoy hot food, get health care, advice, learn new skills, be entertained and much, much more. Max Harvey, of Surrey Scouts said: “Scouts support others and take care of the world in which we live. Our organisation exists to actively engage and support young people in their personal development, empowering them to make a positive contribution to society. The Joel Community Trust was set up in 2010 to raise money for a permanent night

shelter for people experiencing homelessness and in June 2014 a 10-bed night shelter was opened at St Peter's Church in Norbiton. Daniel Wheeler an By Nicola Morgan/Author ex Scout and now Night Shelter Manager at Joel St. Peters said: “I hope that this is the start of a lasting relationship between these two important community based organisations. I enjoyed my time in the Scouts immensely and it’s fantastic the 1st Molesey Scouts are continuing to help others in their community.” The Scout Association Over half a million members across the UK. Worldwide there are over 30 million members. More than 110,000 adults volunteer in the UK. The Chief Scout is, adventurer Bear Grylls. Across the UK over 38,000 young people remain on waiting lists due to the lack of adult volunteers. Over 200 activities are offered by Scouting around the UK, made possible by the efforts of more than 110,000 adult volunteers The largest co-educational youth Movement in the country. Joel Community Services http://www.joelcommunityservices.org.uk/

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Across 7 Innumerable, unspecified amount (7) 9 Photograph, picture (5) 10 Girls' hairstyle or a small cake (3) 11 Oval form (9) 12 Sarcasm, incongruity, used to comic effect (5) 14 Objects of attention or attack (7) 16 17th century Spanish warship (7) 18 Go into a place (5) 19 Aboriginal hunting weapon (9) 20 Type of seabird (3) 21 Perfect, desirable (5)

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Down 1 2 3 4 5

Effervescing, simmering (8) Unlocked, unsecured (4) Crisp salad vegetable (6) Hesitate, waver (6) Most contented or delighted (8)

6 Curve, twist (4) 8 Drab bird which sings beautifully (11) 13 Eyewitness, observer (8) 15 Caressing, soothing (8)

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Calmly, smoothly (6) Festive drink (6) French creamy cheese (4) Opposite of alkali (4)

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Supporting Residents Independently

to

Live

Have you noticed that a family member, or someone you care for is starting to struggle with their day to day life? Perhaps they are becoming more forgetful and you are concerned for their wellbeing, or maybe they are finding it harder to move around or cope at home? Naturally this can be a very worrying time, so understanding the best way to support or find care to help them is important. But where do you start? Right here in Surrey there’s lots of care and support available, from walking aids and grip rails, through to help with personal care and jobs around the home like cleaning or gardening. There are also organisations who help people who are beginning to have problems with their memory. All of these services can make a really big difference and allow your loved one to continue to live well and To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

independently in their own home for longer. Working with many organisations, including the voluntary, faith and community sectors, we want to ensure any information available is easy to find and that’s where Surrey Information Point (SIP) comes in. Packed full of useful local links, contact information and advice, SIP is the go to place for finding the right information about care and support packages. There are also links to local clubs where people can find a way of keeping or getting more active and meet new friends. So, if you have a family member or someone who you care for who could do with some extra help, remember, there is care and support available to them. Go to: Surreyinformationpoint.org.uk Or call Surrey County Council’s Adult Social Care Helpline: 0300 200 1005

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Why choose an international education for your child? Would you like your child to emerge from education as a confident, independent young adult, with a full and life-long appreciation and understanding of other cultures? There is one form of education that can deliver these attributes more than perhaps any other, and that is an international education at an international school, like ACS Cobham. ACS Cobham International School teaches globally recognised qualifications that will open doors to top universities and exciting careers worldwide. The school has offered the two-year International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme since 1986, for students aged 16 to 18, making it one of the most experienced IB World Schools in the UK. The IB Diploma is cited by university admission officers as the ‘best qualification to thrive at university’ and is widely recognised as the best education programme for helping students develop critical Higher Education study skills such as

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independent inquiry and self-management. In 2016, two ACS Cobham students achieved the maximum IB score of 45, equivalent to 7 A* at A Level, placing them in the top 0.3 per cent of all IB Diploma students worldwide. In total, 97 diplomas were awarded, with an average score of 33 points – equivalent to over three A* grades at A level. Over 70 nationalities are represented at ACS Cobham, creating a rich international environment. While many students are expatriates, local families are enrolling in ever-increasing

numbers as awareness grows of the benefits an international education affords. Students benefit from an education that allows them to mature into well-rounded individuals with a better understanding of the world. To find out more or to register for an Open Morning visit www.acs-schools.com/opendays.

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Pancake Day - A History By Susan Brookes-Morris

This year Pancake Day is Tuesday 28th February. More traditionally known as Shrove Tuesday, this is the Christian feast day before Ash Wednesday, which is the start of Lent. Lent is a time of sacrifice, so Pancake Day historically was the perfect time to use up ingredients such as eggs and fats which are intrinsic to pancakes. Historically Christians went to Church on Shrove Tuesday to seek absolution, otherwise known as shriving for their sins. So Shrove is taken from the word Shrive. A bell would ring to call people to confession and this became known as the Pancake or Shriven Bell.

on the story of a local woman who whilst she was making pancakes, heard the Shriven Bell and ran to church still wearing her apron and tossing her pancake in a frying pan to prevent it from burning. For this reason in Olney, racers must be local housewives or men dressed as such and wear an apron and a hat or scarf. During the 415 yard race they have to toss their hot pancake at least three times and the winner has to serve their pancake to the bell ringer and be kissed by him. Other variations of the race include the one held at Westminster School, where the cook tosses a huge pancake over a five metre bar in the playground and boys try to catch the largest piece in order to get a cash prize from the Dean. From the twelfth century onwards, Shrove Tuesday Football Games were played out in the streets and often referred to as mob football. Nowadays only a few games take place as highways legislation has prohibited playing football on the road since 1835. In Scarborough on Shrove Tuesday, it is customary for a large skipping rope to be in place and for up to ten people to be skipping at a time.

The date of Shrove Tuesday varies because it occurs 47 days before Easter Sunday which also alters year on year based on cycles of the moon. In the UK there are various traditions associated with this day in addition to the eating of pancakes. These include: Pancake Races: - One of the most famous races takes place in Olney in Buckinghamshire where is it believed the idea of the contest originated. It is said to be based

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In some other countries, this date is known as Mardi Gras and is marked by carnivals. These are still linked to the concept of celebrating the last day of ‘fat eating’ or ‘gorging’ before the commencement of Lent. The French translation of Mardi Gras is Fat Tuesday.

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Halloween 31st October

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By Monica Chard

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Sudoku

Solution on Page 42

How to play Sudoku It’s simple! Fill in the grid so that each row, column and 3x3 box, contains the numbers 1 through to 9 with no repetition. You don’t need to be a genius. These puzzles use logic alone. Watch out! Sudoku is highly addictive.

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You’d have had to be pretty well snuggled under a mountain of blankets not to have heard about hygge this winter. Pronounced ‘hue-gah’, it’s all about creating a sense of cosiness, of coming together with friends and family, of revelling in simple pleasures. Think warm, fluffy towels, roaring fires and flickering candles. Think good, honest, home-cooked food, shared with friends. Hygge isn’t about buying ‘stuff’, whatever the retailers want us to think. You don’t need to spend money to create a sense of hygge. Wrapping up in a snuggly jumper and going for a walk can be hygge, as can To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

catching up with a friend over coffee. It’s about a feeling, not possessions. It’s about being kind to yourself, and to others. You could… Curl up in PJs and a snuggly blanket, drink hot chocolate and read a book. Light that scented candle you’ve been saving. Stop trying to multi-task and focus on the moment. Bake some gooey chocolate chip cookies. Invite a neighbour over for a cuppa. Send a loved one a letter. Soak in a bath with a few drops of aromatherapy oils. Explore the great outdoors with your family. Turn off your phone. While fashions come and go, hygge is one trend that’s very much worth indulging in.

Enjoy

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I Can’t Eat That ! Food Allergies and Intolerances By Kate Duggan You’ll need to see your GP if you suspect you have an allergy or intolerance, so that they can rule out any other causes for your symptoms. They’ll then likely refer you to a specialist for tests. Food allergies can often be diagnosed with blood or skin reaction tests. Intolerances are more difficult to diagnose. You may be

Wondering whether that dicky tummy or rash could be down to something you’ve eaten? Read on… What’s the difference between food allergy and food intolerance? A food allergy affects the immune system. Symptoms usually appear within a few minutes of eating the offending food, and can include a skin rash, upset stomach (eg vomiting), stomach pains and wheezing. The most severe allergic reaction is anaphylaxis, which can affect breathing and send the body into shock. Without treatment, anaphylaxis can be life-threatening, which is why it’s so important for people with a known allergy to carry an EpiPen if they’ve been prescribed one, and to teach colleagues, friends and family members how to use it. Food intolerances are more common than food allergies. Symptoms include irritable bowel syndrome, bloating, stomach upsets, eczema, migraines and even arthritis. The immune system isn’t affected and symptoms might not appear for a couple of hours, which can make it harder to work out what type of food is causing the problem.

asked to follow an ‘elimination and challenge’ diet, if necessary, to try to determine what foods you’re intolerant to. You’ll be asked to cut out certain types of food for a period of time, then reintroduce them gradually. Treatment If you’re allergic or intolerant to a type of food, you’ll need to avoid it completely. Of course, that’s easier said than done. Ingredients such as milk powder and egg white are often used in products you wouldn’t expect to find them in. And restaurants aren’t always as vigilant as they should be about crosscontamination. So you might be prescribed steroids, antihistamines, or an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen) if you have an allergy. You may also be referred to a dietician, to make sure you’re still getting all the nutrition your body needs.

While you can be allergic or intolerant to any type of food, there are eight common culprits: Peanuts Tree nuts Eggs Milk Fish Shellfish Wheat Soy If you have an allergy or intolerance to one type of food, you may well be allergic to other types in the same food group.

The website www.allergyuk.org has a wealth of information about allergies and intolerances. If you don’t have access to the internet, try the helpline on 01322 619898.

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Word Search

Solution on Page 42

Can you find all of the Valentine-related words hidden in the grid? adore affection amorous balloons be mine beau beloved bouquet boyfriend cards cherub chocolate courting crush cupid darling date envelope

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February flirt flowers friendship gift girlfriend heart heartthrob honey hugs I love you kisses love lovebirds pink red red roses romantic

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Ok, I know this is in Spelthorne, but it is important to us here in Molesey too. It is another example of builders and promises. Residents been well aware for years of the plans of The Jockey Club and Redrow to build on the eastern half of the Kempton Park estate. But it’s part of the London Green Belt, and apart from other worthy functions, it’s what keeps the community from becoming indistinguishable from the London sprawl.Since none of these developers lives anywhere the site, they don’t give a damn. And so residenst had what – and they’re being charitable – must have been a tongue-in-cheek exercise by the PR consultants for Redrow: a “survey” pretending “help those who want to see more housing built locally make their case to the Council”. As if residents aren’t capable of doing that for themselves. Perhaps those particular PR people missed the lecture at PR school about not condescending … And then came the shocking announcement that The Jockey Club and Redrow now plan to build on the western half of the estate as well, bulldozing the racecourse and the grandstands.

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Rather than 2000 units, it’s now 3000 (at a minimum). No wonder the Redrow “survey” was a bit coy about the number of houses they wanted to build. And now another attempt to try it on has surfaced. A few months after the dismissal of a similar application for development on Green Belt at the Old Nursery site on Fordbridge Road, Croudace Homes sent out a booklet spelling out their plans to build 125 dwellings on farmland between Sunbury and Halliford. Again, since they are heretoday-and-gone-tomorrow kind of people, they couldn’t care less that the Green Belt farmland between Sunbury and Halliford is what makes this places what they are. Many examples will be seen like this – mass house builders promising affordable housing, new schools and health centres, motherhood and apple pie. And as we have seen on almost every occasion in the past, those promises disappear like morning mist as the developers suddenly encounter spurious profitability problems. When will they learn that no-one trusts them any more. Keep up to date with the latest information on the Kempton Park development by visiting www.keepkemptongreen.com

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MOLESEY LOCAL HISTORY SOCIETY: FUTURE EVENTS Wednesday 1 February 2017, 8 pm AGM The Power of Beauty in Restoration England: The Windsor & Hampton Court Beauties Talk by Laurence Shafe St Lawrence School, Church Road, KT8 9DR Thursday 9 March 2017, 8 pm Kenneth Wood, Molesey Architect ‘A Modernist in Suburbia’ Talk by Dr Fiona Fisher Hurst Park School, Hurst Road, KT8 1QS Wednesday 26 April 2017, 8 pm ‘Painshill, The Restoration Story’ Talk by Cherrill Sands St Lawrence School, Church Road, KT8 9DR

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Recipe of The Month Oven Baked Cauliflower Cheese Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking Time: 30 minutes Ingredients 1 large head cauliflower, cut into florets Salt and freshly ground black pepper For the sauce 20g/¾oz unsalted butter 20g/¾oz plain flour Grated nutmeg to taste 250ml/9fl oz skimmed milk 40g/1½oz mature cheddar, finely grated 2 tsp Dijon or wholegrain mustard 15g/½oz parmesan, or similar hard cheese, finely grated

Add the grated nutmeg. Reduce the heat then add the mustard and cheddar cheese. Put the roasted cauliflower into the sauce and mix so that all the florets are coated. Pour the cheese and cauliflower mixture back into the roasting dish, sprinkle over the parmesan and return to the oven for 10-15 minutes, or until the cheese is golden-brown and the sauce is bubbling. Serve as a supper dish with a green salad.

Method Preheat the oven to 200C / Gas 6. Place the cauliflower florets into an ovenproof dish and season with a pinch of salt and pepper. Roast for 20 minutes, or until tender and starting to brown. Meanwhile, make the sauce by melting the butter in a saucepan, then adding the flour and cooking for 1-2 minutes, or until a light golden colour. Gradually add the milk until smooth, and then cook over a gentle heat for 3-4 minutes stirring constantly until thickened.

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Controlling Behaviour Relationships

in

Abuse isn’t always physical Domestic violence is the highest reported violent crime in Surrey. Those who experience it don’t always suffer physical violence – many experience emotional abuse such as controlling behaviour. The control comes in many different forms. From one partner constantly criticising, intimidating or threatening the other, through to more obvious things like making them look or dress in a certain way, checking their phone, restricting their money or cutting them off from friends and family.

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If you think you may be in a controlling relationship, we are here to help when you are ready. You can visit http://www.surreyagainstda.info/ or call 01483 776822 for help and advice. In an emergency you should always call 999.

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


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Top Tips to Prepare Your Garden for Spring It may be cold out there, but Spring is on its way. Many of us will be itching to get into the garden for the first time since the summer to either catch up with gardening or just to see that everything is still alive and well. The thought of trying to get the garden ready for summer can be quite a daunting task. However there is hope when you see things blooming and the colour beneath last autumn’s leaves; the motivation that is needed to keep going and knowing that there is light at the end of the tunnel. It will all be worth it, when your well designed garden is shown off to your friends and family. A lot of people think that now is a pretty dormant time in the garden, with very little going on. Well you couldn’t be more wrong! A well designed garden will show colour all year round. Sometimes it’s not just through flowers. It could be the foliage or stems. Around now a few plants have started to kick into action and I can see a lot of things coming into flower in my garden. Here are some ideas to get colour and life in your garden in late winter time: Hellebores – A great starter. Usually comes out late February/ early March. To show them off to their best cut the old leaves off and leave the flower stems to work their magic. Coming in pinks, whites, purples and mixtures these will brighten up any shady corner within the garden. Pulmonaria – Working best in partial shade, this perennial looks good all year round, with leaves that are bright and sometimes spotted giving a good foundation throughout, but it has its magical moment when flowering. Coming in pinks, purples and whites it’s a sure way to brighten up a woodland floor. Camellia - A hardy shrub that looks spectacular when flowering. With so many varieties it’s hard to know which one to choose. But this plant can liven up any garden. An early flowerer to get you in the mood for spring. Being evergreen its great all year round. Why not try using it as hedging? Primula- Starting to flower early March these small perennials stand out at the front of boarders or in pots. Keep deadheading them and they will Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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try to keep going. With some varieties flowering later these are a nice addition to any garden.

Pulmonaria Sarcoccoca – Just starting to go over however the scent is still prominent. This does not mean that is the end for this shrub, once the flowering is done the blue/black berries appear making it a lovely all year round plant. Try and place it near a window or door. So if there is an off chance that you might open or step outside you will be hit with the fragrance. Putting the flowers aside other ways that you can introduce colour this time of year; Cornus – Dogwood has amazing bright stems that can really stand out. Whether it is red, orange or green these are a great way to bring a wintery garden to life. Heucheras – Who couldn’t love a Heuchera? With so many different varieties there use is endless. Bright reds to pop out, bright purples to break up some green, oranges, acid greens, silvers and so many more there is so many different ways that you can use the almighty Heuchera. If you need help trying to introduce colour into your garden this time of year please feel free to contact us.

Gardening Tips and Advice by Holley Designs Garden Design and Creation www.holleydesigns.com Tel : 01932 825593

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'

Urban Wildlife Garden You don’t need to live in the country to enjoy wildlife A blog by Molesey Resident - Della Reynolds A bit like living in the Serengeti, life in the suburbs is often shared with uninvited wildlife. When the weather gets cold in the winter months, the mice from the shed will occasionally venture indoors in order to escape death by hyperthermia. Always a risky option with two cats in the house. To be fair, most of the mice are in fact kidnap victims and unfortunately, only some live to tell the tale. I can usually detect the guttural growl of my black cat Sooty as she crouches over her prey and if I am quick I can distract her long enough to give the mouse a fighting chance. My most unusual visitor was a pigeon who wandered in the front door when I opened it to guests. He walked straight through the house and when I opened the back door he was happy to keep on walking. He then spent several hours going round in circles in my back garden. Someone suggested that perhaps the pigeon was recovering from a shock, such as flying into a window, or being knocked by a car. He just needed a safe refuge until his GPS tuned in again. A close second for unusual visitors was the frog I found in my front garden. We live nowhere near ponds or water, so he had hopped some distance to get to my house. I really should have caught him and put him out the back, but it was confusing to find a frog and in my confusion I simply left him there while I wondered what to do. I’m pretty sure that the urban fox found him on his nightly patrol and made a tidy snack out of him. I have my fair share of spiders of course and they seem to particularly like the bathroom. One built a web like a hammock in the corner of the window. He regularly invited other spiders into his home as well as catching the odd fly or two which came in through the open window. He thrived there for many months and didn’t seem to mind

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having to share the facilities. Then one morning I noticed he had gone. I waited for him to return but he never did and within a day or two his taut web became saggy from neglect. I realised that he must have invested time every day securing his web to the less than welcoming vinyl window frame in order to keep it so pristine. Spiders are so very industrious, building and maintaining webs for the sake of the few meagre scraps which pass their way. Continually underrated and unloved, if I had one wish it would be to reverse spider phobia and make them into a lucky talisman. These poor little chaps have enough trouble making their way in the world without us squashing them at every opportunity. A cheeky pansy managed to find its way in through the bathroom window and plant itself in the fertile soil of my pot plant. This is what I love about nature; its sheer tenacity and ability to seize every opportunity for life. We have a lot to learn from that little pansy. I find woodlice all round the house; usually dead but not always. I found a huge one crawling up the outside of the bath. How do they get in and why? I found a beetle in the dish cloth and realised just in time as I went to wipe the table with him. For a while a whole bevy of slugs managed to find their way through, under or around the front door to come in at night and line dance their way across the front room carpet. I only ever saw the silver trails left behind in the morning after a night of merriment. Eventually, I found their hidey holes and evicted them back into the garden. But then share and share alike is my motto. I enjoy being part of a diverse world where we can all rub along together. Now I just need to convince the cats of the virtue of a live and let live philosophy.

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Leader Supports Calls for an Independent Noise and Air Pollution Regulator for Heathrow “Issues around noise and air pollution need to be urgently addressed”; these are the key concerns from the Leader of Elmbridge Borough Council, Cllr Stuart Selleck, as Elmbridge voted against the expansion of Heathrow airport at last week’s Council meeting. While the Council waits on the outcome of the Government’s national consultation on Heathrow, Cllr Selleck has emphasised the need for an independent regulator for noise and air quality; Cllr Selleck intends to make his views known by writing to government Ministers and through the national consultation run by the Department of Transport which will begin in January 2017. Elmbridge Borough Council is also calling for the Government to support the dispersal of flight paths within the existing corridor to ensure the impact on the Borough is lessened On 7 December 2016, Elmbridge Borough Council agreed that irrespective of the decision by Government as to whether or not to expand Heathrow airport or the

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position taken by Elmbridge, the Council will work in partnership with Heathrow and local community groups to address both the positive economic benefits on Elmbridge as well as the concerns around noise and air pollution. In the opinion of the Council, Heathrow has not adequately addressed the noise and air pollution concerns of its residents nor sufficiently assessed the infrastructure impact on the Borough, such as the road and rail networks. Councillor Selleck commented; “I would encourage the residents of Elmbridge to take part in the national consultation so that the Government is aware of view on the expansion of Heathrow. Further information will be available on the Council’s website and from the Department of Transport.

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River Thames Scheme Update The River Thames Scheme includes a new flood channel, improvements to 3 weirs, community measures and will provide other benefits to local communities and the economy. We are working with 7 local councils, including Surrey, Spelthorne and Elmbridge to reduce flood risk to over 15000 homes and businesses between Datchet and Teddington. What a busy year 2016 was! We held several successful community based workshops and drop-ins, gathered data from environmental and threshold surveys, and progressed with the design and funding for the scheme. We ran two discussion workshops for the scheme channels affecting Staines, Laleham, and Shepperton within Spelthorne and one for the downstream communities for Shepperton, Sunbury and Molesey. Around 60 local residents and organisations with a broad range of interests attended and discussed scheme updates, enhancement opportunities and how they want to stay involved in the future. We also held 10 public local surgeries throughout November and December at different local venues across the scheme area. We met approximately 400 people and discussed the latest information about the scheme in an informal way. Residents told us that they are concerned that the scheme will increase their flood risk. We were able to show them interim outputs from the new modelling where on average, there will be a reduction Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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on flood levels in the river everywhere once the scheme is complete. We also emphasised that we will not build a scheme that makes flood risk worse for others. We propose to hold more of these local surgeries this year. Keep an eye in Molesey Matters or the web site (www.gov.uk River Thames Scheme) in the next couple of months for more details. In order to improve our understanding of local flood risk we are measuring the height of the lowest threshold (lowest entry point for flood water) for over 3500 properties over the whole of the River Thames scheme area. You may have seen our surveying contractors out and about and continuing until February or March this year. This data will help us to consider a range of options to improve flood risk at a community level, from temporary or permanent flood barriers to individual property level measures, such as door barriers and air brick covers. Not only have we been doing height surveys but also many environmental surveys. These include site investigations to find out the ground conditions and ecological, fish, landscape and archaeology surveys. We want to find out as much as possible along the route of the channels and around the weirs at Teddington, Molesey and Sunbury to ensure we improve the environment and do not damage it. For any queries or comments please contact: rts@environment-agency.gov.uk

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Solution to February Quick Crossword

Solution to February Sudoku

Thinking of Selling your Stamp Collection? Cut out the commissions and sell direct to the dealer! Home Call 01932 785635 www.jcstamps.co.uk

Solution February Word Search

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NEWS FROM THE MOLESEY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Christmas: We wish all our r esidents a Happy New Year . We hope you enjoyed the Christmas trees in Molesey last year. The large tree on the corner of Walton Road and Matham Road was provided by local Molesey businesses, with the MRA putting it up and lighting it. MRA also placed lighted trees on the green by the old police station and on the Central Avenue roundabout. We will be working with the Council to try and improve the street lighting displays next year, so if any residents have any ideas or suggestions for improvements please pass them on to one of your MRA Councillors. Pavilion Planning Application: A fur ther planning application has been submitted for building additional houses on the Pavilion site in Hurst Lane. The land was given protection as green space when the houses at Kings Chase were built, and MRA will continue to argue that this protection should be maintained. Review of Elmbridge Local Plan: The Elmbr idge Local Plan guides planning and development in the Borough. It is currently being reviewed to take account of changes to national planning policy, and the Council is consulting on its Strategic Options as the first stage in the process. Consultation runs until Friday 10 February 2017. This is an important document and we would encourage all residents to look at it and respond. Details can be found on the Council’s website at: http://consult.elmbridge.gov.uk/consult.ti/lpsoc/consultationHome Saturday Car Parking: The Residents Association Gr oup at Elmbr idge Council is developing proposals for a period of free parking on Saturdays where this might encourage more people to shop locally and support our small independent shops. The Walton Road car park is one of the locations being considered, and are hopeful this will be introduced by April. Local Bus Services: The cur r ent pr ovider is withdr awing its funding fr om some local services, and this could have implications for several buses, including the 514. Surrey County Council (SCC) is making interim arrangements which will protect most services in the short-term, but a long-term solution is still needed to ensure these services can continue. Heathrow Airport: The announced expansion of Heathr ow Air por t could have a considerable impact on surrounding communities. Elmbridge Council has formally voted against the expansion plans and the Leader of the Council, MRA Councillor Stuart Selleck, has made it clear that residents’ concerns about noise and air pollution need to be urgently addressed. Street lighting: SCC has implemented a par t-night lighting policy which will see street lights in many residential areas switched off between midnight and 5am each night. There will be some exceptions, for example where public transport continues beyond midnight, or possibly where there are speed calming measures, formal pedestrian crossings or locations where the change could adversely affect crime or road safety. These decisions were taken by the Cabinet at SCC without reference to MRA or other Councillors. To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

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Events Coming Up Some we like... The Marriage of Figaro Thames Philhar monia Oper a ar e per for ming Mozar t’s immor tal opera ‘The Marriage of Figaro’ performed in its original Italian. Its first performance was a sell out and this repeat performance has been arranged by popular request. Normansfield Theatre, 2A Langdon Park, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 9PS Sat 11 Feb Tel : 0333 1212300 Half Term Family Fun On weekdays dur ing Half Ter m, our popular car r ides will be operating from 11am-1pm and from 2-3.00pm (subject to weather). Take a trip in a vintage-style car up Test Hill or along the Members’ Banking of the old Race Track. Brooklands Museum Brooklands Road Weybridge Surrey KT13 0QN Mon 13 Feb to Fri 17 Feb Molesey WI meets at Imber Cour t on the fir st Wednesday of ever y month 7.30pm for 8pm, where we have a guest speaker or activity. Visitors are welcome for a £5 fee. First visit is free with a copy of Molesey Matters Follow us on Facebook - Molesey Women's Institute (Molesey Crafty Ladies) Lidl Kingston Breakfast Run The per fect mar athon tr aining r un! The Kingston Br eakfast Run is back for another year with Lidl at its helm. Starting and finishing in the historic Kingston-upon-Thames market square and taking in the river down to Hampton Court. Market Place, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey KT1 1JP Sun 26 Mar Claremont Landscape Garden - Tuesday Tree Walk Discover a twigful of garden history and trunkloads of interesting facts about our beautiful trees. Find out more about our interesting trees on an informal tour of the garden with Hilary, our friendly volunteer guide. Booking Advisable. Claremont Landscape Garden, Portsmouth Road, Esher, Surrey KT10 9JG Tue 21 Feb Molesey Local History Society Thur sday 9 Mar ch 2017, 8 pm Kenneth Wood, Molesey Architect. ‘A Modernist in Suburbia’ Talk by Dr Fiona Fisher. Hurst Park School, Hurst Road, KT8 1QS Molesey Art Society Feb 10th Fri, 7.45pm Demonstration, Freda Anderson : Pastel portrait. Feb 11th Sat 2.00pm Workshop, Tim Stone: Model any medium. Feb 15th Exhibition: LAST DATE FOR SPRING EXHIBITION ENTRIES. Feb 25th Sat 2.00pm.Workshop Barbara Thaxter Pastels. All events are held at St Alban’s Catholic Primary School, Beauchamp Road, East Molesey Surrey KT8 2PG Molesey Photographic Club 14th February 2017. Out of Town - Especially for You, Anne Sutcliffe, FRPS, EFIAP, PPSA. 20th February 2017.Albany Cup. Guildford Photographic Society. 28th February 2017.2nd Members Projected Digital Image (PDI) Competition Judged by Roger Mendham, Bookham C. Meetings normally begin at 7.45pm for 8.00pm. Meet in The East Molesey Methodist Church, Manor Road – Oxshott and Cobham Music Society 25th Febr uar y 2017 - 8pm (doors open 7.30pm) Vitaly Pisarenko, Russian pianist. Fir st Pr ize winner of the 8th Inter national Fr anz Liszt Piano Competition in Utrecht, and more recently the third prize at the Leeds International Piano Competition, Pisarenko is described as being an "immensely gifted pianist, with prodigious technique" by the New York Times. All Oxshott and Cobham Music Society concerts are held at Holy Trinity, Church Road, Claygate, Surrey, KT10 0JP

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Index of Advertisers Car/Repairs/MOT Esher Tyres and Exhausts 13 Care for the Elderly Brigitte Trust 31 Royal Cambridge Home 12 Cleaning Services Time For You 23 Nick Lewis Cleaning Services 41 Curtains and Blinds Angela Charles 11 Decorama 17 Dentists Gentle Dental Practice 16/47 Smilessence 24/25 Driveways SJL Paving 42 Estate Agents/Letting Agents Dowling Styles 48 Events Hampton Court Palace 7 Funeral Services Alan Greenwood 19 Garden Services/Supplies Easicut Mowers 34 Longacres 15 Holley Designs 37 SJL Paving 42 Glazing/Windows House of Surrey 44 Village Windows 30

Health/Fitness Curves Jo James Wellbeing Heating/Plumbing Progas Insurance Hard to Insure Ironing Collection and Delivery Kitchens Ashford Kitchens Legal/Law Perfectly Legal Mobility Services Kudos Mobility Oven Cleaning Ovenclean Restaurants/Bars/Pubs The Stables Schools Halliford School Hampton Prep and Pre Prep Hampton School ACS International School Sell for Cash JC Stamps Robs Records Sports Clubs Imber Court Web Design Surrey Coding

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Disclaimer: Whilst every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information included in this publication, neither the publisher nor the editorial contributors can accept any liability to any party for loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. Molesey Matters does not endorse any advertising material included in this publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval systems or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the publisher.


Feb 2017 molesey  

The Local Community Magazine for East and West Molesey