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standard requirement*). However, Carl tries to keep them as active as possible. “I get them out of their enclosure to play and expend energy,” Carl explains. “Otherwise, they get frustrated.” Play includes pouncing activities, consisting of long poles with large objects attached to the end. “Tigers are just big cats,” says Carl. “They just need a bigger lure to chase.” He also takes them on walks around the property, allowing them to scope out and mark their territory. Carl’s dedication to wildlife conservation began after a motorcycle accident left him temporarily blinded. The injury caused him to contemplate what he would miss most if permanently blind; thinking about his childhood on his grandfather’s farm, Carl concluded it was seeing animals. Though he regained his sight in only one eye, this did not deter him from pursuing his newly found direction. His epiphany led him to a degree in Biology from Indiana University and to his first career at Sea World, where he learned about animal behavior and began educating the public about endangered species such as the sea turtle and manatee. Later, while working as a carnivore keeper at Jungleland Zoo in Kissimmee, Carl found his true calling: training big cats. Though Carl loves all his cats, he has a special affinity for the two orange Bengals. They were his first exotics and inspired Single Vision nature preserve. He helped deliver the cubs while working at the Jungleland Zoo in 2005, and instantly knew Bali and Amira had changed his life. Amira was breeched, and nearly suffocated before Carl and his mentor pulled the

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The Village Journal  

Summer 2012

The Village Journal  

Summer 2012

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