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Fargo-Moorhead’s Biggest Family Events Calendar

February/March 2014

YOGA

FOR KIDS Protect Your Peepers


THE ADVENTURES OF

February 13, 2014 presents

Hosted By: impactgiveback.org

24 Hour Online Fundraising Event

2.14.13

BE SUPER. BE A HERO. GIVE TO NOKOMIS ON GIVING HEARTS DAY. On Thursday, February 13, make a donation of $10 or more online to Nokomis of The Village Family Service Center at impactgiveback.org, and Dakota Medical Foundation will match the first $4,000 given. This is an online-only event, so hop on your computer and donate! Go to impactgiveback.org and choose “Nokomis of The Village Family Service Center.” For more information, call Tasha at 701-451-4956.

Follow The Adventures Online: /TheVillageFamily @VillageFamily


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YOUR FAMILY z from the editor February/March 2014 Vol. 18, No. 1 Publisher The Village Family Service Center Gary Wolsky Tammy Noteboom Editor-in-Chief Kelly Lynch Graphic Design & Layout Jared Zimney Advertising Sales Manager Joy Ryan Advertising Sales Jeff Meyer Calendar Editor Shayna Hendricksen Copy Editor Shayna Hendricksen The Village Family Service Center Board of Directors Carrie Bjorge, David Dougherty, Richard Duysen, Judy Green, Matthew Hallaway, Dr. Richard Hanson, Tammy Hauck, Richard Henderson, Karen Mellum, Nancy McKenzie, Tom Nelson, Dr. Joy Query, Becky Walen

I can’t think of anyone I know who isn’t concerned, on some level, with their health. We are constantly bombarded with information about how to maintain good health, the importance of proper diet and exercise, and the value of regular medical exams. Here’s one more piece of medical advice—don’t forget a trip to the eye doctor. Early detection and treatment of many eye problems can mean saving your sight. In the article, “Protect Your Peepers,” we outline the importance of good eye health, including regular eye exams after the age of 40. A routine visit to the eye doctor just makes sense. Of course, it’s important for kids to maintain healthy habits, too. The CDC reminds parents that children need 60 minutes of exercise every day. Regular exercise helps children feel less stressed; feel better about themselves; feel more ready to learn in school; keep a healthy weight; build and keep healthy bones, muscles, and joints; and sleep better at night. Yoga can help kids achieve many of these things and so much more. Our feature article is “Yoga For Kids.” Award-winning local writer Amanda Peterson spoke to a number of area families who have introduced yoga, and its benefits, to their young children. The kids are enthusiastic about it. Parents who do yoga right along with their children remark about how much they enjoy the experience and connecting with them. The article includes a number of valuable resources to help families get started and a listing of local yoga studios, too. Every October/November we ask our readers to take a survey and give us some input on what they like about the magazine and what topics they’d enjoy reading about in the future. We get a wealth of wonderful suggestions. From this year’s pool of surveys, we discovered a few of the recommendations for articles were already in the works, which tells us we are choosing relevant topics important to our readers and this community. It’s rewarding to know, with all the information sources available to parents and families, people continue to rely on The Village Family Magazine as a valued resource. Thanks for reading.

For advertising, call 701-451-5000 For editorial comments or questions, please call 701-451-4937 or email magazine@TheVillageFamily.org For subscription information, please call 701-451-4936 Printed by Forum Communications Printing, Fargo, N.D. ©2014 The Village Family Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Village Family Magazine is a registered trademark. The Village Family Magazine does not necessarily endorse content of advertising. The mission of The Village Family Magazine is to broaden the ability of The Village Family Service Center to improve the quality of people’s lives. In each issue, articles and features will educate and encourage families to develop and maintain positive, constructive relationships. Mail correspondence to: The Village Family Service Center ATTN: Family Magazine 1201 25th St. S., Fargo, ND 58103

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February/March 2014

Congratulations and Thank You to the winners of our survey drawing. Alice C., Fargo Judy W., Grand Forks

About the Cover Photo Amiya (5) and Camille (1) Photography by Melissa Dale Photography (See Ad Page 9)

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departments z celebrations

6 Valentine’s Treats to Make Your Kids’ Day Special

Embrace the excitement of Valentine’s Day by putting some of these fun foods on your February 14th menu.

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z online

14 How Texting Can Strengthen Relationships

Texting is a great way to stay in touch. Help kids understand how their messages are received and remind them to think before they text.

p.

z feature

16 Yoga For Kids

Local families share their reasons for introducing kids to the many benefits of yoga. z wellness

20 Protect Your Peepers: Eye Problems in Aging Adults

Read about common eye concerns after age 40 and what you should do to maintain good eye health. z consumer

38 10 Things We Spend Too Much On Many emotional or complicated purchases cause us to overspend. Be aware of your rights as a consumer and arm yourself with knowledge before opening your wallet.

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z generations

p.

42 You Want Me to Pay For What?

North Dakota’s filial responsibility law has some interesting components; learn all about it.

in every issue

z gary’s opinion.......9 z books & movies...10 z mom’s view..........12 z dad’s view............13

z events calendar.....24 z food & fun.............45 z words & wisdom.. .46

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YOUR FAMILY z celebrations

By Joanna Nesbit

It’s that time of year again when sweet treats abound, and celebrating Valentine’s Day seems to be all about eating chocolate. February is also American Heart Month, designated by the American Heart Association as the time to develop healthy habits for your heart health. Kids, of course, won’t be thinking about their heart health, and, personally, I worry more about their teeth. So here are some fun, somewhat healthy, food ideas to help your kids celebrate without suffering sweet treat overload.

I-Love-You Strawberry Pancakes Start the day with strawberries and whipped cream on

pink pancakes. Mix a little red food coloring* right into the pancake batter. Once cooked, cut the pancakes into hearts with a heart-shaped cookie cutter. Top with fresh strawberries—or thaw frozen ones left over from last summer—and a dollop of whipped cream or vanilla yogurt.

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family


Yogurt Parfait

In a tall, narrow glass, layer vanilla yogurt with red berries—strawberries or raspberries—for a fun visual treat. The parfait could be a breakfast treat, an afternoon snack, or dessert. If it’s for breakfast, add a little granola between the layers for extra energy.

Cream Cheese Heart Sandwiches Send your little ones off

to school with hearts in their lunchboxes. Cut heart-shaped bread pieces with a heart-shaped cookie cutter. Spread with pink cream cheese made from cream cheese and a few drops of red food coloring.*

Pink Berry Smoothie Fruit smoothies are one of my kids’ favorite

after-school snacks, but this could also be dessert. In a blender, mix frozen strawberries (or any frozen berry), a banana, and low-fat milk or orange juice. To make it Valentine’s special, top with whipped cream and a few chocolate sprinkles.

Chocolate Fondue with Fruit Okay, we all need a little chocolate, and fondue is always

fun for kids. If they agree to dark chocolate, so much the better—it contains substances that help blood vessels relax to lower blood pressure, as well as heart-protective antioxidants. Melt 1½ cups semisweet (or dark) chocolate chips in the microwave, add 3 tablespoons sour cream, and stir until smooth. Use a fork to dip fruity treats, such as fresh strawberries, banana chunks, apple slices, orange slices, or fresh or canned pineapple into warm chocolate and eat it immediately, or dip and freeze for later. To freeze, place the fruit on wax paper on a cookie sheet and insert toothpicks for easy snacking. *If you want to avoid conventional food coloring, boil up a beet and add a few drops of the brightly-colored water to the food you want to color. Or try strawberry juice if your treat contains strawberries. Joanna Nesbit lives in Bellingham, Washington, where strawberries and raspberries grow in abundance. Learn more about her at www. joannanesbit.com. 

Heart-shaped Kids’ Pizza For a fun dinner idea, try red

and white pizza. Make or buy prepared pizza dough. Roll out the dough and cut it into kidsized heart shapes with a butter knife. Spread with pizza sauce, top with mozzarella cheese, and bake. Accompany the pizza with red and white veggie treats, such as slices of red pepper, tomatoes, and cauliflower pieces.

Heart-shaped Strawberry Shortcake Why wait until June or July for strawberry shortcake?

Mix up a batch of shortcake dough (takes very little sugar), pat out, and cut into heart shapes before baking. Layer strawberries and whipped cream between the heart-shaped shortcakes. A fun summer treat to brighten up winter.

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Better Tools for Living Everyone uses tools in their dayto-day lives. Sometimes it’s a kitchen utensil to help make homemade treats; other times it might be a carpenter’s level to ensure the correct position or a new laptop or cell phone to keep connected with family. Our “tools” help us accomplish daily tasks, so we can continue to live fulfilled and active lives. There’s another kind of “toolbox” that is available to older adults that may sometimes be misunderstood. When someone talks about “assisted living,” it may be perceived as a negative, rather than seeing the convenient services as “tools” to continue an active, vibrant life. The precious memories made in your home are wonderful, but moving to another residence means you will have the opportunity to make more great memories, just as valued. Often a discussion occurs about assisted living when family members become aware that a loved one needs some added help. The toolbox available at most assisted living residences can be a wonderful way for someone to stay independent while living life to the full. Many people appreciate the convenience of the services offered in most assisted living settings. No more worries about lawn care or blowing snow, washing windows or cleaning gutters. Plus there’s the opportunity to socialize with new people, get to more activities, and try new things. Other services include: • Hot, delicious meals you don’t have to prepare, and served family style with friends around the table. • A friendly person that not only takes time for a chat, but helps with the housekeeping every week. 8

February/March 2014

• Handy transportation to medical appointments, so even in winter, you don’t have to clear the snow off your driveway, scrape the windows, and warm up your car. • A friendly community that invites you to participate in activities, geared for your preferences and interests. • Assistance with sorting through confusing medications, ensuring that you’re getting the right medications prescribed by your physician at the right times. Lyle Erickson, Director at Pioneer House Assisted Living, notes that the conveniences of an assisted living facility can help enrich and enhance an older person’s lifestyle, supplying the helpful “tools” they need to continue enjoying life. “Sometimes

the children or a neighbor may be concerned about how well a senior is eating; maybe the individual is not taking their medications properly; or someone notices the individual is forgetting important things that they would usually remember,” he said. “And sometimes it is just being isolated—not having friends or family nearby—which can lead to loneliness and depression.” Exploring the handy tools and services of an assisted living facility can be a pleasant afternoon adventure, so take time to visit, to discuss and see if the convenient services are the best choice for a loved older adult. You might be surprised at how fun life can be when you have the right tools available.

Family Friendly Living

Assisted Living for Seniors a ministry of elim care

3540 University Dr S Fargo, ND 58104 701.271.1862 www.elimcare.org/pioneer

Assisted Living • RehAbiLitAtion • skiLLed nuRsing CARe • ChiLd CARe CenteR PH Ad.AW series.2012.indd 3

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YOUR FAMILY z gary’s opinion

Mentoring Works By Gary Wolsky, President/CEO The Village Family Service Center The Village’s Big Brothers Big Sisters program stretches back over 40 years and is a program of which I am immensely proud. A few months ago, I received a report on a Wolsky large scale evaluation assessing the impact of mentoring— which provides further evidence that Big Brothers Big Sisters is changing the lives of kids in our community. This study involved over 1,300 youth, many of whom had multiple risk factors for delinquency, school failure, teen pregnancy, and mental health problems—the same youth we work with every day in Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS). When comparing youth who had similar challenges, the study found that youth with mentors showed improved social competence, attitudes towards school, and grades. The strongest findings were related to decreases in symptoms of depression—an especially noteworthy outcome given that nearly one in four youth in the study reported high levels of depressive symptoms before being matched with mentors.  “Depression has been linked to a host of short- and long-term problems for young people, including suicidal behavior, academic and social difficulties, and increased risk for substance abuse and teen pregnancy,” the researchers reported.  These findings on the positive impact of mentoring are similar to those from a study The Village did years ago in partnership with Dr. Dan Klenow at NDSU. Klenow looked specifically at our program over many, many years, and found that the BBBS matches produced long-term, sustainable, positive impact for kids and oftentimes led to relationships that remained life-long. At The Village, we take outcome measurements very seriously and remain committed to matching kids with adults who can help them family

develop relationships and other life skills necessary to grow into healthy adults. While the idea of matching an adult with a child isn’t a complicated concept, the actual steps our staff takes to make safe and valuable matches is very involved and time-consuming. One of the most challenging aspects of the program is finding the volunteers. Right now we have 47 boys and seven girls on the waiting list for a Big Brother or Big Sister, and I ask that you volunteer as a mentor. Beyond making a difference in the life of one of these 54 kids, you will also benefit. Many mentors have said having a Little Brother or Little Sister was one of the most enjoyable and rewarding things they have ever done. I was a Big Brother in our schoolbased program a couple years ago,

and it was great fun to experience the world through my Little Brother’s eyes. We didn’t do much…ate lunch together, played cards, worked on his homework…but his teacher said he was always excited when it was Monday—because that was the day I visited him each week. His excitement had nothing to do with me—it was all about someone showing up to spend an hour just with him! Please call me at 701-451-4929 to learn more about how you, too, can show up for a child and experience this fabulous program. The opinions expressed in this column are strictly those of The Village Family Service Center CEO. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the organization, staff, or boards of directors.

newborns c hi l dren fami l i es s eni ors weddin gs

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YOUR FAMILY z m vies

Staff Pick: Jared

On

© Summit Entertainment / OddLot Entertainment

“Ender’s Game”

DVD

PG-13 On DVD February 11 A technologically superior alien race, known as Formics, has attacked Earth. To prevent further annihilation, the International Military responds by training children to defend the planet. Young Ender Wiggin, played by actor Asa Butterfield, displays tactical brilliance which gets him promoted to the elite Battle School. He easily masters complicated war games and sets himself apart from the average cadet. Ender emerges as a talented strategist and receives specialized training from International Fleet Commander Mazer Rackham, played by Ben Kingsley. Ender leads his fellow soldiers into an epic battle that will decide Earth’s future and the future of the human race. Based on the bestselling novel by Orson Scott Card, “Ender’s Game” also stars Harrison Ford, Abigail Breslin, Viola Davis, and Hailee Steinfeld.

“The Incredibles”

© Walt Disney Pictures /

Pixar Animation Studios PG Available on DVD Bob and Helen Parr, better known as Mr. Incredible and Elastigirl, are forced into hiding after they and their fellow superheroes are accused of causing too much damage while saving local citizens. Fifteen years and three children later, Bob and Helen are finally able to don their super suits once again as a new threat puts the city and the people they love in grave danger. Voice actors in this superhero adventure include Craig T. Nelson, Samuel L. Jackson, Jason Lee, and Holly Hunter.

New to

Theaters

“A Charlie Brown Valentine” TV-G On Netflix Instant Stream Celebrate Valentine’s Day with Charlie Brown and all the Peanuts gang! The little red-haired girl has Charlie Brown’s affection, as usual, and he struggles to get the courage to ask her to the school dance. Sally continues her pursuit of Linus, while Lucy chases Schroeder with demands for chocolates and kisses. Everyone’s favorite dog, Snoopy, tries his hand at poetry writing. Originally made for TV, “A Charlie Brown Valentine” is a sweet, short (25-minute) movie for the whole family.

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© Warner Bros. Pictures

© Charles M. Schulz Creative Associates

“The LEGO Movie” PG In Theaters February 7 Don’t miss this firstever, full-length, theatrical LEGO adventure brought to life through the voices of Chris Pratt, Will Ferrell, Elizabeth Banks, Liam Neeson, and Morgan Freeman. Designed in 3D computer animation (from the creators of “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs”), the story revolves around Emmet, a strictly by-the-book, seemingly ordinary LEGO minifigure who is about to learn he’s extraordinary! Emmet is recruited to join an expedition to squelch an evil dictator. The journey entertains with a colorful cast of characters each with their own reasons for joining the quest. It’s filled with lots of LEGO building action, too.

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YOUR FAMILY z

Baby & Preschool “Edgar Gets Ready for Bed” by Jennifer Adams Meet the plucky toddler, Edgar the Raven! He’s mischievous, disobedient, and contrary. Dinnertime, cleanuptime, and bedtime are all met with one word: NEVERMORE! But as the evening winds to a close, Edgar’s mom knows just what to do to get her son into bed—a bedtime story.

Ages 9 to 12 “Max Quick: The Pocket and The Pendant” by Mark Jeffrey  Max Quick is a pickpocket, a vagabond, an orphan, and a thief. Even so, nothing about him seems particularly special …until one day when time mysteriously stops. Suddenly, nearly everyone in the world is frozen in time—except for Max. Now he must journey across America to find the source of the Time-stop. Along the way, Max meets others who aren’t suspended in time. He and his companions encounter ancient mysteries, magic books, and clues to the riddle of stopped time. Racing against a clock that no longer ticks, Max must embrace his past to save his future—and the world— from being altered forever. Adults “Private L.A.” by James Patterson, Mark Sullivan Thom and Jennifer Harlow are the perfect couple with three perfect children. They may be two of the biggest mega movie stars in the world, but they’re also great parents, philanthropists, and just all-around good people. When they disappear from their ranch without a word, facts are hard to find. They live behind such a high wall of security and image control that even world-renowned Private Investigator Jack Morgan can’t get to the truth. But as Jack keeps probing, secrets sprout thick and fast—and the world’s golden couple may emerge as hiding behind a world of desperation and deception that the wildest reality show couldn’t begin to unveil. Murder is only the opening scene.

family

Book Reviews Courtesy Barnes & Noble, Fargo

Ages 4 to 8 “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame Kenneth Grahame’s exuberant yet whimsical “The Wind in the Willows” belongs to the golden age of children’s classic novels. These charming, exciting, and humorous tales of the riverbank and its life still continue to exert their charm over adults as well as children. The adventure unfolds with the wonderfully imagined Ratty, Mole, Badger, and the irrepressible but conceited Toad of Toad Hall, whose passion for motor cars (“The only way to travel! Here today—in next week tomorrow”) lands him in many scrapes. Illustrated by Don Daily and published by Applesauce Press. Teenagers “Tilt” by Ellen Hopkins     Three teens, three stories—all interconnected through their parents’ family relationships. As the adults pull away, caught up in their own dilemmas, the worlds of the teens begin to tilt. Mikayla, almost 18, is over-the-top in love with Dylan, who loves her back jealously. But what happens to that love when Mikayla gets pregnant and decides to keep the baby? Shane turns 16 and falls hard in love with his first boyfriend, Alex, who happens to be HIV positive. Harley is 14—a good girl searching for new experiences, especially love from an older boy. She never expects to hurdle toward self-destructive extremes in order to define who she is and who she wants to be. Love, in all its forms, has crucial consequences in this wrenching story from Ellen Hopkins.

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YOUR FAMILY z mom’s view

Confessions of a Quitter By Gwen Rockwood Over the years, my mother let me quit a few things. After several failed attempts at sewing lessons, she accepted that the one and only thing I ever produced was a bath towel wrap with a piece of Velcro sloppily stitched to it. And after a lot of whiny persuasion, she also let me quit playing girls’ softball—a decision which the team coach and the other players appreciated very much. But the one thing she’d never budge on was piano. Even though I drove her crazy with a bad rendition of “Send in the Clowns” which I played roughly 200 times a day, she was determined that I’d learn to play piano—no matter how much complaining I did or how much the lessons cost or how many times per month she had to drive me there. After realizing piano lessons were non-negotiable, I started to get better at it. By high school, I’d survived countless piano recitals and was able to play well enough to serve as the pianist for our little church. This achievement made Mom happy and—even though I never admitted it—I secretly liked it, too. To keep the cycle going, I signed up our three kids for piano lessons last summer. I found a teacher who makes piano-teaching house calls. Every Tuesday after school, she comes to our house and teaches the kids in halfhour increments, back to back, while I go upstairs and fold laundry to the sounds of my offspring tickling (and sometimes torturing) the ivories. I have a whole new respect for what my old piano teachers endured. Without the help of ear plugs or powerful nerve pills, piano teachers can listen to a kid play “Yankee Doodle Dandy” and hit the same wrong note in the same exact spot over and over and over again and yet still manage to hang onto their sanity. They must be the most patient people on the planet. Sometimes the kids ask me to help them with their piano homework, and I’m happy to help. But after a few minutes of watching them plink and plunk around all the wrong notes, part of me wants to yell, “It’s a C, for Pete’s sake! Can’t you see that the note is a C? Play the C already!” But that kind of exasperated impatience is not conducive to learning a new instrument, so I leave the instruction to the teacher and stick to the keys on my computer instead. As some sort of cosmic payback, one of the kids asked me recently if he has to keep taking piano lessons because he’s tired of all the practicing. And, just like my mother did, I said a firm, “Yes, you do. Now go practice.” Because the thing I learned from sticking with piano is that music is a gift. Once you know how to play it well, something magical happens in the midst of it. It’s as if God himself is making music through you, and you just happen to be there moving your fingers. The little hairs on the back of your neck stand up when the notes ring out just right, and it exhilarates 12

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Illustration by Trygve Olson

and calms you all at the same time. A few months ago, we went to a Christmas play with the kids and the song “We Three Kings” came on. As his eyes lit up, 8-year-old Jack turned to me and said, “I can play that song on the piano!” “Yes, you can,” I agreed. And the excitement and pride in his voice was the best kind of music to my ears. Gwen Rockwood is a syndicated freelance columnist. Her new book, “Reporting Live from the Laundry Pile,” is available on Amazon and at Nightbird Books. Email her at rockwoodfiles@cox.net or write to her in care of this magazine.

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YOUR FAMILY z dad’s view

Life Lessons at the Grocery Store By J. Shane Mercer

Taking kids down the cereal aisle at the grocery store is like being part of your own private Black Friday: the pushing, the crying, the fistfights. And there’s more marketing packed into that stretch of big box real estate than in all of Times Square. I’m not just talking about the cereal manufacturers; I’m talking about your kids’ aggressive sales pitches to try to land their favorite cereal in the shopping cart. Them: “This one has a toy inside!” Me: “We’re getting cereal, not toys.” Them: “Dad, these are sooooo good!” Me: “That’s because they’re little cookies.” Them: “This one says it’s made with whole grains.” Me: “Then coated in corn syrup and dipped in chocolate. That was a good try, though.” Despite the chaos, I enjoy cramming the kids into the minivan and heading to the grocery store. They’re a fun lot, and, besides, there are lessons to be learned by shopping with the tikes in tow. For example: Learning to take “No” for an answer.  Stores have basically one job: to get money out of your wallet and into their cash register. It’s not a bad thing, but my job is to keep as much of my money in my wallet as possible. Clearly, the children are on the store’s side of this battle. They want every brightly-colored, cellophane-wrapped hunk of plastic and every sugar-infused, cartoon-character-bearing snack in the place. So, by necessity, I have to teach my children how to deal with not getting what they want. If you roll past my kids and me at the grocery store, you will hear some version of the following: Child: “Can we buy (insert something unnecessary and made of plastic or sugar)?” Me: (Any of the following) “No,” “Not this time,” “Maybe next time,” “Let’s put that back,” “We don’t need that,” “That’s not good for us,” “It’s too expensive,” “Please put that back in that lady’s cart,” “That won’t fit in our van,“ “Nope,” etc. Parents, remember: It’s important to say “Yes” once in a while so when the kids say, “You never buy what we want,” you can say, “That’s not true. Remember that time five years ago when I bought those Lucky Charms?” The value of a dollar. Taking the kids to the grocery store is a fantastic opportunity to use all those grown-up idioms you know, but were always too hip to use before you had kids. Being cool is no longer a goal since you got the minivan, so fire away: “Money doesn’t grow on trees,” “When I was a kid,” “… the value of a dollar,” “Kids today (insert whatever principle your child isn’t taking seriously).” But, more importantly, grocery shopping is an opportunity to teach children about money. For example, you can explain that often the larger size is more expensive than the small size but usually costs less per ounce. There are lessons about using money to buy what’s needed before what’s wanted. You can also teach them how to analyze and respond to marketing. The conversation will go like this: Them: “Can we get the macaroni and cheese that’s shaped like Phineas and Ferb?” You: “It tastes the same as the regular stuff, right?” Them: “Yes.” family

Illustration by Trygve Olson

You: “But it costs more.” Them: “It does?” You: “Yes, and it’s a smaller box, so you get less.” Them: “OK … then we should get two boxes of Phineas and Ferb macaroni and cheese?” Nutrition knowledge. In the movie “Elf,” Buddy says, “Elves try to stick to the four main food groups: candy, candy canes, candy corns, and syrup.” This is the nutritional plan to which children ascribe. They like their carbohydrates and they like them simple. But a trip to the grocery store is the perfect time to help kids navigate nutritional pitfalls and direct them toward the better options. Who knows? If you’re doing that, it might even help you curb your own urge to fill the cart with Zagnut bars and Twinkies. Face time. Modern life seems so busy; it’s easy to miss each other in the rush of it all. But, at the grocery store, you can just walk and talk. It’s natural. There’s no agenda for the conversation, just face time for you and the kiddos. You may be surprised at what comes out of it. Once, I was at the store with my daughter, Talia, when she was younger. She was sitting in the seat of the shopping cart when, out of the blue, she thrust out her little arms, gave me a big hug and said, “I always wanted a daddy like you.” That memory was definitely the best thing I got at the store that day. J. Shane Mercer is the digital marketing specialist at The Village Family Service Center. He and his wife, Amy, live in Fargo with their three children, Ariana (9), Talia (9), and Will (5).

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YOUR FAMILY z online

Growing Up Online:

How Texting Can Strengthen Relationships

By Carolyn Jabs

B

y now, parents of kids with cell phones understand that texting has created new possibilities—and problems. Although research is sparse, a few preliminary studies suggest that, like other forms of communication, texting has the power to bring people closer. Depending on how it is used, it can also create and exacerbate conflict. In one recent, highly publicized study,

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researchers at Brigham Young University found that couples who argued with text messages felt less happy about their relationships, while couples who used text to coordinate plans and send thinking-of-you messages were convinced texting brought them closer together. Of course, the study wasn’t able to say whether texting was cause or effect. In villagefamilymag.org

all likelihood, the people who felt good about texting also had strong face-toface relationships. Perhaps the best way to think about texting is as a snack that tides you over until you can get real nourishment. Face-to-face conversation is a full-course meal in which you can communicate not only with words but also with tone of voice, eye contact, and facial expressions. family


Teens, in particular, may need help to understand this distinction. A young person who is willing to call fries and a sweet drink “lunch” may also be confused about the role texting plays in rewarding relationships. Here are some suggestions that will help both parents and kids get more satisfying results from the time they put into texting.    Choose your topic. Texting is ideal for rapid, simple communication and what used to be called “small talk.” Use it to coordinate plans or to let someone know you’ll be late. Share quick observations, inside jokes, and how’s-your-day updates. Texting is not well suited to complicated negotiations or anything emotional. If you need to ask for advice, work out a problem, or make an apology, pick up the phone or arrange to see each other.       Be concise and comprehensible. Part of the appeal of texting is that a message can be read in a moment. Keeping communication brief shows respect for the other person who is, after all, being interrupted by a buzzing phone. Acronyms can speed things along—if the other person doesn’t have to puzzle them out. Remind your child that code isn’t a form of communication unless both people know what it means. A quick proofread before pressing send is also a good habit if only because autocorrect is so often clueless about what you were trying to say. Be positive. Texting is most likely to build relationships when it’s used for funny, encouraging, or friendly messages. Like everyone else, kids will have thoughts that are mean, rude, or snarky. Encourage your child to think before putting those thoughts into a text. The best test: How would you feel if you received this message? If the text is going to a friend, how might it impact the friendship? If the person on the other end isn’t a friend, why are you even sending a text? With a little updating, Grandma’s rule still applies: “If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t text anything at all.” Don’t overreact. Because text messages are so short, they are easily misunderstood, so it’s especially important to give other people the benefit of the doubt. If a message seems unclear, unkind, or out of character, don’t shoot back an angry response. Instead, the best reply is probably WNTT—We Need to Talk. Be sensibly responsive. Because texting can be impulsive, it may lead to impatience or even aggression. Teens, in particular, often expect an instantaneous response, especially from a romantic partner. Parents may need to help their children think about the pace of texting so they can set appropriate boundaries. What is a reasonable response time for messages from parents, other family members, friends, or acquaintances? Answering every text instantly monopolizes your time; waiting too long makes it seem like you are ignoring the other person. Point out that friends are less likely to be upset if they know, in advance, that you’ll be off the grid for a family dinner, homework, or another obligation. You may also want to help your child disable the “message received” feature on the phone. If other people don’t know when a message is read, they may be less adamant about an instant response. Learn how to stop. Develop guidelines about when texting is appropriate. Many young couples send each other family

goodnight messages. Because there aren’t generally accepted guidelines about how to “hang up” on a text conversation, these exchanges can go back and forth long after parents assume their teen is asleep. Help your child set limits by, if necessary, putting the phone out of reach after bedtime.    Finally, be sure your child has plenty of opportunities to develop a full repertoire of communication skills including face-to-face conversation. One intriguing study by researchers at the University of Essex found that simply having a phone in the same room made conversations less meaningful, perhaps because participants were thinking about all the other people they could be texting instead of giving full attention to the person in front of them. The authors concluded that “interacting in a neutral environment, without a cell phone nearby, seems to help foster closeness, connectedness, interpersonal trust, and perceptions of empathy—the building blocks of relationships.” The goal for parents, of course, is to raise children who are aware of those building blocks and understand that texting is just one of many ways to construct durable relationships.   Carolyn Jabs, M.A., raised three computer-savvy kids including one with special needs. She has been writing Growing Up Online for 10 years and is working on a book about constructive responses to conflict. Visit www.growing-up-online. com to read other columns. 

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YOUR FAMILY z feature

YOGA

FOR KIDS There’s no (age) limit to this stressreducing, awareness-building practice.

By Amanda Peterson • Photography by Dennis Krull

ga is Jamie Anderson says yo e e. of any ag Sh beneficial for children ughter, Ruby, and her 9-month-old da together. po often do fun yoga ses

When Allison Svobodny of Moorhead became a mom four years ago, she knew she needed to make time for yoga. After nine years of weekly practice, she loved what yoga provided: exercise, emotional awareness, calming effects, and a sense of connection. She also knew it would benefit her young son. They began doing simple yoga poses together when he was a toddler. 16

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KIDS’ YOGA RESOURCES Apps The Adventures of Super Stretch C-Fit Yoga: Classroom Fitness Kids’ Yoga Journey: I Am Love Kids’ Yoga Journey: I Am Sun, I Am Moon YogaKids Books “The ABCs of Yoga for Kids” by Teresa Power (ages 8 and under) “My Daddy is a Pretzel” by Baron Baptiste (ages 8 and under) “Yoga for Children” by Lisa Flynn (ages 2-12) “Yoga for the Special Child” by Sonia Sumar

“Yoga Therapy for Every Special Child: Meeting Needs in a Natural Setting” by Nancy Williams

Cards “The ABCs of Yoga for Kids Learning Cards” by Teresa Anne Power and Kathleen Rietz (ages 8 and under) “The Kids’ Yoga Deck: 50 Poses and Games” by Annie Buckley (ages 5 and up) “Yoga Pretzels (Yoga Cards) Cards” by Tara Guber and Leah Kalish (ages 4 and up)

“I enjoy connecting with him,” she says. “Yoga is something I love and have found to be profoundly beneficial in my own life, so I enjoy sharing it with him.” Svobodny, a naturopathic doctor at Prairie Naturopathic in Moorhead, looks forward to also starting yoga with her 1-yearold daughter soon. “Yoga teaches mindfulness, acting with intention, and breath awareness—all things we want for our kids,” she says. “It’s also a way for kids to become aware of their bodies. This awareness has a profound impact on health later in life. If a child can feel what is happening in his or her body in a more subtle way, it will affect the choices they make in other areas of health.” Thankfully, yoga is easier than ever to start with your family. Several yoga studios in Fargo-Moorhead offer family and kids’ classes. Free books and DVDs are available at the libraries. More resources can easily be found online through Amazon and YouTube. And the best news? Kids can reap the benefits in just minutes a day.

DVDs “Gaiam: Yoga Journal’s Family Yoga” (may be best for older kids with some experience) “Gaiam Kids: Yoga Kids Fun Collection” (ages 3 to 6) “Storyland Yoga: Yoga for Kids and Families” (ages 3 to 8) “Teen Yoga: Featuring Allie LaForce” (teens) “Yoga For Families: Connect With Your Kids” (ages 4 and up) “Yoga Motion - Yoga DVD for Kids Ages 2.5+”

special needs or abilities,” says Alicia Waldoch of Fargo, who teaches yoga at NDSU, the YMCA, and the Boys and Girls Club of the Red River Valley. “I feel like children are being pulled in so many different directions and distracted by so many things that they need a productive way to find time each day to check in with themselves, and relax their minds and bodies.” In many ways, yoga for kids will look similar to yoga for adults. It can be done at home, at a yoga studio, or even outside. Materials needed include comfortable clothing, bare feet, a

What It Looks Like Dating back 5,000 years ago in India, yoga developed as a way to connect mind and body through exercise, breathing, and meditation. It has since grown into hundreds of teachings across the world. The most common school of yoga, hatha yoga, combines physical movements (yoga poses) with breathing. At its simplest, a person forms his or her body into a particular pose, such as “mountain” or “tree,” and concentrates on breathing evenly and deeply while focusing on the body. The first step when considering yoga for your kids is to rid yourself of any stereotypes you might have about this ancient practice. Yoga is not just for the young, slender, flexible woman. The goal is not to push yourself into extreme poses or become a certain body type. It’s about gently stretching and toning your muscles, and calming and nurturing your spirit. That leaves yoga wide open to people of all shapes, sizes, fitness levels, and ages—including kids. “Kids are very adept at learning yoga,” says Kristi Abbott, owner of BodySava in Moorhead. “It is something they can feel pride in.” Yoga can be practiced by any child, too. “Yoga can help all kids of all ages, including children suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder or those with family

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KIDS’ YOGA CLASSES Several yoga studios and organizations offer kids’ and family yoga classes. Contact them for class times, days, and cost. Boys and Girls Club of the Red River Valley 2500 18th St. S., Fargo 701-235-2147 www.bgcrrv.org Jamie’s Little Yogis Workshops at Two Turtles Yoga Studio 824 Main Ave., Moorhead 701-478-2898 (Two Turtles Studio) 701-306-1613 (Jamie Anderson) www.twoturtlesacupuncture.com

Brenda Weiler encourages her 20-month-old daughter, Ruby Ann, to copy her breathing and poses. They do yoga together at home and at the studio. cushioned non-slip yoga mat, and sometimes a yoga foam block (for proper positioning). A session typically begins with a focus on breath and calming. Then it moves through several poses and finishes with more time for relaxing and breathing. Yoga instructors also understand the particular characteristics of children—a desire to be fun and a little silly, shorter attention spans, growing bodies, and less personal awareness. Instead of doing yoga poses for a solid hour, a kids’ class might spend some time doing a couple of yoga-related games, reading a short story, practicing a few poses, and working out some energy. “Letting children animate their poses is really fun, like having a friend act like a lumberjack to cut down a tree—so the child in the ‘tree’ pose can timber down to the ground,” says Andrea Paradis, yoga instructor at Elements, Fargo. “While in ‘downward facing dog,’ children can walk around making barking noises.” Encouraging children to use their imagination also makes it easier to teach poses and deep breathing, Paradis adds. “While in ‘savasana,’ a pose lying on the floor, children can close their eyes and pretend they are sleeping,” she says. 18

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“If they start to get the wiggles, a yoga teacher can say something like, ‘Your parents are coming into your room! Can you make them think you are completely asleep?’ They still their bodies and find a natural relaxation.” Being gentle, encouraging, and patient is also helpful. Brenda Weiler, owner of Ecce Yoga in Fargo, and her husband, Derek Harnish, both do yoga with their 20-month-old daughter. Harnish encourages their little one to copy his yoga poses and breathing. He also knows when to take a break. “If she stops being interested, we move onto doing something else, usually dancing to some music,” Harnish says.

The Benefits The benefits of yoga are numerous: improved balance, posture, flexibility, concentration, relaxation, self-control, and the ability to be present in the moment. Kids become more aware of their own bodies—their breathing, movement, limitations, and strengths. “Yoga is so beneficial for a child’s mind, body, and soul,” says Jamie Anderson, owner of Jamie’s Little Yogis, which offers kids’ yoga workshops at Two Turtles Yoga Studio in Moorhead. villagefamilymag.org

Mojo Fit Studios 2119 13th Ave. S., Suite 10, Fargo 701-526-0908 www.mojofitstudios.com YMCA of Class Clay 400 1st Ave. S., Fargo 701-293-9622 www.ymcacassclay.org Vayu Yoga 4207 12th Ave. N.W., Fargo 701-566-0035 www.vayu-yoga.com “Yoga helps you think about what you are doing and what is happening right now. It’s about being mindful of the present and experiencing yourself fully.” Anderson, also the school counselor at the Osgood Kindergarten Center in West Fargo, uses yoga daily in her job, helping students calm their bodies and minds. “I’m teaching kids important life skills,” she says, “like being able to be a good listener, sit quietly, and be a good friend.” Emphasis on breath and movement encourages kids to focus on the present. “The breathing alone is stress reducing, providing a calming effect,” Waldoch says. “When the breath is paired with movement, kids begin to feel rejuvenated, calm, and peaceful. Even just a few minutes of yoga a day can provide children with a new outlook.” Yoga also encourages creativity through movement. “Oftentimes our kids’ yoga classes can go in a different direction because family


Jen DeMaio loves what yoga teaches her sons, Cole Spader, 6, and Gabe Spader, 10—relaxation, flexibility, and strength. the kids start making up their own names for poses and teaching them to us,” says Kristen Burbank, owner of Mojo Fit Studios in Fargo. “We like to embrace that creativity and imagination.” Trying new poses and having a little fun are two of the reasons Gabe Spader, 10, and Cole Spader, 6, like yoga. The boys’ parents own Two Turtles Acupuncture and Two Turtles Yoga Studio, so they’ve done plenty of yoga at home and at the studio. Gabe says two years of yoga practice have made him more flexible and he enjoys it. “It’s really fun and it helps you,” he says. “It can also be relaxing.” His little brother agrees, saying that he feels good after a yoga session. “It helps you be flexible and it’s good for your body,” Cole says. “And you can be strong.”

They began using a yoga DVD and book at home, eventually introducing it to all of Kittelson’s home daycare children, who now do yoga weekly. “When the children need a break and to relax, we do the ‘do nothing’ pose where we rest on our backs, focus on our breathing, and listen to the sounds around us,” she says. “This is a great one to do outside on a summer day.” If, like Kittelson, you are ready to try yoga at home, begin with simple poses children can mimic. “We usually start with ‘mountain’ pose or ‘dog’ pose,” says Burbank, referring to the standing and all-fours poses. “Most kids have some familiarity with one of those two poses. My 1-year-old will frequently show off her ‘dog’ pose, so it really is accessible to most ages.” Keep breathing exercises simple by having children copy those as well. “Many kids aren’t able to focus for very long periods of time, so to begin with, just have them breathe in and out, copying you,” Weiler says. Yoga sessions should be short, upbeat, and encouraging. Ten or 15 minutes is plenty. Play soothing music in the background or use a kids’ yoga video. Yoga cards can also help both you and your children remember poses. Mostly, enjoy the time together, knowing how much your kids are benefitting—physically and emotionally. Amanda Peterson is an award-winning writer with a love for the Web, social media, and magazines. She lives in Moorhead with her husband and two children, and enjoys a good “warrior II” pose now and then.

Getting Started If you are new to yoga, try signing up your kids—or family— for a local yoga class. You’ll learn about the practice from an experienced teacher who can walk you through the steps. Kid-friendly classes are usually 30 to 60 minutes and offered weekly. Good classes will keep kids engaged and teach them yoga elements. “An hour-long session usually flies by,” says Steph Asheim, yoga instructor at Vayu Yoga in Fargo. “But if I can see the children’s energy is a bit low, I will often read a book with an underlying yogic theme such as gratitude, kindness, peace, or acceptance. Or, I may give them an extra-long savasana.” Very young children can attend class with you, while older ones might be ready to try a class on their own. Any age is appropriate, as long as the child is interested. Katy Christianson, yoga instructor at the YMCA and the Plains Art Museum in Fargo, has taught children age 2 through high school. “Each week [at the YMCA family yoga class] was different due to the range of ages,” Christianson says. “As an instructor, my intention was for parents and children to have fun interacting while moving their bodies and being aware of their breath.” When Nicole Kittelson of Dilworth first brought her young daughter to a YMCA family yoga class, they were both hooked. family

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YOUR FAMILY z wellness

Protect Your Peepers

Eye Problems in Aging Adults

By Patricia Carlson

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We know what we’re supposed to do. Have a yearly physical. Visit the dentist every six months. After a certain age, get an annual or bi-annual mammogram or a prostate exam. For a variety of reasons, though, some of us have a hard time sticking to that schedule. We’re even worse when it comes to taking care of our eyes and vision. (We’ll save ears and hearing for another article, but sometimes we’re pretty bad at that, too.) However, your eye health is serious stuff and should be given the same care as the rest of your body.

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“As we mature, more people have the diagnosis of diabetes or high blood pressure and people can have eye problems related to those conditions, too,” states Dr. Jed Hillmer, an optometrist who owns Hillmer Eye Clinic near downtown Fargo. “I would say that most people don’t know that, though.” Age-related eye issues will become an increasing burden on our health care system as our current crop of baby boomers continues to get older. By the year 2030, approximately 70 million Americans will be over 65 years old. A

family


report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shows that roughly one in three elderly patients has some form of vision-reducing eye disease by the age of 65.

When Should You Start?

The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends adults with no signs or risk factors for eye disease should get a baseline screening at age 40, the time when early signs of disease and changes in vision may start to occur. Your screening will determine if you need any follow-up appointments. An eye exam helps detect eye problems at their earliest, and most treatable, stage. Dr. Steve Bagan, who has had an eye surgical practice in Fargo since 1980 (he currently owns and practices at Bagan Strinden Vision), advises that every adult should have an eye exam every two years, whether or not they wear glasses or contacts. “Some eye problems or diseases can’t be detected by the patient until they are advanced or beyond treatment that can restore vision,” explains Bagan. “For example, if vision has deteriorated from glaucoma to the point that the patient can

from our experts, for your health

notice it, it is quite advanced. If detected earlier, this loss could be prevented.”

What Can You Expect?

Be prepared to discuss your eye health history at your first appointment. Your clinician will want to know if you’ve ever had an eye exam before and why you’re visiting them now. Is this a routine checkup due to age or do you have a primary concern about your eyesight or eye health? You’ll undergo routine tests which are designed to measure your visual acuity. “The way I explain visual acuity is to think of it as your quantity of vision,” says Hillmer. “When you hear things like ‘20/20,’ that’s your acuity, the clearness and sharpness when you see.” You know those eye charts you’ve seen on TV or at your driver’s test? You’ll read from something similar on the wall and from a hand-held sheet both with and without your glasses or contact lenses. The American Academy of Ophthalmology describes the next portion of your exam as “objective.” This means that your clinician is not looking for your response, but rather they’re

examining the form and function of your eye. They’ll check out things like the retina, pupils, eye muscle movements, eye turns, and motility. Next, your doctor will have you sit in front of a specialized tool called a biomicroscope to determine the health of your eye. The biomicroscope has lenses and very bright lights the doctor looks through to see the front, middle, and back of your eye. Sometimes your doctor will dilate (enlarge) your pupil with eye drops to get a better view. All of these tests allow your doctor to make a diagnosis (if needed) or at least give them a baseline from which to measure your eye health during routine appointments. If your doctor does find something disturbing (see “What Are Common Ailments?”), he or she will likely discuss a course of treatment with you.

Who Should You See?

Just like medical practitioners, eye doctors have different levels of education and expertise. Your sight depends on who you see, so you need to make sure you’re visiting the right type of eye professional.

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Here is a breakdown provided by the American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (misaligned eyes): An Optician is a technician with whom you’ll work after getting a diagnosis or prescription from your doctor. They’ll help you pick out the right glasses and frames and ensure that the fit is ideal for your face. They’ll also help you learn the basics of contact lens use. They do not test your vision and they’re not permitted to diagnose and treat. An Optometrist is not a medical doctor, but they do hold a four-year doctor of optometry degree (O.D.), along with the requisite bachelor’s degree. They are licensed to perform eye exams and vision tests, prescribe lenses and medications, and detect some eye abnormalities. An Ophthalmologist (commonly called an eye doctor or Eye M.D.) has a higher level of training and education compared to an optometrist and optician. Ophthalmologists are licensed to not only practice medicine and surgery, but also diagnose and treat all eye disease issues and prescribe

medications. Some ophthalmologists also specialize in surgical eye care or a specific eye area or condition like glaucoma, retina, cornea, pediatrics, neurology, and plastic surgery. Depending on your needs, you might see one or all of these eye professionals during your life. Bagan says many optometrists and ophthalmologists work well together in formulating a patient’s treatment plan. “While Eye M.D.s can do eye exams and prescribe eyeglasses and contacts, most concentrate on treating eye disease and doing surgery such as cataract surgery, Lasik surgery, and many other kinds of treatments and surgery,” Bagan explains. “Ideally, the two types of eye doctors work in harmony, with the optometrist sometimes referring the patient to the ophthalmologist for consultation and/or surgery of diseases, and the ophthalmologist relying on the O.D. for their expertise in their specialty area.”

What Are Some Warning Signs?

When it comes to our health, it’s easy to ignore symptoms that something is wrong. We may not want to face the truth. We may not think we can afford treatment. Or, we may think the problem will correct itself. That’s a huge risk when it comes to our eyes. The American Academy of Ophthalmology warns you need to get your eyes checked if you have diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, thyroid disease, or you experience any of these symptoms: • Bulging of one or both eyes • Dark curtain or veil that blocks your vision • Distorted or double vision • Excess tearing • Eyelid abnormalities • Halos • Loss of peripheral vision • Misaligned eyes • New floaters (black “strings” or specks in the vision) and/ or flashes of light • Unusual red eye Because of our brutally cold climate, Dr. Casey Bartz, an optometrist with Moorhead Vision Associates who specializes in macular degenerations and the diagnosis and management of dry eye syndromes, says many people in the Red River Valley are particularly susceptible to eye issues in the winter. “The eye is covered by the tear layer and when a cold blast of air hits it, the tear layer is disrupted,” explains Bartz. “You feel burning eyes, watery eyes. In general, many people struggle with uncomfortable eyes and, especially, discomfort with contact lenses because of the cool air.” Tell your doctor if your family has a history of eye disease; it could make you more prone to certain conditions, too.

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What Are Common Ailments?

As you age, it’s normal to not see as well. Your eyes are getting older just like the rest of your body. Bartz says you might notice it first around age 40 when you pick up a book and feel your arms aren’t long enough. Or if the numbers on your cell phone get a bit fuzzy. Most times, this initial loss can be corrected with over-the-counter reading glasses (called “cheaters” among eye professional circles), but there are several eye diseases that can have long-term and profound effects if left untreated as we age. Glaucoma—This is actually a group of diseases marked by high pressure inside the eye that can damage the nerve fibers that send information to your brain. As the main nerve, called the optic nerve, deteriorates, blind spots form in your visual field. Left untreated, glaucoma can lead to irreversible blindness. Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is the most common type of glaucoma disease. In 2000, it was estimated that 2.22 million Americans had POAG, a number that will increase to 3.36 million by 2020, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Cataracts—These are cloudy areas that cover part or the entire lens of your eye. Imagine a healthy lens is clear like a camera lens. If a cataract is present, light can’t filter through the lens and your eye can’t process the image. They often form slowly and don’t cause pain. Cataracts can usually be removed by outpatient surgery, explains Hillmer. “They used to have to do cataract surgery in the hospital and it was really invasive compared to what it is now,” he says. “Overall, it’s a safer procedure.” Age-Related Macular Degeneration—This disease causes a blind spot to form in the center of your vision. What’s happening behind the scenes is the center part of your retina is deteriorating. You might also experience distorted printed words or a gradual haziness of your overall vision, according to the Mayo Clinic. Eye Floaters—The Cole Eye Institute at the Cleveland Clinic describes floaters as tiny spots or specks that float across the field of vision. They can look like black or gray specks. Some complicated cases can look like cobwebs. Most floaters are harmless and don’t require family

treatment. If you experience flashes of light with your floaters, head to the doctor right away: You could have a retinal tear or detachment.

Don’t Delay

Damaging or losing your vision could have a tremendous impact on your quality of life. Many eye problems are treatable and the earlier they are detected, the more likely you are to retain good eyesight. In certain cases,

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early treatment, medications, or surgery can prevent vision reduction and vision loss—giving you good reason to schedule that eye exam now. Protect those peepers. They’re the only two you’ve got. Patricia Carlson is a freelance writer from Dilworth whose work regularly appears in publications across the country. She also crafts strategic website and marketing content for small businesses. Check out her work at www. patriciacarlsonfreelance.com.

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Calendar of Events

To include your event in our family-friendly calendar, email shendricksen@TheVillageFamily.org. Deadline for the April/May calendar is February 26, 2014. Although we strive to be as accurate as possible, please call ahead to verify information, registration requirements, or event fees. Due to limited space, we are unable to include all submissions.

FEBRUARY 2014 EVENTS 2.1 Saturday • Bowl For Kids’ Sake 2014 Registration Opens. Grab your friends and create a bowling team to raise funds for Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Village Family Service Center. Bowling dates are Feb. 28, 3:30 p.m.; Mar. 7 & 14, 3:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m.; West Acres Bowl, 3402 Interstate Blvd. S., Fargo, 701-451-4875 or www.bbbsfargo.org (click on Bowl for Kids’ Sake logo) • Cross Country Ski Race. 9-11:30 a.m., Edgewood Chalet, 19 Golf Course Ave. N., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www. fargoparks.com • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902

• Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com • 4 Luv of Dog Rescue’s Meet the Dogs. Visit dogs available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, www.4luvofdog.org • Family Winter-ific Day. 1-4 p.m., Edgewood Chalet, 19 Golf Course Ave. N., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www. fargoparks.com • Moorhead Parks & Recreation Polar Party. Bonfire, sleigh rides, outdoor games, ice skating. 1-4 p.m., Northeast Park, 1817 8th Ave. N., Moorhead, 218299-5340 • Kid Quest: Clay for a Cause. Register at 701-551-6100 or www.plainsart.org. 1-4 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo (See ad pg. 26)

• Monster Jam. 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www. fargodome.com • Midwinter Piano Festival. 2 p.m., Christiansen Recital Hall, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4414 • Saturday Fun Night. Grades K-6. Register at 701-293-9622 or www. ymcacassclay.org/funnights. 4:30-9:30 p.m., Schlossman YMCA, 4243 19th Ave. S., Fargo • American Heart Association Red River Valley Heart Ball. Silent auction, dinner, and dancing to raise funds for cardiovascular research and education. 5 p.m.-midnight, Holiday Inn, 3803 13th Ave. S., Fargo, 800-437-9710 or www. redrivervalleyheartball.org

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February/March 2014

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• Frozen Fantasy. 7-9:30 p.m., Doublewood Inn, 3333 13th Ave. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www. fargoparks.com • Fargo Force vs. Sioux Falls Stampede. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com • The Concordia Orchestra Spotlight Concert. 7:30 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 2.2 Sunday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Me & My Shadow! Groundhog Day celebration. 1-5 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-6102 or www. childrensmuseum-yunker.org 2.5 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com 2.7 Friday • American Heart Association National Wear Red Day. www.goredforwomen. org/wearredday

•G  iving Hearts Day Open Gym. Ages 5-14. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.org •J  ustin Timberlake Concert. 8 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www. fargodome.com 2.8 Saturday •K  ids Dream Winter Film Series. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • “Love Monsters” Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com •A  wesome Art Afternoon. 1-3 p.m., RDJ Rec Center, 1104 2nd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www. fargoparks.com •A  dopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. 1-3 p.m., Petco, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, www. adoptapetfm.org •N  ational Girl Scout Cookie Weekend & Cookie Olympics. Girl Scouts compete in a Girl Scout Cookie culinary challenge, community members participate in Cookie Olympic activities. 1-4 p.m., West Acres Mall, 3902 13th Ave. S., Fargo, 701-293-7915

• Saturday Fun Night. Grades K-6. Register at 701-293-9622 or www. ymcacassclay.org/funnights. 4:30-9:30 p.m., Fercho YMCA, 400 1st Ave. S., Fargo • Teen Pool Party. 6:30-9 p.m., Fargo South Indoor Pool, 1840 15th Ave. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www. fargoparks.com • FM Derby Girls Bout. Pretty in Pink: 80s-themed bout with a portion of proceeds going to MSUM’s Go Pink with the Dragons campaign for breast cancer awareness and screening. 7 p.m., Fargo Civic Center, 207 4th St. N., Fargo, www.fmderbygirls.com • The Fargo-Moorhead Chamber Chorale’s “A Singing Valentine.” Libations, dinner, auction items, and a concert of love songs from the stage and screen. Dinner at 7 p.m., concert at 8 p.m., Ramada Plaza & Suites, 1635 42nd St. S., Fargo, www. fmchamberchorale.org 2.9 Sunday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902

ace

Explore your charitable giving options confidentially. d give back with the click of a mouse. TheVillageFamily.org/GiftPlanning

www.TheVillageFamily.org family

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2.9 Sunday continued • Destination Anchor Island. 1-5 p.m., Fargo South Indoor Pool, 1840 15th Ave. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com • Little Caesars Skills Challenge. 2:30 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com • The Concordia Band Home Concert. 4 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 2.11 Tuesday • Davies High Theatre Entertainment. Musical selections, “Mam, There’s a Spaceship in Our Backyard.” 7:30 p.m., Davies High School, 7150 25th St. S., Fargo, 701-446-5768 • “The Long Christmas Ride Home.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-2993314 2.12 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com • “The Long Christmas Ride Home.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-2993314 2.13 Thursday • Giving Hearts Day. Support Nokomis Child Care Centers by visiting www.impactgiveback.org and making a donation. Dakota Medical Foundation will match all online gifts of $10 or more up to $4,000 to each charity. (See ad pg. 2) • “The Long Christmas Ride Home.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-2993314

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2.14 Friday • PetSmart Charities National Adoption Weekend. PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-281-8531 • “Sweet Charity.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-499-1971 or www.westfargotheatre.com • “The Long Christmas Ride Home.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-2993314 2.15 Saturday • PetSmart Charities National Adoption Weekend. PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-281-8531 • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701461-8902 • Hearts & Smiles. Join the Tooth Fairy for fun with toothbrushes and valentines. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-6102 or www. childrensmuseum-yunker.org • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com • Moorhead Parks & Recreation Polar Party. Bonfire, sleigh rides, outdoor games, ice skating. 1-4 p.m., Lamb Park, 1325 14th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-299-5340 • 17th Annual Celebration of Women & Their Music. 6 p.m., Fargo Theatre, 314 Broadway, Fargo, www.debjenkins.com/ celebrationofwomen.html • Fargo Force vs. Lincoln Stars. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com

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• “Sweet Charity.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-499-1971 or www. westfargotheatre.com • “The Long Christmas Ride Home.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3314 2.16 Sunday • PetSmart Charities National Adoption Weekend. PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-281-8531 • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • “The Long Christmas Ride Home.” 2 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3314 • “Sweet Charity.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 2:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-499-1971 or www. westfargotheatre.com • Fargo Force vs. Lincoln Stars. Family Fun Day: Bring your skates to skate with Force players following the game. Dollar hot dogs and pop, special appearance by Spiderman. 3:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com • TobyMac Concert. 7 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-2419100 or www.fargodome.com 2.17 Monday • School’s Out Day Camp. Call for details and registration. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www. tntkidsfitness.org • Student Loans presented by The Village Family Service Center. Register at http://FRCstudentloans. eventbrite.com. 6-7 p.m., Dakota Medical Foundation, 4141 28th Ave. S., Fargo 2.18 Tuesday • School’s Out Day Camp. Call for details and registration. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www. tntkidsfitness.org • Symphonic Band Composers Concert. 7:30 p.m., Centrum, Knutson Campus Center, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 2.19 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com

family

Fargo Force Hockey (Photo Credit: mjoy Photography)

• “Almost, Maine.” Presented by MSUM’s University Theatre Series. 7:30 p.m., Gaede Stage, Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-4772271 or www.mnstate.edu/theatre

• “Almost, Maine.” Presented by MSUM’s University Theatre Series. 7:30 p.m., Gaede Stage, Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-4772271 or www.mnstate.edu/theatre

2.20 Thursday • Little Lights Preschool Open House. 5:30-7 p.m., Triumph Lutheran Brethren Church, 2901 20th St. S., Moorhead, 218-233-4048 or www. littlelightspreschool.com (See ad pg. 32)

2.21 Friday • FM Kennel Club Dog Agility Trials. 10 a.m., Expo Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-232-7693

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• “Almost, Maine.” Presented by MSUM’s University Theatre Series. 7:30 p.m., Gaede Stage, Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2271 or www.mnstate.edu/ theatre • “Sweet Charity.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-499-1971 or www.westfargotheatre.com

2.1 Bowl For Kids’ Sake 2014 Registration Opens

2.21 Friday continued • Red River Valley Home & Garden Show. 3-9 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Unglued Craft Fest. Handmade items by artists and crafters, workshops for kids and adults. 5-9 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-551-6100 or www.ungluedmarket. com • NDSU Football Open Gym. Ages 5-14. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www. tntkidsfitness.org • Fargo Force vs. Waterloo Black Hawks. Youth Hockey Night: Discounted tickets for all youth hockey players. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com

2.22 Saturday • YMCA Youth Olympics. Ages 3-15. Register at www. ymcacassclay.org/olympics (See ad pg. 31) • FM Kennel Club Dog Agility Trials. 9 a.m., Expo Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-2327693 • Sugar Valley Toy Show. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Hartl Ag Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-799-4420 or 701-282-6410 • Red River Valley Home & Garden Show. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Unglued Craft Fest. Handmade items by artists and crafters, workshops for kids and adults. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-551-6100 or www. ungluedmarket.com • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com • Adopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. 1-3 p.m., Petco, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, www.adoptapetfm.org • “Almost, Maine.” Presented by MSUM’s University Theatre Series. 7:30 p.m., Gaede Stage, Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2271 or www.mnstate.edu/ theatre • “Sweet Charity.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-499-1971 or www.westfargotheatre.com 2.23 Sunday • FM Kennel Club Dog Agility Trials. 8 a.m., Expo Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-2327693 • Sugar Valley Toy Show. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Hartl Ag Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-799-4420 or 701-282-6410 • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Red River Valley Home & Garden Show. 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Family Day at the Dike. 1-4 p.m., Dike West, 310 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www.fargoparks.com • “Sweet Charity.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 2:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-499-1971 or www.westfargotheatre.com 2.25 Tuesday • Summer Program Information Open House. 5:30-6:30 p.m., Trollwood Performing Arts School, 801 50th Ave. S.W., Moorhead, 701-477-6500 or www.trollwood.org 2.26 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com

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• Fargo Force vs. Sioux City Musketeers. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com 2.27 Thursday • “Honk.” Presented by Horizon Middle School. 7 p.m., Moorhead High School Auditorium, 2300 4th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-284-2345 2.28 Friday • “Honk.” Presented by Horizon Middle School. 7 p.m., Moorhead High School Auditorium, 2300 4th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-284-2345 • Luke Bryan Concert. 7:30 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome. com

MARCH 2014 EVENTS 3.1 Saturday • 8th Annual Wine & Dine Reservations. Support Nokomis Child Care Centers and Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Village Family Service Center by attending Wine & Dine on Nov. 14, 2014, at the Fargo Holiday Inn. Call Jenny at 701-451-4957 for more information and to reserve your table now. • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701232-6102 or www.childrensmuseumyunker.org • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com • Awesome Art Afternoon. 1-3 p.m., RDJ Rec Center, 1104 2nd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com • Kid Quest: Great Art Free for All. Register at 701-551-6100 or www. plainsart.org. 1-4 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo (See ad pg. 26) • “Honk.” Presented by Horizon Middle School. 2 p.m., Moorhead High School Auditorium, 2300 4th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-284-2345 • Saturday Fun Night. Grades K-6. Register at 701-293-9622 or www. ymcacassclay.org/funnights. 4:30-9:30 p.m., Schlossman YMCA, 4243 19th Ave. S., Fargo

•K  ids Dream Winter Film Series. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 •R  ead Across America Celebration. Storytime featuring Dr. Seuss’s “Green Eggs & Ham.” 1 p.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com 3.5 Wednesday •C  hildren’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com 3.6 Thursday •L  ittle Black Dress for MS Luncheon. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 4351 17th Ave. S., Fargo, www. littleblackdressforms.org •R  ed River Valley Sportsmen’s Show. 5-9 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www. fargodome.com 3.7 Friday •R  ed River Valley Sportsmen’s Show. Noon-9 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com •O  pen Gym. Ages 5-14. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.org

3.8 Saturday • YMCA Camp & Program Fair. Preview summer camps and new youth program offerings. Visit www.ymcacassclay.org for details (See ad pg. 31) • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Celtic Festival. Entertainment, food, informational booths, vendors. 10 a.m.4 p.m., Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 701-499-7788 or www. fargoparks.com (See ad pg. 37) • Red River Valley Sportsmen’s Show. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com • 4 Luv of Dog Rescue’s Meet the Dogs. Visit dogs available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, www.4luvofdog.org • Adopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. 1-3 p.m., Petco, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, www. adoptapetfm.org • Fargo Ice Revue. 7 p.m., Coliseum, 801 17th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www.fargoparks.com

Indoor Birthday Party Place!

Includes: • Bounce N Slide • 16’ Slide • Western Shoot Out • Giant Birthday Chair • Big Screen TV 15 Children Allowed Adults Welcome

Games Galore Provides the Following: • Professional Attendent • Plates, Cups, Napkins, Utensils • Tables/Chairs • Fridge/Freezer • Pizza Ovens

3.2 Sunday • Annual North Dakota Picnic. Sponsored by Edgewood Senior Living, 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Pioneer Park, 526 East Main, Mesa, Ariz., 701-451-4957

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3.8 Saturday continued • FM Derby Girls Bout. Living Dead Derby: Zombies, vampires, and other creatures of the night are invited. 7 p.m., Fargo Civic Center, 207 4th St. N., Fargo, www.fmderbygirls.com • James Sewell Ballet: “The Inferno.” 7:30 p.m., Hansen Theatre, Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2271 or www.mnstate.edu/ perform 3.9 Sunday • Red River Valley Sportsmen’s Show. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Fargo Ice Revue. 2 p.m., Coliseum, 801 17th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www.fargoparks.com • Chamber Music Series: London Calling. 2 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 650 2nd Ave. N., Fargo, 701478-3676 or www.fmsymphony.org • The Concordia Choir Home Concert. 4 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515

3.10 Monday • Jazz Ensemble Concert. 8:30 p.m., Anderson Commons, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 3.12 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com 3.13 Thursday • MSUM Percussion Ensemble & Concert Choir. 7:30 p.m., Hansen Theatre, Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2271 • “The Diviners.” Presented by Davies High Theatre Dept. Call 701-446-5768 for tickets. 7:30 p.m., Davies High School, 7150 25th St. S., Fargo 3.14 Friday • Growing Communities FM Forum. Speaker Robin Garwood talks about local food efforts in the FM area. Contact Sara Van Offelen at 218-2348926 or vanof001@umn.edu for more information. 7 p.m., Dakota Medical Foundation, 4141 28th Ave. S., Fargo • Moorhead Ice Show. 7 p.m., Moorhead Sports Center, 324 24th St. S., Moorhead, 218-299-5340

• Fargo Force vs. Lincoln Stars. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www. fargoforce.com • “The Diviners.” Presented by Davies High Theatre Dept. Call 701-446-5768 for tickets. 7:30 p.m., Davies High School, 7150 25th St. S., Fargo 3.15 Saturday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com • Moorhead Ice Show. 7 p.m., Moorhead Sports Center, 324 24th St. S., Moorhead, 218-299-5340 • “The Diviners.” Presented by Davies High School Theatre Dept. Call 701446-5768 for tickets. 7:30 p.m., Davies High School, 7150 25th St. S., Fargo • Masterworks Concert IV: Wagner & Verdi. 7:30 p.m., Festival Concert Hall, NDSU, Fargo, 701-478-3676 or www. fmsymphony.org 3.16 Sunday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902

Kindergarten Registration for Fall 2014 February 24-28 7:30 am - 4:00 pm

Register at the school your child will attend. If you do not know which school your child will attend, please call 446-1043. Child must be age 5 by July 31, 2014.

Please be sure to bring: • Your child’s certified birth certificate. • Your child’s current immunization record. • To verify the correct neighborhood school, please bring a current utility bill with your name and current address on it.

701.446.1000

www.fargo.k12.nd.us

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• Moorhead Ice Show. 1 p.m., Moorhead Sports Center, 324 24th St. S., Moorhead, 218-299-5340 • School Spirit: Celebrating Youth Art Month Artists’ Reception. Refreshments, art projects, music by Fargo Moorhead Area Youth Symphonies. 1:30-4 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701551-6100 or www.plainsart.org • “The Diviners.” Presented by Davies High Theatre Dept. Call 701-446-5768 for tickets. 2 p.m., Davies High School, 7150 25th St. S., Fargo • Masterworks Concert IV: Wagner & Verdi. 2 p.m., Festival Concert Hall, NDSU, Fargo, 701-478-3676 or www. fmsymphony.org • Fargo Force vs. Sioux Falls Stampede. 3:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com • Chapel Choir Home Concert. 4 p.m., Centrum, Knutson Campus Center, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-2994515 3.19 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com

3.15 & 3.16 FM Symphony Masterworks Concert

• Investing Basics presented by The Village Family Service Center. Register at http://investingbasics. eventbrite.com. 6-7 p.m., Dakota Medical Foundation, 4141 28th Ave. S., Fargo

• Honey Happenings. A bevy of honey products and related activities. 6:308 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-551-6100 or www. plainsart.org

3.20 Thursday • School’s Out Day Camp. Call for details and registration. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.org

3.21 Friday • School’s Out Day Camp. Call for details and registration. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.org

NEW! at the YMCA

YOUTH OLYMPICS February 22nd

Join us for a day of fun competition! Sign up for as many activities as you like in multiple areas and categories! Ages 3-15 10:00 - 11:00am > Climbing 11:00am - 1:00pm > Gym 1:30 - 3:30pm > Pool All participants will receive medals!

Registration NOW OPEN! ymcacassclay.org/olympics family

ALL NEW & EXCITING YOUTH PROGRAMS • Tiny Tumblers • Little Leapers • Dance • Cheer

• Wacky Science • Fantastic Contraptions • Y Swim School • 7 Mindset Youth Empowerment

For more information on all the new programs visit us online, or contact Carrie at carrie.jaenicke@ymcacassclay.org or 701.364.4116

Spring Session Starts

March 17th!

Registration Open for Community

March 3rd

................................ . . . . .

CAMP & PROGRAM FAIR March 8th

Fercho YMCA | All Ages

Come and check out all the great day and overnight camps the YMCA of Cass and Clay has to offer this summer! Meet the counselors, try camp activities, ask questions, receive EARLY BIRD DISCOUNTS and more! Also come preview all the new youth programs we will be offering this Spring and Summer!

Details at ymcacassclay.org villagefamilymag.org

No Registration Required

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3.21 Friday continued •F  M Kennel Club Dog Agility Trials. 10 a.m., Expo Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-2327693 3.22 Saturday •C  entral ND Rabbit Breeders Spring Show. Hartl Ag Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-7286162 •F  M Kennel Club Dog Agility Trials. 8 a.m., Expo Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-232-7693 • Teddy Bear Tea Party. Pre-registration required. 10-11 a.m., Rheault Farm, 2902 25th St. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www. fargoparks.com •B  ouncin’ Bash & More. Inflatable family fun; children 12 and under must attend with an adult. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Veterans Memorial Arena, 1201 7th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-433-5360 or www.wfparks.org •C  hildren’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com •4  Luv of Dog Rescue’s Meet the Dogs. Visit dogs available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, www.4luvofdog.org •A  dopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. 1-3 p.m., Petco, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, www.adoptapetfm.org •F  M Derby Girls Bout. Wild About Derby: Animal ambassadors from Red River Zoo and activities for kids. 7 p.m., Fargo Civic Center, 207 4th St. N., Fargo, www.fmderbygirls.com •S  tudent Showcase Concert. 7:30 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515

3.23 Sunday • FM Kennel Club Dog Agility Trials. 8 a.m., Expo Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1805 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-232-7693 • Bouncin’ Bash & More. Inflatable family fun; children 12 and under must attend with an adult. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Veterans Memorial Arena, 1201 7th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-433-5360 or www.wfparks.org • Cosmic Bowling. Pre-registration required. 1-3 p.m., West Acres Bowl, 3402 Interstate Blvd. S.W., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www.fargoparks.com • Three Choirs Concert. 4 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 3.24 Monday • School’s Out Day Camp. Call for details and registration. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.org 3.25 Tuesday • American Diabetes Association Alert Day. Take the Diabetes Risk Test at www.diabetes.org/risktest and find out if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. 3.26 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com 3.27 Thursday • Summer Program Information Open House. 5:30-6:30 p.m., Trollwood Performing Arts School, 801 50th Ave. S.W., Moorhead, 701-477-6500 or www.trollwood.org • Xtreme Bulls. 7:30 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com (See ad pg. 22)

Celebrating 20 Years!

Christian Preschool

t r u r P o a g n Doi

Clay County in WWII Feb. 11, 2014 - Dec. 31, 2015

Offering an active, hands-on educational experience within a Christ-centered environment

Students Age 3 — Pre-Kindergarten OPEN HOUSE February 20th ∙ 5:30—7:00 p.m.

Triumph Lutheran Brethren Church 2901 20th Street South Moorhead ∙ MN ∙ 56560

218∙233∙4048 www.littlelightspreschool.com little.lights@triumphlbc.org

Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave., Moorhead www.hcscconline.org 218-299-5511 32

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3.28 Friday • Open Gym. Ages 5-14. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kid’s Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.org • Fargo Force vs. Tri-City Storm. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com • “Buried Alive & Embedded.” FM Opera’s world premiere based on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. 7:30 p.m., Reineke Festival Concert Hall, NDSU, Fargo, 701-329-4558 or www.fmopera.org (See ad pg. 34) • PRCA Championship Rodeo. 7:30 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com (See ad pg. 22) 3.29 Saturday • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com • Fargo Force vs. Tri-City Storm. Family Fun Night: Dollar hot dogs and pop. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-356-7656 or www.fargoforce.com • Performing Arts Series: Contempo Physical Dance. 7:30 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3466 • PRCA Championship Rodeo. 7:30 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com (See ad pg. 22) 3.30 Sunday • “Buried Alive & Embedded.” FM Opera’s world premiere based on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. 2:30 p.m., Reineke Festival Concert Hall, NDSU, Fargo, 701-329-4558 or www.fmopera.org (See ad pg. 34)

Inspiring dreams

PUBLIC LIBRARIES

Call or visit the library for more information. Pre-registration may be required. Fargo Public Main Library (See ad pg. 28)

102 3rd St. N., Fargo, 701-241-1472 or www.fargolibrary.org • Winter Read-A-Thon. All ages invited to participate. Ends Feb. 28 • Weekly Spring Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Pre-registration required • Chess Club. Open to players of all ages and abilities. Thursdays, 5:30-8:30 p.m. • Superhero Storytime & Craft. Preschool-7 yrs. Pre-registration required. Feb. 1, 2 p.m. • Valentine Hugs Craft. Preschool-7 yrs. Feb. 4, 4 p.m. • Baby Rhyme Time. Lapsit storytime for babies (birth-18 mos). Feb. 6 & 20, Mar. 6 & 20, 6:30 p.m. • Muslim Journeys – Points of View. Feb. 6 & 20, Mar. 6 & 20, 6:30 p.m. • Paws for Reading. Pre-registration required. Feb. 8 & Mar. 8, 1 p.m. • Olympic Movie Series. Feb. 9, 16 & 23, 2 p.m. • Blue Plate Special. Storytime for adults; bring a bag lunch. Feb. 12 & Mar. 12, 12:15-12:45 p.m.

Valentine’s Day

&

achievement

Sweetheart Dinner for Two February 14, 2014 • 5-11 pm

In Minnesota, all children are required to attend a free screening before they enter kindergarten.

Select a Dinner to Share

Early Childhood Screening is a quick and simple check of how your child is growing and developing. If your child is 3 years old or older call 218-284-3800 for an appointment.

Moorhead Area Public School’s Early Learning Center 218-284-3800 family

3.31 Monday • Women of the Year. YWCA Cass Clay will honor outstanding women whose lives, talents, and passions shape the community. Proceeds support the YWCA Emergency Shelter. Social at 5:30 p.m., dinner and program at 6:30 p.m., Holiday Inn, 3803 13th Ave. S., Fargo, www.ywcacassclay.org

New York Strip and Barramundi • $99 Appetizer of Warm Spinach Dip Hearts of Romaine Caesar Salad Macadamia Crusted Barramundi with a Mango Beurre Blanc Broiled New York Strip with Veal Demi-Glaze Basmati Rice Pilaf Braised Brussels Sprouts Red Velvet Cheesecake Lobster and Tenderloin • $139 Shrimp Cocktail Heirloom Tomato Caprese Salad Two 7 oz Tenderloin Medallions with a Blackberry Demi-Glace One 12 oz Lobster Tail split with drawn Butter Roasted Gold, Ruby, Purple Potatoes and Bacon Wrapped Asparagus Chocolate Raspberry Torte Piano Music 7-9 pm Basies Dinner Menu Also Available

Reservations 701-281-7105

villagefamilymag.org

1635 42nd St S, Fargo, ND

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Fargo Public Main Library continued • Darwin Day Event. Dr. Allan Ashworth will present on “Ice-Age Fossils.” Feb. 12, 7 p.m. • Little Squirt Science. For preschoolers. Pre-registration required. Feb. 13 & Mar. 13, 6:30 p.m.; Feb. 14 & Mar. 14, 11 a.m. • Crafts for Teens & Adults. Preregistration required. Feb. 15, 10 a.m. • Saturday Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Feb. 15 & Mar. 15, 10 a.m. • Lemony Snicket Book Club. Grades 3-6. Pre-registration required. Feb. 18 & Mar. 18, 4 p.m. • FAFSA Information Session. For teens and their parents. Pre-registration required. Feb. 19, 6:30 p.m. • Crafty Teens. Pre-registration required. Feb. 27, 4:30 p.m. • Computer Classes. Call for details and to register Dr. James Carlson Library

2801 32nd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-4764040 or www.fargolibrary.org • Winter Read-A-Thon. All ages invited to participate. Ends Feb. 28

• Weekly Spring Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Pre-registration required • Tea Time Book Club. Feb. 2 & Mar. 2, 2:30 p.m. •B  aby Rhyme Time. Lapsit storytime for babies (birth-18 mos). Feb. 6 & 20, Mar. 6 & 20, 10 a.m. • Valentine Hugs Craft. Preschool-7 yrs. Feb. 6, 4 p.m. •S  aturday Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Feb. 8 & Mar. 8, 10 a.m. •U  nraveled Crafters Club. Feb. 9 & 23, Mar. 9 & 23, 1 p.m. •M  anga Club for Teens. Feb. 12 & Mar. 12, 6:30 p.m. •L  ittle Squirt Science. For preschoolers. Pre-registration required. Feb. 13 & Mar. 13, 11 a.m. •C  rafts for Teens & Adults. Preregistration required. Feb. 13, 6:30 p.m. •F  ree Friday Movies. Feb. 14 & Mar. 14, 1 p.m. •M  agic Tree House Book Club. Grades 1-4. Pre-registration required. Feb. 16 & Mar. 16, 2 p.m. •C  rafty Teens. Pre-registration required. Feb. 25, 4:30 p.m. •C  omputer Classes. Call for details and to register

Northport Branch

2714 N. Broadway, Fargo, 701-4764026 or www.fargolibrary.org • Winter Read-A-Thon. All ages invited to participate. Ends Feb. 28 • Weekly Spring Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Pre-registration required • Saturday Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Feb. 1 & Mar. 1, 10 a.m. • Valentine Hugs Craft. Preschool-7 yrs. Feb. 10, 4 p.m. • Northport Classics Book Club. Feb. 19 & Mar. 19, 6:30 p.m. West Fargo Public Library

109 3rd St. E., West Fargo, 701-4335460 or www.westfargolibrary.org • Homework Center. Grades 1-8. Mon.Thurs., 3-5:30 p.m. on days school is in session • Children’s Simply Stories. Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m. • Storytime with Project. For preschoolers and caretakers. Tuesdays, 1:30 p.m.; Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. • Knitty Giddy. Adult group; bring your own supplies. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. • Ham Radio Operators. Call for details. Wednesdays, 6:45 p.m. • Friday Morning Movies. Fridays, 10:30 a.m. • Genealogy Saturdays. A staff genealogist will be available for questions. Saturdays, noon-4 p.m. • Saturday New Release Movies. Feb. 8 & 22, Mar. 8 & 22, 2 p.m. • Creative Corner. Open to all adults. Feb. 12 & 26, Mar. 12 & 26, 12:30 p.m. • Fun with Food: Healthy Snacks. Nutrition program geared for preschoolers and their caretakers. Call to register. Feb. 24, 10:15-11 a.m. • Tech/Computer Classes. Call for details and registration Moorhead Public Library

118 5th St. S., Moorhead, 218-2337594 or www.larl.org • Open Computer Practice. Mondays, 2 p.m. • Origami Club. All ages and experience levels welcome. Mondays, 6:30 p.m. • Storytime Plus. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m.; second Saturday of the month, 10 a.m. • Storytime. Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. • Baby Bounce. For parents and babies (up to age 2). Thursdays, 10 a.m. • Brain Breaks. Teens can study at the library with breaks for games and snacks. Feb. 3 & Mar. 3, 4 p.m. • Peace Corps Series: Guatemala. Feb. 3, 7 p.m. • Wii Wednesday. Feb. 5, 6 p.m.

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• Peace Corps Series: Malawi. Feb. 10, 7 p.m. • Make It Yourself: Powdered Laundry Detergent. Please pre-register. Dec. 13, 7 p.m. • Saturday Movie Matinee. Feb. 15 & Mar. 15, 2 p.m. • Classics Book Club. Feb. 18 & Mar. 18, 7 p.m. • Adult Book Club. Feb. 20 & Mar. 20, 7 p.m. • Lego Club. Open to all skill levels. Feb. 22 & Mar. 22, 2 p.m. • Peace Corps Series: Ukraine. Feb. 24, 7 p.m. • Yarn Circle. Open to all ages and experience levels. Feb. 27 & Mar. 27, 6:30 p.m. • Beginning Blogging Workshop. Mar. 5, 6:30 p.m. • Make It Yourself: Button Jewelry. Please pre-register. Mar. 13, 7 p.m. • Read It Together Book Club. For parents and kids (suggested grades 4-6). Mar. 22, 2 p.m. • Maud Hart Lovelace Voting Gala. Partnered event with Moorhead Public Schools. Mar. 24, 6 p.m. • Computer Classes. Call for details and to register

from our experts, for your health

CLASSES

Call for information. Pre-registration may be required. The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm

1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-2326102 or www.childrensmuseumyunker.org •S  uper Science Saturdays • Yunkie Club

Early Childhood Family Education (See ad pg. 33)

Classes for infants to kindergarten entry. Probstfield Center for Education, 2410 14th St. S., Moorhead, 218-284-3400 or https:// communityed.moorheadschools.org •B  aby Connection •C  urious Cruisers •D  ynamic Discoverers •F  amily Fun •F  amily Fun with Little Ones •F  antastic Fours & Fives •J  aneen’s Treasure Box •L  ittle Chefs •M  ake & Take •M  arvelous Mud •M  onday Play Group

• Ooey Gooey Fun • Ones & Twos • Storybook Science • Wonderful, Wobbly Ones Essentia Health OB Education

3000 32nd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-3648100 or www.essentiahealth.org • Basic Training for New Dads • Breastfeeding Class • Car Seat Safety • Lamaze • Mom’s Helpers • Tender Transitions Fargo Park District

701-499-7788 or www.fargoparks. com • Teen Art Woodworking Class FM Ambulance

701-364-1758 or www.fmambulance. com • B.L.A.S.T. Babysitting Day Camp • Heartsaver CPR/AED • Pediatric First Aid & CPR/AED Fraser, Ltd.

2902 S. University Dr., Fargo, 701232-3301 or www.fraserltd.org • Adult CPR/First Aid • Infant/Child CPR/First Aid

“To reduce the risk of concussion in contact sports, lead with your eyes and not with your head.” Dan Ostlie, MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

EssentiaHealth.org

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Moorhead Community Education

218-284-3400 or https://communityed.moorheadschools. org Music-n-Play

Classes for infants to 5 yrs. www.music-n-play.com • Christian Music & Play Mommy n’ Me • Sing n’ Sprout Plains Art Museum (See ad pg. 26)

704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-551-6100 or www.plainsart. org • Kid Quest • Youth & Adult Studio Classes Parenting Resource Center

701-241-5700 or www.ag.ndsu.edu/casscountyextension/ home-and-family • Conscious Discipline: 10 Steps to Positive Discipline • Nurtured Heart Approach • Parents Forever • Preventing Problems, Supporting Success

Sanford Health Community Education

701-234-5570, 877-234-4240 or www.sanfordhealth.org • Baby Signs • Baby’s First Ride • Better Choices, Better Health • Breastfeeding Beginnings • Caring for Your Newborn • C.A.R.S. (Children & Restraint Systems) • Family & Friends CPR Adult • Family & Friends CPR Infants & Children • Infant Massage • Labor – What to Expect • Lamaze • Our Family is Having a Baby • Safe & Sound – Preparing Your Home for Baby • Weight Loss Surgery Informational Seminar Trollwood Performing Arts School

218-477-6500 or www.trollwood.org

• Ballroom Dance • Belly Dancing • Contempo Dance • Mainstage Musical Audition Workshop

Red River Zoo (See ad pg. 37)

4255 23rd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-277-9240 or www. redriverzoo.org

The Village Family Service Center

• Feast or Famine • Pint-Size Explorers

701-451-4900 or www.TheVillageFamily.org • Follow My Lead • Mindfulness • Relationships 101

Sanford embrace Education Series

701-234-7463 or www.sanfordhealth.org • Heart Effects of Cancer Treatment • How to Manage Distress

The Village Counselors are here to help. In-office counseling available for individuals, couples, parents, and children. Online counseling also available.

1201 25th St. S., Fargo • 701-451-4900 1401 8th St. S., Moorhead • 701-451-4811 www.TheVillageFamily.org 36

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The Village Financial Resource Center

Concordia College Cyrus M. Running Gallery

701-235-3328 or www. HelpWithMoney.org

901 8th St. S., Moorhead, 218-2994623

• Bankruptcy Education • Homebuyer Education • Money Management Education • Tenant Education

•A  nnual Concordia Faculty Art Exhibition. Ends Feb. 16 •A  nnual Juried Student Exhibition. Mar. 13-30

YMCA (See ad pg. 31)

Fargo Air Museum

701-293-9622, 701-281-0126 or www.ymcacassclay.org

1609 19th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-2938043 or www.fargoairmuseum.org

• 7 Mindset Youth Empowerment • Cheer • Dance • Fantastic Contraptions • Little Leapers • Tiny Tumblers • Wacky Science • Y Swim School

Historical & Cultural Society of Clay County (See ad pg. 32)

Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 218-299-5511 or www. hcscconline.org •D  oing Our Part: Clay County in WWII. Begins Feb. 11 • The Piga Project: Women, Immigration & Resilience. Ends Mar. 1 •M  innesota Disasters. Begins Mar. 22

MUSEUMS & EXHIBITS Call for additional information.

MSUM Art Gallery

Cass County Museum

1351 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701282-2822 or www.bonanzaville.org • Prairie Expressions. Ends Feb. 18

Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2930 •M  SUM Faculty Exhibition. Feb. 3-13 •M  SUM BA/BS Student Exhibition. Feb. 17-27 •M  SUM BFA Student Exhibition #1. Mar. 3-13

MSUM Planetarium

Bridges Hall, MSUM, Moorhead, 218477-2920 • One World One Sky. Ends Mar. 9 • IBEX: Search for the Edge of the Solar System. Ends Mar. 10 • The Mars Show. Begins Mar. 29 • Cosmic Colors: An Adventure Along the Spectrum. Begins Mar. 30 Plains Art Museum

704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-551-6100 or www.plainsart.org • Red River Reciprocity: Contemporary Ceramics in MN & ND. Begins Feb. 8 • School Spirit: Celebrating Youth Art Month. Mar. 1-31 • My Generation, Let’s Take It Over: Emerging Artists of Fargo-Moorhead • The One Minute Film Festival 20032012 The Rourke Art Museum

521 Main Ave., Moorhead, 218-2368861 or www.therourke.org • Cloudscapes: Lance Thorn. Ends Mar. 9 • Minnesota: Inside & Out • Transformations: The Art of the Mask

Saturday, March 8 10a.m. - 4p.m. BRITTANY • CORNWALL ISLE OF MAN • GALICIA IRELAND • SCOTLAND • WALES

Hjemkomst Center

202 1ST AVE N • MOORHEAD

Free Admission 2 ENTERTAINMENT STAGES HERITAGE PRESENTATIONS ARTS & CRAFTS CELTIC FOODS & TREATS INTERACTIVE BOOTHS & SHOPPING

701.499.7788 fargoparks.com

Parks and Recreaon

• Support for this project is provided by the ciites of Fargo, Moorhead and West Fargo through

The Arts Partnership.

The Red River Zoo is a THE place to hold your next birthday party! Carousel rides, zoo admission, birthday cake, punch, animal presentation and festive set up all included! Treat bags and Zooper Meals also available! To book your child’s party, call

701-277-9240

10 OFF

$

your birthday package if booked before April 30, 2014 coupon must be presented at initial booking

• This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State

Arts Board, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund.

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YOUR FAMILY z consumer

10 Things We Spend Too Much On

All too often, we buy things we think we’re supposed to, and whenever there’s an emotional component involved, our tendency to overspend is enhanced even more. Think funerals, weddings, and engagement rings, just for starters. Read on for more examples of traditional purchases people routinely spend too much on and solid suggestions for cutting those costs.

1. Funerals The worst time to shop for a funeral is after a loved one dies, when grief can affect judgment. That suggests this is a purchase you should arrange yourself long before your demise. According to the National Funeral Directors Association (NFDA), Americans paid an average of $7,075 for a funeral in 2012, and that doesn’t include a burial plot, marker or stone, flowers, and obituary. 38

February/March 2014

Here’s how to significantly reduce that cost: Consult the government. The Federal Trade Commission regulates “funeral providers.” In its article, “Shopping for Funeral Services,” the FTC lists the rules providers must follow, plus some excellent advice, including: “The law requires funeral homes to give you written price lists.” “You have the right to buy goods and services separately.” Shop around. Because the law allows you to BYOC (bring your own casket), shop around. Where? Try Costco. While the NFDA says a casket averages $2,295, you can get a beautiful Costco casket for $950—delivery included. But there are many other discount options online. Get cremated. More Americans are opting for ashes. In 1960, only 3.6 percent did, but that figure rose to 42 villagefamilymag.org

percent by 2011, says the NFDA. The Neptune Society, one of the largest cremation services, says its costs vary by “local market factors” but insists it’s “a fraction” of burial costs.

2. Weddings Who doesn’t enjoy reading about “The 12 Most Expensive Weddings in History”? Number one is Princess Diana’s wedding ($110 million adjusted for inflation). While the average American wedding costs a fraction of that, it’s still $28,427, according to a survey by wedding website The Knot. While everyone from Martha Stewart to Bank of America offers advice for saving on weddings, the truth is plain: Many brides refuse to skimp on their big day. So, even though buying from websites like family


PreOwnedWeddingDresses.com and limiting the floral arrangements and guest list can save thousands, many are going to eschew those steps. Maybe these other cost-cutting suggestions will appeal: DIY DJing. The Knot survey says a reception band will cost about $3,084, while a disc jockey will run almost $1,000. But many couples, especially younger ones, are programming their own music on iPods and simply hiring someone (or even asking a friend) to push the right buttons at the right time. Search online for “DJing your wedding” and you’ll find all kinds of detailed advice. Skimp on the cake. How many weddings have you been to where everyone exclaimed, “That cake was delicious!” Most attendees don’t care, and they only get a sliver, anyway. So don’t buy your wedding cake from a specialty baker. Buy it from your local grocery chain. Since the average cake runs $560, you can easily cut that cake price in half.

3. Diamond rings You’ll notice we didn’t mention engagement and wedding rings in the Weddings section. That’s because jewelry is an overspending category unto itself—and diamonds may be the most marked-up item on this list. But like funerals and weddings, buying diamonds is fraught with danger because it’s yet another emotional purchase. If we try too hard to save money, we feel like we’re being cheap. But here’s a secret: Diamond prices are often negotiable, even at major chains like Zales and Kay Jewelers. So while it’s important to know the four C’s of diamonds— carat, color, clarity, and cut—the biggest lesson you can learn is to haggle. If your local jeweler or national retailer won’t come down on price, they’ll often be willing to upgrade the setting for a discount or even free.

Arc Buddies Arc Buddies

ArcBuddies Buddies Arc

4. New cars Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson lives in a beautiful house on the water, and there’s a 30-foot boat docked out back. But he’s never, ever bought a new car. This is what he says: “When it comes to buying cars, the vast majority of people I’ve known over the years approach the subject with no imagination at all. They simply do what the commercials tell them to and what their friends do: Trudge down to the nearest dealer and buy a new car.” Instead, he’s bought used cars for as little as $5,000. How? He avoids car lots. “A few years ago I bought a 1994 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham from a 91-year-old lady,” Johnson recalls. He suggests asking around—friends of friends seem to value a fair price and honesty. He also consults websites like Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds to establish a value. And finally, he gets the car inspected by a local mechanic. It might cost $50, but it can “save a ton of headaches and bills down the road,” he says. But if you’re dead-set on a new car, consider more than the price. Also take into account resale value, fuel efficiency, repair record, and the cost of insurance.

Do you like to new Do you likemake to make newfriends? Dfriends? o you like to

Start 2014 off right make a new friend! The and Arc has Buddies waiting Arc Buddiestois be looking to match volunteers matched with a volunteer with someone who has a disability in the right now! The Arc has Buddies waiting community. to be matched with a volunteer right Call now!293-8191 or email jschill@arccassnd.com

make new riends?

f

The Arc has Buddies waiting to be matched with a volunteer right now! 255 North University Drive Fargo, ND 58102

3201 43rd St.S Fargo, ND 58103

www.arccassnd.com

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The National Association of Independent Schools. It represents 1,700 institutions nationwide—including religious and boarding schools—and it has a Parents’ Guide with tips for everything from visiting the school to landing financial aid. PrivateSchools.com. This simple-looking website is about financial aid, plus details on scholarships, loans, and vouchers. It also has a search function for nearly 30,000 schools, including those in the Fargo-Moorhead area.

8. College

5. Food Here are two quick and easy suggestions for saving money on food: Eat smart when eating out. Of course, the unhealthiest food is often the cheapest. If you’re both healthy and priceconscious, skip the soup and salad—they’re not only expensive for what you get, they’re not nearly as good for you as you think. Buy smart when eating in. If you don’t like to cook, at least make meals with healthy ingredients that are easy to manipulate. Money Talks News recommends using cheap and easy ingredients like beans, brown rice, eggs, frozen green peas, and frozen whole turkey.

6. Clothes Kanye West made headlines recently not just for releasing his new album, but also for selling his own clothing line that featured a $120 white T-shirt. Guess what? He sold a lot of them, says The Huffington Post. While maybe you weren’t among those who purchased one, the fact is we’ve all overpaid for clothes because we liked the label. Like food, there’s all kinds of good advice about saving on clothes. Perhaps the most crucial advice is about what not to do: Don’t buy brands. Five years ago, in a study of online clothes shopping, Consumer Reports determined that its readers rated Sears clothes “excellent” 29 percent of the time—and “Victoria’s Secret, the Gap, J.C. Penney, and Kohl’s fared about the same.”

7. Private school Of all the items on this list, none is harder for scoring a deal. First, you need to find one close to home. Then you need to figure out the best way to compare prices and services. Finally, you want to pursue financial aid. Here are a couple of good places to start: 40

February/March 2014

While experts offer all kinds of conflicting college advice, they seem to agree on one thing: Spending more than you can afford to attend a big-name school isn’t smart. Like buying clothes, you need to look beyond the pricey labels. As Money Talks News reported last summer, “Forbes has released its list of top colleges for 2013 and for the first time, the top two aren’t in the Ivy League.” Start by checking out the U.S. Department of Education’s College Affordability and Transparency Center. For North Dakota residents, NDSU’s estimate of costs for the current school year is $14,763; UND’s is $15,194. For Minnesota residents, MSUM’s estimated cost for the current school year is $14,948; U of M-Twin Cities’ is $23,124.

9. Insurance and warranties We’ve all heard the expression “better safe than sorry.” But we also know about “nothing ventured, nothing gained.” You can spend a lot of money insuring yourself against any probability, and insurers also prey on those fears. But many things that can go wrong can be fixed for cheaper than the premiums. For example, cell phone insurance: One Money Talks News partner did the math and determined it wasn’t worth the cost, while an MTN writer came up with five cheap alternatives. Yet another MTN writer broke down travel insurance and concluded, “If you insure yourself to the extent you’ll never lose a dime, odds are you won’t have a dime to lose, because you’ll spend everything on insurance.” The same goes for extended warranties. Consumer Reports has always been skeptical of them, pointing out that your credit card may already provide an extended warranty.

10. Credit cards This item has the potential to rack up big savings with just a few minutes of your time. But too many of us sign up for a few credit cards and never look back, paying high interest on a balance or a large annual fee. Or we cut them up because we think those pieces of plastic got us mired in debt. But credit cards, wisely used, can work in your favor. Reward points are like free money, and balance transfer offers can reduce your interest rate to zero for many months. The problem is finding the right card. Money Talks News’ credit card reviews can help you with that. Source: www.moneytalksnews.com Written for Money Talks News by Michael Koretzky

villagefamilymag.org

family


Women’s Heart Health— Don’t Be the One in Three!

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer in America— surpassing even cancer! Astonishingly, a whopping one in three women will develop heart disease within her lifetime, while simultaneously only half of all women even realize this disease’s high mortality rate, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). February is recognized as American Heart Month to increase awareness of heart health. National Wear Red Day®, February 7, specifically focuses on educating women about gender-specific heart health. Sanford Heart supports this effort and echoes to women this simple message. “Don’t be the one in three!” Why is it so many women end up victim to heart disease?

rates among women with cardiovascular disease are not improving at the same rate as men’s, due in part to the lack of information and awareness of the disparities in heart disease symptoms between men and women. Improving outcomes in women who have heart disease begins by looking at heart symptoms and conditions based on gender. Often physicians are looking for male-pattern heart disease, when they should be looking at female patterns, making it easy to attribute cardiac symptoms in women to psychological conditions such as anxiety, panic, or stress. As a result, women are less likely than men to receive recommendations from their physicians about preventive or interventional care.

Not Just a ‘Man’s Disease’ Many men experience “classic” signs of a heart attack—crippling chest pain, sweating, difficulty breathing—women often report experiencing an entirely different set of symptoms and warning signs, including:

Know Your Risk While heart event symptoms in men and women differ, preventive measures stay the same. These include: • Maintaining a resting blood pressure that is no higher than 120/80 • Knowing family history • Keeping total cholesterol levels under 200 • Physical activity for 30 minutes most days for a goal of 150 minutes per week • Quitting smoking • Maintaining a Healthy Body Mass Index • Eating a heart-healthy

• nausea and vomiting • chest tightness • upper back pain • shortness of breath • lightheadedness • unexplainable fatigue The American Heart Association reports survival

diet full of lean proteins, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Low in sodium and trans-fat. • Controlling diabetes if you are a diabetic • Practicing relaxation and reducing stress Get Screened Prevention is key to warding off heart disease and its destructive effects. Sanford Health can help you determine your risk factors with the Heart Screening program. You can help yourself by getting screened. A heart screen is recommended if you have: • Early family history of heart disease (less than 50 years old) • A history of smoking or are currently a smoker • Hypertension • High Cholesterol (Total cholesterol greater than 200 mg/dL) • Obesity • Diabetes, or are a • Postmenopausal Woman “Early diagnosis and preventive therapy for heart disease is the best line of defense for our families

This medical update was brought to you by Sanford Health. Learn more at www.sanfordhealth.org. family villagefamilymag.org

and our community,” says Sanford’s interventional cardiologist, Dr. Thomas Haldis. “It is a very treatable and preventable disease as long as it is identified in its early stages. Most people over the age of 40 have at least one risk factor and many have multiple risk factors. That’s why it is important to know your risk factors and have a heart screen. The Heart Screen at Sanford is the best way to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment.” For more information on women’s heart health and how to prevent or treat heart disease, visit goredforwomen.org. If you, or someone you know, fit the criteria listed above, the Heart Screen is available for $50 at the Sanford Center for Screening located at 1720 University Drive S., in Fargo. The screen takes less than an hour and is scheduled in advance. Schedule a screen at: (701) 23-HEART (701-234-3278), or 800-821-2232.

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YOUR FAMILY z generations

What Your Parent’s Financial State Can Mean for You By Shannon Parvey

I

n the past few weeks, I mentioned to a handful of people that I was writing an article about laws that say adult children can be held responsible for their parents’ medical bills and long-term care, even if they don’t agree to do so. As a conversation starter at a party, this one drummed up some heated reactions. “That’s not fair!” “Those laws don’t really exist, do they?” “People can’t be responsible for debts they didn’t create…right? Not without signing a contract.” “That can’t happen.” While it is unusual, it can happen. And, once in a while, it does. North Dakota and 28 other states have “filial responsibility” laws. They sound simple enough, but they can have a life-changing impact in some particular situations. North Dakota’s law reads: “It is the duty of the father, the mother, and every child of any person who is unable to support oneself, to maintain that person to the extent of the ability of each. This liability may be enforced by any person furnishing necessaries to the person. The promise of an adult child to pay for necessaries furnished to the child’s parent is binding.” Filial responsibility laws apply in several circumstances. For example, they have been used in North Dakota to force a father to support his twin

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February/March 2014

sons after age 18. Both sons were intellectually disabled and unable to support themselves. By most standards, a father being required to provide for his offspring seems reasonable. This application of the filial responsibility law doesn’t seem as “wrong” as how the law is used in other circumstances. These laws garner the most attention in lawsuits between medical facilities and adult children—when hospitals or nursing homes seek payment from an unsuspecting child for care previously provided to the parent. So, when does this happen? Last year, a Pennsylvania case, Health Care & Retirement Corporation of America v. Pittas, made the headlines in a big way. A court said a son, John Pittas, was liable for his mother’s $93,000 nursing home bill. Immediately, one might assume that the nursing home had no other option and took this approach as a last resort. Actually, a Medicaid application for payment was pending at the time of the lawsuit. And, Pittas’s mother was married and had two other adult children. These facts didn’t affect the decision. The Court held that the nursing home was not required to consider other sources of payment, such as Medicaid, villagefamilymag.org

before taking legal action against a family member…and the nursing home had every right to pick which family member to sue. Just a couple of months ago, North Dakota’s filial responsibility statute emerged from hibernation in Four Seasons Healthcare Center, Inc. v. Linderkamp. Like Pittas, a son, Elden Linderkamp, was ordered to pay his parents’ $100,000 nursing home bill. Ultimately, the North Dakota Supreme Court reversed the trial court’s decision and ordered it to determine possible liability of Elden’s siblings for that same bill. The case is still pending. Perhaps Elden won’t shoulder the nursing home burden alone, but he certainly isn’t off the hook. Situations like Pittas and Linderkamp are not at all common. Before the Court deemed Linderkamp liable for his parents’ gigantic nursing home bills, the Court found that he had participated in a fraudulent transfer of his parents’ land (which effectively left them too broke to pay their long-term care bills). Because Linderkamp took ownership of that land, it left him plenty of money to pay his parents’ nursing home expenses. It only seemed right. Although the Pittas Court did not find any such “wrongdoing” to justify family


its decision, the Court similarly focused on Pittas’s ability to pay his mother’s outstanding bills. The Court discovered he recently finished paying a substantial personal debt shortly before the lawsuit began, thus freeing funds to help his mother. The payor’s ability was the deciding factor in both instances. Why so rare? With the success of these two lawsuits, it may seem surprising that hospitals and nursing homes don’t use filial responsibility statutes more often. Perhaps the most concerning aspect of these laws is that their enforcement seems so arbitrary. How is it that most people escape any liability, while others become plagued with enormous bills, without consent or warning? The answer, in part, lies in the specific circumstances of each case. The laws are clear that not just anyone can be forced to incur these expenses. Before a third party is able to obtain payment from an adult child for his or her parent’s bills, five strict requirements must be proven: (1) kinship of the parties, (2) the reasonable value of the services rendered, (3) the immediate necessity of the care rendered, (4) the indigence of the person receiving care, and (5) the financial ability of the person sued to pay the expenses. The first three requirements are often simple enough. However, the remaining two are not always so easy to determine. It takes more than a third party wanting payment. It requires proof that the patient can’t pay his debt and that his family member can. Filial responsibility laws do not impose primary responsibility for a parent’s medical bills on their children. Basic contract principles still apply in these situations, just as anywhere else: People who directly sign agreements to receive services or obtain benefits are primarily on the hook for the costs of those services. Filial responsibility statutes impose a secondary liability on the family members because of the kinship connection. Family members must help if it’s necessary and they can. Fear not? No one likes debt. But, most of the time, we create the situation ourselves. We know what we owe, and we know why we owe it. It’s scary to imagine life-changing debt could land in your lap unexpectedly because of something you really had nothing to do with. The “ability to pay” requirement family

It’s scary to imagine life-changing debt could land in your lap unexpectedly because of something you really had nothing to do with.

should give comfort to people who might feel panic or a sense of impending doom about the possibility of a filial responsibility lawsuit knocking on the door. Under these statutes, a person cannot be held responsible for bills he or she simply cannot afford to pay. After all, most of us would gladly send a dollar or two to Mom and Dad if we had a money tree in the backyard. These laws aren’t intended to make the poor poorer. They are intended to require each of us to look out for family. At the end of the day, it’s the right thing to do…but not at the expense of the child’s wellbeing or survival. Long-term care costs are worrisome for everyone at every stage of life. The expenses can be unpredictable, and their impact financially devastating. These days, federal legislation makes it more difficult for the elderly to qualify for Medicaid coverage. As a result, filial responsibility laws emerge as an attractive option for medical and longterm care facilities.

them make decisions that will benefit everyone down the road. The conversation may be awkward, but it’s always better to know the facts now and avoid unpleasant surprises later. • Talk to an attorney and obtain advice specific to you and your family’s circumstances. Plan ahead. Filial responsibility doesn’t have to feel scary or inevitable. It’s not like hospital and nursing home personnel are wandering the streets to strike at random and take away all your hard-earned cash. But it might pay to be aware of these laws before that even becomes a possibility. Filial responsibility is alive and well in North Dakota and elsewhere across the country. Your parents likely helped you plenty along the way. Repay the favor and help them prepare for their financial future, too. It could save everyone a bundle in the long run. Shannon Parvey is a family law attorney at Gjesdahl Law, P.C. She and her husband, Eric, live in Fargo and are expecting their first child in March 2014.

How do I protect myself? There are several things a person can do to protect against a Pittas or Linderkamp situation. Fargo attorney Mike Gjesdahl of Gjesdahl Law, P.C. gives this advice: • Find out whether your state has filial responsibility laws. Research and understand the requirements. If it becomes an issue in your life, you want to be informed. • Discuss savings and long-term care insurance plans early to avoid empty accounts in old age. It is cheaper and easier to get insurance when you’re young. Tackle this issue early. • Prepare Medicaid or Veterans Administration Aid applications early and secure coverage before it’s too late. Different states have different requirements, so understand what you need to do where you live. • Talk about money! Be aware of your parents’ financial situation and discuss where they plan to live when they become elderly. Help villagefamilymag.org

February/March 2014

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COUNSELING

School Safety

Counseling Supervisor The Village Family Service Center

Principal Grace Lutheran School

Jean Syverson

Chuck Summers, MS, LMFT, CEAP

do I know if I should consider Q:How seeing a counselor?

A:

People often decide to see a counselor when something significant happens in their life, such as a traumatic experience, a relationship crisis, death of a loved one, or simply an overwhelming level of personal stress. The process of discussing your concerns with a neutral and knowledgeable third party can often help you begin to put your experience into perspective rather quickly. In some cases, you and the counselor may discover that depression, anxiety, or some other mental health issue is a complicating factor. If this occurs, you and the counselor will work together to develop a plan for treating the mental health issue, so you are able to more effectively manage the challenging situations in your life.

The Village Family Service Center Fargo: 1201 25th St. S. 701-451-4900

Moorhead: 1401 8th St. S. 701-451-4811 www.TheVillageFamily.org

ASK A COUNSELOR David Collins, MS, LAC Program Director ShareHouse, Inc.

Q: A:

 What is “Ask a Counselor”?

An email service provided by ShareHouse, trusted for recovery. Are you worried about a family member’s drug or alcohol use? Have you found something in your child’s room and you think it may be related to drugs? Is your spouse’s alcohol use causing stress in your family? Are you confused and don’t know what the next step is to get help for you or your family member? Do you want help, but don’t know where to go for treatment? We can help. This service will help anyone start the process of getting themselves, their family, or friends into recovery. Your email will go directly to our on-call phone and will be answered ASAP, day or night. Please email us at AskACounselor@sharehouse.org

ShareHouse, Inc. 701-282-6561 www.ShareHouse.org

Q:How do I know my child will be safe at school?

A:

When your child is away from you it’s easy to feel as if safety is out of your control, but there are reassurances that can provide you peace of mind. First, find out if your child’s school has a camera/security system. Controlling access is critical. It is unfortunate we have to keep doors locked, but student safety must be a priority. Next, learn your school’s safety procedures and drills. Talk to your children about how we “practice” in case of a fire/tornado so they know what to do. It is the same with lockdown drills. Schools in ND are required to perform these drills yearly. Although it can be scary for children and parents, helping everyone know what to expect will ease some of the anxiety. Grace Lutheran School’s staff is committed to keeping our students safe through controlled access and strict safety guidelines while also providing excellence in Christian education. We invite you to set up a visit and come experience Grace today!

Grace Lutheran School 701-232-7747 www.GraceLutheranSchool.org

Ask The Expert The Ask the Expert section in The Village Family Magazine identifies YOU as “The Expert” in your field. The ad promotes you as the “go-to person” when there’s a question or problem in your field of expertise, and promotes your business as the place to get the answers, products, and services our readers need. Contact Jeff Meyer for more information, 701-451-5000


Sh am Sta ro mp ck • Bell pepper • Knife • Spoon • White paper • Paper plate • Green paint Cut bell pepper in half and carefully scrape out seeds with a spoon. Squirt a large dollop of green paint on a paper plate, and spread paint on plate with the spoon. Place half of the pepper, cut-side down, in the paint and press down with your hands. Move the pepper around a bit in the paint to coat completely. Lift pepper from paint and press firmly on white paper to make a shamrock print.

Khloe, Age 2 1⁄2

• Black, red, orange, blue, or any color construction paper • Scissors • Glue • White paint • Marble • Empty Pringles can • Star stickers

family

1. Cut 3 circles in different colors and sizes from the colored paper to make planets. 2. Roll up the black construction paper and place in Pringles can. 3. Dip marble in white paint and place marble in Pringles can. 4. Shake the can to create “marble painting.” 5. Remove black paper from can and glue on the three planets. 6. Add star stickers. (Submitted by: Pre-Toddler I Room at Nokomis I) villagefamilymag.org

YOUR FAMILY z food & fun

Moo Shu Chicken Lettuce Wraps

• 2 Tbsps soy sauce • 1 Tbsp hoisin sauce • 1 Tbsp sherry • 1 tsp rice vinegar • 2 Tbsps olive oil • 1 Tbsp minced garlic • ½ tsp ground ginger • 2 chicken breasts, sliced into thin strips • 1 carrot, peeled and cut into matchstick-sized pieces • 2 sliced green onions • 5 cups finely shredded cabbage (or packaged coleslaw) • 1 tsp Chinese five spice powder • 10-12 lettuce leaves In a small bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, hoisin sauce, sherry, and rice vinegar. Set aside. Heat olive oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add minced garlic and ginger. Sauté for 30 seconds, then add chicken. Stirring frequently, cook for five minutes or until chicken is no longer pink inside. Add carrots to the skillet. Cook and stir for one minute. Add soy sauce mixture, green onions, and cabbage. Then sprinkle with five spice powder. Continue cooking and stirring for a few minutes until coleslaw has wilted. Serve chicken mixture on lettuce leaves with soy sauce, hot mustard, or Sriracha sauce.

February/March 2014

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YOUR FAMILY z words & wisdom

Love is everything it’s cracked up to be. That’s why people are so cynical about it. It really is worth fighting for, being brave for, risking everything for. And the trouble is, if you don’t risk anything, you risk even more.

Hold a true friend with both your hands. —Nigerian Proverb

— Erica Jong

We all take different paths in life, but no matter where we go, we take a little of each other everywhere. — Tim McGraw

May your walls know joy; may every room hold laughter, and every window open to great possibility. —Mary Anne Radmacher

A Field Mouse or an Osprey By Harold Byne

A few months back while sitting in a boat fishing with a couple of friends, I noticed a field mouse on the river bank. He emerged out of his hole, darted in a couple of directions, and then scurried back. I thought of the existence of this little creature. His life is spent running around, frightened and frantic, following his nose. He darts here, scurries there, turns in circles, but never really sees much beyond his nose. He is trying to sniff his way to successful living, which defined by a mouse’s existence, is finding some daily morsel to consume, to sustain him, so that he can carry on for the rest of his life, frightened and frantic. Sound familiar? A few minutes later, I glanced up and noticed soaring high above was an osprey. Rather than a picture of a frightened and frantic existence, I saw a wide-winged creature using the air currents to maneuver majestically in the unlimited heights. Rather than sniffing out a meager existence, this keen-eyed hunter with a panoramic view of the river and lake beneath was simply waiting for the appropriate time to swoop

and capture his prey. The amazing creature, rather than return to some tiny hole in the river bank, glides toward a nest fashioned at the top of the tallest of trees. The strength in his wings, the power in his talons, the amazing capacity of his vision, the effortless capacity to soar…it is the osprey, not the field mouse that models our human potential. I don't know about you, but it is easy for me to decide which creature I want to exemplify my life. I want to soar. I want to explore. I want to see the big picture. I want to conquer. I want to climb higher, go farther, dive deeper, and experience more. I want my soul enlarged, my mind expanded, my heart enlivened, and my spirit energized. I want the scurrying to stop. I want the frantic darting about, following my nose, to end. I want new strength, fresh thinking, clear vision, and resolved courage. I want to be more and more like the osprey and less like the field mouse, for to live like this field mouse is to insult my creator and deny my true destiny.


A loving and learning-rich environment for all children.

’’

I don’t want to take my kids anywhere else! —Jennifer, mother of two Nokomis children

At Nokomis Child Care Centers of The Village Family Service Center, your child is in loving hands. Our teachers, many who have been at Nokomis for years, love the kids with all of their hearts and are passionate about making Nokomis your child’s home away from home.

Nokomis offers the best of everything for your child. In addition to playing, laughing, growing, and making friends, your child will benefit from a wide range of special activities and programs including: • Teaching Strategies GOLD, a comprehensive assessment program, tracks critical educational and developmental factors for children from birth to kindergarten. • Raising a Reader, a proven early literacy curriculum, engages parents in reading and interacting with their children. • Partnering for Healthy, Fit Kids, a partnership with TNT Kid’s Fitness, incorporates physical activity and movement into the classroom. • Pre-K Reading Corps program, a partnership with the Southeast Education Cooperative, brings Americorp volunteers to Nokomis to incorporate Reading Corps strategies into the daily routine of the classrooms. The volunteers also provide one-on-one literacy tutoring and assessment to make sure every Nokomis child is ready for kindergarten. To learn more or to set up a tour, contact Nokomis Child Care Centers. 618 23rd St. S., Fargo; 701-232-5635 1620 16th Ave. S., Fargo; 701-232-0426


MONTH February is National Heart Month

Good choices are the key to protecting and improving heart health. Join Sanford Health in supporting heart health for you and for those you love. Make the choice to eat healthier, reduce stress, get active and know your risk for heart disease through appropriate screenings. Give your heart the love it deserves.

Call (701) 23-HEART to learn how you can start your journey to a healthier heart and life. sanfordhealth.org keyword: Fargo Heart Screen

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The Village Family Magazine - February / March 2014 Issue