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Fargo-Moorhead’s BIGGEST Family Events Calendar

February/ March 2013

Date Night Running for Family Fitness & Fun Enriching Activities for Little Ones


presents

See the kids of Nokomis decorate a heart just for you!

Hosted By: impactgiveback.org

24 Hour Online Fundraising Event

2.14.13

February 14, 2013 On Thursday, February 14, make a donation of $10 or more online to Nokomis of The Village Family Service Center at impactgiveback.org, and Dakota Medical Foundation will match the first $4,000 given online. This is an online only event, so hop on your computer and donate! Go to impactgiveback.org and choose “Nokomis of The Village Family Service Center.�


Nothing’s more important to Stacey and Erik than their family. Fargo’s Dr. Patty Laqua knows that.

According to Stacey and Erik Lucht, Dr. Patty Laqua is the right doctor for them—hands down. She’s a good listener. She’s respectful. She’s easy to talk to. She takes time to get to know who they are and she is just plain awesome to the whole family. We know there’s just one you and we know working together helps you stay healthier. Has it been a while since you saw a doctor? Call Essentia Health-Fargo for an appointment today.

(701) 364-8000 or (800) 437-4054

Need to find your very own primary care physician? Call us or go to EssentiaHealth.org

MyHealth onLinE ACCESS to your DoCtor’S oFFiCE

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170 ESSEntiA HEALtH PrimAry CArE PHySiCiAnS


YOUR FAMILY z from the editor February/March 2013 Vol. 17, No. 1 Publisher The Village Family Service Center Gary Wolsky Tammy Noteboom Editor-in-Chief Kelly Lynch Graphic Design & Layout Jared Zimney Advertising Sales Manager Joy Ryan Advertising Sales Madalyn Pezalla Food & Fun Editor Shayna Hendricksen Copy Editor Shayna Hendricksen The Village Family Service Center Board of Directors Carrie Bjorge, David Dougherty, Lyman Edds, Matthew Hallaway, Dr. Richard Hanson, Tammy Hauck, Richard Henderson, Nancy McKenzie, Dale Mowry, Michelle Powers, Joy Query, Becky Walen

For advertising information, call 701-451-5000

When I first began working outside of the home I was understandably a bit panicky about dinner. How was I going to get a decent meal on the table for my husband and three boys after walking into the house at 5 p.m. every night? Having a family dinner is incredibly important to me. I cherish that time with my children. I did everything you’re supposed to do. I did exhaustive meal planning, made my list, and grocery shopped in an organized, well-orchestrated manner. I truly had it down. I filled in calendars with my weekly meals and kept the calendars to refer back to when I needed a meal idea. It worked really well that first year. I was young. I was dedicated. Fast-forward a decade and a half and things are much more chaotic. I have just one son left at home, and his time there is a blur of activity as he rushes from one obligation to the next. Sometimes it seems futile to prepare a meal that will likely get tossed at him as he races out the door. Every now and then, my husband and I corral him and have a sit-down family meal. It’s wonderful! I love it! What to fix for that family meal is a constant thorn in my side. I am blessed to have a husband who enjoys cooking and regularly prepares dinner as I wallow in indecisiveness. I’m not sure when the indecision began, but it’s rampant. Maybe freezer meals are the answer to my indecision. In this issue’s article, “CHILL OUT: Not Your Mother’s Frozen Leftovers,” the author reminds us how much time you can save the day of the meal when all you have to do is thaw and heat. The article features three recipes, too. We also included a freezable entrée on page 45, in the Food and Fun section. Publisher Tammy Noteboom shared the chicken noodle soup recipe she’s perfected over time. It’s a nice option for a frosty February evening meal. Thanks for reading.

For editorial comments or questions, please call 701-451-4937 or email magazine@TheVillageFamily.org Printed by Forum Communications Printing, Fargo, N.D. ©2013 The Village Family Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. The Village Family Magazine is a registered trademark.

About the Cover Photo Parents Peter and Christel with children Adley (3), and Asher (1) Photography by Melissa Dale Photography

The Village Family Magazine does not necessarily endorse content of advertising. The mission of The Village Family Magazine is to broaden the ability of The Village Family Service Center to improve the quality of people’s lives. In each issue, articles and features will educate and encourage families to develop and maintain positive, constructive relationships. Mail correspondence to: The Village Family Service Center ATTN: Family Magazine 1201 25th St. S., Fargo, ND 58103

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departments z spirituality

6 Writing Your Own Obituary

Relieve your relatives of the task of re-creating your entire life story for your obituary. Discover the advantages of penning your own final tribute. z consumer

16 CHILL OUT: Not Your Mother’s Frozen Leftovers

Get helpful tips on freezing food for future family feasts, along with a selection of delectable, easy-to-freeze recipes. z feature

20 Date Night in Fargo-Moorhead

The area abounds with opportunities to enjoy the company of the one you love. Explore all there is to do on a date in FargoMoorhead. z do-it-together

34 Running for Family Fitness and Fun Running is a sport for young and old. Area families share their passion for running and how it helps them spend time together. z parenting

40 Enriching Activities for Little Ones Preschoolers love to be busy. Discover ways to keep them entertained and challenged at the same time.

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20 34 40

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p. in every issue

z z z z

gary’s opinion.......9 books & movies...10 mom’s view..........12 dad’s view............13

z events calendar.....24 z food & fun.............45 z words & wisdom.. .46

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February/March 2013 5


YOUR FAMILY z spirituality

By Courtney Taylor Pondering your own death can be considered pessimistic, depressing, or morbid. What’s the point anyway? You’ll be gone, so it’s not your problem, right? That might be the wrong attitude. Contemplating what will happen after you die—not in heaven or through reincarnation, but in the days on Earth just after your last breath—can be a responsible decision. Many funeral homes provide the option of prearranging your funeral, both logistically and financially. Among the customs following death is writing an obituary. You can probably name several people who know you well enough to take care of that for you, but why not do it yourself?

Preservation of Personality Writing your own obituary can preserve a piece of your individuality. Steve Wright of Wright Funeral Home, Moorhead, says, “I think the best person to write the basis of an obituary is the person who lived the life.” He explains that even those dearest to us cannot come close to painting an exact reflection of our unique existence. Would the person who knows you best capture your wit? Are you sure the accomplishment you valued most will be remembered? Wright references two mindsets: those who want an obituary that 6 February/March 2013

covers their life from A to Z and those who stick to the bare facts. Writing for yourself ensures that your obituary will not leave out things that were important or flaunt things that were not. Your obituary will be read by people who knew you well, seeking a happy memory, and by people who barely knew you at all but want one last chance to learn who you were. It may be your last biographical clip. Why not make it an autobiography?

Favor for Survivors If you aren’t drawn by the personal motive to write about yourself, consider those you will leave behind. The period between a death and a funeral is brief, busy, and emotional. Amidst their grief, your relatives are responsible for planning a memorial ceremony, a burial, and any number of other funeral traditions. Even their best effort to honor your life in your obituary may be plagued by sorrow and further limited by a quick deadline for publication to announce the interment. Prearranging your funeral can be a final act of kindness toward your loved ones. Michele Walloch, Boulger Funeral Home, Fargo, notes that writing your own obituary is not a required part of prearranging, but it is one simple step to relieve your survivors. Likewise, if you choose not to prearrange your funeral, storing a

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copy of your self-written obituary with someone you trust will still reduce one obligation for whoever is in charge of arranging your funeral. Even providing a brief outline of your obituary can ease the burden of the person responsible for recalling your full timeline. With the basis of your life drafted, your loved ones can focus on their best memories of you to highlight the good times.

Improved Motivation for Life If you think you are too young to be contemplating your death, think instead about your life. If something unexpected happened, would you be satisfied with the summation of your existence? Writing your own obituary can be a thorough evaluation of the life you are presently living and a way to motivate change. If you are unsatisfied with your personal summary, make time now to improve it. The Warner Bros. film, “The Bucket List” (2007), inspired audiences to consider their own lists of life desires. Have you marked anything off your list lately? Take the opportunity to alter your lifestyle and reprioritize your goals. Be proactive to ensure your ultimate obituary, whether written by you or someone else, reflects a life that makes you proud.

Telling Your Story You’ve decided for whatever reason that you should draft a copy of your own obituary. Now what should you say? Wright advises that you start at the beginning. Where were you born? Who were your parents? Where did you go to school? What happened after that? The facts of your life form the outline for your obituary. (See Basic Obituary Outline below.) Wright explains that after you have the framework of your personal story, “you can embellish with the things you care about.”

Basic Obituary Outline PERSON Full name (nickname, if applicable) Age at death Residence at death Month/Day/Year of death Place and/or cause of death LIFE Date and place of birth Names of parents, siblings, schools attended Dates of marriage(s), place, name(s) of spouse(s) Degrees, achievements, and other items of note Jobs Places of residence Hobbies, activities, and sports Religious, charitable, political, or other affiliations

FAMILY Survived by (include place of residence): Spouse Children (in birth order, include spouses) Grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc. Parents, grandparents, siblings (in birth order) Others, such as nephews, nieces, cousins, in-laws, friends, pets Predeceased by (list name and/or relationship) SERVICE Date, time, location Visitation information: date, time, location Place of interment: date, time, location Name of funeral home handling arrangements ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Memorial donation suggestions

Boulger Funeral Home has a comprehensive, paragraph-by-paragraph guide to writing an obituary on their website, www.BoulgerFuneralHome.com/documents. family

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The Remembering Site (www.therememberingsite.org) is a thought-provoking website designed to generate words and ideas that will help you formulate your life story and thus, your obituary. Answers to the questions listed there will provide an extensive inventory of your past. You may find that a few answers highlight an already forgotten piece of yourself that you would like people to remember and enjoy. Wright also advises looking at others’ published obituaries as a guide for writing your own. Consider the clever ways your life can be described. This is a line from a recent obituary for a surveyor from Utah, “His fine penmanship and eye for the line were put to good use on the draftsman’s table to create the charts and blueprints for the future he was building for the rest of us.” Here is a sample from a financially shrewd woman from Texas, “Linda was also very good at managing money. She could take a nickel and turn it into $1.00.” Humor comes through in this 2008 obituary from Tennessee, “In Ida’s spare time she became an assistant coach to the University of Memphis Tigers, the Memphis Grizzlies, the LA Lakers, and the Miami Heat, if not in reality in her mind. As a professional armchair consultant to the NBA, Ida was nicknamed Hoop Mama Two.” These examples paint a vivid picture of the people they represent. Your obituary may be the final thing people read about you. Share the best of life with those who knew you only a little, and let those who knew you well smile once more in recollection. Use this final journal entry to relieve a burden from your loved ones, to secure the memory of what you valued most, and to enhance the life you are living now. Courtney Taylor is a Fargo resident who hopes her own obituary will reflect her passion for traveling, volunteering, and writing.

The Village Counselors are here to help. In-office counseling available for individuals, couples, parents, and children. Online counseling also available.

1201 25th St. S., Fargo • 701-451-4900 1401 8th St. S., Moorhead • 701-451-4811 www.TheVillageFamily.org 8 February/March 2013

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YOUR FAMILY z gary’s opinion

Elections Have Consequences By Gary Wolsky, President/CEO The Village Family Service Center Let me start with a story. The day after the election, I visited with a business person who explained to me that a significant donation to support the work of The Village would not be forthcoming as planned. It was explained that the individual was withholding any and all potential charitable contributions until getting a better read on the impact on business of the Wolsky huge and onerous cost of Obamacare, and the blatant anti-business tenor emanating from Washington, D.C. Unfortunately, that was the first of several conversations I’ve had with other business leaders that were similar in tone. Elections, indeed, have consequences. The multitude of government-dependent nonprofits are typically not very bothered by the stories I shared in the first paragraph, as their income is largely locked in, irrespective of the business climate. The Village, on the other hand, depends on corporate and individual donations to provide the funding required to treat kids and families.

these circumstances to grow into healthy adulthood. We could write volumes on the incredible turnaround that so many of these kids have made in becoming productive citizens— governorships, congressional responsibilities, business ownership, and simply quiet productive citizens raising good families. Your challenges as a donor or as a business owner are not the fault of these kids—and I urge you not to abandon them because of it. Oftentimes when things get tough economically, they need you more than ever. Elections do have consequences; however, it’s not up to “our kids” to pay the consequences. I’m optimistic that the generosity of the people in this region will prevail as we navigate through these challenging national economic times. The opinions expressed in this column are strictly those of The Village Family Service Center CEO. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the organization, staff, or boards of directors.

They contribute to our work because: 1) they believe in our work; 2) they understand the credibility we represent with 122 years of service; 3) they understand we are not a quasi-governmental agency and how much we rely on their generosity; 4) they can; and 5) they have some optimism and sense of predictability in the business climate including the issue of government regulation, taxes, etc. If you’re reading this I’m very likely talking about you. I’d like to challenge the business community, and perhaps you. • The 143 kids who attend the Nokomis Child Care Centers, many of whom come from very challenging circumstances, don’t know a capital gains tax from a lollipop. • Similarly, the 158 kids in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program and the 85 kids waiting for matches don’t know and have no reason to be concerned about how progressive the tax code is. • None of these kids know how the debt ceiling will affect their future. These kids remain worthy of your support in both good times and bad. You and I know that their sense of well-being and self-identity in their younger years will be a huge contributor to their health, and that of the neighborhoods in which they live, in the future. The Village has the unique perspective of 122 years of working with kids and families, and we’ve needed to partner with donors in our community each and every year since then, both in good times and some very, very bad times. Some kids don’t get a very fair deal in the circumstances they are dealt and they need us, as a community, to counterbalance family

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YOUR FAMILY z m vies

Staff Pick: Jared

© Warner Bros. Pictures

G Available on DVD “The Hobbit,” released in 1977, may be a less expensive alternative for your family than the new major motion picture version. Although it’s not in 3D, and the songs and animation style may seem out of date, this account of “The Hobbit” is still a great representation of the book. It tells the story in a way that only an animated, made-for-TV movie from the ‘70s can. This version of “The Hobbit” debuted as the most expensive animated program in television history ($3 million). The saga of Bilbo Baggins, a Hobbit from The Shire, is a tale of magic, burglary, and adventure for all ages. Well, ages 10 and up anyway. So take a journey to MiddleEarth…a land filled with wizards, dragons, trolls, goblins, orcs, elves, dwarves, and, of course, hobbits.

New to

© Walt Disney Pictures

“The Hobbit” (1977)

“Pocahontas” G On Netflix Instant Stream Captain John Smith and Governor Ratcliffe have crossed the Atlantic to the New World to plunder its treasures for mother England. Meanwhile, Native American Chief Powhatan has given his daughter Pocahontas’ hand to the village’s greatest warrior. But, the high-spirited Pocahontas isn’t happy at the thought of spending her life with the serious, yet brave, Kocoum. She has other ideas and falls in love with John Smith. When Kocoum is killed, John Smith is erroneously arrested for the murder. Pocahontas knows the truth and throws herself on John Smith to prevent his execution. Risking her own life to save his brings peace to the land. Although it is quite broad in its interpretation, “Pocahontas” was the first Disney film based on the life of a real person.

Theaters

On

DVD

PG In Theatres March 8 Through the magic of Disney, we’ll be returning to Oz on March 8th in the fantastical adventure, “Oz: The Great and Powerful.” Small-time circus magician Oscar Diggs (played by James Franco) is propelled in a hot air balloon from the dusty Kansas countryside to the energetic and dazzling Land of Oz. Amazingly, they’ve been waiting for a great wizard to save them from the wicked witch. Oscar uses his magical skills to create the illusion that he’s larger than life and qualified to take on any challenge. Believing him to be the wizard, the prophecy states if he can defeat the wicked witch, all the treasures of the Emerald City will be his. In his quest to save the Land of Oz, Oscar’s character transforms himself, not only into a believable wizard, but into a better man, too. The film also starts Mila Kunis, Rachel Weisz, and Michelle Williams.

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“How To Train Your Dragon”

© DreamWorks Pictures

© Walt Disney Pictures

“Oz: The Great and Powerful”

PG On DVD Hiccup, a Viking teenager, is riddled with conflict. He finds himself unable to be the type of Viking his father wants him to be…a mighty dragon slayer. By an odd twist of fate, Hiccup manages to ensnare a dragon and, given the opportunity to slay it, he simply cannot. Instead, he decides to nurse the dragon back to health. What unfolds is a story of understanding and friendship between Hiccup and the dragon, named Toothless. One critic likened it to the heartwarming relationship between a boy and his dog. The tale is based on the book by Cressida Cowell and is a 3D production from DreamWorks Animation using the voices of Gerard Butler, Jonah Hill, Jay Baruchel, and Craig Ferguson.

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YOUR FAMILY z

Book Reviews Courtesy Barnes & Noble, Fargo

Baby & Preschool “Charley Harper ABCs” by Charley Harper Charley Harper was an American illustrator who worked from his studio in the woods near Cincinnati, Ohio, until his death in 2007, at the age of 84. Charley’s illustrations make learning A is for Ape, B is for Bird, and C is for Crab memorable and fun. This charming book is sure to appeal to Charley’s loyal fans as well as introduce his lyrical illustrations to a whole new generation of young readers.

Ages 9 to 12 “Eight Keys” by Suzanne LaFleur  Elise has always lived in the big house with her loving uncle and aunt, because Elise’s parents died when she was too young to remember them. There is a barn behind the house with eight locked doors on the second floor. Elise and Franklin have always been best friends. When Elise and Franklin start middle school, things feel all wrong. Bullying. Not fitting in. Franklin suddenly seems babyish. Then, soon after her 12th birthday, Elise receives a mysterious key left for her by her father. A key that unlocks one of the eight doors upstairs in the barn. A great coming of age story written with sensitivity and insight.

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Ages 4 to 8 “Rocket Writes a Story” by Tad Hills Two years ago, eager learner canine Rocket took his first puppy steps towards literacy in “How Rocket Learned to Read.” Now he makes a great leap forward by writing his first story. Rocket loves books and he wants to make his own, but he can’t think of a story. Encouraged by the little yellow bird to look closely at the world around him for inspiration, Rocket sets out on a journey. Along the way he discovers small details that he has never noticed before, a timid baby owl who becomes his friend, and an idea for a story.

Teenagers “Frozen” by Mary Casanova     A new selection from Minnesota author Mary Casanova. “Frozen” tells the remarkable story of Sadie Rose, whose mother died under strange circumstances the same night that Sadie Rose was found, unable to speak, in a snowbank. Sadie Rose doesn’t know her last name and has only fleeting memories of her mother—and the conflicting knowledge that her mother had worked in a brothel. Taken in as a foster child by a corrupt senator, Sadie Rose spends every summer along the shores of Rainy Lake, where her silence is both a prison and a sanctuary.

Adults “Reporting Live from the Laundry Pile: The Rockwood Files Collection” By Gwen Rockwood Gwen Rockwood reports on everyday life for the readers of her syndicated weekly newspaper column, The Rockwood Files. Funny, poignant and relatable, this collection tracks her evolution from naïve newlywed to resourceful mom on the assignment of her life—raising three kids in the spin cycle of a busy home life. She finds big meaning in the little moments of marriage and mothering, telling stories that resonate with readers both in and out of the parenting trenches. Gwen is a regular contributor to The Village Family Magazine’s Mom’s View column.

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YOUR FAMILY z mom’s view

The Fifth Grade Reality Check By Gwen Rockwood Last week, there was a foul mood afoot. Our oldest, who is typically a laid-back, agreeable 10-year-old, sounded more like a grumpy old man. It was as if his glass half-full had spilled and he’d stepped in the puddle with sock-feet. Noting his sour demeanor after school one day, I said, “Wow, you’re in a bad mood today. What’s going on?” But he was in no mood to talk, so his younger brother chimed in and offered his own diagnosis: “It’s probably the adolescence, Mom.” “The adolescence, huh? Does the adolescence put you in a grumpy mood?” I asked, as the brooding kid did his best to ignore us. “Yeah, I think that’s what it does to you,” Jack said, clearly relieved that he’s still young and hasn’t yet contracted the dread disease. So I let the issue drop because sometimes the best cure for a negative mood is a little time and space to work through it. But I’ve been noticing lately that this kid who was once optimistic and full of wonder and ambition seems a little disillusioned lately—not in a bitter, angry way. It’s more of a resigned sadness, as if he’s beginning to figure out that the world is not Disneyland. Things aren’t always fair. And sometimes life is disappointing and hard. This new awareness is probably an inevitable part of growing up, but that doesn’t make it any easier to watch as a parent. In order to empathize, I try to revisit what fifth grade was like for me. The schoolwork got harder. Teachers expected more. The tests were trickier. And suddenly the social food chain was a much bigger deal than ever before, and navigating it made me anxious and edgy. Status mattered more. Brands mattered more. And coolness was critical. Girls “liked” boys, and boys “liked” girls, even though most of us had no idea what the “liking” was all about. Some girls were mean and manipulative, and some boys threatened to beat up other boys. Social clumps started to form—the popular kids, the nerds, the weird kids, the sports stars, the goody-goodies, the mean kids, and then lots of regular kids floating somewhere in the midst of all those cliques. The playground was no longer about freeze tag and monkey bars. It was complicated and sometimes emotionally exhausting. I was always glad to go home after the final bell and escape the tween drama. But even at home, things were different. My fifth grade awareness of the world made me notice that my parents were sometimes annoying, too, and I was convinced that their personality change had nothing to do with my own frustration and swirling pre-teen hormones. So maybe fifth grade is one of life’s first reality checks. It’s when we find out that growing up is not always as fun 12 February/March 2013

Illustration by Trygve Olson

as it looks on the Disney channel, and none of us escapes it completely unscathed. Watching this process has given me a whole new respect for this stage of the parenting game. We sometimes think the toughest stuff happens during the baby years, when we’re sleep deprived, changing diapers, and making sure they don’t eat dirt. But the challenges change as the kids do. I once heard a parenting guru say that our job is not to move the boulders out of our kid’s path but to help them learn how to climb over them. And that’s what I’m trying to do, but there are times when all I want is to climb into a steamroller and pave the way ahead of him—eliminate the hurts and struggle and protect the tender heart. Gwen Rockwood is a syndicated freelance columnist. Send comments to her at rockwoodfiles@cox.net. Archives of The Rockwood Files can be found online at www. nwaMotherlode.com.

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YOUR FAMILY z dad’s view

I Used To Be Cute, Too By Rick Epstein “So, what’s your plan for the evening?” I asked Brandon, the high school senior who stood in our living room, dutifully meeting the parents. I meant the question to sound ambiguous, not that I really expected him to give me a sly wink and outline a scenario of seduction for me. “I thought we’d rent a movie and then go back to my house and watch it,” he said, reasonably enough. “Will there be any old people there?” I asked. “Oh yes,” he said, smiling and holding up two fingers. “Two parents.” I wanted a phone number to confirm that, but decided not to insult him by asking for it. My wife asked another question to which he knew the right answer, “Are you a careful driver?” “Oh yes,” Brandon said soothingly. “Very careful.” “OK,” I said grudgingly. “Can you have her home by 11?” “No problem,” he said, then he and my 16-year-old daughter Wendy said goodbye and ran down the front walk like they’d just lit a fuse. But when they drove away, there was no shower of gravel. “He’s cute!” said my wife. “I used to be cute, too,” I retorted bitterly. If it weren’t February and time for my annual Valentine Report, I’d just as soon skip this entire topic. Young love gets old fast when you have three daughters. This was Wendy’s first date with a boy who drives, and I’m not liking it. Up until now, Wendy’s social life has been without privacy. I’d deliver her to someone’s house and get a responsible adult to take a blood oath to monitor the suspect until my return. Or Wendy would entertain in our living room—a central hub you have to pass through to get practically anywhere in the house. It’s as public a place as you’re liable to find in a private home. Social historians say the automobile changed America’s “courtship patterns,” and now that includes Wendy. I have to admit Brandon made good eye contact and had a firm handshake. He has a reputation for being devoutly religious and fervently anti-drug. But my source for that information is Wendy, a girl who mixes fact and fiction like a bartender creating exotic drinks. We waited up for her, and at the stroke of 11 Wendy surged into the house like she’d been popped out of a champagne bottle. She told us, “Out in the car, Brandon said, ‘I think your parents like me. Should I come in and say goodnight?’ I told him, ‘Don’t over-do it.’ Then he goes, ‘C’mere a second,’ and he gave me a little kiss.” She was as happy and breathless as if she’d just won the Kentucky Derby. The situation forces me to remember a romance that I perpetrated about a thousand years ago, when I was a high school senior with full access to my stepmother’s Pontiac Tempest, which was underpowered but roomy. Kathy was a freshman who was active in church and 4-H. “Have her home by 10,” said her sad-eyed father at the outset of our first date.

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Illustration by Trygve Olson

“How about 11?” I countered. “Ten-thirty,” the old man said wearily. Whenever I took Kathy to a movie or a basketball game, I would pad the schedule with at least 30 minutes of off-theradar parking time. Looking back, I’m glad to say that we never got much past kissing. But Kathy deserves all the credit. One night driving home from her house, I was so preoccupied that I made the four-mile trip with the parking brake on. I smelled something burning, but I thought it was hormonal. After four months, Kathy and I realized that the only thing we really had in common was my desire, so we broke up. When our inning of the Game of Life ended, our relationship was an unscored run that died halfway between first and second base. We both moved on, me more quickly than she. So if you like justice, there’s plenty of it in my current thankless role as father of a hot chick. It’s like being reincarnated as a skunk after living a wicked life. It’s totally fair, but it still stinks. Rick Epstein can be reached at rickepstein@ yahoo.com.

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Cat and Dog Theology

By Laurie Neill In a bookstore a while back, my attention was caught by a book entitled, “Cat and Dog Theology.” The premise of the book was that a dog says, “You pet me, you feed me, you shelter me, you love me, you must be God.” A cat says, “You pet me, you feed me, you shelter me, you love me, I must be God.” Let me start by apologizing to all the cat lovers out there. This is in no way meant to be a slam on our feline friends. It is only an analogy that uses the traits of these two animals to make a point. And the point is this: consider which of these two views fits the description of your relationship with God. The dogs among us, you see, live for God. They come to him because that’s who life is about. They seek God for who he is, not for what he can do for them.

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The cats among us, on the other hand, want to know, “What’s in it for me?” Because it is all about me, isn’t it? Cats seek God for what he can do for them, not for who he is. It’s been said that dogs have masters, and cats have staff. The dogs learn to obey their masters; whereas the cats want their masters to obey them. If we apply this to a relationship with God, cats may not fully admit it, but they come to him saying, “I’m here, please bless me.” Or they may believe coming to God means a better life—perhaps one without as much suffering or one with more abundance. Or perhaps a cat comes to God out of fear—fear of what might happen after they die if they don’t have a relationship with him. Cats may be walking toward God, but they are walking backwards because their eyes are focused on their fears. Whereas dogs are walking towards God forward, because their focus isn’t on their fears—their focus is on God. Their motivation for seeking him out is totally different. They say, “I’ve found someone who’s not only beautiful, he is beauty. I’ve found someone who is not only powerful, he’s almighty. I’ve found someone who not only loves, he is love. And I’ve got to give him glory through my life.” Much of how people view God depends on their definition of Christianity. As I see it, Christianity isn’t just a religion or a doctrine or a set of beliefs. It isn’t merely a set of rules or a mystical idea or a practice or a tradition. That’s not to say that it is not also those things or that those things aren’t important. All of those things shape our expression and understanding of our faith. But if someone comes to me and wants to know what Christianity is all about, my job is not to make them believe everything I believe. My job is not to tell them what they do and don’t need to do in order to be saved. My job is not to convert them to have the same beliefs and opinions I do. My job is tell them about the relationship on which Christianity is based. If our relationship with God is like a business relationship instead of a personal one, we may find ourselves making demands. We sometimes are tempted to bargain with God, saying, “Hey, I’m holding up my end of the deal here, why aren’t you doing your part?” If our relationship with God is personal, then we bask in his love. We make time for him and get together just to get together—not because we want something. We even rearrange our schedule to put God first.

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Dogs have masters. Cats have staff.

Are you a cat or a dog? Chances are each of us is a little of both. I know I am. We all desire blessings and happiness and a life abundant, but if those are the only reasons we want a relationship with God, then we are missing the point. It’s not that cat theology is wrong, but that it is incomplete. C.S. Lewis said, “I didn’t go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of Port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don’t recommend Christianity.” Don’t seek out a relationship with God to be saved from something, but instead to be saved for something. Your life circumstances may not change, but the way you see your life circumstances will. It may benefit us to review all our relationships through the lens of cats or dogs. When we look at each individual relationship, what is it we are asking of that relationship? Are we in it for what we can get out of it, or for what we can give to it? It just may change the way we see and act towards those we value most in life. “In Touch” is brought to you by First Lutheran Church, Downtown Fargo.

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February/March 2013 15


YOUR FAMILY z consumer

By Jessica Fisher

Once upon a time, you might have gone to your mother’s freezer and found all kinds of crazy things, including three or four versions of Mystery Meat Casserole and Chicken a la King. And you might not have been too excited about dinner time. The freezer meals of yesteryear were filled with canned cream soups and other dubious ingredients. If your mom did “once-a-month-cooking,” perhaps you watched her spend days at a time shopping, chopping, and hopping around the kitchen in a frenzy to fill the freezer. Then, she was wiped out at the end of her efforts. It just may have turned you off from the thought of ever feeding your family a frozen meal. Times, my friends, have changed. The “make-ahead and freeze” method has matured. Not only are there easy ways to fill the freezer, but there are tasty ones, too. Here are four things you should know about the modern age of freezer cooking.

1. Freezer cooking can save you time, money, and sanity.

By making several meals in advance and storing them in the freezer, you are providing for those future nights when life is hectic and you just don’t have time to cook. You will avoid takeout since you know there’s a home-cooked meal ready to go. And you will spend less effort puzzling out what’s for dinner. Just grab some homemade soup or burritos from the freezer and have a feast!

2. You don’t need a deep freeze.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to have a ginormous freezer to make batch cooking work for you. With careful packaging and organizing, you can store at least a week’s worth of meals in the smallest refrigerator/freezer, even more if your fridge is a big one.

3. Casseroles are not the only things you can make.

Some people think you can only “freezer cook” if you’re making tons of casseroles. This is just not the case. Marinate 16 February/March 2013

chicken breasts to throw on the grill. Precook and season taco meat to make quick work of a taco bar later in the month. Mix up a stew or soup to reheat on another night. There’s no end to the possibilities. Think about what part of a meal you can make ahead and prep that.

4. Premade meals can taste great!

You may be worried about freezer burn or freezer taste, remembering those Mystery Meat Casseroles of yore. Honestly, we are food snobs at my house; those situations would not fly with my people. Correct packaging and freezing is key. Cool foods completely, wrap them well, and eat them up within a month or two for best taste and texture.  Don’t believe me? Try one of these recipes on for size. Jessica Fisher is the author of Not Your Mother’s MakeAhead and Freeze Cookbook. A busy mom to six children, she writes about life, laughter, and the pursuit of a clean house at LifeasMOM.com and shares delicious ways to act your wage at GoodCheapEats.com.

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Cheddar Soup with Zucchini, Broccoli, and Carrots Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients: ⁄4 cup (1⁄2 stick) butter

1

2 cloves garlic, minced ⁄2 medium-size zucchini, shredded 1

1 carrot, peeled and shredded ⁄2 medium-size onion, shredded 1

1. In a large saucepan, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. Add the garlic, zucchini, carrot, and onion. Sauté until the vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes. 2. Stir in the broccoli and broth. Simmer until the broccoli is tender, about 10 minutes.

2 cups milk

3. Meanwhile, melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a large pot over medium heat. Whisk in the flour and cook for a minute or two. Whisk in the milk until smooth. Simmer until thickened. Whisk in the cheddar cheese gradually, stirring to incorporate.

2 cups shredded cheddar cheese

4. Pour the vegetable mixture into the cheese mixture, stirring to combine. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Freezing instructions:

To thaw and serve:

• Packaging: Plastic containers with lids

• Thaw the soup in the refrigerator. Reheat in a saucepan until heated through, stirring to recombine. Serve immediately.

⁄4 cup unbleached allpurpose flour 1

Fancy cafés charge a pretty penny for their cheese and broccoli soup. Save money and eat at home in style. Keep single-serving containers of this soup on hand for quick lunches and suppers.

• Portion the soup into mealsize plastic containers. Cool to room temperature. Cover and chill in the refrigerator before freezing.

© 2012 from Not Your Mother’s Make-Ahead and Freeze Cookbook by Jessica Fisher and used by permission of The Harvard Common Press.

Cheddar Soup preparation courtesy of Rhonda Harmon (West Fargo); Photos by Jared Zimney family

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February/March 2013 17

1 head broccoli, chopped into small florets (about 3 cups)

3 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

Cooking instructions:


Versatile Slow-Cooked Carnitas

Cooking instructions:

Ingredients:

1. Place the pork roast in a 4-quart slow cooker. Season the meat generously with salt and pepper. Add the chopped onion and sprinkle the oregano over all. Add the water to the pot.

Serves 10 to 12

One 3- to 4-pound pork shoulder roast

1 medium-size onion, chopped

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1

⁄2 teaspoon dried oregano ⁄4 cup water

1

2. Cook on LOW for 8 hours or on HIGH for about 4 hours. The meat should be very tender and shred easily. 3. Remove the meat from the pot. Strain the juices and reserve them to add to chili, stew, or soup.

4. Shred and cut the meat into bite-size pieces. Carnitas (“Little Meats” in Spanish) is a seasoned, shredded pork filling used for tacos, tostadas, and tamales. Traditionally, the pork shoulder is boiled and then roasted. Here, it is prepared in a slow cooker for a simpler yet equally delicious result. The moist and juicy carnitas freezes and reheats quite well, making it a perfect addition to your freezer cooking arsenal. Instead of a shoulder roast, you can use country-style pork strips, which often go on sale.

Freezing instructions:

To thaw and serve:

• Packaging: Quart-sized ziptop freezer bags or plastic containers with lids

• Thaw the meat in the refrigerator. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Place the meat in a baking dish and reheat for 15 minutes, until hot. Adjust the seasonings to taste.

• Divide the carnitas into mealsize portions in freezer bags or containers. Chill the meat in the refrigerator before freezing.

© 2012 from Not Your Mother’s Make-Ahead and Freeze Cookbook by Jessica Fisher and used by permission of The Harvard Common Press.

18 February/March 2013

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Easy Slow Cooker Red Sauce Makes 14 to 16 cups ⁄4 cup olive oil

1

2 large onions, diced 1 tablespoon chopped garlic Four 28-ounce cans crushed tomatoes 1 to 2 cups water 1 tablespoon salt ⁄3 cup chopped fresh basil or 2 tablespoons dried basil 1

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley or 1 tablespoon dried parsley flakes ⁄2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1

To thaw and serve:

• Packaging: Plastic containers with lids

• Thaw the sauce in the refrigerator. Reheat in a saucepan over low heat, whisking to recombine.

• Divide the sauce into meal-size portions in plastic containers. Chill in the refrigerator before freezing.

© 2012 from Not Your Mother’s Make-Ahead and Freeze Cookbook by Jessica Fisher and used by permission of The Harvard Common Press.

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February/March 2013 19

1. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and cook until softened. Spoon the onion mixture into a 5-quart or larger slow cooker. Add the crushed tomatoes, water, salt, basil, parsley, and red pepper flakes. Cover and cook on LOW for at least 4 hours. Adjust the seasonings to taste.

Freezing instructions:


YOUR FAMILY z feature

By Heidi Tetzman Roepke Photography by Shane Mercer

“I think that men know how to romance a woman and most do it well, at least for a time, otherwise women wouldn’t marry them. The problem is that most of them begin to rest on their laurels.” —Nicholas Sparks Nicholas Sparks, author of such renowned books as “The Notebook,” “A Walk to Remember,” and “Nights in Rodanthe,” recognizes that after marriage, romancing—or dating—your spouse may diminish in priority as other obligations take precedence. Dating isn’t just for those couples beginning to get acquainted. The rituals and romance of dating have a valuable role to play in strengthening a marriage or other wellestablished relationship. John Lyon, a therapist with The Village

20 February/March 2013

Family Service Center, Fargo, remarks, “The more time couples spend with each other, focused on each other, the less conflict they experience.” Lyon goes on to say how, through dating or doing unique things together, couples create their own stories and a sense of connection to each other. We’ve scoured the streets of Fargo-Moorhead to detail a list of date night ideas for you and your special someone. Impress a new acquaintance or stoke the flames with your longtime love with one of these out-of-the-ordinary ideas, full of possibilities.

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Play in the snow

If you believe the adage, “A couple that plays together, stays together,” then grab your date, bundle up, and head outdoors. You’re never too old to act like a kid. Have a good oldfashioned snowball fight, make a snowman—or snow angels— together. Check out one of the local rinks for ice skating or try cross-country skiing. Dave Klundt, assistant director of recreation for the Fargo Park District, says cross-country skiing is a great, low-impact workout if you’re looking for a fun afternoon outdoors. “We have die-hards—some people have rented skis and liked it so much they bought their own,” Klundt says. The one catch is there has to be enough snow. Six to 12 inches, Klundt says. There are four different Park District sites for cross-country skiing in Fargo: Edgewood Golf Course, Dike East to Lindenwood Trail, Prairiewood Golf Course, and Rose Creek Golf Course. The old clubhouse at Edgewood is open as a warming facility and features an interior fireplace and snack bar. You can rent skis, boots, and poles there for $10.25 per adult. Hours of operation are 3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on weekdays, Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Sunday noon to 8 p.m. The Park District

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offers adult lessons on Sundays dependent on snow. See www. Fargoparks.com for more details. After your playtime out in the snow, you and your date can warm up with an Irish coffee, hot toddy, or cocoa at a local restaurant or bar.

Act like a tourist

Sometimes we forget that our own hometown is ripe for exploring. Strap on a camera and become a tourist in FargoMoorhead for your date. Stroll around picturesque Island Park and take photos of each other among the trees or by the gazebo. Snap photos by the Fargo clock in front of the Park District offices on Main Avenue, with the Fargo Theatre sign in the background on Broadway, or near the Stave Church at the Hjemkomst Center in Moorhead. For other photo ops, stop at the Fargo-Moorhead Convention and Visitors Bureau (FMCVB) on 44th Street South to see the actual wood chipper prop from the movie “Fargo.” Another free attraction at the FMCVB is the Celebrity Walk of Fame which includes more than 110 signatures, handprints, and footprints in cement of celebrities from the music industry, politics, arts, business, and sports—all of whom have visited the area.

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February/March 2013 21


Head over to Scheels and ride the 45-foot, 12-car Ferris wheel or take a trip to the Red River Zoo and hop on the horses of the Diederich Family Carousel. Think of all the places around Fargo-Moorhead you send your guests when they’re visiting and take some time to explore those venues on a date.

Get altruistic

Spend quality time with your special someone while doing some good in the community. Maybe the two of you can work together at a food pantry or volunteer to help with dogs and cats at an animal shelter. Many evening volunteer opportunities exist. FirstLink is the area’s clearinghouse for organizations seeking help from the public. Log on to www.myfirstlink.org for a listing of current needs. For a fancier spin on altruism, make a date to attend one of the many local nonprofit fundraising events that come complete with food, fun, and entertainment—all to help a good cause. This community is lucky to have so many groups dedicated to serving those in need and rarely a month goes by without one of them hosting a dinner event. Organizations such as the North Dakota Autism Center, Ronald McDonald House, Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch, and The Village Family Service Center

all hold annual evening events. It’s a wonderful opportunity to dress up, enjoy one another’s company, and make a difference in the community, too.

Dance the night away

Have you ever considered square dancing? Four area square dancing clubs make up the F-M Square Dancers Association. Lessons are available and, because there are so many clubs, you can do-si-do somewhere in town every week. Northern Lights Ballroom Dance Club also holds weekly dances (with lessons) in the lower level of the West Fargo VFW. Just to keep things interesting, a different type of dance is taught each month. Area dance schools like Gasper’s, Bonnie Haney, or Red River Dance offer a variety of dance lessons and some have private lessons as a nice date option. If swing dancing interests you, FargoSwings! is currently on hiatus, but hopes to start weekly dance events again in August. John Noone of Fargo Swings! says swing dancing has a “friendly feel to it and they are always happy to see newcomers.” Visit their Facebook page or www.fargoswings. com for more information.

Parents enjoy a night out

while the kids join us at the YMCA for climbing, gym games, XerZones and more!

SATURDAY FUN NIGHTS! February 2 & March 2 Grades K-6 | Time: 4:30 - 9:30 p.m. Mbr Fee: $14.50 Non-Mbr Fee: $20.00 Location: Schlossman YMCA

EXTREME NIGHTS! March 9 Grades 6-8 | Time: 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. Member Fee & Non-Member Fee: $5.00 Location: Schlossman YMCA (4243 19th Ave. S, Fargo)

To Register Call 701.293.9622 or www.ymcacassclay.org/funnights Clip this out, hang it on your fridge, & schedule your nights out!

22 February/March 2013

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Look for adventure

Skydiving or a hot air balloon ride both smack of adventure, but take some pre-planning and research to arrange in Fargo-Moorhead. The local skydiving club operates seasonally out of the West Fargo Airport. For information regarding tandem and static-line jumps, go online to www.skydivefargo.com. An easier adventure might be exploring the 32-foot indoor climbing wall at Schlossman YMCA. Just sign a waiver, pay the $12 fee, and you can spend your time together getting fit and climbing up the wall!

A twist on the old stand-by

Going out to dinner for date night is a no-brainer. With more than 350 restaurants in the Fargo-Moorhead area, choosing the one you want to visit might be the trick. There are several ways you can make this exciting. Get out of a rut. Perhaps you always head out to the mall area to go to dinner at a tried and true chain restaurant. Why not travel downtown? Restaurants there showcase a variety of cuisines to enjoy from fantastic American contemporary at Mezzaluna to delicious dishes of noodles galore at Drunken Noodle. Another idea is to dedicate date nights to trying all the variations of just one food category, so over a certain period of time you’d dine at every pizza restaurant in town, or every BBQ place. Act like restaurant critics and discuss what you find delicious or what you find deplorable. Maybe a world tour theme is the answer. For food-lovers and travellovers, nothing could be more romantic than a mini-adventure sampling different selections from restaurants representing far-flung destinations around the globe. Try an appetizer from Thailand at Leela Thai, then an entrée from Italy at Altony’s or Toscana, and finish with a dessert from Mexico at Paradiso, Mexican Village, or Juano’s. If you’re not interested in testing your palate with such a variety of cuisines, you can still jazz up the evening by visiting a different restaurant for each

course—appetizers through dessert. Or try a backwards dinner by enjoying dessert first, then a main course, then an appetizer!

Make the time

This is not an exhaustive list of all the date night things to do in Fargo-Moorhead, by any means. Our community is rich with cultural events sponsored by area colleges and other arts and entertainment groups. Use your imagination to carve out time for you and your special someone. It can be as simple as grabbing a cozy blanket, taking a drive out to the country, and gazing up at the stars, together. Heidi Tetzman Roepke is a freelance writer and copy editor/page designer at The Forum of Fargo-Moorhead. She lives in Fargo with her husband, Dave, and their cat, Sahara.

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February/March 2013 23


Calendar of Events

To include your event in our family-friendly calendar, email shendricksen@TheVillageFamily.org. Deadline for April/May is March 1, 2013. Although we strive to be as accurate as possible, please call ahead to verify information, registration requirements, or event fees. Due to limited space, we are unable to include all submissions.

FEBRUARY 2013 EVENTS 2.1 Friday • American Heart Association’s Wear Red Day. www.goredforwomen.org/wearredday • Midwinter Piano Festival. Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4414 • Me & My Shadow. Groundhog Day celebration. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-6102 or www. childrensmuseum-yunker.org • Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam. Monster truck show. 7:30 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • “Rumors.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • Fargo Force vs. Omaha Lancers. 7:35 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www.fargoforce. com 2.2 Saturday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701461-8902 • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-2811002 or www.bn.com • Adopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. Meet animals available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PETCO, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, 701232-5856 or www.adoptapetfm.org • Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam. Monster truck show. 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Saturday Fun Night. Grades K-6. 4:309:30 p.m., Schlossman YMCA, 4243 19th Ave. S., Fargo. Register at 701-293-9622 or www.ymcacassclay.org/funnights (See ad pg. 22) • American Heart Association’s Masquerade Heart Ball. Silent and live auction, dinner, and dancing. 5 p.m.midnight, Hilton Garden Inn, 4351 17th Ave. S., Fargo, www.redrivervalleyheartball.org • Father Daughter Sweetheart Dance. For young ladies ages 4-12 and their dad, uncle, or grandpa. Please register by Jan. 31. 6-8 p.m., Sheyenne 9th Grade Center, 800 40th Ave. W., West Fargo, 701-4335360 or www.wfparks.org

24 February/March 2013

• Candlelight Ski. Skiers, snowshoers, and hikers can come and enjoy candle-lit trails. Call 218-498-2124 for details. 6-9 p.m., Buffalo River State park, Glyndon • Frozen Fantasy. 7-9:30 p.m., Doublewood Inn, 3333 13th Ave. S., Fargo, 701-4997788 or www.fargoparks.com • Fargo Force vs. Omaha Lancers. Kids Rule Night! Visit any Stop-N-Go location for a free kids ticket voucher. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www.fargoforce.com • The Concordia Orchestra Spotlight Concert. 7:30 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-2994515 • “Rumors.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org 2.3 Sunday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701461-8902 • History Sundays with Steve Stark: Smith Stimmel. Like a storybook unfolding before your eyes, Steve Stark’s speed drawing and storytelling will entertain the whole family. 1 p.m., Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 218-299-5511 or www. hcscconline.org • “Rumors.” 2 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org 2.5 Tuesday • Trollwood Performing Arts School Information Open House. Parents and students are invited to stop in for 2013 season information. 5:30-6:30 p.m., Trollwood Performing Arts School, 801 50th Ave. S.W., Moorhead, 218-477-6500 2.6 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-2811002 or www.bn.com 2.7 Thursday • “Rumors.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org 2.8 Friday • Open Gym. Ages 5-14. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kids Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.com • “Rumors.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org

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2.9 Saturday • Kiwanis Pancake Karnival. 7 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701461-8902 • Polar Party. Sleigh rides, bonfire, and outdoor family fun. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., MB Johnson Park, 3601 11th St. N., Moorhead, 218-299-5340 or www.cityofmoorhead.com/ parks • Hearts & Smiles. Join the Tooth Fairy for fun with toothbrushes and valentines. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-6102 or www.childrensmuseumyunker.org • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-2811002 or www.bn.com • Awesome Art Afternoon. 1-3 p.m., RDJ Rec Center, 1104 2nd Ave. S., Fargo, 701499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com • 4 Luv of Dog Rescue “Meet the Dogs.” Visit dogs available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-205-0190 or www.4luvofdog.org • China Painting Presentation. Vida Clocke will present on the history and art of china painting. 2 p.m., Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 218-299-5511 or www. hcscconline.org • FM Chamber Chorale Gala: A Singing Valentine. Social hour, silent auction, dinner, and a concert of Broadway show tunes. Call 701-491-2910 for ticket information. 6 p.m., Ramada Plaza & Suites, 1635 43rd St. S., Fargo, www. fmchamberchorale.org • Teen Pool Party. 6:30-9 p.m., Fargo South Indoor Pool, 1840 15th Ave. S., Fargo, 701499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com • FM Derby Girls Bout. 7 p.m., Fargo Civic Center, 207 4th St. N., Fargo, www. fmderbygirls.com • “Rumors.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org 2.10 Sunday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701461-8902

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• History Sundays with Steve Stark: Bonanza Farms. Like a storybook unfolding before your eyes, Steve Stark’s speed drawing and storytelling will entertain the whole family. 1 p.m., Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 218299-5511 or www.hcscconline.org • Destination Anchor Island. 1-5 p.m., Fargo South Indoor Pool, 1840 15th Ave. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www. fargoparks.com • “Rumors.” 2 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • The Concordia Band Home Concert. 4 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515

Chamber Music Series: Woodwind Serenades - 2.17

2.13 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com 2.14 Thursday • Giving Hearts Day. Support regional nonprofits by logging on to www.impactgiveback.org and making a donation. Dakota Medical Foundation will match all online gifts of $10 or more up to $4,000 to each charity. (See ad pg. 2) • Happy Valentine’s Day, Yunker Farm! 2-for-1 admission. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-6102 or www. childrensmuseum-yunker.org • ND State Wrestling Tournament. 10:30 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www. fargodome.com • Valentine’s Concert: Darin Henze & Friends. Noon, Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-3821 or www. plainsart.org • “Songs for a New World.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • “Boeing Boeing.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3314 2.15 Friday • West Fargo Middle School STEM Center Book Fair. View science projects and demonstrations as students work to raise money for books for their school. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www. bn.com • ND State Wrestling Tournament. 10 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • “Crazy For You.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-356-2050 or www.westfargotheatre.com • “Songs for a New World.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • Fargo Force vs. Waterloo Black Hawks. 7:35 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www. fargoforce.com • “Boeing Boeing.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3314 2.16 Saturday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • ND State Wrestling Tournament. 10 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Saturday in the Sky. Geared to grades 4-8. 10-11:30 a.m. & 1-2:30 p.m., Fargo Air Museum, 1609 19th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-293-8043 or www.fargoairmuseum.org • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com

family

Letting Our Little Lights Shine! Open House February 21 5:30-7:00 pm Christian Preschool

Come experience Little Lights and register for Fall 2013!

3-Year Old Class Tuesday and Thursday Mornings 3, 4, and 5-Year Old Multi-Age Class Tuesday and Thursday afternoons 4 and 5-Year-Old Classes Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings Five-Day Pre-K Class Monday through Friday afternoons Triumph Lutheran Brethren Church 2901 20th Street S Moorhead, MN 56560 218.233.4048 www.littlelightspreschool.com

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February/March 2013 25


West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-356-2050 or www. westfargotheatre.com

Unglued Craft Fest - 2.22 & 2.23

2.18 Monday • School’s Out Day Camp. Grades K-7. Call 701-365-8868 for details and to sign up. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kids Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, www.tntkidsfitness.com 2.19 Tuesday • Symphonic Band Concert. 7:30 p.m., Centrum, Knutson Campus Center, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-2994515 2.20 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com

Proof Stamp

2.16 Saturday (cont.) • “True Strength” Book Signing. Actor and author Kevin Sorbo will be signing copies of his book. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com • Adopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. Meet animals available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PETCO, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, 701232-5856 or www.adoptapetfm.org

Date: ____

OK__ Changes__

• Family Day at the Dike. 1-4 p.m., Dike West, 310 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www.fargoparks.com • “Songs for a New World.” 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • 16th Annual Celebration of Women &

Signature________________ Their Music. 6:30 p.m., Fargo Theatre, Become a

Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA)

• Outstanding opportunities in the healthcare industry • Designed for those entering a nursing career or working in a long-term care facility • New classes begin every 6 weeks

1305 19th Avenue North

ndscs.edu/fargo

701-231-6900

26 February/March 2013 14 August/September 2011

314 Broadway, Fargo, www.debjenkins. com/celebrationofwomen.html • FM Derby Girls Bout. 7 p.m., Fargo Civic Center, 207 4th St. N., Fargo, www. fmderbygirls.com • Fargo Force vs. Waterloo Black Hawks. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www. fargoforce.com • “Crazy For You.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-356-2050 or www. westfargotheatre.com • “Boeing Boeing.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3314 2.17 Sunday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701461-8902 • Chamber Music Series: Woodwind Serenades. 2 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 650 2nd Ave. N., Fargo, 701-4783676 or www.fmsymphony.org • “Boeing Boeing.” 2 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3314 • “Songs for a New World.” 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • “Crazy For You.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 2:30 p.m.,

villagefamilymag.org villagefamilymag.org

2.21 Thursday • Little Lights Preschool Open House. Bring your preschooler and experience Little Lights. 5:30-7 p.m., Triumph Lutheran Brethren Church, 2901 20th St. S., Moorhead, 218-233-4048 or www. littlelightspreschool.com (See ad pg. 25) 2.22 Friday • RRV Home & Garden Show. 3 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Unglued Craft Fest. Showcase of handmade items by regional crafters and artisans. 5-8 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-3821 or www.ungluedmarket.com • “Crazy For You.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-356-2050 or www. westfargotheatre.com • Fargo Force vs. Sioux Falls Stampede. 7:35 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www. fargoforce.com 2.23 Saturday • RRV Home & Garden Show. 9 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Unglued Craft Fest. Showcase of handmade items by regional crafters and artisans. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., Plains Art Museum, 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-2323821 or www.ungluedmarket.com • Sugar Valley Toy Show. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Hartl Ag Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1201 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-282-2200 • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701461-8902 • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com • 4 Luv of Dog Rescue “Meet the Dogs.” Visit dogs available for adoption. 1-3 p.m.,

family family


PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-205-0190 or www.4luvofdog.org • “Crazy For You.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 7:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-356-2050 or www.westfargotheatre.com 2.24 Sunday • Sugar Valley Toy Show. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Hartl Ag Building, RRV Fairgrounds, 1201 W. Main Ave., West Fargo, 701-282-2200 • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-4618902 • RRV Home & Garden Show. 11 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • History Sundays with Steve Stark: Propellers & Pantaloons. Like a storybook unfolding before your eyes, Steve Stark’s speed drawing and storytelling will entertain the whole family. 1 p.m., Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 218-299-5511 or www.hcscconline.org • “Crazy For You.” Presented by West Fargo High School Theatre. 2:30 p.m., West Fargo High School, 801 9th St. E., West Fargo, 701-356-2050 or www.westfargotheatre.com 2.27 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com 2.28 Thursday • On the Move Little Black Dress for MS Luncheon. Keynote speaker Ronda Giangreco. 11 a.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 4351 17th Ave. S., Fargo, www.littleblackdressforMS.org • “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” Presented by Horizon Middle School Theatre. ASL interpreted performance. 7 p.m., Moorhead High School Auditorium, 2300 4th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-2842345 • “Forever Plaid.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org

3.3 Sunday • Annual North Dakota Picnic. Food, music, conversation, and door prizes. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Pioneer Park, 526 East Main, Mesa, Ariz., 701-451-4957 • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” Presented by Horizon Middle School Theatre. 2 p.m., Moorhead High School Auditorium, 2300 4th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-284-2345 • MSUM Wind Ensemble Concert. 7:30 p.m., Glasrud Auditorium, Weld Hall, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2102 3.6 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com 3.7 Thursday • Sportsmen’s Boat, Camping & Vacation Show. 5 p.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com 3.8 Friday • Sportsmen’s Boat, Camping & Vacation Show. Noon, Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www.fargodome.com • Open Gym. Ages 5-14. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kids Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.com 3.9 Saturday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Sportsmen’s Boat, Camping & Vacation Show. 10 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or www. fargodome.com • Saturday in the Sky. Geared to grades 4-8. 10-11:30 a.m. & 1-2:30 p.m., Fargo Air Museum, 1609 19th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-293-8043 or www.fargoairmuseum.org

MARCH 2013 EVENTS 3.1 Friday • “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” Presented by Horizon Middle School Theatre. 7 p.m., Moorhead High School Auditorium, 2300 4th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-284-2345 • “Forever Plaid.” 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • Fargo Force vs. Lincoln Stars. 7:35 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www.fargoforce.com 3.2 Saturday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 10 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-4618902 • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com • Adopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. Meet animals available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PETCO, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-232-5856 or www.adoptapetfm.org • “Forever Plaid.” 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., The Stage at Island Park, 333 4th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-6778 or www.fmct.org • Saturday Fun Night. Grades K-6. 4:30-9:30 p.m., Schlossman YMCA, 4243 19th Ave. S., Fargo. Register at 701-293-9622 or www.ymcacassclay.org/funnights (See ad pg. 22) • “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” Presented by Horizon Middle School Theatre. 7 p.m., Moorhead High School Auditorium, 2300 4th Ave. S., Moorhead, 218-284-2345 • Fargo Force vs. Lincoln Stars. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www.fargoforce.com

family

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Ever wonder how kids learn their first language?

Come help us find out! The Language Lab at NDSU is looking for study participants who are 2-5 years old. Each study involves one visit to our lab, scheduled at your convenience. All participants will receive a small gift to thank them for their help.

Interested?

Please give us a call at 701-499-5276.

28 February/March 2013

3.9 Saturday (cont.) “The Complete World of Sports.” - 3.23 • Celtic Festival. Presentations, arts and crafts, and Celtic food. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 701-499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com (See ad pg. 29) • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www. bn.com • 4 Luv of Dog Rescue “Meet the Dogs.” Visit dogs available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-2050190 or www.4luvofdog.org • Fargo Ice Revue. 7 p.m., Coliseum, 801 17th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www. fargoparks.com • Extreme Night. Grades 6-8., 7-10 p.m., Schlossman YMCA, 4243 19th Ave. S., Fargo. Register 3.14 Thursday at 701-293-9622 or www.ymcacassclay. • “Five Women Wearing the Same Dress.” org/funnights (See ad pg. 22) 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, • Fargo Force vs. Lincoln Stars. Bring Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299your skates and get on the ice with the 3314 Force after the game. 7:05 p.m., Scheels 3.15 Friday Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364• Bouncin’ Bash & More. Inflatable family 3672 or www.fargoforce.com fun. Open to all ages; children 12 and 3.10 Sunday under must attend with an adult. 4-9 p.m., • Sportsmen’s Boat, Camping & Vacation Veterans Memorial Arena, 1201 7th Ave. Show. 10 a.m., Fargodome, 1800 N. E., West Fargo, 701-433-5360 or www. University Dr., Fargo, 701-241-9100 or wfparks.org www.fargodome.com • Moorhead Ice Show. 7 p.m., Moorhead • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View Sports Center, 324 24th St. S., Moorhead, a family flick for $2. 11 a.m., West Acres 218-299-5340 or www.cityofmoorhead. Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701com/parks 461-8902 • Fargo Force vs. Des Moines • Fargo Ice Revue. 2 p.m., Coliseum, 801 Buccaneers. 7:35 p.m., Scheels Arena, 17th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www.fargoparks.com www.fargoforce.com • The Concordia Choir Home Concert. 3.16 Saturday 4 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia • Central ND Rabbit Breeders Spring College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 Show. All day. Hartl Ag Building, RRV 3.11 Monday Fairgrounds, 1201 W. Main Ave., West • Jazz Ensemble Concert. 8:30 p.m., Fargo, 701-282-2200 Anderson Commons, Knutson Campus • Bouncin’ Bash & More. Inflatable family Center, Concordia College, Moorhead, fun. Open to all ages; children 12 and 218-299-4515 under must attend with an adult. 9 a.m.-4 3.12 Tuesday p.m., Veterans Memorial Arena, 1201 7th • Fargo Force vs. Lincoln Stars. 7:05 p.m., Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-433-5360 or Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, www.wfparks.org 701-364-3672 or www.fargoforce.com • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 10 a.m., West Acres 3.13 Wednesday Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701• Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes 461-8902 & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com

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family


• Saturday in the Sky. Geared to grades 4-8. 10-11:30 a.m. & 1-2:30 p.m., Fargo Air Museum, 1609 19th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-293-8043 or www.fargoairmuseum.org • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com • Adopt-A-Pet Adoption Days. Meet animals available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PETCO, 1126 43rd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-232-5856 or www.adoptapetfm.org • Moorhead Ice Show. 7 p.m., Moorhead Sports Center, 324 24th St. S., Moorhead, 218-299-5340 or www.cityofmoorhead.com/parks • Fargo Force vs. Des Moines Buccaneers. 7:05 p.m., Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-3672 or www.fargoforce. com • Masterworks Concert Series. Guest conductor Darryl One. 8 p.m., Festival Concert Hall, NDSU, Fargo, 701-478-3676 or www. fmsymphony.org • “Five Women Wearing the Same Dress.” 8 p.m., Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-3314 3.17 Sunday • Kids Dream Winter Film Series. View a family flick for $2. 11 a.m., West Acres Cinema, 4101 17th Ave. S.W., Fargo, 701-461-8902 • Moorhead Ice Show. 1 p.m., Moorhead Sports Center, 324 24th St. S., Moorhead, 218-299-5340 or www.cityofmoorhead.com/parks • Leaping Leprechauns! St. Patrick’s Day celebration. 1-5 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701232-6102 or www.childrensmuseum-yunker.org • Chapel Choir Home Concert. 4 p.m., Centrum, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 3.19 Tuesday • Trollwood Performing Arts School Information Open House. Parents and students are invited to stop in for 2013 season information. 5:30-6:30 p.m., Trollwood Performing Arts School, 801 50th Ave. S.W., Moorhead, 218-477-6500

Fargo Public Library Storytime

• Student Showcase Concert. 7:30 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 • “The Complete World of Sports.” Presented by The Reduced Shakespeare Company. 7:30 p.m., Hansen Theatre, Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2271 or www. mnstate.edu/perform 3.24 Sunday • Cosmic Bowling. 1-3 p.m., West Acres Bowl, 3402 Interstate Blvd. S.W., Fargo, 701-499-6060 or www.fargoparks.com • Premiere of “DARK.” Planetarium show about dark matter. Show runs on Sundays at 2 p.m. and Mondays at 7 p.m. through May 20. 2 p.m., MSUM Planetarium, Bridges Hall, MSUM, Moorhead, 218477-2920

3.20 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com 3.22 Friday • Easter Eggstravaganza. Meet the Easter Bunny, create crafts, and dye eggs. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. with egg hunts at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. & 3 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-6102 or www.childrensmuseum-yunker.org • Open Gym. Ages 5-14. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kids Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, 701-365-8868 or www.tntkidsfitness.com 3.23 Saturday • Teddy Bear Tea Party. 10-11 a.m., Rheault Farm, 2902 25th St. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com • Easter Eggstravaganza. Meet the Easter Bunny, create crafts, and dye eggs. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. with egg hunts at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. & 3 p.m., The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm, 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-6102 or www.childrensmuseum-yunker.org • Children’s Storytime. Special guest Clifford. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701-281-1002 or www.bn.com • Premiere of “Sky Zoo.” Planetarium show about animal constellations for kids. Show runs on Saturdays through May 18. 11 a.m., MSUM Planetarium, Bridges Hall, MSUM, Moorhead, 218477-2920 • Awesome Art Afternoon. 1-3 p.m., RDJ Rec Center, 1104 2nd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com • 4 Luv of Dog Rescue “Meet the Dogs.” Visit dogs available for adoption. 1-3 p.m., PetSmart, 1630 13th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701205-0190 or www.4luvofdog.org

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3.24 Sunday (cont.) • Three Choirs Concert. 4 p.m., Memorial Auditorium, Concordia College, Moorhead, 218-299-4515 • MSUM Choir Concert. 7:30 p.m., Gethsemane Episcopal Church, 3600 25th St. S., Fargo, 218-477-2102 3.26 Tuesday • American Diabetes Association Alert Day. Take the Diabetes Risk Test at www. diabetes.org/risktest and learn your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. • Easter Egg Hunt. Ages 2-8. 5-7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Arena, 1201 7th Ave. E., West Fargo, 701-433-5360 or www. wfparks.org 3.27 Wednesday • Children’s Storytime. 10 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com 3.28 Thursday • 2013 United Way of Cass-Clay Annual Meeting. Open to any community member who would like to hear more about the work of United Way of CassClay and help us thank our volunteers. Visit www.unitedwaycassclay.org for details and registration. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Holiday Inn, 3803 13th Ave. S., Fargo

for

College KIDS: Where Learning Meets Fun July 8-11 & July 15-18, 2013 For ages 8 to 14 Classes, schedules and application:

www.mnstate.edu/collegeforkids cfk@mnstate.edu ∙ 218-477-2579

30 February/March 2013

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3.29 Friday • School’s Out Day Camp. Grades K-7. Call 701-365-8868 for details and to sign up. 7-8:30 p.m., TNT Kids Fitness, 2800 Main Ave., Fargo, www.tntkidsfitness.com 3.30 Saturday • Children’s Storytime. 11 a.m., Barnes & Noble, 1201 42nd St. S.W., Fargo, 701281-1002 or www.bn.com

PUBLIC LIBRARIES

Call or visit the library for more information. Pre-registration may be required. Fargo Public Main Library 102 3rd St. N., Fargo, 701-241-1472 or www.fargolibrary.org • Winter Read-A-Thon for Kids. Ends Feb. 28. Call or visit website for details • Weekly Spring Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Pre-registration required. Visit the library or website for a schedule • Fargo Force Visits the Library. Hear stories and meet Fargo Force players. Feb. 5 & Mar. 5, 6:30 p.m. • Baby Rhyme Time. Lapsit storytime for babies, birth-18 mos. Feb. 7 & 21, Mar. 7 & 21, 6:30 p.m. • Crafts for Teens & Adults. Preregistration required. Feb. 9, 6 p.m. • Teen Crafts. Pre-registration required. Feb. 14 & 28, 4:30 p.m. • Chemistry Science Event. Hands-on experiments for kids in grades 4-6. Feb. 16, 9:30 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. • Saturday Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Feb. 16 & Mar. 16, 10 a.m. • Paws for Reading. Emerging readers can sign up to read to a therapy pet. Preregistration required. Feb. 16 & Mar. 16, 1-3 p.m. • Lemony Snicket Book Club. Grades 3-6. Pre-registration required. Feb. 19 & Mar. 19, 4 p.m. • Library Card Keychain Craft. Ages 12 and under. Feb. 21, 10 a.m. • “Sweetland” Film Event. Feb. 24, 2 p.m. • It’s a Search Dog’s Life. Search dog expert Earle “Bud” Myers and his bloodhounds will share what it takes to be a Search and Rescue Dog. For kids and families. Feb. 27, 4 p.m. • “The Wizard of Oz” Movie. Mar. 1, 1 p.m. • Off to See the Wizard. Listen to excerpts from “The Wizard of Oz,” enjoy games and crafts. For kids of all ages. Mar. 2, 2 p.m. • “From Fiction to Film” Program and Visit with Author Will Weaver. Mar. 4, 7 p.m. • Computer Classes. Call for details

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Dr. James Carlson Library 2801 32nd Ave. S., Fargo 701-476-4040 or www.fargolibrary.org • Winter Read-A-Thon for Kids. Through Feb. 28. Call or visit website for details • Weekly Spring Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Preregistration required. Visit the library or website for a schedule • Tea Time Book Club. Feb. 3 & Mar. 3, 2:30 p.m. • Baby Rhyme Time. Lapsit storytime for babies, birth-18 mos. Feb. 7 & 21, Mar. 7 & 21, 10 a.m. • Crafts for Teens & Adults. Pre-registration required. Feb. 7, 6 p.m. • Free Friday Movies. Feb. 8 & Mar. 8, 1 p.m. • Saturday Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Feb. 9 & Mar. 9, 10 a.m. • Unraveled Crafters Club. Feb. 10 & 24, Mar. 10 & 24, 1 p.m. • Valentine Buddies Craft. Ages preschool-7 yrs. Feb. 11, 4 p.m. • Teen Crafts. Pre-registration required. Feb. 12 & 26, 4:30 p.m. • Library Card Keychain Craft. Ages 12 and under. Feb. 14, 10 a.m. • Magic Tree House Book Club. Grades 1-4. Pre-registration required. Feb. 17 & Mar. 17, 2 p.m. • “The Wizard of Oz” Movie. Mar. 1, 1 p.m. • Computer Classes. Call for details Northport Branch 2714 N. Broadway, Fargo, 701-476-4026 or www.fargolibrary.org • Winter Read-A-Thon for Kids. Through Feb. 28. Call or visit website for details • Weekly Spring Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Pre-registration required. Visit the library or website for a schedule • Saturday Storytime for Toddlers & Preschoolers. Feb. 2 & Mar. 2, 10 a.m. • Valentine Buddies Craft. Ages preschool-7 yrs. Feb. 12, 4 p.m. • Northport Classics Book Club. Feb. 20 & Mar. 20, 6:30 p.m. • Library Card Keychain Craft. Ages 12 and under. Feb. 28, 10 a.m.

• Luck of the Irish. Decorate a treasure chest and enjoy a short flick on Finn McCoul. Call to register. Mar. 2, 2-4 p.m. • Ireland Travelog. Enjoy green tea and view aerials of Ireland. Mar. 13, 2-3 p.m. • Glide into Spring. Make a paper airplane, design a project, and have a snack. Call to register. Mar. 15, 3-4 p.m. • Kids on the Block Puppet Show: “Shhhh!” Mar. 26, 2-2:30 p.m. • Computer Sessions. Call for details Moorhead Public Library 118 5th St. S., Moorhead, 218-233-7594 or www.larl.org • Storytime. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. • Craft Time. Tuesdays following storytime • Baby Bounce. Thursdays, 10 a.m. • Old School Gaming Day. Play classic games and learn about video game consoles of the past. Feb. 2, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. • Origami Club. Feb. 4 & Mar. 4, 6:30 p.m. • Peace Corps Talks Series. Feb. 4, 11, 25, 7 p.m. • Wii Wednesday. Feb. 6 & Mar. 6, 6 p.m. • Saturday Science. Experiments for young scientists. Feb. 9, 9:30-11 a.m. & 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. • Classics Book Club. Feb. 19 & Mar. 19, 7 p.m. • LEGO Club. Feb. 14 & Mar. 14, 6 p.m., Feb. 23 & Mar. 23, 2 p.m. • YELL in the Library. Teens: Play games, have snacks, volunteer, plan events, and more! Feb. 18 & Mar. 18, 7 p.m. • Adult Book Discussion. Feb. 21 & Mar. 21, 7 p.m. • Make it Yourself Series: Reed diffusers. Feb. 27, 7 p.m. • Civil War Nerd Trip. Markus Krueger recounts a recent trip through Gettysburg and Virginia Civil War sites. Mar. 21, 7 p.m. • Make it Yourself Series: Toothpaste. Mar. 27, 7 p.m. • Computer Classes. Call for details

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West Fargo Public Library 109 3rd St. E., West Fargo 701-433-5460 or www.westfargolibrary.org • Homework Center. Room is supervised, help is offered, and snack provided. 3-5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday on days school is in session • Children’s Storytime. For preschoolers and their caretakers. Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m., Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. • Genealogy Saturdays. A staff genealogist will be available for questions. Saturdays, noon-4 p.m. • Knitty Giddy. Adult group; bring your own supplies. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. • Ham Radio Group. All adults welcome; children must attend with an adult. Wednesdays, 6:45 p.m. • Friday Morning Movies. Geared for preschoolers and younger children and their caretakers. Fridays, 10:30 a.m. (No movie on Mar. 29) • New Release Movie. Call the library for title. Feb. 2, 2 p.m. • Preserving Family Heirlooms. Registration required; first 10 registrants bring a photo for scanning. Feb. 9, 2 p.m. • Video Gaming. All ages welcome. Feb. 10 & 24, Mar. 10 & 24, 2-4 p.m. • I Spy with My Two Eyes. Preschoolers with caretakers can decorate a spy telescope and go on an imaginary treasure hunt. Feb. 20, 11 a.m. • Kids on the Block Puppet Show: “At the Dentist.” Feb. 26, 2-2:30 p.m.

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CLASSES

• Great Expectations • Lamaze • Mom’s Helpers • Tender Transitions

Call for information. Pre-registration may be required. The Children’s Museum at Yunker Farm 1201 28th Ave. N., Fargo 701-232-6102 or www.childrensmuseum-yunker.org • Super Science Sundays • Yunkie Club Early Childhood Family Education Probstfield Center for Education, 2410 14th St. S., Moorhead, 218284-3400 or https://communityed.moorhead.k12.mn.us • Baby Connection (Birth-12 mos) • Big & Messy Art (Birth-kindergarten entry) • Family Fun with Little Ones (Birth-3 yrs) • Gym Fun (Birth-kindergarten entry) • Make It, Take It (Birth-kindergarten entry) • Marvelous Mud (Birth-kindergarten entry) • Splish! Splash! Indoor Version (Birth-kindergarten entry) • Storybook Science (Birth-kindergarten entry) • Weird, Wild, Wacky Art (2 yrs-kindergarten entry) • Wonderful, Wobbly Ones (12-24 mos) embrace Education Series 701-234-7463 • Integrative Health for the Cancer Survivor • Living with a Genetic Cancer Syndrome Essentia Health OB Education 3000 32nd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-364-8100 or www.essentiahealth.org • Basic Training for New Dads • Birthing Center Tour • Car Seat Safety • Developing the Art of Breastfeeding

FM Ambulance 701-364-1758 or www.fmambulance.com • First Aid • Heartsaver CPR F/M Communiversity 218-299-3438 or www.fmcommuniversity.org Fargo Park District 701-499-7788 or www.fargoparks.com • Teen Art FirstLink 701-293-6462 or www.myfirstlink.org Fraser, Ltd. 2902 University Dr. S., Fargo, 701-232-3301 or www.fraserltd.org • Infant/Child & Adult CPR/First Aid Girl Scouts Dakota Horizons 701-293-7915 or www.gsdakotahorizons.org. Non-members welcome • Earth Hour Hjemkomst Center 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 218-299-5511 ext. 6738 • China Painting Workshop • Tatting Lace Workshop • Fraktur Calligraphy Workshop • Pysanka or Ukrainian Egg Workshop Moorhead Community Education 218-284-3400 or https://communityed.moorhead.k12.us

Check out these FAMILY FUN animal adventures! Snowsnakes: Saturday, February 9th 1:00-2:30 pm Egg-cellent Bunnies! Saturday, March 23rd 1:00 - 2:30 pm

Kids aged 4-6 years will participate in a variety of activities and animal encounters!

Funny Ferrets: Wednesday, February 13th at 3:15-4:45 pm Slithery Snakes: Wednesday, March 27th at 3:15-4:45 pm

This show featuring the animals from the Zoo is held at the MSUM Planetarium! Saturdays at 11:00 am, starting March 23rd

Please register in advance as space is limited! www.redriverzoo.org for details. 32 February/March 2013

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MSUM 218-477-2579, www.mnstate.edu/msumcollegeforkids, or cfk@ mnstate.edu • College for Kids (See ad pg. 30)

MSUM Art Gallery Roland Dille Center for the Arts, MSUM, Moorhead, 701-388-6512 • Art & Design Faculty Show. Feb. 11-21 • BA/BS/BFA Exhibition #1. Feb. 25-Mar. 18 • Student Juried Show. Begins Mar. 25

Plains Art Museum 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-3821 or www.plainsart.org • Art for Two • Kid Quest (See ad pg. 37) • Youth & Adult Art Experiences Parenting Resource Center 701-241-5700 or www.ag.ndsu.edu/casscountyextension/homeand-family • Nurturing Parenting Program Red River Zoo 4255 23rd Ave. S., Fargo, 701-277-9240 or www.redriverzoo.org • Pint-size Explorers (See ad pg. 32) • ZooVentures Sanford Health Community Education 701-234-5570, 877-234-4240 or www.sanfordhealth.org • Baby Signs • Better Choices, Better Health Workshop • Breastfeeding Beginnings • Car Seat 101 • Caring for Your Newborn • Family & Friends CPR • Heartsaver CPR for Day Care Providers • Infant Massage • Lamaze • Our Family is Having a Baby! • Safe & Sound – Preparing Your Home for Baby • Total Knee & Total Hip Replacement Information Sessions • Your Labor Experience – What to Expect

MSUM Planetarium Bridges Hall, MSUM, Moorhead, 218-477-2920 • Larry Cat in Space. Ends Mar. 10 • Red River Skies. Ends Mar. 11 • Zoo Sky. Begins Mar. 23 • DARK. Begins Mar. 24 Plains Art Museum 704 1st Ave. N., Fargo, 701-232-3821 or www.plainsart.org • Andy Warhol: Creating Myth & Icon. Begins Feb. 3 • Beyond Convention: New Work by Jessica Wachter. Begins Feb. 9 • Renewal Phase: New Work by Britta Trygstad. Begins Feb. 16 • School Spirit: Celebrating Youth Art Month. Mar. 1-31 • A Creative Life: Honoring Charles Beck • Playful Pollinators • The Artist’s Studio: Robert Kurkowski The Rourke Art Museum & Gallery Museum: 521 Main Ave., Moorhead, Gallery: 523 S. 4th St., Moorhead, 218-236-8861 or www.therourke.org • Jonathan Rutter: Ghost Image. Ends Feb. 24 • Jessica Matson-Fluto: Figurative Encounters. Ends Feb. 24 • Art From Earth From Above. Begins Feb. 28 • Carl Oltvedt: Observations. Ends Mar. 17 • The Brothers: James Tiernan O’Rourke and Orland Rourke. Begins Mar. 17

Prairie Daughters

U of M Extension 218-236-2005 • Parents Forever The Village Financial Resource Center 1201 25th St. S., Fargo, 701-235-3328 or www.HelpWithMoney.org • Bankruptcy Education • Homebuyer Education • Tenant Education

The Art and Lives of Annie Stein and Orabel Thortvedt The Untold Story of Early Female Artists in Clay County

YMCA Call Cortney Hagen at 701-364-4166 for more information • Healthy Family Home

MUSEUMS & EXHIBITS Call for additional information.

Concordia College Cyrus M. Running Gallery 901 8th St. S., Moorhead, 218-299-4623 • Faculty Art Exhibition. Ends Feb. 17 • Annual Juried Student Exhibition. Mar. 12-31 Fargo Air Museum 1609 19th Ave. N., Fargo, 701-293-8043 or www.fargoairmuseum. org Historical & Cultural Society of Clay County Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N., Moorhead, 218-299-5511 or www.hcscconline.org • A Woman’s Perspective on Ritual. Feb. 1-Mar. 30 • Land in Her Own Name. Feb. 6-Mar. 6 • Electrifying Minnesota. Begins Mar. 13 • Prairie Daughters: The Art and Lives of Annie Stein and Orabel Thortvedt (See ad pg. 33)

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Historical and Cultural Society of Clay County Hjemkomst Center 202 1st Ave N, Moorhead, MN 218-299-5511 www.hcscconline.org

This activity is funded in part by a grant from the Lake Region Arts Council through a Minnesota State Legislative appropriation.

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YOUR FAMILY ❚ do-it-together

By Patricia Carlson

Vicki Schneider, Fargo, started running in high school as a way to stay in shape for soccer. By the time she was a senior, her friends— all avid runners themselves—talked her into joining the track team. She was hooked. “I did pretty well at the half-mile and two-mile races and have been running distance ever since,” she says. 34 February/March 2013

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Vicki Schneider and daughter Mackenzie love the effort it takes to run, and the feeling that comes with beating your goals. Several years and five kids later, Schneider still pounds the pavement on a regular basis. And as soon as her kids were each old enough, she started running kids’ runs and 5Ks with them. “When we started running with our kids, it was to get them outside and moving,” says Schneider. Now, her kids run on their own or with any combination of people from their blended family. Sometimes they hit the streets with Vicki and her husband, Bryan Jacobson, or they head out with their dad, Dave Kirkpatrick, and his girlfriend, Sarah Bundy. It’s truly a family affair and the kids say they couldn’t be happier with the combination of exercise and together time. “I got started running a while ago when my mom and dad ran with me around the block,” says 11-year-old Mackenzie Kirkpatrick. “Then I ran a half mile and after it was over I loved the feeling so I kept running. I also kept running because I love running with my family.” With a slew of road races coming up this spring, including the events of the Fargo Marathon, now is the ideal time to lace up your sneakers and start putting one foot in front of the other. Chances are, once your kids see you do it, they’ll want to go for a run, too. Local runners and coaches chimed in to tell us why they love their sport so much. We think it’s the perfect motivation for you and your kids!

Why Kids Love It It’s fun Mark Knutson, director of the Fargo Marathon and the man widely credited with bringing forth Fargo’s running renaissance, says it’s easy to see why kids love running. family

“It’s very hard for some kids who say they want to go out for basketball or hockey and there are a limited number of spots on the team,” he explains. “It’s fairly discouraging for the kids who want to be in something but aren’t gifted enough for that particular sport.” But almost every kid can run. “It’s a simple thing,” Knutson says. “Even a second grader can get out and go for a run with his or her mom and dad.”

It’s active Schneider’s son, Tanner Kirkpatrick, who is 13, says he likes running because “I feel like I’m doing something.” That’s a common theme among his brothers and sisters, too. “As the kids get older, they have started running more on their own or with friends,” says Schneider. Her former husband, Kirkpatrick, says he’s been impressed that his children have found a way to combine their friendships with fitness. “As their friend groups become increasingly important, we also encourage them to invite those friends along to participate as another way of keeping it enjoyable for them,” says Kirkpatrick.

It takes effort Carving time out of a family’s busy schedule to go for a run isn’t easy, but it is important. James Parker, a certified personal trainer who owns Fargobased fitness-training company Muffins to Marathons: Fit 4 Life, says running time should be scheduled into your daily schedule just like homework time or TV time. “Not every day will go as planned but more often than not, you will find success,” he advises.

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Vijay Gaba and his family participate in nearly every local and regional run throughout the year. Helping kids establish their running routine, or allowing your child to pursue running as a sport, will help them find that success and build their confidence, adds the Fargo Marathon’s Knutson. “You tell a child they just ran a mile and they’re like, ‘That’s great!’” he states. It’s worked for Schneider’s daughter, Mackenzie, who is proud of the fact that she runs road races. “I like when I finish the race or when I beat my goal. I love running because it takes effort,” says Mackenzie. 

Why Parents Love It It keeps you fit Thirty-six-year-old Shawn Griego of Moorhead used to be that guy who made fun of runners. “On Facebook, I’d always joke about it. Making a crack here or there when someone posted something about running,” he says. Then he got some shocking news from his doctor. His cholesterol was out of control. His blood pressure was sky-high. He was overweight and constantly fatigued. If anyone needed to go for a run, it was Griego. So that’s what he did. “A group of people at work were doing a health thing and they talked me into joining,” he says. “Within three months of starting to run, I cleared up all my health problems.” Parker’s story is similar to Griego’s. In February 2008, he woke up, looked in the mirror, and didn’t recognize the person looking back at him. “I was overweight, out of shape, and unhappy with myself,” Parker writes on his website. He 36 February/March 2013

says he needed to make a change, not only for himself, but for his family. Parker joined a gym and less than a year later had dropped 75 pounds. Since then, he’s amassed a variety of fitness certifications and completed 23—yes, 23—marathons.

It provides family time It’s pretty rare when everyone interviewed for an article agrees on the same thing, but that is exactly the case with this motivating factor: Running brings your family together in a unique and healthy way. When Vijay Gaba moved to Fargo in 2004 with his wife and two daughters, none of them were involved in any sport. They had tried team sports like soccer, or partner sports like tennis, but had never been able to keep up their participation because of their hectic family life. Then Gaba emailed Knutson about the possibility of joining a running club. Within a few years, the entire Gaba clan had turned into runners. His wife, Anu, has completed five halfmarathons and countless 5Ks and 10Ks. Gaba’s oldest daughter, 16-year-old Harshita, ran her first half-marathon when she was just 12. “She is now faster than me and I am proud of her,” says Gaba. And 11-year-old Nishita finished her first 5K when she was only 6 years old. The family participates in nearly every local and regional run throughout the year—even in the dead of winter—and

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Gaba says the sport has brought them closer than he ever imagined. “I treasure these occasions because it brings us all together and goes a long way in contributing to the total time we spend together as a family,” he says. “If not for those races, my children and I would have been doing our own individual pursuits: catching up on emails, being with friends, office work, homework, and the like.” Griego, whose two pre-teen daughters picked up the sport after they saw their father doing it, echoes Gaba’s thoughts. “I kind of like the fact that I have something in common with my kids other than the hustle and bustle of electronics,” he says. “It’s just running shoes and the road. It’s free. It just takes energy and motivation.”

It’s (relatively) inexpensive Every sport costs money. But in comparison with moolamunching biggies like hockey, football, and baseball, running is a penny-pincher’s dream. “Hockey is time and money and camp and travel,” says Knutson. “Only about ten percent of the population can do that.” For running, the only thing you need is sneakers. A modest pair will run you about $50. Once you’re serious about the sport, you may want to invest in a pair suited to your needs. The smartest way to do this is to visit a retailer, like Beyond Running or Fargo Running Company, that specializes in running shoes. They can measure your biomechanics, foot shape, and

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weight, and will consider the type of running you’re planning to do (races, trail, etc.). Both stores have experienced staff who will do a gait analysis and use other techniques to determine the type of footwear best for you and your running needs. The correct footwear will not only make running more comfortable and enjoyable for you, it could also prevent injury. Another expense for the competitive runner, which can add up over time, is registration fees. Typically, 5K registration costs about $25 to $35 per race. Early registration for the Fargo Marathon is $70. Latecomers will have to shell out $95.

Why Kids and Parents Love to Race It’s competitive (without being discouraging)

Once you’ve been running for a while, you may find yourself kicking up your pace or entering your first race. The sport undoubtedly drums up a competitive drive—whether with yourself or others. Muffins to Marathons’ Parker has been running competitively for years and still finds new barriers to bust through. “The toughest part is pushing yourself to run faster and farther than you were able to run the week before or two weeks before,” says Parker. “It is always a challenge to improve; however, when you

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Dave Kirkpatrick and his family couldn’t be happier with the combination of exercise and together time. do see that improvement it is well worth the struggles.” Dave Kirkpatrick enjoys the healthy competition running has fostered in his family, especially among his sons, Tanner and 12-year-old Cole, who both admit they love the rush of passing people in a race. “I think there are a couple of boys who are looking to try to beat me in a race this coming year,” says Kirkpatrick. “I think it will be fun to see if and when they can pull it off.” Knutson believes that, as a community, we have a responsibility to promote healthy, active lifestyles for our youngsters. One of the ways he contributes to this is by coordinating a youth run at the Fargo Marathon, but he stresses it’s all in the name of fun. “We don’t time it. We don’t do places,” he says. “Everybody crosses the line and gets a medal. I think it’s important simply to get kids to a place where they think that they can do this.”

It encourages goalsetting When Vijay Gaba first picked up running, he was in his late forties and unsure if he had the stamina and strength to do it. But he set small goals for himself, like joining a running club and participating in a short race, and as he achieved them, his confidence grew. “I have run the Fargo marathon every year and have also run the marathon in other cities such as New York, Chicago, and 38 February/March 2013

Minneapolis,” says Gaba. His next goal is qualifying for the Boston Marathon. One of the things Dave Kirkpatrick likes about the sport is that it allows each person in his extended family to set individual goals, regardless of age. “It allows each of us to pursue our individual goals, whether that is to run a particular time, go so far without walking, or simply have fun being out and doing it, while still being there to support each other in pursuit of those goals,” he says. His parents have even participated with him and Sarah and his kids in the walking division in local 5Ks. Griego has also found that mementos like race bibs and participation ribbons or medals are good motivators for his daughters, 12-year-old Bailee and 9-year-old Alexis.

It’s fun Last, but certainly not least, is running’s fun factor. Yes, it takes work. Yes, it takes time. Yes, it takes dedication. But the immediate and lifelong rewards you’ll get from pounding the pavement with your family are innumerable. “If it’s something that challenges them and they can continue to enjoy it with friends and family for years to come, all the better,” says Schneider. With that, she laces up her sneakers and heads out the door. Patricia Carlson is a freelance writer and media coach from Dilworth, MN. View more of her work at www. patriciacarlsonfreelance.com.

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When Minutes Matter As the winningest coach in the history of NDSU men’s basketball, Erv Inniger knows that minutes matter. With little time on the clock, exceptional teamwork can make the difference. On August 24, 2012, minutes and teamwork saved his life from a formidable opponent: heart attack.

A normal day until… Physically fit at 67, Inniger started the day with his usual high energy. He delivered the newspaper to his condominium neighbors, walked up and down three flights of stairs and showered. “But when I stepped out of the shower, my life changed just like that,” he recalls. He noticed unusual tiredness and considered staying home. Instead he drove to his office at NDSU—familiar territory to this former coach and retired senior administrator.

Fast response As Inniger approached NDSU he felt tightness in his chest and numbness in his arm followed. He managed to safely park his car, but couldn’t walk straight. At the trainers’ office in the Bison Sports Arena, staff saw his ashen complexion and unsteadiness. They called 911. Within minutes F-M Ambulance and Fargo Fire arrived. Well-trained in addressing heart symptoms, the paramedics administered an electrocardiogram (EKG), then transmitted results to Sanford Heart Center for interpretation. Inniger was having an ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI)—a type of heart attack caused by blocked coronary arteries. National standards

dictate blockages must be opened within 90 minutes or less to save lives and minimize heart damage. Sanford has put every piece in place to make this happen. The ambulance rapidly transported Inniger to Sanford Emergency Center, where he went directly to the cardiac catheterization lab. Sanford cardiologist Dr. Craig Kouba and team were ready and waiting. Says Dr. Kouba: “Time is muscle. Opening that artery allows us to abort the heart attack and help maintain heart function without damage.”

Opened in 37 minutes Tests in the cardiac cath lab showed Inniger’s right coronary artery was almost 100 percent blocked. Though the situation could have triggered fear, Inniger was comforted by the mastery of his team. “I was never scared because nobody was panicking around me,” he says. “The nurses were so unbelievable, so calm.” An angioplasty procedure opened the blockage, then a stent was inserted to keep it open. The entire process from the first EKG at NDSU to the opened artery took just 37 minutes—one-third the national standard of 90 minutes. By the time Inniger’s wife arrived, he was already recovering. For Inniger and all heart attack patients, the fast path to successful treatment involves:

This medical update was brought to you by Sanford Health. Learn more about heart care! Visit heart.sanfordhealth.org.

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• Well-trained professionals throughout the heart-care network including first responders, paramedics, emergency room personnel, and cardiac cath staff. • Excellent communication from one step to the next. • Most important of all— recognition of symptoms and urgency in getting help. Sanford’s efforts in implementing a higher standard of heart attack care have been nationally recognized by the American Heart Association. The aim: quicker, more targeted care to save lives and reduce heart damage.

More wins! Inniger continued his recovery at Sanford’s outpatient cardiac rehab program. Conversations with other heart attack patients have made him realize how fortunate he is not to have heart damage. Rapid symptom response, rapid diagnosis, and rapid treatment made a key difference. “When I had my heart attack, I was blessed to have people around me getting me where I needed to go,” says Inniger. “I owe my life to them.” Today Inniger puts his healthy heart into training for the 2013 National Senior Games. An avid racquetball player, he qualified to represent North Dakota. And he proudly represents heart attack survivors, too.

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YOUR FAMILY z parenting

By Kelly Lynch

I remember my mother doting on my toddler son because he could manipulate the pegs on her cribbage board. She was fascinated he could grasp the teeny tiny pegs in his chubby fingers and move them deftly from hole to hole. She lived in a retirement community then, and whenever my son was there, she’d make him perform like a circus act and demonstrate his ability to move the peg from spot to spot. I didn’t realize how helpful that measured movement was for improving his fine motor skills. Toddlers and preschoolers are in a constant state of growth and development. Each day brings new challenges and experiences to delight, frustrate, and intrigue them. To keep the little ones entertained and constantly learning and advancing, it’s important to provide them with a variety of enriching activities which challenge both their fine and gross motor skills.

Fine Motor Skills

What are fine motor skills? Stephen Olson, occupational therapist at Pediatric Therapy Partners, Fargo, provides a comprehensive definition. Fine motor skills are a combination of motor and visual skills children develop over time which include good visual acuity (sharpness of vision), eye-hand coordination, strength, and dexterity. Some examples of fine motor skills are zipping a zipper, coloring, writing, stacking blocks, and stringing beads.

Activities to Improve Fine Motor Skills

Preschool teachers, therapists, and others who work with small children all agree play dough and scissors are two popular items when it comes to developing fine motor skills. Dough—including bread or cookie dough— can be kneaded and molded into shapes. Working with play dough or scissors improves hand and finger strength and dexterity. Lezlie Sando, a toddler teacher at Nokomis II Child Care Center, Fargo, reminds parents, “If your child is just beginning to learn how to cut, be sure to emphasize the correct way to hold a scissors.” She suggests parents hold the paper for children when 40 February/March 2013

they first use scissors. Sando points out the actions of grasping the paper and maneuvering the scissors at the same time can be difficult for beginners. Everyday activities such as eating with utensils, buttoning clothing, and tying shoelaces are wonderful exercises to improve fine motor skills in children.

5 Fun Fine Motor Activities Fuzzy Stem Stacking

Stick a chenille stem (pipe cleaner) upright into a glob of play dough or a piece of floral Styrofoam. Have your child “bead” or stack O-shaped cereal, tubular pasta, or beads onto the stem.

Bathtub Time

Sando suggests you allow your child to play with basters, medicine droppers, squirting toys, water bottles, and spray bottles in the bathtub. Demonstrate how to squeeze and release to make the water squirt out. An outdoor version of this concept is to fill a spray bottle with colored water and take your child outside in winter to decorate the snow!

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Cribbage Board Game

You’ll need a cribbage board, pegs, and one die. Roll the die to get a number and have your child move the peg, hole by hole, along the board. You can make it a race if you each have a peg and take turns moving it along the board. For an older child, persuade them to use their less-dominant hand to move the peg.

Writing and Drawing

Encouraging children to use crayons, paper, pencils, and markers not only helps them improve their fine

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motor skills of grasping, gripping, and coordination, but also develops a child’s creativity. Most toddlers will just scribble on the page. As children progress, you’ll begin to see shapes, lines, and recognizable forms in their artwork. Write down the letters that form your child’s name and help them copy those letters. “Preschoolers love to write their names,” says Pam Machtell, preschool teacher at Nokomis I Child Care Center in Fargo.

Tweezer, Tongs, Cotton Balls, Poms

Gather up a tweezer or tongs, cotton balls or those small, soft, pom pom balls, and some containers—or

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even a muffin pan. Have your child sort the pom poms by color into the containers, or separate the cotton balls into different containers using the tweezer or a pair of tongs. If manipulating the tongs is too tricky, simply separating the pom poms into containers, without the tongs, is an excellent exercise for beginners, too. “I think the most important thing to remember is we don’t need to buy a lot of fancy items to help our children develop fine motor skills. We just need to find ways to have them be involved in day-to-day activities we are already doing such as cooking, cleaning, writing, bathing, grooming, etc. Our kids learn best from imitating us,” says Olson.

5 Great Gross Motor Activities Indoor Obstacle Course

Has the weather got you stuck inside? Create an obstacle course in your family room. Stack up a few pillows for your child to climb over. Lay a blanket on the floor for him to crawl under. Use sofa cushions, card tables, chairs, boxes, stools, or toys—whatever you can think of for your child to navigate around, over, under, and through. To add to the excitement, use a timer and urge the little ones to try to go through a bit faster each time.

Gross Motor Skills

Animal Safari

Activities to improve gross motor skills

Bubble Stomp

Brian Borchardt, physical therapist at Pediatric Therapy Partners, offers this definition, “Gross motor skills are everyday activities that use the body’s large muscle groups in a coordinated manner.” For instance, large muscle groups are used to walk, run, jump, catch, crawl, and throw.

A typical day for most little people involves running, climbing, crawling, and jumping. Toddlers and preschoolers are incredibly active by nature and their gross motor skills often develop with little persuasion required. However, physical activity promotes good health and increases coordination, too. Encouraging your child to dance to the music or hop on one foot is a great way to strengthen those large muscle groups. Going for walks, spending time at the playground, or running around outside are all extremely beneficial activities that allow children to improve their gross motor skills and burn off energy in the process.

Toddler teacher Sando suggests you blow bubbles for your child and have him stomp on them when they hit the floor, or run around and pop the bubbles with his hands. To liven things up, she suggests you turn on some music and have your child dance around as he chases the bubbles.

Upstairs Downstairs

There are many ways to play this game. The idea is that there are objects on one level of your home that your youngster can carry down to the next level. Going up and down stairs is an important skill for toddlers and preschoolers to master. Your child’s proficiency at using the stairs should determine how much supervision you provide during this game. You can put a bucket of socks on one level and an empty bucket on the other level and have your child transfer the socks, one at a time, from bucket to bucket. You could also use refrigerator alphabet magnets. Set a few magnets that spell a word—or maybe his name—in a bowl upstairs and have your child carry the letters, one by one, down to the fridge. When he’s finished, show him what the letters spell.

Masking Tape Mayhem

Because All Great Spuds Start Somewhere Call or go online for a list of classes. 218-284-3400 https://communityed.moorhead.k12.mn.us A Community Education Program of the Moorhead Area Public Schools

42 February/March 2013

Have your child pretend to be different animals. Shout out an animal and have him imitate it, or point to an animal picture in a book. He can crawl like a spider, hop like a rabbit, wiggle like a worm, or run like a cheetah. An alternative way to play this game is for your child to act like a particular animal and for you to guess which animal he’s imitating.

Do you have hardwood floors, vinyl, or tile flooring? This activity works well on those surfaces. Make a zig-zag line across the floor with masking tape and have your child walk the line. Or, make a perfectly straight line to act as a “balance beam” and let your child practice staying on the line. You can also tape off squares spaced apart for kids to hop from square to square. Use your imagination and let your child use his to come up with other activities using masking tape on the floor. Riding a tricycle, jumping rope, and many other physical activities will help your child improve the coordination and strength of his larger body muscles. It doesn’t have to be complicated, just fun! Machtell reminds us, “Simply spending time with your child is the best way to make sure they will develop the skills they need.” In addition to those quoted, the author would like to thank Nokomis Child Care Centers teachers Michele Gedgaud and Robin Trenda for their contributions to this article. Kelly Lynch is the editor-in-chief of The Village Family Magazine. She lives in Fargo with her husband and sons.

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Working with play dough... improves hand and finger strength and dexterity.

We asked Brian Borchardt, PT, MPT, and Stephen Olson, BS, OTR/L, of Pediatric Therapy Partners, Fargo, to tell us what sort of things a 2-year-old, 3-year-old, and 4-year-old should be able to do in reference to gross and fine motor skills. “We usually try to be careful about putting black and white ages to activities as kids develop at different rates,” says Borchardt. “We look at both what a child isn’t doing and what they ARE doing to determine if there is a reason for concern. That being said, here are some common gross motor skills for the ages in question.”

2-year-old:

• Walk independently • Run fairly well with few falls • Go up and down steps with use of a railing (both feet on each step) • Climb on/off furniture • Developing ability to throw and kick a ball

4-year-old:

• Typically balance and hop on one foot • Jump forward and over objects • Go up and down steps without a handrail (one foot on each step) • Catch and throw a ball accurately

Keeping in mind that all children develop at different paces, here are some fine motor skill developmental benchmarks a child should be mastering or working towards, as outlined by Olson.

2-year-old:

3-year-old:

• Walk backwards • Run without falling • Stand on one foot for a second or two • Typically ride a tricycle

family

• Cover and uncover boxes and containers • Start to scribble • Move toward using utensils to eat instead of finger feeding • Hand dominance becomes much more evident • Rotate knobs on toys to open doors such as a busy box, jack-in-the-box, etc.

3-year-old

• Eat with utensils but still messy • Turn pages in books one at a time • Write with a crayon (holding it more with palm and fingers) • May imitate overlapping circles, vertical and horizontal lines when drawing • Begin to use scissors to snip edges of paper • Build towers with blocks • Open/close twist-off containers such as pop bottles • Dress himself/herself to a degree • Button/unbutton larger buttons • Manipulate zippers

4-year-old

• Write, using a tripod grasp • Copy or imitate simple shapes and some letters of the alphabet • Use scissors to cut on a line • Use eating utensils with little mess • Dress himself/herself completely • Manipulate fasteners including zippers, snaps, and buttons • Brush hair/teeth • May begin tying shoes

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GRIEF AND LOSS

SOFTWARE SOLUTION

Certified Grief Recovery Specialist Benson Psychological Services, PC

Product Manager PeakNFP Donor Management, Summit Group Software

Lynne Flanders, MSW, LICSW

Bill Malone

Q:

A very important person in my life died 5 years ago. People tell me to just give it time but the emotional pain still hurts. How much longer before it goes away?

A:

Grief is the natural response to loss and is filled with many different and sometimes conflicting feelings. Unfortunately, the “time heals all wounds” belief may be responsible for continued emotional pain as people wait for time to heal their grief for them. Sadly, time does little to heal the pain of loss. Rather, it is what we do with our emotions within that time frame that can help. The Grief Recovery Method has helped people move forward from losses such as death, divorce, separation, infertility, miscarriage, and pet loss. If you would like more information about specific steps to take that will help heal the pain, go to griefrecoverymethod.com or contact Lynne Flanders, MSW, LICSW, at 701 297-7540.

BPS

Benson Psychological Services, PC 1308 23rd St. S., Suite G, Fargo, ND Benson Psychological Services 701-297-7540

Q: A:

What should our organization consider when purchasing new software?

When customers purchase software solutions they always seem to struggle with the product cost. While it is excellent practice to get the best solution for your dollar, it is critical that everyone understands two things: (1) the problem(s) you expect to solve with a software solution and (2) the amount of change imposed upon you or the organization. You might hear the above called Business Analysis and/ or Change Management. Both are critical to the success of software implementations. Understanding how the software will bring return in terms of process improvement and time and money saved is a must. Equally important is planning for and managing changes that happen as a result of the project. Always analyze the returns against cost and prepare to manage the change that is coming. PeakNFP Donor Management, Summit Group Software 1405 Prairie Parkway, Suite A, West Fargo 701-551-6664 www.PeakNFP.com

MENTAL HEALTH

COUNSELING

Clinical Psychologist ShareHouse, Inc.

Counselor The Village Family Service Center

Rachel Blumhardt, MEd, LPCC, NCC

Erica Hoff, PhD

Q: A:

are the benefits of web-based mental Q:What health counseling at The Village?

 What is borderline personality disorder?

Borderline personality disorder is a mental health diagnosis that is characterized by long-standing patterns of instability in several areas of a person’s life. Individuals with borderline personality disorder have a poor sense of self that shifts frequently and unpredictably. It is common for these individuals to have instability in interpersonal relationships. Impulsivity and poor ability to regulate emotions are other key characteristics of the disorder. Individuals with borderline personality disorder experience a great deal of emotional pain. Fortunately, help is available and many who seek help see positive changes in their lives. Group or individual therapy offers opportunities to learn healthy ways to cope with difficult situations and emotions. It also nurtures the development of a positive sense of self.

ShareHouse, Inc. 4227 9th Ave SW, Fargo, ND 701-282-6561 www.ShareHouse.org

44 February/March 2013

A:

The biggest benefit of web-based counseling is flexibility—you can receive treatment in the comfort of your own home. In addition to taking away the stigma many feel about going to a counselor, web-based counseling improves access to counseling services for those who live in remote areas, or who are homebound due to illness or mobility problems. Another benefit to web-based counseling is that you can receive couples counseling when you are in two different places. For example, if your spouse is often out-of-town for work, you can still have a couples counseling session with your partner when it would have been difficult to find a time for you both to make it to the counselor’s office. For more information or to schedule a web-based counseling appointment, go to TheVillageFamily.org.

The Village Family Service Center 1401 8th St. S., Moorhead 701-451-4811 1201 25th St. S., Fargo 701-451-4900 www.TheVillageFamily.org

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YOUR FAMILY z food & fun Daysha, Age 3

Love Bug Red and black construction paper Scissors Glue White crayon

Cut out a large red heart for the body, a mediumsized black heart for the head, and a few small black hearts for spots. Cut six small rectangular strips for legs, and two strips for antennae. Glue pieces together. Use the white crayon to draw a face on your love bug.

(Submitted by: Preschool 1 Room at Nokomis II)

Hearty Chicken Noodle Soup 1 3-5 lb. whole chicken 4 medium potatoes, chopped 2 celery ribs, chopped 4 carrots, chopped 5 Tbsp. chicken base 1 ⁄8 tsp. parsley

⁄8 tsp. garlic salt ⁄2 tsp. thyme 1 pinch of oregano 1 ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper 10 oz. bag of egg noodles 1 1

Begin by roasting the chicken with 2-3 cups of water added to the roasting pan to use for broth. Prepare the vegetables while the chicken bakes. After roasting the chicken, remove and discard the skin. Clean the meat off the bones, tear into bite-sized pieces and set aside. In a large pot, over medium heat, combine the juices from roasting the chicken with water to equal 41⁄2 quarts. Add the chicken base and all the seasonings. Stir well. Add chicken meat. Toss in potatoes, celery, and carrots. Simmer until vegetables are tender. Add 10 ounces dry egg noodles. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then simmer for 5-10 minutes until noodles are done. If freezing the soup, leave out the noodles and add them in when you reheat. family

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YOUR FAMILY z words & wisdom

In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life:

“Follow your bliss. If you do follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while waiting for you, and the life you ought to be living is the one you are living. When you can see that, you begin to meet people who are in the field of your bliss, and they open the doors to you. I say, follow your bliss and don't be afraid, and doors will open where you didn't know they were going to be. If you follow your bliss, doors will open for you that wouldn't have opened for anyone else.” —Joseph Campbell

it goes on.

—Robert Frost

If you have much, give of your wealth; if you have little, give of your heart.

Love is a force more formidable than any other. It is invisible—it cannot be seen or measured, yet it is powerful enough to transform you in a moment, and offer you more joy than any material possession could.

—Arabic proverb

—Barbara De Angelis

“Children are apt to live up to what you believe of them.” —Lady Bird Johnson 46 February/March 2013

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Save on Your Taxes There has never been a better time to show your commitment to North Dakota’s children with a new expanded state tax credit. North Dakotans may now receive a 40% tax credit for gifts made to endowments of charities such as The Village Family Service Center*. 40% for Individuals Contributions of $5,000 or more (cash or planned gifts) will qualify for a 40% tax credit of up to $10,000 per person or $20,000 for a married couple. A donor in the 28% tax bracket may see these benefits: GIFT AMOUNT Federal Tax Savings North Dakota Tax Credit

$5,000 -1,400 -2,000

$50,000 -14,000 -20,000

Net cost of gift:

$1,600

$16,000

40% for Businesses & Financial Institutions C corporations, S corporations, estates, limited liability companies, and trusts may qualify for a 40% tax credit, up to a maximum credit of $10,000. (This information is accurate as of date of publication.)

For FREE information on the North Dakota State Tax Credit and other Estate Planning tools, complete and return the form below, or call Janet at 701-451-5036. Complete and mail to: Janet Zinke, The Village Family Service Center, P.O. Box 9859, Fargo, ND 58106

 Please send me additional information on how I can use North Dakota’s expanded tax credit to save on my taxes. Name:__________________________________ Telephone:_________________ Address:___________________________________________________________ City:______________ State:____ Zip:________ Email:______________________

* The Children’s Village Family Service Foundation was created solely to support the ongoing work and legacy of The Village Family Service Center. The Village is North Dakota’s oldest child-caring agency and has served North Dakotans throughout the entire state since 1891.


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Village Family Magazine - February / March 2013