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Through the eyes of technology See page five

105 7 T H ST. S W PU YA L LU P WA SH, 98371

BIG GEARS ROLL TOWARD ST. LOUIS After winning the Seattle Olympic Regional, the robotics team was offered an invitation to the World Championship. After this announcement, they were then prompted with the question of raising funds.

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Above: Juniors Connar Krob and Cameron Kerl watch intently as their robot works to successfully place a ring on a post. The team is going on their second year of building and competing at regional levels. With a regional win under their belt this year, Robotics turns to strategy to win the World Championship with over 300 teams to compete against.

of days to accept or decline the invitation to the World Championship. For us, the decision was a gamble as there he robotics team won the regional robotics was a $5,000 entry fee. Fundraising became the name of competition March 19 and moved on to the world the game,” Fadaie said. championship in St. Louis, Mo. April 27-30. Over the course of four weeks, the team raised thousands The win at regionals came as a surprise for the of dollars in order cover various costs to be able to go to team but the excitement couldn’t last, according to junior the championship. Michael Fadaie. “Everyone on the team and our mentors reached out “I knew the team had done a great job and we had a to friends, family, co-workers and whatever contacts they viable robot, but it was still a surprise,” had for raising money. We recently held a “ T H E F E E L I N G I S fundraiser at PHS where Jim Kerl, our lead Fadaie said. “After we all came to the AMAZING ONLY realization that we had just won, the big mentor, brought in his fantastic Swing BEING A TWOquestion came: how are we going to pay Band to play Sinatra music,” Fadaie said. YEAR TEAM AND to get there? It was a dose of reality after The April 12 benefit concert wasn’t the ACCOMPLISHING the excitement.” only fundraiser for the trip. The team has SO M UCH.” Sophomore Martin Mattes described received support from many businesses, the win as unexpected after having to community members and the school overcome an obstacle that could have district, according to lead mentor Jim CODY SQUIRE cost them the win. Kerl. SOPHOMORE “During the final match, the [robot’s] Sophomore Cody Squire is proud arm broke. A pin in one of the gears popped out and the to have won the regional competition and have the arm fell. That was a pretty scary moment, but then we opportunity to compete at the world championship. used our minibot and ended up winning,” Mattes said. “The feeling is amazing only being a two-year team and An obstacle of a different form came when the team accomplishing so much,” Squire said. accepted the invitation to the World Championship. Jim Kerl stresses the importance of the team members “After winning regionals, the team is given only a couple and adult mentors’ time and support to the team and B Y PAU L A B I S I A R W E B M A N A G E R

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SPRING OPEN-GYM

Every Tuesday and Thursday the gym will be available from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. for open-gym use. This will run through the end of May.

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winning. “Every year we take a group of kids who have [different levels] of experience and by the end of the season we have produced something remarkable. That cannot happen without a huge commitment by the team members and the adult mentors that volunteer their time to the club,” Kerl said. To Kerl, the process of building the robot is more important than winning the competition itself. “As much as we loved winning the Seattle Olympic Regional, the real experience is in the process. We are given a task that seems impossible, with too little time and not enough money and somehow it comes together,” Kerl said. The whole team is excited for the competition in St. Louis, according to Fadaie. There will be more than 20,000 people attending and the team will compete with about 300 of the best teams from all over the world. Kerl considers the chance of winning the world championship unknown. “We will be competing against all the other regional winners; teams that have been established for years and have competed at the highest levels numerous times,” Kerl said. “But each season is a new game and I think we have a very competitive robot. We have a talented drive team. Everyone knows their roles, so we’ll see.”

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SENIOR SLIDESHOW PHOTOS

COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS

Photos for the senior slideshow need to be submitted to Josh Moynahan by June 1. Any questions are directed to Moynahan at moynahanjm@gmail.com.

Puyallup River clean-up event April 30 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Anyone interested in participating, meet up at Johnny’s Bar and Grill. It’s an opportunity for students to complete community service hours.

CASH ONLY FOR SENIORS

WINNIE THE POOH AT PHS

Effective May 2, checks will no longer be accepted as a payment option. Fines and fees, prom tickets, graduation tickets and anything else you pay must be paid in cash.

PHS Drama Department puts on the “Winnie the Pooh” play Thursday May 12 through Saturday May 14. Thursday and Friday shows start at 7 p.m. Saturday shows starts at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 with ASB and $7 without ASB.

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REJECTED, WAITLISTED, DETERMINED T O N Y

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As seniors are receiving their college acceptance letters, many are facing those dreaded letters. For some, they have back up plans in place while others are simply sitting, waiting it out. B Y A D R I A O L S O N A N D S O N I A X U F E A T U R E S E D I T O R , R E P O R T E R

As the end of the school year approaches, seniors are faced with the reality of getting rejected from their top school and having to decide what to do next. According to the University of Washington (UW) admission brochure, tuition for an out-of-state resident is $25,329 versus the in-state resident which cost $8,701. The difference between the two is why many believe that they’re getting rejected from UW. Receiving the dreaded, thin envelope from your top university is disappointing and may cause some to lose hope, but not for senior Nicole Hobble. Hobble received a rejection letter from UW, her first choice, but instead of getting discouraged she found another way to try to get in. “I was really disappointed at first, but I met someone at UW over the summer that would help me just in case I didn’t get in,” Hobble said. Participating in a program concerning diversity at UW last summer, Hobble became acquainted with a Native American adviser who helped her with her application and told her about petitioning. “At UW there is a forum on their website called a petition and you basically write a one to three page essay telling them why you think you got rejected, why you should be reconsidered and why you belong there,” Hobble said. “You also have to include three letters of recommendation and in two to three weeks they will let you know.” Although Hobble admits her SAT scores were average, she also believes UW picking out-of-state resident versus in-state residents played a factor in her rejection. “UW would rather accept an out-of-state resident with the same test scores as me rather than an in-state because this way UW is getting more money,” Hobble said. There are many misconceptions about this change, according to UW Associate Vice President of Media Relations and Communications Norman Arkans. The original plan was for the UW to accept 150 more non-resident students for next school year, according to Arkans. When the projections for tax revenues were announced

in March, the UW had to alter their plan because the Erickson, she thought it would improve her odds of getting into as many good schools as possible. numbers were going down. “I first applied to a couple of schools that I knew Instead, they decided to accept 150 less resident students and accept 300 more nonresident students. I could get into and then I took a chance and applied It’s only because nonresident students pay almost three to schools that I really wanted to get into but are very selective,” Erickson said. times what resident students do, according to Arkans. Out of all the schools Erickson applied to, she Last year, 84 percent of the students were residents; got waitlisted to Colby and Whitman and accepted this year, 80 percent of the students will be residents. Out of 25,000 applications the UW receives each year into Washington State University (WSU), Western Washington University (WWU) and Central Washington for the freshmen class, only 5,500 of them are accepted. “The University, regrettably, has always turned away University (CWU). “I was certain that I would get into Whitman at least–I more qualified students than we could admit,” Arkans said. “We have always had to disappoint students took all AP and honor classes and I got a 2090 on the SAT. So when I got a letter saying I was on the waitlist I was because we just don’t have the room.” Hearing about this news didn’t stop senior Cameron J. surprised,” Erickson said. Whitman was one of Erickson’s top choices but Parker from only applying to UW. Growing up around a father who frequently went to Carleton College was Erickson’s main focus. “When I first stepped foot on the campus I instantly UW basketball games and having parents who regularly took him up to Seattle, Parker is no stranger to the UW loved it. I met all the requirements and my extracurricular were adequate. The atmosphere was perfect and less atmosphere. than 2,000 students attend, which is my “I remember going with my dad to the “IF EDUCATION kind of learning environment.” UW basketball games, I grew up around IS REALLY THAT Erickson was denied to her numberit. I loved going up there to be a part of it IMPORTANT TO one school but has decided to take the and so did my parents,” Parker said. The UW is the one and only school Y O U , Y O U H A V E T O next best offer. K E E P T RY I NG.” Next fall quarter, Erickson will be an Parker has ever wanted to go to. honors college student at WSU where Parker got put on the waiting list for she was offered $17,000. UW and has decided that he is going NICOLE HOBBLE Erickson is happy with her choice but to wait it out and continue working in SENIOR wants to caution others to not do the Puyallup until he gets accepted. same thing she did. “The UW is the only school I have “Do not apply to 10 schools, it’s a lot of work filling ever wanted to go to, so if I don’t get accepted into Fall 2011 I’ll apply for Winter 2011; however long it takes for out all the application forms, getting all the addresses, me to get in. During the duration of that time I’m going sending in SAT scores and it costs a lot of money and to work and save up money until I get accepted,” Parker time,” Erickson said. Whether you have been rejected or waitlisted to said. Aug. 1 is the latest Parker will know if he gets colleges, Hobble offers this advice. “The thing to remember is that everything happens accepted. While Parker is determined, many seniors have “safe for a reason. If education is really that important to schools” just in case they don’t get into their desired you, you have to keep trying and it doesn’t stop at that one college. Wherever you go you’re still going to get school. Senior Lauren Erickson had eight. Erickson, a 3.87 GPA student with above average SAT education you just have to be able to pick yourself back up and move on,” Hobble said. scores, applied to a total of 10 schools. This may seem like an outrageous number but to

Puyallup Valley: living in the shadow of a natural disaster B Y

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ver the past decade the world has been plagued with countless natural disasters. The Indian Ocean Tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, the earthquake in Haiti, the earthquake in Chile and most recently the devastating Tsunami in Japan. Though these hardships have had a huge impact on the world, a disaster waiting to happen is shadowing the Puyallup Valley. If Mount Rainier erupts, it will be the most destructive volcanic explosion in

the United States, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. “Just imagine a wall of fast-moving concrete flowing through the valley. It would pick up everything in its path,” Pierce County Deputy Director of Emergency Management Jodi Woodcock said. “What makes this disaster even more complicated is that volcanic eruptions can last for many years and it is unknown when or if residents would ever be able to return to or rebuild their homes.” Lahars originating from Mount Rainier are not completely inconceivable, the

500-year-old Electron lahar started as a landslide from Sunset Amphitheater on the upper west flank of the volcano. The lahar swept through the Puyallup valley depositing as much as 50 feet of mud, boulders, and wood debris near presentday Orting, according to the Mount Rainier Emergency Response Plan. Although the destruction would be great to the Valley, there isn’t much worry about Mount Rainier erupting any time soon. It is considered a high risk, low probability incident, according to Woodcock. “The last I heard from the science

community was that we have about a one in 10 chance that we could see something happen in our lifetimes,” Woodcock said. For a school, the procedure for a natural disaster is one that needs to be carried out with the greatest proficiency, according to Assistant Principal Eric Hogan. “If [the emergency] requires an evacuation the first thing you do is go into more of a lockdown. The only thing you would do immediate evacuation for would be a fire or a lahar,” Hogan said.

See “Disaster” page three


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“Disaster” page two In the event of a lahar, the Puyallup Valley to elementary schools and retirement homes,” has only one hour and 20 minutes until the Hogan said. “The reality is that in the event of a water and debris hits the Puyallup River, natural disaster, high school students are going according to the Mount Rainier Emergency to be treated more like adults than children.” Response Plan. In Pierce County the Police and Fire “The procedures for earthquakes are Department play a critical role in disaster much different in that they may not require response, according to Woodcock. immediate evacuation. The last thing we want “They are ultimately the front line is to have people running from buildings if emergency responders that save and protect they don’t need to. Many times people flee lives,” Woodcock said. “We are lucky that these stable buildings only to be hit with debris disciplines participate heavily in the planning as they exit,” Woodcock said. “Unnecessary process so emergency management is able to evacuation would also cause gridlock on our support their operations in a disaster.” roadways prevent emergency responders from Pierce County has a variety of resources and getting to those who need them the most.” programs available to help families prepare for Hogan remembers the 2000 earthquake well natural disasters. Pierce County Neighborhood when he was an Assistant Principal at Bethel Emergency Teams (PC NET) are one such High School. program. “During the earthquake “PC NET is the most effective “IN THE EVENT [the school] wanted to do a emergency preparedness OF A NATURAL lockdown because you didn’t effort,” Woodcock said. “PC DISASTER, HIGH know if there were power lines NET is a neighborhooddown,” Hogan said. “There S C H O O L S T U D E N T S centric preparedness program are a whole lot of things you A R E G O I N G T O B E that allows residents to decide TREATED MORE want to check before you just what is important to them and L I K E A DU LTS.” start sending kids out onto a build plans based on their own sidewalk.” resources and capabilities.” ERIC HOGAN ASST. PR INCIPA L At Puyallup High School, Natural disasters are not each teacher has a certain something to shrug off and responsibility. assume they will never happen here. We have “Mrs. Heeb and Mr. Showacy are the ones become a ‘just in time’ society, according to that do most of the work in the event of a real Woodcock. emergency here day in and day out. I’m the one “When you’re dealing with the tyranny of who would speak to the media from whatever the urgent: trying to get kids off to school Principal Jason Smith tells me,” Hogan said. and yourself off to work and you don’t believe In the event of a natural disaster, teachers are disasters affect you, you’re unlikely to prepare,” not the only ones that take a part in ensuring Woodcock said. the safety of the students. In the end, no one knows how a city or school “Typically the communication will happen will react to a natural disaster, according to from Smith to the authorities downtown and Hogan. vice versa. He’ll let the city authorities know “Someone told me once: make sure your which schools need assistance.” building knows how to do a lockdown and In emergency situations, high school make sure they know where to evacuate to, but students are thought of as adults, according to the reality is that if something bigger than [a Hogan. minor emergency] happens you have to have “Any resources that [the city has] will be good decision makers in place because there’s heavily tapped into and most of them are going always going to be a twist to it,” Hogan said.

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With about 28 school days left until seniors walk across the stage to receive their diploma, seniors are working to finish graduation requirements. There are several helpful resources available to seniors during this process. In order to graduate, seniors must earn 22 credits and finish the Culminating Project. They also need to pass the reading and writing portion of the WASL or HSPE as well as the math portion or complete BUR 2.0 math credits after sophomore year. At the start of school, Sept. 2, 2010, the number of seniors enrolled came to a total of 557, according to Student Services Secretary Julie Beckman. As the school year has been underway, the latest enrollment of seniors has been tallied to about 509, according to Graduation Specialist Annette Burnett. Drop-out numbers for this year have the latest register of 24 seniors who have withdrawn with drop-out codes, according to Beckman. As graduation is nearing, the status of seniors is slightly better than last year, according to Career Specialist Shelley Jellison. “I’m very optimistic that our numbers are looking good,” Jellison said. At the semester mark, seniors had

the smallest number of Fs of about 70 students out of 509, according to Assistant Principal Eric Hogan. The amount of students have been pretty consistent the whole year. The Culminating Project, one of several requirements needed, is soon coming to a close with Senior Boards May 23 and 24. Burnett’s job is to help those seniors who have procrastinated complete their requirements in a timely fashion. “[A lot of seniors struggle] if they’ve let [their Culminating Project] go until the last minute,” Burnett said. “We sit down NETT and try to chunk it in a timely, double manner. It’s hard to juggle things and have [good] time management [at the same time].” A lot of students struggle to keep up on their portfolio because there’s no incentive like grades or credits, according to Jellison. The incentive [put in place for seniors] was the ability to attend prom. “[Students struggle more] because they haven’t adhered to the timelines,” Jellison said. “The Advisory program is designed to keep students on track.” With guidance set in place, faculty members have a hard time with some students’ excuses. “The frustrating part [is when they say] ‘I have that done, I just haven’t turned it in,’” Jellison said.

AN OPEN LETTER TO

PRESIDENT OBAMA ABOUT

WORLD PRESS FREEDOM DAY

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n May 3, the United States will, for the first time, play host to World Press Freedom Day, an event that will focus an international spotlight on the state of press freedoms in our own country as well as abroad. You and your administration, and in particular Secretary Clinton, have been commendably forceful in pressing foreign governments to remove the fetters from online communications that obstruct the free flow of ideas. As Secretary Clinton said in her February 15, 2011, address on Internet freedom at George Washington University: “Some take the view that, to encourage tolerance, some hateful ideas must be silenced by governments. We believe that efforts to curb the content of speech rarely succeed and often become an excuse to violate freedom of expression. Instead, as it has historically been proven time and time again, the better answer to offensive speech is more speech.” Regrettably, the United States will lack the full moral authority to advocate for world press freedom so long as our laws fail to effectively protect the majority of the Americans who gather and report news each day: Those working for student media. The values conveyed by journalism – attribution, verification, fairness, accountability – are the values that every young person needs as a citizen of the online world. Because the professional news media cannot be everywhere, our society needs candid reports from “embedded” student journalists to tell us what is going on inside of our schools. Yet far from embracing the educational benefits of journalism, school after school has done just the opposite. Those bearing the brunt are America’s journalism teachers, the best of whom go to work every day certain that the question is when, not if, they will be fired in retaliation for what their students write. A generation ago, the Supreme Court rolled back students’ First Amendment rights significantly in its Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier ruling. We have now 23 years of experience with Hazelwood – a generation of students from kindergarten through college – and it is undeniable that Hazelwood, having done nothing to improve student learning or school safety, is a failed experiment on America’s children. American’s most vulnerable journalists need those who have spoken out so persuasively against censorship abroad to speak with that same forcefulness at home. We urge your administration to publicly acknowledge the unfinished work of press freedom in our own nation, to denounce the shameful practice of stifling candid discussion of school issues, and to ensure that this World Press Freedom Day concludes with a global commitment to protect the rights of all journalists, even the youngest.

Get the facts www.splc.org/wpfd

SIGNED BY American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression American Copy Editors Society American Society of Journalists and Authors Asian American Journalists Association Associated Collegiate Press Broadcast Education Association Center for Scholastic Journalism, Kent State University College Media Advisers, Inc. The First Amendment Project Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, Inc. Illinois College Press Association Illinois Community College Journalism Association Inter American Press Association Investigative News Network IRE, Investigative Reporters & Editors, Inc. Journalism Education Association Mid-America Press Institute National Association of Black Journalists National Association of Hispanic Journalists National Association of Science Writers, Inc. National Coalition Against Censorship National Federation of Press Women National Lesbian & Gay Journalists Association National Newspaper Association National Press Foundation National Press Photographers Association National Scholastic Press Association National Society of Newspaper Columnists National Youth Rights Association The Poynter Institute Quill and Scroll International Honorary Society for High School Journalists Religion Newswriters Association Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press Society of American Business Editors & Writers Society of Collegiate Journalists Society of Environmental Journalists Society of Professional Journalists Society for Features Journalism Tully Center for Free Speech at Syracuse University

Paid for by the Student Press Law Center, Journalism Education Association, Society of Professional Journalists, College Media Advisers, Inc., National Scholastic Press Association, and Quill & Scroll International Honorary Society for High School Journalists


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E DI TOR-I N- CH I E F.........................S A M BA BBI T T MANAGING EDITOR.............KIRSTEN GUSTAFSON OPINION EDITOR..........................JULIE DUNLAP FEATURES EDITOR.........................ADRIA OLSON FOCUS EDITOR...............................ANA DUEÑAS A&E EDITOR........................... K ATELYNN HA AS SPORTS EDITOR....................DAIZY MCCONNELL ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR.......CHRIS UTTERBACK NEWS EDITOR.........................BRITTANI CURLEY AD MANAGERS...SAM BABBITT , KIRSTEN GUSTAFSON ASSISTANT AD MANAGER.................... JESSE GILES CIRCULATION MANAGER.........ANNA WULFEKUHLE PHOTO EDITOR........................BRYNN FLETCHER GRAPHICS EDITOR................JEFFREY WHITLATCH ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR ........KELSEY ROBINSON W EB M A NAGER..............................PAUL A BISI A R FACT CHECKER.....................ISA AC SCHOENFELD GR APHICS................................ALOR A CAUDILL PHOTOGR A PHERS............................THOM A S X U REPORTERS.............................JESSICA DICKINS .............................................EMMA ENGLUND ...........................................SHAKAYLA FIELDS ..........................................STEPHEN HAMMEN .......................................KHADIJAH HOMOLKA ................................................KATIE LARSON .............................................SA R A PA RLIM A N ................................................BRI PEDICONE ..........................................K ATHRYN RUSSELL ................................................ANA SCHMIDT ..................................................TON Y SER NA ......................................................SONIA XU ADVISER.............................SANDRA COYER, MJE PUBLICATIONS POLICIES:

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Staff members speak out about disrespect shown to dozens of students around the school who participated in the Day of Silence April 15.

It might be blatant defiance or disrespect. day: the voices of bystanders witnessing these injustices Maybe it’s laughing at the crack of a seemingly witty and failing or refusing to act. By not speaking up or taking joke. action, idle bystanders still bear responsibility for the Perhaps, it’s ignoring it all together. unjust actions of others. It’s easy to deflect the seriousness of an issue that is not The verdict is in: you’re guilty by association. necessarily our collective problem. Naivety is claimed. Ignorance is claimed. But in such an And yet, one thing remains constant: our treatment educated society, claims such as these have no merit. of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Go ahead brush this off; this can not Transgender (LGBT) Community at PHS is be that prevalent of an issue, right? “THERE IS AN EVERa serious dilemma. Think again. PRESENT DIVISION We noticed the lack of education B E T W E E N W H A T S O C I E T Y While not always physically visible, and respect for the Day of Silence that C OANNSDI DUENR AS CACCECP ET PA TBAL BE L E the underlying tensions exist. The things occurred April 15; we witnessed obvious we bury beneath us have the power to CONCERNING THE acts of insolence against this day of silent topple us all. SUBJECT OF SEXUAL PREFERENCE.” protest. There is an ever-present division This is completely unacceptable. between what society considers OUR VIEW We cannot begin to convey our acceptable and unacceptable concerning disappointment with those who acted the subject of sexual preference. with intention to harm. Simply put, we are Open your mind. Take a moment to dismayed and saddened that this type of behavior would self-reflect. We challenge you to step out of your comfort rear its ugly head in a school that boasts student unity. zone; talk to someone within the LGBT community, And unfortunately, we do not have any advice for you, educate yourself on the Day of Silence and different issues the individual, on promoting change because such a facing the LGBT community and most importantly: show level of intolerance and disrespect for humanity is not some compassion and empathy. something we can communally change. We stand in respect of the LGBT Community—not The change would have to come from within. because it’s the “right” thing to do, not because it’s the That being said, not all students acted with deliberate “politically correct” thing to do—because it’s the human intention to harm. There were other silent voices on that thing to do.

Editorial Cartoon

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EDITORIAL POLICY:

The Viking Vanguard operates as a limited forum. The Viking Vanguard’s duty is to expand student perspectives, maintain community relations and act as a student publication advocating voice. Besides providing an opportunity for the exchange of viewpoints, The Viking Vanguard serves as an academic tool by which students can voice opinions as well as highlight issues facing today’s students. LETTER POLICY:

The Viking Vanguard accepts unsolicited copy from businesses. Only signed and dated letters with addresses and phone numbers from community members, or grade level from students will be accepted. Letters must be limited to 350 words and will be published as space is available. The staff reserves the right to edit any letter without changing its content. All letters are the sole opinion of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of The Viking Vanguard staff. Letters to the Editor may be submitted by E-Mailing them to thevikingvanguard@gmail.com, or mailing them to The Viking Vanguard c/o Puyallup High School. ADVERTISING POLICY:

The Viking Vanguard publication staff accepts advertisements for most products available to the public. However, the staff reserves the right to reject, edit or cancel any advertisement at anytime. Advertisements shall be free of implications that the staff deems offensive in light of normal public standards (WIAA 18.20.0 and 18.20.1). Ads violating this policy will not be accepted. The staff will not accept advertising for products or groups which are racist, sexist or illegal for high school students. Advertisements do not necessarily reflect the views, endorsements and/or positions of The Viking Vanguard, student body, faculty, administration or school board. CORRECTIONS:

*SEV ER A L AWA RD W INNERS W ERE OMITTED FROM THE SOLO AND ENSEMBLE STORY ON PAGE T WO, INCLUDING K ELSEY H A R R ISON A ND SHELBY STEWART *ISA AC SCHOENFELD’S NAME WAS SPELLED INCOR R ECTLY ON PAGE T WO *NORSEL ANDERS WAS SPELLED INCORRECTLY ON PAGE T WO

The Viking Vanguard staff values accuracy, and wishes to correct mistakes made in previous issues. If you believe we have made an error, please contact us at: thevikingvanguard@gmail.com.

Be a superhero for the earth! Please, do your part and recycle The Viking Vanguard. HEY! HEY YOU! YES YOU! DO YOU WANT TO SEE YOUR NAME IN THE PAPER? WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR AND DROP IT OFF IN RM. 313 OR IN MRS. COYER’S BOX.

Student embraces cultural diversity

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ne week. measly. passport, so he stole sips from my That’s what they were The beginning of this week was, to uncles every time she looked away. asking for. To open up our say the least, awkward. When she served me rootbeer homes for one week to a The small one never spoke, the in a bottle, neither of the Russians handful of strangers. older one spoke a lot (but you hardly understood the concept. I figured, I can do that. understood a word). Nikolay kept asking me “Why Pick them up from the They washed their does she serve you beer and you’re airport, feed them, drive undergarments in my underage but not me? I’m 26!” them around all week and bathtub and hung them We tried explaining the concept of use my poor Russian skills over the shower rack, they rootbeer. It was useless. to attempt entertaining drank nothing but tea Rostislav put 14 packets of sugar them. and didn’t understand the and a quarter glass of iced tea in his Easy-shmeesy, piece of inappropriateness of walking Sprite. And the second Nikolay looked cake. I got this. around in their underwear in away, he snatched my rootbeer and No strings attached. front of ladies. poured some in his drink. So why did it feel like that But truth be told…we As he developed an imaginary piece of cake was topped loved every second of it. sense of intoxication, he informed us LISA IRBY with bitter frosting and G U E S T C O L U M N I S T Eventually car rides went that he created a “cocktail.” smashed right in my face as from awkward silence to It was moments like these that made I choked back tears during a heartfelt making animal noises and growling saying goodbye so hard. Moments goodbye. at each other. like the naivety of experiencing a new But we’re not quite to that point in The little one began to open up. culture and meowing at each other the story yet. We’re still back seven He even went as far as letting us have in the car on the way home from days prior on a Saturday in the middle lunch with him and his friends. concerts. of SeaTac Airport. We began to build an incredible It was moments like these that The Vladimir Boys Russian Choir bond with Nikolay. The four of us sat turned this trip from no strings came to visit and several members on my bed for hours as he played my attached to a trip that pulled directly of choir and their families offered to guitar and serenaded us with russian on the strings attached to my tear house them for a week. Their flight songs. ducts. had been delayed and they were a By the time the week was spiraling As I watched them board the bus to day late coming in. to a close we couldn’t believe their leave on a Friday morning I realized We had signs and cameras and time with us was going my perspective of enthusiasm all prepared for their to end. We realized these young men “WE REALIZED IN ONE MOMENT WE MANAGED grand entrance (one that we waited in one moment we and their culture had TO MISJUDGE THEM hours for, I might add). managed to misjudge completely changed. AND IN ONE WEEK THEY When the group arrived, my cousin them and in one week I thought, Nikolay. MANAGED TO MAKE and I immediately began picking they managed to T H E I R W A Y I N T O T H E I R 26. A young man with VERY OWN PLACES IN apart the crowd of boys, pointing make their way into a golden voice and a O U R FA M I LY. to our hopeful potentials (yes, we their very own places spirit that absolutely pointed to the cute ones. Sue us). in our family. envelopes everyone LISA IRBY SENIOR We were the last family to receive We went out he meets. Absolutely our Russians, of course. to dinner on our anything but average. My first thought was, great we got last night at a small restaurant in Rostislav. 12, still looks like he’s nine. the left-overs. Tacoma. Perfectly and utterly shy. Adorable (in Nikolay. 26. About six-foot-tall with We introduced Rostislav to Sprite that I could pinch your cheeks kind of some meat on his bones. He looked (apparently soda isn’t a common way). Unforgettable. average. thing in Russia) and he was hooked. I figured, one week. I can do that. Rostislav. 12, but I would have Nikolay was upset that the waitress Easy-shmeesy, piece of cake. guessed eight or nine. Skinny and wouldn’t serve him beer without his No strings attached.


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t seven years old, most girls Middleton at Westminster Abbey. are dreaming of being a As I stared at my computer princess. screen, gawking and cringing Eventually, reality hits them at these nauseating wedding and they move on to pursuing a details, my stomach twisted into career as a teacher or a a pretzel. I felt all of doctor. my hopes and dreams They come to terms dissolve as I looked into with the fact that they the photographed face live in a country that of my mortal enemy: traded monarchy for Kate Middleton. democracy many years She was not only ago. stealing my man, (That is the most she was stealing the devastating part to Cinderella story I had me about U.S. history: been planning for my we traded crowns and FAEDARTI UA ROELSS EODN. entire life. palaces for top hats and Disney was going white houses.) to make an old school At 17 years old, I still cling to cartoon princess movie about the hope that I will, in fact, be a me: I would join Cinderella, Ariel princess when I grow up. (I am and the others in the Disney petitioning that state colleges princess Hall of Fame. recognize “Being a Princess” as There would be a look alike of an accepted Major.) me waltzing around Disneyland, Ever since I was a little girl, signing autographs. I’ve said I would marry a prince: Before I sunk into a deep, dark Prince William to be exact. pit of depression at the realization A few weeks ago, I found the that my William was marrying invitation for the Royal Wedding another woman, I heard a lovely displayed online: The Lord voice burst from my laptop. Chamberlain is commanded by “Speak Now” by Taylor Swift the Queen to invite... blah blah was playing on Pandora. blah... Friday, 29th April... blah (For the longest time I tried to blah... the marriage of His Royal resist the Taylor Swift cult, but I Highness Prince William of eventually gave in and accepted Wales, K.G. with Miss Catherine the fact that I was a closet

T-Sweezy fan.) The song is about a girl whose true love is about to marry another someone else. I connected to the song all too well. Obviously, this was a sign. Obviously, Pandora was telling me that I needed to crash William’s wedding. No, I’m not talking about crashing the reception. (I’m not going to be that girl that shows up to the reception to snag a slice of red velvet cake and dance like a maniac to the YMCA.) I’m talking about crashing the Royal Wedding itself. “I am not the kind of girl who should be rudely barging in on a white veil occasion, but you are not the kind of boy who should be marrying the wrong girl...” Swift sang. Kate is marrying him for all of the wrong reasons: she loves him, she wants to support him and she is his best friend. My intentions are pure: I want to be a princess. I want to wear poofy dresses and read with little children and watch movie classics (like The Princess Bride, for example) in my PJs with the queen. The wedding takes place in the hallowed Westminster Abbey— the church will be buzzing

with charming politicians and opposes the marriage to speak celebrities and family friends. now— I will. There will be stuffy dress “I hear the preacher say ‘Speak suits and flamboyant hats and now or forever hold your peace...’” white gloves worn by dukes and Hopefully, everything will turn duchesses and lords and ladies. out the fairytale-like way that There will be something old, Swift sings about and we can get something new, something married Nov. 28, 2011— the day borrowed and something blue. I turn 18 because I’ll be a tad The crowd will grow silent underage until that day. (A prince: when the wedding party parades what a wonderful birthday gift!) in and the ceremony will begin. “Don’t wait or say a single vow... “Fond gestures you need to hear are exchanged and me out and they “I AM the organ starts P E T I T I O N I N G T H A T said, ‘Speak Now’.” to play a song My plane ticket STATE COLLEGES that sounds like a R E C O G N I Z E ‘ B E I N G is booked, my hotel death march...” arrangements have A PRINCESS’ AS After the train been made and my AN ACCEPTED MAJOR.” of Kate’s dress outfit for the big follows her down day is planned. the aisle and the I’ll admit that ADRIA OLSON FEATURES EDITOR tears make their the thought of way down her disrupting a Royal parents’ faces, I will make my sly Wedding is slightly intimidating entrance. to me. I haven’t exactly received an There is a lingering thought in invitation in the mail— Kate and the back of my mind that my plan I aren’t exactly on speaking terms might fail. (nor have we ever really been, I could be tackled by burly but that is irrelevant). British bodyguards or oversleep “I am hiding in the curtains... and miss my cue. It seems that I was uninvited by I keep reminding myself that your lovely bride-to-be... but I I have no need to worry: Kanye know you wish it was me...” West will be attending the When the Archbishop of wedding. Canterbury asks for anyone who If I don’t object, he will.

I’m waiting. Every day I’m waiting. I’m waiting for a call, a miracle, hope, but waiting is what kills me the most. Oct. 21, 2010. This was the day that taug taught ught ug ht m me what life really is. I found out that at a any ny moment your world could be turned ed u ups upside pside down ps and the ability to turn it rig right ight ig ht ssid side ide up was id in the hands of someone el else else. se.. se On this day I learned th that at lliv living ivin iv ing wasn’t in just for me and I dr drop dropped oppe op ped pe d ev ever everything eryt er ything to yt o be there for someone ne e else. e. One e year, year ye ar,, seven ar seve se ven ve n mo mont months nths nt hs a and nd tthr three hree day hr days ays ay ago, I met a b boy (no (now now no w be before re y you ou sto stop top to p reading this thinking it it’s ’s a ssop soppy oppy op py lov love ove ov story, wait because it’s not not). ot). ot His name was DJ. Of course he was trouble and y yes es h he go gott me into lots of it. Yet he was unl unlike nlik nl ike an ik any y other “trouble maker”— not bec because ecau ec ause o au off who he was, but because people ssaw aw h him im for who he really was. They knew ew h he e wa wass someone real, someone who wasn wasn’t sn’t sn ’t ffak fake. ake. ak e. He became my best friend nd a and nd eventually, my boyfriend. This iss wh what at made it so hard when I found out h he e ha had d a brain tumor. All of life paused for me. It came me tto oa standstill. I was gone and everyone cl clos close ose os to me knew I disappeared. But it was o onl only nly nl for a brief moment, for I no longer had d my A R E

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better. I knew that he was dying. Chemo began to work again. He got better for the first time. He was home and was even able to go back to school. It felt own little world. I had d a ne new world th that like hope had bloomed and I had him involved someone ne I llov loved oved ov ed and a brain back, but this was just for a moment. tumor. After four weeks, chemo failed once My goal was to move mov m ove my llife around so ov more. What was once a six-month notice that I could have e as m much h ti time me was now three months and by with with my boy as I ccou could ould ou ld unt until ntil nt il h he e December 2010 he wasn’t himself left left me. m anymore. The Th doctor doctors orss br or brok broke oke my ok Monday I could walk in and he’d heart hear he artt with ar with their tthe heir he ir w wor words. ords. My or say “stay.” Tuesday I could walk in eyes es closed cclo lose lo sed se d an and d I to took ok a dee deep eep ee p and he’d say, “Why are you here?” breath. breath th.. “W th “We can’t fix hi him. m. We’ We’ve e’ve e’ ve He changed his mind about tried, but b there is no noth nothing thing el th else se people all the time and it killed we can do.” me. Not only was this brain tumor My heart sank and d I co couldn couldn’t dn’t dn ’t going to take him away from me open my eyes. Opening Open enin en ing in g th them em forever, but it was also messing D A I Z Y M C C O N N E L L meant I would have to o fa face ce tthe he with his head during the only SPORTS ED. truth. The doctors wer weren’t eren er en’t jjus en just ust us time I had left with him. It hurt so feeding me a bunch off sc scri scripted ript pted pt ed badly to walk in to see him and not know lines; they really had d don done one on e al all that they if he was going to let me stay or tell me to could do. To remove hi hiss tu tumo tumor mor would kill mo go. Even though I knew it wasn’t what he him and chemo therapy therap apy ap y an and radiation really meant, it still felt real. were no longer effective effective. ve. ve After a few weeks he came around They continued to tr try y ch chemo and I and the mood swings stopped, but all prayed. I prayed that so some somehow meho me how it would ho that meant was something else was just work. I tried to talk myse myself self se lf iinto believing waiting around the corner. one day I would wake u up p to see that he DJ had been lined up for a few football was back to normal, ba back ck to playing scholarships; he was getting ready to sign football and making me laugh, but I knew with a college when he found out he had

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YADDA! YA DDA YA DDA

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“TOM & JERRY BECAUSE

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O U T O N T O P.”

“PROBABLY RUGR ATS. THEY’RE JUST CUTE C H A R AC T E R S.”

CHRISSY PHILLIPS SOPHOMORE

JUSTIN HAERCHERL JUNIOR

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Q: What was your favorite cartoon show growing up?

“CATDOG, BECAUSE

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a brain tumor. This started to get to him— he was always depressed and nothing fixed it. All I could do was lay with him on the hospital bed and not say a word. As all this was happening, things slipped away. Friends slipped away, school slipped away and I could only work a few hours at my job, which meant money slipped away. I only had a few friends who really cared and realizing the shallowness of some of them made everything even worse. It made life that much harder to take on. I expected support from my friends, the friends that I had always been there for when they needed me. But that support never came. My hope was that I would have people to prop me up, but instead I had to rely mostly on myself. In your junior year of high school, you don’t expect your best friend to get a brain tumor. You might expect overwhelming homework, lots of experimenting, fun, life. My junior year, I experienced pain, a pain like no other. April 5, 2011. Now, I live life. I live it without DJ. I live life knowing love and having it taken away. It’s been hard. I’ve cried, been angry and given up, but I will move on because those were DJ’s last words to me and I plan on living them up.

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“THE OLD X-MEN CARTOONS. IT ACTUALLY HAD A G OOD STORY.”

“FOGHORN LEGHORN. HE HAS REALLY FUNNY STAT E M E N T S .” PJ SIRL TEACHER

DYLAN TIMM SENIOR

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Ready to Graduate: At 21 years old, senior Carisa Pietila is ready to graduate. To show her school spirit, she holds up purple letters that complement her purple cap and gown that she will be wearing to graduation.

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SHE WILL BE WEARING PURPLE Carisa Pietila is a special needs student with the rare diagnosis of Myras Syndrome. She is one of only 16 known cases worldwide. Despite this circumstance, she will be graduating with the senior class. B Y A D R I A O L S O N F E A T U R E S E D I T O R

Junior High.

*** enior Carisa Pietila will be graduJanie and Carisa sit closely together on a ating June 11, 2011 at noon at the couch in their living room. Caelyn comes Puyallup Fairgrounds— two days downstairs and joins them on the couch. before her 21st birthday. Camryn casually takes a seat on the floor Eddy Grant, Kent Cornyn and with her back against a side table. Doug sits Max O’Neal will also be receiving gradua- in a recliner chair underneath a collection tion diplomas. of family photos taken on the beach. They have been at the school for about *** five or six years, depending on where their Carisa is in the Support Center program, birthday falls: they have aged out of the which is part of the special education deprogram and therefore will partment. be graduating. Janie, a former English Lan“I DON’T The students typically T H I N K P E O P L E guage Learners teacher at Puyhave two to three years S H O U L D F E E L allup, noted that Puyallup High designated as their junior School is known for their excelSORRY FOR years and only one senior lent special education program. T H E M.” year since it’s such a big The teachers encourage the PEGGY HASKEY year for students, accordstudents to reach their full poSUPPORT CENTER ing to Support Center tential, according to Janie. teacher Peggy Haskey. “[Haskey] doesn’t let their *** disability be their crutch,” Janie said. The Pietila family stands in the foyer of “She pushes them as far as they can be their home. Carisa’s mom, Janie, has dark pushed.” brown hair and glasses. Carisa’s dad, Doug, *** is wearing a WSU T-shirt that represents Carisa is curled up in a fleece blanket his alma mater. He leads Carisa to the en- with edges that are twisted together. One tryway— she is wearing a sweatshirt with side is solid yellow while the other side is “Vikings” spelled out in gold lettering to filled with a floral design. Caelyn and Camrepresent her soon-to-be alma mater. ryn made her the blanket for Christmas. The family moves to their living room “She doesn’t like being cold,” Doug said. and call for Carisa’s two younger sisters, “She’s always bundled up.” Caelyn and Camryn, to come downstairs. *** *** The program is designed to teach stuAt six months old, Carisa’s parents, Janie dents skills that they can apply to their evand Doug, began to realize that something eryday life, rather than just book skills. about their daughter was different. Students are taught how to count their When Carisa’s chromosomes were money, follow a schedule and find differchecked, everything appeared to be normal. ent places in the community. After years of consulting doctors, Car“[Our program has] been around for a isa still had no official diagnosis; Janie and long time and I think that we’ve figured Doug decided to stop looking. out what to do,” Haskey said. It wasn’t until this past year that Carisa was Students in the special education definally given a diagnosis: Myras Syndrome. partment are often seen around school A local pediatrician knew of a conference for and in the community serving— they geneticists from around the world and she rec- empty recycle bins, shred paper and do ommended that they take her case to them. other similar types of projects. To their surprise, Dr. Myras from EngWhile some students might feel sorry land recognized Carisa’s syndrome. for them or wonder why they’re cleaning She is one of only 16 known cases in the up, Janie sees the value in having the stuworld with Myras Syndrome. dents perform these jobs. The syndrome isn’t genetic, so her “It gives them a purpose,” Janie said. “It younger sisters Caelyn and Camryn won’t gives them something to be proud of.” pass it on to their children someday. Haskey shares the same opinion. Caelyn is a junior at Rogers High School “I don’t think people should feel sorry and Camryn is an eighth grader at Ballou for them,” Haskey said. “They should be

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excited for them: they are working on skills gives two thumbs up. that will transfer [to future jobs].” Coincidentally, tomorrow is Monday. *** “Her smile is always on,” Doug said. Carisa points to the TV and says “baby.” *** Baby is her nickname for Full House, her When Carisa is at home, she enjoys lisfavorite TV show. One of the DVD series is tening to music: particularly country. resting on top of the TV. The rest are tucked According to Caelyn and Camryn, she away elsewhere. She owns every season. wakes them up every Saturday morning at *** seven a.m. because of her blasting music. At one point, when Carisa was in charge Raising a child with special needs is no of shredding paper, her fingers got stuck in easy task, according to Janie: it has been a the shredder. team effort between each family member. At the time, Janie was still teaching at The efforts have been worth the rewards, Puyallup. according to Doug: Carisa has taught them A security guard realized what was hap- valuable life lessons. pening and ran up to Janie’s classroom to “On the grand Richter Scale scale of life, report to her what had happened. our problems are nothing compared to They had to dismantle the shredder to what she has to go through,” Doug said. release her fingers. *** Despite this accident, Carisa is going to Doug looks at Carissa. apply at a paper shredding business spe“You teach us to never give up, right?” cifically designed to hire employees with Doug asks. special needs. Carissa smiles. *** *** Abby, the family beagle, Carisa has a 22-year-old “ON THE GR AND is lounging in her tan dog caregiver named Amanda RICHTER SCALE bed. She quietly groans, that comes over for two and OF LIFE, OUR PROBLEMS and the family shifts their a half hours each day to ARE NOTHING attention to her droopy help out. COMPA RED TO eyes and floppy ears. EvTo help with communicaery morning when Carisa W H A T S H E H A S T O tion, Carisa will be receiving G O T H ROUGH.” comes downstairs to get a machine that will help her ready for the day, Abby talk: she can type in what DOUG PIETILA C A R I S A’S FAT H E R scurries upstairs to lie in she wants to say and it will Carisa’s empty bed. Carisa communicate it for her. detests this. Her family has learned to understand *** what she is trying to say by asking clarifyCarisa became involved in bowling ing questions and using hand motions. for the Special Olympics where she was “It’s a constant game of charades,” Doug awarded a gold medal. said. Along with bowling, Carisa also enjoys Since Carisa can be unsteady on her feet swimming. at times, Caelyn and Camryn will help her Last semester, Carisa took a swimming walk through the graduation ceremony. class at school. When they call out her name, Carisa When she finally was able to blow bub- Janae Pietila, all three sisters will walk tobles in the water, she earned the nickname gether to receive the diploma. “Bubbles,” according to Haskey. *** School is very important to Carisa: she Janie asks Carisa about graduation. counts down the days during the weekend. “What are you going to wear, Carisa?” Rather than being annoyed by Mondays, Janie asks. Carisa embraces them. Carisa pats her head to signify the graduRather than embracing snow days and ation cap. school breaks, Carisa is annoyed by them Carisa then points to herself and says, because she doesn’t get to go to school. “purple!” *** Indeed, the graduation gowns are a rich As Carisa listens to her family explain shade of Viking purple. this, a smile radiates from her face and she ***


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computer ut first st arriving ivin on the science scene in 1936 starting hirty years ago, a cell phone with the Z1 Computer. In 1971, the floppy disk was the size of a brick. Its uses extending to the basic revolutionized home computers due to its ability to store phone call. Today, people hold in their information in a portable hands a sleek, light-weight touch- manner. “Early recreational computers screen phone used for texting, apps, web use and “face time” were so limited in their functions, whereas today’s computers are calling. Starting with mechanical remarkably versatile,” Science clocks and calculators so many Technology Engineering and Mathematics thousands of years ago, it seems most don’t “ T E C H N O L O G Y ( S . T . E . M ) COMPLETELY teacher Alex think about the roots of INFLUENCES Macdonald the things we have so EACH said. naturally incorporated GENERATION The early into our daily lives. AND EACH computers Past: I N DI V I UA L .” used in schools In the early 1900s, offices people portrayed A L E X M A C D O N A L D and were extremely S.T.E.M. TE ACHER st the 21 century as a restricted: revolutionary, almost there were very few applications science-fictional era through available making it impossible to literature and entertainment. Television shows such as 1965s do much more than write simple Lost in Space depicts a space programs yourself. “I had some of the early colony family living among working, human-like robots at computers way back to the early Apples and even before,” the turn of the 21st century. One of the larger advancements University of Washington Tacoma in technology was the modern Professor Larry Wear Ph.D. said. B Y

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was pretty much “Everyth “Everything keyboard-oriented. floppy disk, keyboard-ori and a screen; that’s a keyboard a about it.”

Present:

Walking into classrooms today, you see projectors mounted into the ceiling and personal laptops for each teacher. Macdonald’s classroom consists of dozens of computers, a Smart Board and many other electronic tools, all of which you wouldn’t have found in a classroom twenty years ago. He seems comfortably kicked back, feet up on the table and a cell phone ringing in his pocket; as though he were at home among such forms of machinery. “We are seeing today that technology completely influences each generation and each individual,” Macdonald said. “In the past, when the technology was very limited, the influence was limited, often nonexistent.” Some simple items people take for granted daily have much more power than most knew when purchasing them in the first place: the U.S. Air Force is combining over 1,700 PlayStation 3s to create a supercomputer used to mimic the human nervous system. “One thing a lot of people aren’t aware of is that many electrical appliances being

manufactured now have the gene therapy and manipulating ability to communicate with matter at the atomic scale, as other devices,” Dr. Wear said. well as improving transportation, “I think we will probably see medical implants and that happening more and more, communication. where you’ll be “Whatever we’re able to turn on thinking of right now “COMPUTERS your coffee maker A R E G O I N G T O that just seems out of from your office.” B E C O M E M O R E the ordinary is sure to Dr. Wear pop up later,” S.T.E.M AND MORE goes on to talk I N T E L L I G E N T . ” student Francis Manaabout parallel ay said. “I’m sure any LARRY WEAR computing, science fiction stuff is PROFESSOR which is two or definitely possible.” more processors Specifically in combination to solve a single for technology, machines problem. are expected to grow more Parallel computing provides intelligent. the most powerful and efficient “[In the future, electronics foundation for computers and are] going to be smaller, [they] robots alike to solve problems will stay out of your way and it’ll and function efficiently. become a natural part of life,” On the television show Jeopardy, S.T.E.M student Joel Pederson an IBM robot supercomputer by said. the name of “Watson” has faced Macdonald predicts that many some of the toughest contestants devices that people think are fully on the show’s history. The developed will be redeveloped supercomputer is made up of with lighter and stronger 90 servers and a total of 2,880 materials, and submicroscopic processors; needless to say, engineering will afford amazing Watson has won many times. growth in health and sciences. “Computers are going Macdonald stares off to the to become more and more other end of the room, hands intelligent,” Dr. Wear said. folded neatly in his lap and sadly said, as though speaking to Future: According to Technology himself. “I wish I were 18 and could see Award, technology in the future is predicted to develop a form of the future firsthand.”

Hacking: used for good or evil? B Y A N A D U E N A S F O C U S E D I T O R

People have begun vandalizing the world’s largest nation: the Internet. Senior Carter Odem has experienced online vandalism. For him, his hacker posted explicit content. He admits he had a weak password and when having it sent to his email after forgetting it, didn’t realize it could be intercepted. “Anyone that knew my email could have found out my password,” Odem said. Odem recognizes other things that make people susceptible to hacking. “I know of people getting hacked from leaving their profile up on the computer and not logging out,” Odem said. From the perspective of senior Josh Bachman, hacking can be beneficial.

“There are beneficial ways it can be used, yet they have a negative connotation. One of the major things is you can take old programs and change them for the better which is essentially hacking since you go in and change the internal info,” Bachman said. Hackers often are able to find their ways around things like safeguards. “There are a lot of things that can bypass security settings and there isn’t much you can do about it if it’s already going to happen,” Bachman said. Varying motives lead hackers to work around these settings. “For some [hackers], they do it for the risk and thrill; maybe they are hacking to get to money or if they don’t really like someone,” Bachman said. The low security on sites like Facebook doesn’t help, according to Bachman.

“Social networking sites dumb-down their security so that big businesses can come in and get info for advertisements,” Bachman said. Computer programming teacher Kim Root recognizes other problems. “For young people, having hundreds of people in your friends that you don’t really know can be an issue. You should also keep private what you want to keep private and be aware of what employers and anyone can see,” Root said. Legal consequences for hacking are up to 30 years in jail and up to $100,000 fines. Root suggests to her students the need to use their power for good, not evil. “Some people are just mean and malicious and post crude information and steal. It can be a challenge to see how smart they are by breaking the system,” Root said. A L O R A

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Medical Journal Teens have been through sex education class, however there are some unmentioned facts that teens need to know about STDs and other risks of sex including how to take care of your body. B Y

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STD Facts “More than 25 percent of sexuallyactive people have been exposed to STDs. A lot of them are not aware of that and that can go on to cause bigger problems including major infections that are life threatening and it can go on to affect your fertility later in life,” Jennifer Sonney ARNP said. “STDs are really common in adolescence and part of it has to do with your anatomy. As a teenager, your body is actually more susceptible to the infection, particularly women because of the type of cells that they have on their cervix,” Sonney said.

HPV

HPV stands for Human Palpillomavirus. It is an infection and the main cause of cervical cancer and genital warts. “It’s estimated that 80 percent of sexually active individuals have been exposed to the Human Papillomavirus,” Sonney said. Over 80 strains of HPV have been identified. Two of them cause genital warts and many of the others are cancer causing. “About 70 percent of cervical cancer occurrences we believe are related to HPV infection,” Sonney said. There is however, a preventative shot for HPV, called Gardasil. “Unlike gonorrhea and chlamydia, which is spread through fluid, HPV it is not spread by the fluids. It is skin contact,” Edstrom said. People need to be extra cautious when it comes to protecting themselves against HPV because it is spread skin to skin without major warning signs. “There is no such thing as safe sex in regards to HPV,” Edstrom said.

Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, Herpes and Genital Warts

Gonorrhea and chlamydia are spread through fluid and can be very detrimental to health. “If you get an infection with one [gonorrhea or chlamydia] your chances of not ever being able to have a child is increased by 15 percent,” Edstrom said. Though condoms do help protect against STDs to some extent, they are not guaranteed to. “If you protect yourself with condoms you can still get an STD and that’s what scary. I’ve had a number of patients get herpes or genital warts even though they’ve worn a condom and protected themselves,” Sonney said. According to Gynecologist Kenneth Edstrom, 25 to 40 percent of sexually active adults have herpes virus. This means that each time a person has another sexual partner, their odds of getting an STD increase.

Preventatives and Contraception Gardasil

A recent development in the prevention of HPV, which leads to cervical cancer and genital warts, is the Gardisil shot. Girls can get the shot and many physician offices have started to administer the shot to boys as well to help protect their partners.

“Part of the reason we’re so excited about vaccines like Gardasil is that if we had a universal vaccination we cent could potentially eliminate 70 percent cer later in of the cases of cervical cancer life,” Sonney said.

rs The Pill and others

st common The easiest and most dolescence methods of birth control for adolescence ing and the are the pill, the patch, the ring shot, according to Sonney. People need to realize that all of these evention, methods are for pregnancy prevention, so they may not protect againstt STDs. veryday The pill needs to be taken everyday around the same time and if it isn’t, people run the risk of getting pregnant. de of The patch is placed on the outside icine your body and it administers medicine into the person. The ring is inserted into the body ut and left for three weeks and taken out the fourth week. e The shot is the most reliable because the medicine stays in your body for 10 to 12 weeks after injected.

SEX EDUCA

With an increase of studies and research pointing t to be armed with the knowledge and information the psychological effects of sex.

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Condoms alone are not 100 percent effective. If a hundred couples are having sex regularly and they are using condoms for birth control, 150 out of 1000 will get pregnant in a year, according to Edstrom.

How to take care of your body According to Sonney, chlamydia and other STDs can be anywhere in the body, so even if people aren’t having sexually intercourse, they are still highly susceptible to STDs. If teenagers choose to have sex they need to be aware of their body and check in with doctors. “A recommendation for people who are sexually active as teens before they get married is they should probably be examined twice a year and be checked for infections, so if you have an infection it can be caught as fast as possible,” Edstrom said. Dr. Edstrom gives teenagers another way to help reduce the chances of getting an STD. “If you are shaving your genital area, you’re going to have cuts in your skin and that increases your chance of getting HPV, AIDS, hepatitis and herpes. There’s no medical reason to shave your genital area,” said Gynecologist Edstrom. According to Edstrom, people should not sit on tanning beds, toilet seats, etc. without something between your skin and the bench just in case of lurking bacteria and viruses through dead skin cells.

Post-sex signals to watch out for After having sex, people need to be aware of any abnormal things occurring with their body. People need to see a doctor right away if they experience: painful urination, increase in vaginal discharge or change in discharge, if you notice any bumps, blisters and it is really important to report if you’re having painful intercourse, according to Sonney. Boys tend to not be as symptomatic, but they need to watch out for having any sort of discharge, painful burning and anything else abnormal, according to Sonney.

“If a hundred couples are having sex regularly and they are using condoms for birth control, 150 out of 1000 will get pregnant in a year.” Gynecologist Kenneth Edstrom

Contr F THE PILL: “A recommendation for people who are sexually active as teens before they get married is they should probably be examined twice a year and be checked for infections, so if you have an infection it can be caught as fast as possible.” Gynecologist Kenneth Edstrom

Within the first w not completely e using a backup m

THE PATCH: The biggest pro people forget to comes off while other activities.

THE RING: The problem with uncomfortable in

THE SHOT: The drawback is a clinic every 10 shot.

CONDOMS: Edstrom recomm well as another choose to be sex


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Q&A: Sex Sociologist , Dr. Pepper Schwartz B Y S A M B A B B I T T E D I T O R - I N - C H I E F

Accredited sociologist, Dr. Pepper Schwartz, offers insight into the innerworkings of sexual relationships in high school. How have the ways adolescents view sex changed over the last 10 years, 20, years 30 years? Well, I think it changed a few times. It has evolved into the whole idea of sex for sex’s sake. There use to be dates, [relationships] would progress and it would take a long time for [sex to become a factor in a relationship]. There has been much more acceptance of casual sex and I think and that can hurt young [adolescents].

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What factors have contributed to the way sex is viewed by teens?

“Condoms alone are not 100 percent effective.”

oblem with the patch is that o change it every week or it e swimming or participating in

h the ring is that most girls feel nserting it.

s that people need to come into 0 to 12 weeks to get another

mends teens use condoms as method of birth control if they xually active.

What social stigmas do adolescents have about sex? If a girl is as sexually free as a guy, she gets a different sexual reaction, [people] stigmatize her. [It’s] based on what’s popular and not popular. Sexual preference also plays a factor in stigmatization.

Gynecologist Kenneth Edstrom

Are there larger implications the way sex can be perceived? If people aren’t careful, they can become young mothers and fathers. If they have sexual experience that is not very solicitous or caring, it can impact the way they mature.

raception Facts

week or two of starting the pill is effective, so people need to be method of birth control.

[I think] people realize marriage happens much later and that they are going to be single much longer. I think the double-standard is not as punishing on girls and there is much better contraception [than in previous times].

Is it important to address sexuality during adolescence?

“Part of the reason we’re so excited about vaccines like Gardasil is that if we had a universal vaccination we could potentially eliminate 70 percent of the cases of cervical cancer later in life.” Jennifer Sonney ARNP

I think it definitely is. If you don’t know how to manage it, it can ruin your life. It’s very important for young people to deal with and know about these issues.

Is there anything else you would like to contribute? The sexualization and disrespect [involved can be] intimidating to a lot of kids. [It] creates overglamorized expectations of what sex is so yeah, it’s got to have a big impact. The more guidance and discussion you have on these issue the better it will be.

Pepper Schwartz holds a M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from Yale University.


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in the “scrapbook.” When a similar problem arises in the relationships but a decreased quality of peer relationships future, we flip to that “picture” in our memory and do the and vice versa for students who became sexually active t’s like a scrapbook filled with memories. same behavior to solve the problem. earlier. The first boyfriend. The first time you fought with a friend. Whenever people are looking for something in a The first kiss. The first time you lied to a parent about why you failed relationship that is not there and begin acting out, they The “first time.” a test. are seeking to meet a need somewhere else: the need The age of a teenager’s first sexual encounter is slowly The first time you sought negative attention to get any for fulfillment and acceptance are both fairly common dropping, according to a study conducted on male and attention. examples of needs that people seek, according to female teenagers in grades ninth through twelfth grade by “[The “picture”] may not have been the best way to Johnson. C. Raymond Bingham from Michigan State University and handle a problem, but it worked to some degree at one “[People] are usually looking for acceptance or for love Lisa J. Crockett from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. point for them,” Johnson said. “Every time a girl [or boy] is they may not have had before and the displacement of Sexual encounters are powerful experiences that require looking for reassurance from their [partner], it’s because those needs on another person around the same age is a trusting and respectful relationships first and foremost, that worked for her at one point and will keep doing not good,” Johnson said. according to therapist MSW Dawn Johnson. it. Every time that action is used, it reinforces the [coLike co-dependent behaviors, these emotional voids “[A person’s ability to handle a sexual relationship] is dependent] behavior.” that need to be filled are not formed overnight. truly an individual thing,” Counselor MSW CHt Dawn The unhealthy behavior’s affects are not only felt by the “We make certain conclusions about ourselves at Johnson said. “But generally speaking, most high school one acting on them, but by their partner as well, according different points in our lives at a very sub-conscious students aren’t ready.” to Johnson. level,” Johnson said. “When we act on those conclusions However, it is not to be assumed that all teenagers are “On the other end of the relationship, they may develop without awareness, we can get into situations that we not ready for a sexual relationship, according to Johnson. issues being in a clingy and needy relationship and can’t handle.” “Sometimes there are teenagers develop an impression that that is what These sub-conscious conclusions may be drawn who really are entering a mature, “ I T I S I M P O R T A N T all relationships are like,” Johnson said. situations where a child is abused and develops feelings mutual relationship and are ready for T O S T A Y F O C U S E D Co-dependent relationships have of worthlessness, neglect or self-hatred. The self[sex],” Johnson said. “There are always negative side effects that spill over into conclusions are carried long past the initial incidents and ON YOUR OWN exceptions.” other areas of someone’s may cause someone to try “extra hard” to GOALS AND According to counselor Nalisha Scott, life, according to be accepted in high school, according to “SOMETIMES FEELINGS...IN relationships can be healthy and positive R E L A T I O N S H I P S . ” Johnson. Johnson. THERE ARE as long as they are based on mutual The time spent “Adolescence is a time when you’re TEENAGERS WHO feelings of respect. hanging out with a figuring out who you are, what you want REALLY ARE... NALISHA SCOTT “It is important to stay focused on your boyfriend or girlfriend R E A D Y F O R [ S E X ] . ” out of life, what you stand for. It’s hard to COUNSELOR own goals and feelings and it is important instead of studying. do that when you’re trying to be something to grow in relationships,” Scott said. “You The failed test. else for someone else,” Johnson said. have to maintain your values.” “In relationships, from what I’ve seen Some [personality changes] are DAW N JOHNSON The earlier a sexual encounter occurs for a teenager, the [from people at any age], when you have normal: “trying on” different personas THERAPIST more likely they are to develop co-dependent behaviors, co-dependent signs people often put and personalities and figuring out what according to Johnson. the feelings of others before their own, face you want others to see. “[Co-dependent behaviors] set you up for ‘drama,’” distance themselves from friends and family and have a But any time that is out of balance there is a problem, Johnson said. “Frankly, you see a lot of co-dependent drop in grades [if they are in high school],” Scott said. according to Johnson. behavior in high school.” Relationship behaviors can be developed in a number “If you don’t know who you are yet or what you want According to Johnson, having set boundaries are critical of ways, according to Scott. [from life or for yourself] and if you don’t have those to possess before entering any kind of relationship. “The way relationships go can be learned,” Scott said. boundaries, you have no business getting into that kind Without a strong sense of what is okay or not okay for a Seeing a functional marriage. of relationship. It’ll change you,” Johnson said. “You may particular individual, they can often get themselves into Seeing a set of feuding parents. change because of what you perceive the other person situations and relationships that are too much for them. “They can also be from a value system,” Scott said. wants. You mold yourself to what they want and not who Co-dependent behaviors are difficult to eradicate, Holding others’ needs above your own. you are.” especially if the behaviors have been practiced over a Saying “no” until marriage. The time you donned a vintage dress to stand out. considerable period of time. According to the Michigan/Nebraska study, there is a The time you wore brand-name clothes to fit in. According to Johnson, inside of everyone’s head is a correlation between family and peer relationships and The time you changed your hair to impress the boy in scrapbook and every time they come to a problem, they the age students began having sex. biology class. take a mental picture of how they dealt with it and put it Students who waited longer had better family Another memory. B Y

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Cell phone stalking: •

Signs of an unhealthy relationship:

The study also al found that “more than 1 in 4 says ays their boyfriend or girlfriend has checke ked the text messages on their phone with thout permission.”

According to counselor Nalisha Scott, friends can be instrumental in helping friends who are in unhealthy relationships. Here area few signs to look out for:

Though tec echnology doesn’t esn’t cause nor necessarilyy play a role in teen dating violence, it clea early can amplify the proble problem, especially cially iif a partner in the relationship is using usi a ccell phone or computer to harass, stalalk or spy on their partner

• Changes in personality • Withdrawl from friends • Excuses for partner’s behavior • Signs of physical abuse (bruises, stratches, etc.)

Information comp In mpiled from safekids.com

Counselor Recommendations:

Caps and gowns: Students who abstained from sex until approximately twelfth grade were [shown] to have better: • grades • academic plans Information compiled from C. Raymond Bingham,Michigan State University and Lisa J. Crockett, University of NebraskaLincoln.

Scott advises these steps if you see these or other signals in a relationship. •

Don’t jump to conclusions, relationships are never “cut and dry.” • If you feel like a friend is in an unhealthy relationship, see a counselor to discuss it further. • Support your friend. “The biggest thing a friend can give is support,” Scott said.


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COLLEGE: RIGHT OR PRIVILEGE? College tuition continues to rise due to limited state funding. In order for students to attend college, they have to call upon five main resources: self funding, financial aid, scholarships, Work Study programs and student loans. college tuition. “[The tuition] is ridiculous. It makes ou’ve probably heard it hard, especially if you are funding consistently throughout it yourself and don’t really have any your high school career that other resources,” Rubida said. Senior Paige Miller will be college is important. You’ve probably already picked attending the University of out your dream college and have Portland and knows the difficulty plans to room with your friends and of funding a private education. “It’s so high and they’re have the best four years of your life. You get excited when thinking making it hard for the students,” of college: the campus, the new Miller said. “We’re the future of the country [and] if we don’t people, the independence. Reality snaps in and suddenly [become] educated, this country you’re being hassled by questions of isn’t going to be in good hands. A how you’re going to pay for college lot of people who want to go get a higher education can’t and it’s tuition; you don’t have an answer. As college tuition increases, really sad that it comes down to students feel pressure to not only money.” Some seniors have been be accepted to college, but also to exploring different options for fund tuition. Senior Jennifer Mayer has already how to pay for college in addition been offered academic scholarships to deciding where they want to go. Mayer, like 90 from the private percent of the colleges that she’s “IF WE DON’T other students applied to, but she [BECOME] Washington still feels the cost of E D U C A T E D , T H I S in tuition is too high. C O U N T R Y I S N ’ T State attending an “It’s put a lot G O I N G T O B E I N independent college, G OOD H A N DS.” have turned to of stress on our financialaid,according family,” Mayer PA IGE MILLER to icwashington.org, said “This whole SENIOR which offers updated year has revolved around how I am going to get into news on independent colleges in the colleges that I need to and pay Washington. Karl Yaeger, the Admission for them.” Senior Madeline Rubida is Advisor at Western Washington paying for college on her own and University, says that all financial is struggling to fund the price of loans are solely dependent on B Y

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the Free Application for Federal money and they qualify or get more money from financial aid. Student Aid (FAFSA). Nearly every department has “A variety of scholarships are available for students who have jobs and gives students the option done exceptionally well in and to apply where they are interested, according to Mclynne. outside of school,” Yaeger said. Loans can also Students are “ I T ’ S A G O O D help get students instructed to apply I N V E S T M E N T through college even for financial aid and TO M A K E .” though they must be are awarded grants, paid back in full with according to Donna interest, according to Mclynne, Associate MARIYA KUYAN icwashington.org. Director to Student SENIOR Seniors have some Accounts at Seattle advice for the students who plan on Pacific University. “We don’t treat any students continuing their education after high differently from others. They all school but are worried have the same chance for financial about the cost of aid and it goes to whoever is in tuition. “Start early need,” Mclynne said. apply Some seniors depend on and scholarships to go to their college for as many scholarships of choice. you Senior Mariya Kuyan is grateful as for the financial help she’s p o s s i b l y received so that she can attend can [and] her dream school, the University keep in touch of Washington. “Without the [grants] that w i t h FAFSA gave me, I don’t know what y o u r I would have done,” Kuyan said. For those who need further help, many colleges offer Work Study programs students can apply for and earn money as well as give you experience. Work Study is when students get a job and are paid from a budget, that way it looks like less

financial aid consultant, try really hard [in school]: GPA and SATs will be automatic scholarships,” Mayer said. Miller believes that students should make sacrifices so they can go where they want. “If you are truly set on it and you think it will help you better yourself later in life, you should be able to make those sacrifices that you need to.” Kuyan is optimistic that students can afford tuition if they are determined to go to college. “Even though paying for college seems impossible, it’s a good investment to make,” Kuyan said.

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April 15 is designated as the Day of Silence– students remain silent for the duration of the school day to bring light to bullying, particularly bullying targeted at gay students. the importance of the event. “I couldn’t explain that [the silence] ome students were quiet April 15. was about solidarity with the people who Some kept their mouths shut experience perience this from their attackers and with tape. are silenced and don’t have anywhere to Others with willpower. go,” Nelson said. “It was very frustrating.” This is the Day of Silence. Nelson noted a change in environment The National Day of Silence is sponsored as she he participated in the movement. by GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight “I noticed oticed that people made an effort to Education Network. make ke homosexual slurs in the presence of It calls attention to the “silencing” of people ople participating in the Day of Silence,” LBGT (lesbian, bisexual, gay, Nelson said. “THE transgender) students by In the event of bullying. any type of bullying, PROBLEM IS, PHS students, along with S T U D E N T S S E E standard procedure is a people nation-wide, went thorough investigation, [SEXUALITY] one day without speaking in A S T H E W H O L E followed by appropriate support of those persecuted consequences guided PE R SON.” for their sexuality. by the Harassment, According to adviser of the Intimidation and GAYLE FRANKS Gay-Straight Alliance Gayle Bullying guidelines, ENGLISH TEACHER Franks, the silence brings according to Assistant attention to the issue of Principal Conchita bullying, especially in the light of recent Oliver-Moore. er-Moore. LBGT student suicides. “We encourage students to report,” Despite affiliation with discrimination Oliver-Moore er-Moore said. “We do not tolerate based on sexual and gender expression, harassment.” rassment.” Franks views the Day of Silence as a According to Roe, the repercussions universal camaraderie. of this his action should discourage further “I think any student can relate to being displays lays of homophobia. bullied,” Franks said. “It’s very gratifying Much objection to the movement and to see that the message is getting out, that to homosexuality omosexuality in general is fostered by friends do support each other.” ignorance, norance, according to Franks. Senior Dane Roe articulated “The problem is, students see [sexuality [sexuality] ty]] acquaintance with many people within the as the he whole person,” Franks said. “It’s fear LGBT community and participated in last of the he unknown.” year’s Day of Silence in solidarity with his Nelson reported feeling a sense of empathy friends. with th victims of aggression and ignorance Sophomore and first-year participant that she hadn’t initially anticipated as a in the Day of Silence Abby Nelson is very byproduct product of participation. supportive of “the right to be yourself.” “Itt wasn’t just a statement to other “I think people deserve the right to be people, ople, but a way for me to empathize,” themselves without being attacked for it,” Nelson lson said. “The empathy was just an end Nelson said. result; lt; maybe that was the point but I just Though Nelson is a “straight” participant, didn’t dn’t understand.” she empathizes with students of alternative Respecting the differences of other sexualities. students udents is essential to progress and an “Even if you don’t agree with end to discrimination, according to Oliverhomosexuality, it should be perfectly clear Moore. ore. that people shouldn’t be bullied for being “Itt is imperative that we recognize and who they are as human beings,” Nelson respect ect the differences of others and said. honor them,” Oliver-Moore said. Nelson’s experience “ T H I N K A B O U T “When we see something that is reinforced her inappropriate or if we see someone THE VOICES support of equality, who is being harmed, it is important YOU’RE NOT which armors her to stand up.” H E A R I NG.” perception. Franks repeated the importan importance ance ce “Being able to of awareness and affirmed stud students uden ents DANE ROE just have a deeper who participated in the Day of SENIOR understanding of Silence. what I believe in [was “You’re not doing the average powerful],” Nelson said. “It sort of made me teenage enage thing,” Franks said. “It’s not about sad that lots of people didn’t understand.” being ing gay or straight; it’s about taking a Unable to speak and unwilling to break stand.” d.” her silence, Nelson felt vulnerable to the Roe, a generally outgoing and talkative criticism of others. person, on, wore tape over his mouth April 15. “You’re defenseless,” Nelson said. “You While Roe’s voice was unheard for a da day, y, get made fun of for your participation and he expressed sympathy for those whos whose ose e you can’t say anything in response.” will never be heard again. The inability to speak left students open “Think about the voices you’re n not ot to jeers and hasty generalizations about hearing,” aring,” Roe said. B Y

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CULINARY TO CUT AWAY AT NATIONALS The Culinary Arts team took first at state competition March 19 and will be competing at nationals April 29 to May 1 in Overland Park, Kan. At nationals, the students will be required to display their ability to break down a chicken. Essentially, to break down a chicken means to divide it into eight pieces, like you would find it at a grocery store. Once the student has successfully broken the chicken down, they lay it on a board and make it look like it was before it was cut. Senior Taylor Thompson breaks down the process in six simple steps: B Y A D R I A O L S O N F E A T U R E S E D I T O R

1. Dry the chicken off and check inside to see if there are organs. If there are, take them out.

4. Cut the spine out. The students are given 20 minutes at the competition to accomplish this task, according to Thompson.

2. Take the wings off with a knife. Don’t cut through the bone (this is very important). Get as much meat as possible off the chicken.

5. Cut the breast bone in half. Take a chef’s knife and stick it right down the middle, between the ribs and pound it down. Now you have your bone and chicken breast. Make sure to trim off the fat.

Gotta date, but did you wait too late? Time is ticking away for girls who haven’t bought dresses for prom yet, but do not fret; these websites offer last minute shipping for fashionable dresses at a reasonable price. B Y

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www.unique-vintage.com

If you are worried about your dress arriving on time, the shipping policy on this website allows each person to choose their shipping method. If dresses are needed in a hurry, they can be shipped by air in two or three days or overnight depending on the location. The shipping price depends on the location for air shipping as well. For a cheaper option, the dress can be shipped on ground for $9.95, but it will take five to 10 business days to arrive. This website offers a wide variety of styles, cuts and colors of dresses. Dress styles range from classic to girly to glamorous and many more. There is also a feature on the website that allows people to view dresses worn by celebrities and then purchase them yourself. Another perk of using this website is vintage dresses are offered as well to accommodate people looking for something a little more unique. Dresses can be as low as $38 and go up to $900. There are numerous dresses for each price range. They also offer wide variety of options for plus size girls.

www.promgirl.com

The shipping policy for this website offers many choices to the consumer. Dresses can be shipped on ground in three to seven business days for $8.75. For a faster delivery method, the dresses can be shipped in three days for $17, in two days for $22 or overnight for $30. You can shop by style, price or color

on this website. It has many features to help navigate each person to their perfect dress. Prices range from $49 to $1900. The dresses do get quite pricey, but there are affordable selections as well. If the dress doesnt fit, this website allows you to return your dress for store credit. The return policy has many aspects to it, so make sure you read it thoroughly to guarantee you aren’t stuck with a dress you don’t like. Whichever delivery method you choose, be sure to allow enough time to make a return or exchange if necessary.

www.preownedpartydresses. com The shipping policy for this site is quite different from other websites because these dresses are pre-owned. The price depends on how far each dress needs to be shipped, but the dresses usually arrive in two to three business days. Prom dresses are usually only worn for one night; so if you don’t want to spend a lot of money on a dress you will only wear once, try buying a pre-owned dress. Dresses are priced as low as $15 and go up to only $115. Some of the dresses retailed for over $500 and they are now reduced down to an affordable price. The selection of dresses always varies because the dresses on the website depend on which dresses people are trying to sell. This is great if you don’t mind wearing a pre-owned dress because you can get a dress for an incredible price.

3. Take the legs and the thighs off. Trim any fat off as well.

6. Separate the leg from thigh: Rub the skin and pull slightly so that you can see where the division is. Cut at the fat line.


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Go Green

TThis his year, EEarth Day occurred April 22 celebrating its 41st aanniversary nniversar as a recognized day devoted to conservation awareness awareness. B Y

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Earth Day se serves as an occasion where people are inspired to plant trees, buy items with very little packaging and recycle. While these are all great actions that people should be taking every day of the year, some of the ea easiest and most inexpensive ways to be green are often overlooked. This list cons consists of a few small ways to get started down the path of environmental savvy-ness. •

Buy local: loca Try to buy locally grown fruits and vegetables from the farmer’s market. foods have a shorter distance to travel which is healthier for the air and These fo buying llocal is great for the economy.

Try a bike: On nice days, try biking to school. Benefits include less air pollution and exercise. Be Being active before coming to school can help with alertness and prevent drowsing off in class. Even carpooling with a friend helps to reduce pollution.

Try cold water: wat When washing your clothes, try the cold water setting. All but 15 percent of the energy energ used to clean one load of laundry is used for the heat of the water. Colder water is gentler gen on fabrics and will save you money.

• Buy used: Buy used items or borrow things. Thrift or consignment stores are great for more eclectic tastes tast and are inexpensive. Not only will you be unique with what you wear, more of it. but you’ll have mo •Try the library: The library is a great place for free books and music which can be downloaded iTunes. For those people that don’t collect their books, purchasing them is directly onto iTun unnecessary and a waste of paper. • J E F F

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Think Costco: Buy items item in bulk. This helps to cut down on packaging and waste, as well as less store which is better for the air. trips to the grocery sto

Seniors explore world outside classrooms Both girls have had exchange students from Barcelona; Imhof had them for the last two years and Foreman for ine students, three trips, one summer and a few the last 10 years. “Every July for a month about 50 different Spanish last memories before they part ways. Seniors Sarah Rose and Ashton Zeth are planning students stay here in homes,” Foreman said. “Every year I host one. I love getting to go back to Spain to visit them.” on going to Hawaii for their senior trip. Like Rose and Zeth, Imhof and Foreman are close Their plan is to go to Maui, June 13-18. “We wanted to go somewhere nice, but we didn’t want friends. They have spent the last two summers together and to leave the country because we are not very experienced are both excited to go on the trip together, according to with traveling,” Rose said. Rose’s previous travels include a mission trip to Mexico Imhof. “Just [she and I] are traveling together, but we are last summer, while Zeth lived in Australia for a year with bringing back [two] exchange students,” Imhof said. her family. The girls will be staying with the family of the exchange “I will become more cultured [because of this trip],” Zeth said. “I intend to gain some independence. It’s the students they hosted. They are leaving time in their trip for relaxing and catching up with their old friends and first trip I’m going on without [parents].” Rose and Zeth are going on the trip together due to their are looking forward to the warm weather, according to Foreman. long friendship. “The weather is completely different from Seattle. It will The two met in the sixth grade and have been best be probably about 110 degrees every day,” friends since ninth grade year, Foreman said. according to Zeth. “WE WERE “I’m so excited to eat later at night, walk “Sarah is my best friend,” Zeth PLANNING ON the streets of Barcelona and shop.” said. “We are attached at the hip. We STAYING IN A The girls have plans for the trip, but do do everything together.” HOSTEL, BUT THEN not plan to see many tourist attractions, The duo has been planning the I SAW THE MOV IE trip for a year, according to Rose. A N D I G O T S C A R E D , according to Imhof. “While I am there, I am going to be They have five days and plan to SO I DECIDED A sightseeing around Barcelona,” Imhof leave lots of time for relaxing. HOTEL WOULD BE said. “I want to see Barcelona from a local “We are going to hang out on the S A F E R .” perspective, not like a tourist.” beach, go scuba diving and get [a Another tan],” Rose said. SARAH ROSE group of The girls are going to rent bikes to SENIOR seniors explore the island. have trips They will also be staying in a planned hotel for the duration of the trip, for this summer, but according to Zeth. “We were planning on staying in a hostel, but then I saw rather than fly, these the movie and I got scared, so I decided a hotel would be girls are hitting the road. safer,” Rose said. Seniors Becca Harris, Both Rose and Zeth are looking forward to the trip. Next year they will both be attending WSU, Rose plans Monica Gallucci, Paige Miller, Hannah Clark to declare pre-med and Zeth, business and marketing. Another set of seniors will be taking trips this summer; and Brynn Fletcher are seniors Kelli Imhof and Ciri Foreman are traveling to taking a road trip down another side of the world, Barcelona, Spain, for two weeks the coast of California. “Since we are driving from June 19-July 5. “I love to travel. I love seeing different cultures. That’s a to California, we plan on stopping along the big part of my life; expanding my views,” Imhof said. Imhof has always been interested in traveling. She has way to different places. This includes going to had her eyes set on Spain since she was young. “When I was in the 5th grade, I decided that Spain, beaches and possibly Greece and Switzerland [were] where I wanted to go,” going to a theme park,” Miller said. “If all of the Imhof said. “Now I get to go to Spain.” Foreman is no stranger to traveling. She has been to members of the group agree, we might camp Barcelona two times and is looking forward to her third. “I’ve been blessed to travel before. I’ve been to other for a few nights also.” The four girls have places like Rome, Italy; Taormina, Sicily; Puerto Rico, Jamaica [and more],” Foreman said. “But my absolute been friends for the last three years and all favorite place in the world to be is Barcelona.” B Y C H R I S U T T E R B A C K A S S T. S P O R T S E D I T O R

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play water polo together, according to Gallucci. However, they will not all be going to the same college. That makes this trip all the more important, according to Gallucci. “We are all really good friends and it would be a nice thing to do before we part ways,” Gallucci said. “We just really want to spend time together.” Five girls and one car. That is the plan for the trip, according to Harris. “We are going to split the cost of the trip equally among the five of us. Most of us have saved up money for the trip,” Miller said. The girls do not really have plans for where they are going, they are just going to drive and figure it out on the way. “We don’t really have any destination. We are just road tripping,” Gallucci said. The girls have yet to decide all aspects of the trip; they will be leaving a few weeks after graduation in late June, according to Harris. “I want to make memories with all four of the girls before we go to college so I can have something to always look back on and reminisce about ‘the good old days’ when I’m a little old lady,” Harris said. All of these seniors are going to different places, but are celebrating the same thing: they made it through high school and are moving on with their lives. Many other seniors may find taking trips to be life changing as well. “If you ever have the opportunity to travel, do it,” Imhof said. “It can change your life.”


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DOUGLAS AND MCLAUGHLIN: BI-WINNING

Far Left: Junior Mikayla Douglas running the four by two at Sparks Stadium. Her team ran against Rogers March 23. Above: Junior Nathan McLaughhlin ran in the same race. B Y

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McLaughlin is ranked first in the 1600 and 3200 meter runs and is a part of the third ranked four by four relay team in the league. Appointed by stepping up and taking action, senior the stand patiently standing behind a video recorder girls track captain Sabrina Salazar has had the pleasure of working with both Douglas and McLaughlin. watching every event Douglas participates in. “With Mikayla the team loves to see her compete well, “In 9th grade he ruptured his Achilles tendon trying to train me on my sprints for conference. He still trained the team always has the same response, ‘Oh I want to be me a little last year but now its more verbal motivation,” like her’,” Salazar said. “It drives the others on the team.” McLaughlin is not much of a different story. Douglas said. “Every match he comes to and records my Always helping people, looking to better himself and races and when I get home we go over it and work on it.” Douglas competes in every sprint, the four by one, four having a positive attitude, according to Salazar. “I promise you, in the next 15 years he’ll be a nominee by two and the four by four relays as well as the 100 meter for the Nobel Peace Prize,” Salazar said. and 300 meter hurdle races. With every driven athlete, comes In her first meet competing in hurdle “[MY DAD’S]WHAT the superstitions practices and races her sophomore year, Douglas took GOT ME STARTED consistencies that prepare them for a second place against tough competitor, AND WHO HAS tough match. Rogers High School. STUCK WITH ME “Before every race I breathe in Dennis Erlenmeyer began coaching THE WHOLE WAY and hold it for three seconds and track as an Assistant Coach at Rogers T H ROUGH.” then breathe out for five, it calms my High School in 1980 and began coaching heartbeat down, and before I go to boys track at PHS in 1985. MIKAYLA DOUGLAS run I put my hands down on the track “My main goal as a coach is to see kids JUNIOR and tap it twice. I block everything in reach their full potential and have them the world out except for the starter,” reach their full successes,” Erlenmeyer Douglas said. said. Although not necessarily a physical consistency, A good leader is an athlete who is committed to the team and themselves and has respect for the competition. McLaughlin prepares mentally for every race. “I [use] the power energy gel packets and the powder [They] also need to lead by example and encourage team energy drinks. I don’t know if it actually works but I feel members, according to Erlenmeyer. energized, it’s more to keep me mentally prepared,” “Nathan is a very humble and committed team member McLaughlin said. who leads by example,” Erlenmeyer said. With track being a strong passion for both athletes, McLaughlin competes in the 1600 and 3200 meter runs dreams to continue on competing in college are goals as well as the four by four relay. “Nathan would run a couple distance races and will both see being reality. “Both of them are just all around amazing, and great come right back and run the mile relay, he’s committed,” team motivators. We all think so,” Salazar said. Erlenmeyer said.

Track stars Douglas and McLaughlin have been on the same track teams since elementary school. They are working towards victories in their high school careers. B Y

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pounding heart through a proudly worn jersey, a rush of adrenaline as other contestants fall behind and a gasp of air as feet pass the finish line. A feeling known all too well by competitive junior track stars Mikayla Douglas and Nathan McLaughlin. Both athletes began track in 5th grade at Spinning Elementary and have continued competing on the same team throughout their junior high and now through their high school careers. “My dad was and is my main motivation. [My dad’s] what got me started and who has stuck with me the whole way through,” Douglas said. With a dad who had past experience with track, Douglas was grateful for the help when learning to come out of the box and to perfect her sprint. “He’s my own personal trainer,” Douglas said. McLaughlin was inspired by a somewhat similar contributor. “My brother was a big track star back in sixth grade and I wanted to be like that,” McLaughlin said. “I think it was my brother and that I realized I actually had some talent and that motivated me to keep trying it.” Track coach of 15 years, Ken Fleisch has been coaching six years at PHS for the girls track team and is in his second year of coaching Douglas. “She’s an extremely competitive person and definitely has the desire to get better and improve,” Fleisch said. On top of Douglas’s typical school practice, she spends her own time practicing with her dad. The crowd by now has to know who he is, the man in

Dancers leap their way to state competition B Y

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Excitement was felt by everyone on the dance team recently as they made their trip to the State championships for the second year in a row, according to coach Aimee Nolan. “This year I was confident but also surprised that we made it to State,” Nolan said. “All their hard work definitely paid off.” Making it to State was especially exciting considering the amount of newcomers and varying experience levels, according to Nolan. “Every year the skill level of dancers that come on to the team varies,” Nolan said. “This means we may have some members who have danced at a local dance studio their whole lives and others who just think dancing looks like fun and love to dance at home when no one else is around.” Going to competition at the state level can be a fun experience as well as

a challenge for newer members on the to State, but after State nothing happens.” team, according to sophomore Brittney Gearing up for the state-level Lindstrom. competition called for better utilization of “The new girls, including me, had never time and practice facilities. been in something like this so going to “We prepared for State by adding State was pretty intense,” extra longer practices, Lindstrom said. “But the utilizing a local dance “THE NEW GIRLS, best part of State was studio so we could use INCLUDING ME, getting to stay in a hotel a space with mirrors HAD NEVER BEEN with all the girls on the and lots of hard work,” IN SOMETHING LIKE team and having fun Nolan said. THIS SO GOING TO doing all of the activities The dance team had STATE WAS PRETTY together.” to step up their game IN T ENSE .” All fun aside, practice when it came to their was an important factor technical skill for the BRITTNEY LINDSTROM to success at State. In the state routine, according SOPHOMORE end, the girls decided to Bobadilla. that preparation for “They really had to Districts was more work on improving their stressful than State. turns, sharpening their movements and “Preparing for State wasn’t so much dancing as a whole group,” Nolan said. “It more difficult than practicing for Districts,” was those improvements that helped us to Senior Arianna Bobadilla said. “Our qualify this year.” performance at districts decides if we go Through all of the hard work, the girls

made sure to keep their goal of having a fun time ever present. “Preparing for State was definitely a balance of fun and hard work,” Bobadilla said. “Even though we had to get serious sometimes, our coach and captain never failed to make sure we were having fun.” Aside from the competitions, the dance team performed at the Puyallup Fair, various football and basketball games (including Homecoming), parades, assemblies and a GLEE event at the South Hill Mall. Being on the team made for a great opportunity to get in shape and improve flexibility, according to Lindstrom. But perhaps an even better opportunity was getting to connect with all the girls on the team. “So many girls on the team inspire me,” Lindstrom said. “I would suggest trying out for the team to any girl at our school who is looking for a fun way to stay in shape and connect with new friends.”


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VIKINGS HEAD TO SAFECO FIELD

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stepped on the field. It opened my eyes to the bigger Everyone is huddled around a radio in the Iworld of baseball and what it would feel like to be a professional player,” Graves said. garage. The whole town is listening. Now it’s a lotDisregarding the loss that day, the team still took away of memories that day, according to Weise. down to the bottom of the 11th inning. “They all took away a lifelong memory from that game. Even the little things like playing catch and walking on Edgar Martinez is up to bat; the ball is good and here comes Griffey around third. He makes it home and the Mariners win it. Division World Series 1995 Champions. They just made history. April 2, 2011, the Viking baseball team made school history by playing against Newport High School at Safeco Field. The out-of-league game ended with the Vikings losing 8-1. Baseball Coach Mark Weise has been a coach for Puyallup for over 16 years and was a former player for the New York Mets. He made it possible for the team to play at Safeco . “Safeco had recently started a high school series deal where they give high school teams the opportunity to play at the field. So I decided to contact the Seattle Mariners and they ended up choosing us to come and play a game there,” Weise said. “They’ve invited us back to play again next year too.” Many of the players have grown up watching and admiring the Mariners and they say it is an honor for them to play where the Mariners have played, according to senior Tyler Graves. “The fact that the Mariners play there and just the

the fields is something that they will always treasure,” thought that Felix Hernandez has stepped on that Weise said. mound truly made it an honor to play there. He’s alOne of the most memorable memories occurred durways been my favorite player,” Graves said. ing the game with Tyler McDowell. Weise especially enjoyed seeing “McDowell was batting and the boy’s excitement when they arthought he hit a double, so he ran “THE WHOLE rived at the field. all the way to second base and EXPERIENCE “The smiles on the kid’s faces stood there with the biggest smile when they stepped on that field just R E A L L Y B R O U G H T on his face, even though he found showed how excited they were to be out that he hit a foul ball. He was THE TEAM at Safeco. They were really grateful still grinning even after he walked TOGETHER AND for being able to play there,” Weise off the field,” Weise said. BONDED EVERYONE said. All in all, the players say playing EV EN MORE.” Aside from the exhilaration, at Safeco was a very rewarding exthere was a lot of additional presperience for the team. sure, according to senior “The whole experience really ROBBIE INGRAM Robbie Ingram who has been brought the team together and SENIOR playing since bonded everybody even more. It he was four years old. made the younger players realize that there are great “For the team as a whole, there was a lot of pressure,” things in store for them in the future of baseball and that Ingram said. “It was the first time for many of the guys they should always play their hardest,” Ingram said. on the team playing on a large field like Safeco.” Ingram, as well as Graves, prized time on the field and Graves also agrees that the game was nerve-racking, hope to return one day. but that it also helped to widen his perspective on the “It was a once in a lifetime experience,” Ingram said. reality of the major leagues. “And we will remember that day for the rest of our lives.” “I really realized how serious everything was when S O P H I A

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Volume 99, Issue 8  

April 29, 2011 Issue

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