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VOLUME 100

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ISSUE TWO

L I M I T E D

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F O R U M

OCTOBER 28, 2011

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PUYALLUP HIGH SCHOOL

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105 7 T H ST. S W PU YA L LU P WA SH, 98371

PUYALLUP OCCUPIED B Y

S A R A PA R L I M A N A D M A N A G E R

Based out of the Occupy Wall Street movement that started Sept. 17 and surged across the nation, the group known as ‘Occupy Puyallup’ is trying to fortify the message to the more immediate public. Community members of Puyallup as well as students have been standing on the corner of west Pioneer and south Meridian in front of US Bank supporting the movement. The common question becomes: ‘What is Occupy Wall Street?’ According to occupytogether.org the main goal is to provide people with information about local events, actions and promote peaceful demonstrations. Occupy Wall Street is leaderless and protests are evident in the largest cities to the smallest towns. Senior Tyler Garrett is taking part in this protest, getting involved and educating students and community members on the cause. “Basically we’re trying to draw attention to the fact that big business is playing a role in our politics and democracy and not everyone is getting their fair share of the say in what goes on,” Garrett said. “We just want to draw attention to that and hopefully people are seeing us out here and educating themselves on what’s going on.” The movement has caused mixed reactions throughout the community. “I feel like [those who are protesting] are not educated enough to do what they’re doing,” junior Noland Moore said. “They’re not aware that allowing these big companies [to get] bailouts is keeping jobs.” Some teachers and students believe that the efforts of the protestors are ineffectual if the message isn’t getting across.

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Above: Protestors occupy Puyallup in Pioneer Park Oct. 20. “Occupy Puyallup” is a local take on “Occupy Wall Street,” which is a protest against government greed.

“They’re having a problem explaining why they’re there,” Security Guard James Jenkins said. “They think it’s fun to be a part of a protest. They shouldn’t bring it to school. Anything that’s not what they’re supposed to be learning is a distraction [from they’re work.]” Contrary to Jenkins’ belief, Andrew Andersen was a protest participant who could explain his motivation. “Occupy Puyallup is about greed

of corporate businesses and how we want to reinstate the Glass-Steagall act and that’s about banks protecting our money,” Anderson said. “[If I were CEO of a major corporation] I would just do things for the people. Life’s not about making money. Sure, everyone wants to make money, but it gets to a point where you don’t need all of that.” The ‘Occupy Oakland’ movement was confronted by the police Oct. 11, reveal-

ing a more forceful side to the alleged nonviolent movement. According to Jenkins, those involved with the Oakland protest had a fair amount of warning and were arrested to make a statement. The protest is ongoing and those who are involved are unyielding in their attempts to spread the word.

Downtown Forza to change name to Anthem B Y

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The downtown Forza will be closing as of Oct. 27 to undergo changes and, upon its reopening, will serve customers under a new name. “The downtown Puyallup Forza location will become an independent coffee shop called Anthem,” lead barista Drew Westerfield said. “We made the decision to make the switch from the Forza franchise to the independent label after five years in order to fulfill the management’s dream of creating a coffee brand and identity on our own.” Westerfield has been employed at Forza for nearly five years. Hired just a few months after the shop opened its doors to the public, he is one of the longest-employed workers at the Puyallup location. Over the years he has seen Forza grow into what he describes as a family. “We have had two employees marry each other while I performed the ceremony. Our customers have become parts of our lives here as we have grown to know them. We have such a close relationship that once while [co-worker Derek Konzelman and

I] were in a large rush, a customer started to those who are involved in the industry doing dishes to help alleviate our stress,” and allows us to fully show off our abilWesterfield said. “We truly have cultivated ity to craft beverages and show off coffee a family relationship during the five-year blends,” Westerfield said. “Taking pride in run as Forza coffee that we will continue our coffee is something we have always as Anthem.” enjoyed and now we can take that pride to Forza’s menu has offered a variety of cof- the next level.” fee beverages, tea and smoothies. Anthem, Forza is scheduled to reopen as Anthem however, will provide customers with new Nov. 1 with more choices, extended hours, menu choices. new floors, new cabinets “ W E T R U L Y H A V E and other fixtures. How“We are going to expand CULTI VATED our selection of beverages ever, some things will not A FAMILY to include a more diverse be changing. R E L A T I O N S H I P. . . option of brew methods A S F O R Z A C O F F E E “The only changes will THAT WE WILL on drip coffee as well as be in design but not in CONTINUE AS carrying regional craft ownership, employees A N T H E M.” brew beer options and or atmosphere,” Westerlocal northwest wines,” field said. “We will still be DREW WESTERFIELD Westerfield said. flipping cups and yelling LEAD BARISTA The change also introout orders as always. The duces a new realm for customers and em- change will only be to provide more to cusployees alike. tomers, not remove any of the atmosphere “For the employees, this offers us an that we have cultivated over the years.” opportunity to expand our drink making This comes as a reassurance to senior skills to new avenues with beer and wine Eric Olson who says he visits Forza at least and simply growing our repertoire of cof- three times a week. fee beverages. The addition of alternative “To me [the changes] don’t matter as brewing methods is extremely exciting long as the same people are working.

Those are the people that make me come back,” Olson said. “The people that work there are really friendly; they know me by name and they know what I want to drink. It is really personalized.” After opening its doors in Dec. 2006, Forza has been a hotspot for a host of different activities. Centrally located downtown close to Puyallup High School and the library, Forza has provided a place for students to stay before and after school. “I usually go [to Forza] to meet friends or do bible study. Other people are usually studying, working on computers, doing work or having meetings,” sophomore Julia Roof said. In addition to taking over the Forza location, another Anthem store is scheduled to open across the street from the University of Washington Tacoma campus on the same day. An espresso cart will be open at the downtown Puyallup location while the remodel is going on to be able to keep serving the community. “This new venture gives us the platform to further that goal and be a part of more lives in the South Puget Sound area.” Westerfield said.

TIMELINE In honor of The Viking Vanguard’s 100th anniversary each issue will represent a decade. The flag 1921-1931

1921 Enrico Caruso, world famous tenor, died in Naples.

at the top of this issue and timeline running at the bottom represent the 1921-1931 decade.

1922 Phoebe Anne Oakley Mozee sets shooting record in Pinehurst, NC (98 of 100).

1925

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1927

Over 40,000 members of the Ku Klux Klan march on Washington D.C.

American archaeologists report discovery of ancient Mayan city in Yucatan.

Charles Lindbergh becomes first person to cross Atlantic by air.

1929 Stock market crash on ‘Black Thursday’ triggers the Great Depression.

1930 Pluto discovered.


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SCHOOL BOARD ELECTION NOV. 8 Pasquier acknowledges the negativity “A superintendent must be super that has taken hold of the district and dynamic – he or she has to be a good fit for For many people in Puyallup, the promises to help alleviate this through the community and engage the people of school board may seem like a very distant building trust and confidence by being Puyallup,” Pasquier said. In an interview with The News Tribune, governing body, completely disconnected honest and open. Dane Looker, Pasquier’s competition Pasquier supplemented this notion. from their day-to-day lives. “If people feel valued, they want to be The upcoming elections Nov. 8, and volunteer school football coach, has however, may prove to be extremely recently undergone many criticisms. part of that organization,” Pasquier said. Looker agrees with his competitor. decisive for the future of the students and After announcing his run for the school board, he attempted to “The way we educate community, according to District Director drop out of the race in July “ W R I T E L E T T E R S our children is constantly of Communications Karen Hansen moving. It’s never the same. “It will be a very significant election,” to run instead for the state AND LET [THE legislature. We need an innovative B O A R D ] K N O W Hansen said. “If three-fifths of the positions However, he changed his W H A T Y O U W A N T . [leader] who can foresee are going to be filled with new faces, we WE ACTUALLY course again earlier this changes in education and will see some new decisions.” R E A D T H E M.” month, stating that he will adapt to that,” Looker said The board currently consists of five in the same article. representatives elected by the community. not pursue a spot in the KAREN HANSEN A national search will It stands as a board to put new policies state legislature in favor of DISTRICT be conducted to find a into place, many of which consider the the school board. “I can assure you that replacement for the current monetary issues which are a result of the from the day I filed to run as a candidate superintendent, Dr. Tony Apostle when he economic crisis. The News Tribune endorses candidate I have never wavered in my desire to serve retires at the end of this year. The first step is to decide upon the firm Therese Pasquier, who holds many new the kids of our district. Unfortunately I visions she hopes to implement if elected. found myself caught up in press releases, who will actually select people from across “We should no longer rely completely official statements and news reports that the nation. Once this step has been taken on the public’s money,” Pasquier said. “A contradicted my true feelings,” Looker and the company provides us with possible candidates, the Educational Priorities strong education is important for all and said in a Facebook post. Like his competition, Looker also Advisory Committee conducts research for the economy.” Pasquier seeks to secure private funds hopes for improved communication. He to “identify the community’s priorities for the continuation and expansion of the advocates additional options for partaking in regards to program and curriculum district’s programs, which could otherwise in the board meetings, like holding town- offerings for the students of the Puyallup hall type meetings over the phone. He School District,” according to the charter be cut, according to Hansen. “We try to keep the cuts as far away from also aims at having a physical presence made by the superintendent when he put students as possible. With an additional within the community by getting to know this committee in pla^ce. students, teachers and parents. The committee will then provide the projected $12,000 “ I T W I L L Having been a Vice President board with a report Dec. 12 of this year and that now needs to BE A VERY for LTC (Long Term Care) the board will elect a new superintendent be carved out of the SIGNIFICANT Solutions for 14 years and the based off of this criteria. schools, though, EL ECT ION...W E Director of Development for The public plays an integral part in the students might WILL SEE SOME Tacoma Philharmonic, Pasquier research component of the Educational start to be affected,” N E W D E C I S I O N S . ” and her supporters feel she is well Priorities Advisory Committee. The report Hansen said. qualified for a leadership position reflects the values of the community, so it Other visions KAREN HANSEN within the district. is crucial that those values be known to the D I S T R I C T include student “Every time I pursue a new committee. representatives Hansen provides the public with ways in participating in the school board’s decision- project or leadership position, I first ask myself, ‘Will I make a difference?’ And which they can become involved. making process as an advisory counsel. “The board meets every second Pasquier said her main goal is to improve the answer regarding the school board is ‘yes,’” she said. “My passion lies with the and fourth Monday at 6 p.m. in Ballou communication in the community. Junior High. The public and students “We must all become an extension of the school board.” Regardless of which two or possibly are encouraged to voice concerns and school system through information and knowledge. Communication is essential to three fill the positions within the school opinions,” said Hansen. “And letters. Write board, all agree that choosing a new letters and let them know what you want. this,” Pasquier said. superintendent will be first priority. We actually read them, you know.” B Y A L L I S O N S U L L I VA N C I R C U L A T I O N M A N A G E R

School Board Candidates POSITION 2 Dane Looker Age: 35. Website: “Dane Looker for School Board” Facebook page.

Therese Ngo Pasquier Age: 45. Website: www.theresepasquier.com

POSITION 3 Pat Jenkins

Age: 56. Website: “Pat Jenkins for Puyallup School Board” Facebook page.

Klaus Snyder Age: 50. Website: “Klaus Snyder for School Board” Facebook page.

POSITION 5 Chris Ihrig Age: 44. Website: www.linkedin.com/in/ chrisihrig

Kathy (Rebar) Uphaus Age: 46. Website: None.

New parking regulations’ confusion explained B Y

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New parking regulations, adopted by the Puyallup City Council, went into effect downtown Sept. 20. There are new requirements to park in certain city-owned parking lots, as well as new hours for street parking, with the goal of containing overflow commuter parking from the Sounder trains. The city hopes these residential parkers will begin to park in the Sounder and Puyallup Fair Red lots. In late October, city workers ‘ L I K E ’

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uncovered the new parking signs, which stand on streets around PHS and Sparks Stadium, as well as other locations downtown. So what does this mean for the students and staff of PHS? The PHS school zone is the only area downtown given eighthour parking zones. 3rd Avenue Northwest, 6th Street Northwest, West Main and other streets integrated with the PHS campus, such as the bus zone, will offer eight-hour parking in normal daytime hours, as defined by a new parking map provided by the city.

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FOOTBALL TEAM TO PLAYOFFS The varsity football team will play in Olympia Nov. 5. For the fi rst time in several years the Vikings will be playing in the playoff.

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The majority of downtown street parking at PHS only span parking will be ticketed after from 7 a.m.-5 p.m. their parking time has “It was a bit confusing exceeded two, three to us at first, because it or four hours. said eight-hour parking One-hour visitor but there are 10 hours parking for PHS is that you’re allowed to zoned on Pioneer park,” security guard Jim and along the front Jenkins said in regards entrance. to the plastic-covered For students and signs. staff who don’t stay Tickets will be issued after school for sports after 5 p.m. for any SMITH or activities, the new violations. regulations should Principal Jason Smith pose no problems. has a few reassurances. However, the hours given for “If you park in a parking lot,

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[you] will have nothing to worry about,” Smith said. He then extended an invitation, targeted to students involved in sports and other ASB activities that take place before or after school. Smith encourages said students to make use of the staff parking lots when they need to move their car. “The third parking lot does not require a parking permit, so it’s essentially free to students,” Smith said.

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VETERAN’S DAY ASSEMBLY

PROGRESS REPORTS

In honor of the men and women who served our country, there will be no school Friday, Nov. 11. An assembly will be held Nov. 10 in the auditorium in appreciation of our veterans.

Progress Reports will be sent home and posted on students’ Home Access Center accounts Nov. 15. PACE Awards will also be distributed on this day.

SENIOR PORTRAITS DUE

SAT MATH PREP WORKSHOP

Hard copies of Senior Portraits for the yearbook are due Nov. 10. To submit your photo, bring it to room 313 before or after second period or leave them in Ms. Gerhardt’s box in the main office. Contact phsvikingyearbook@gmail.com for questions.

Ms. Davis will be offering a free SAT Math Prep Workshop in the library from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 5 and 19. Students can sign up in the Counseling Center in Student Services.

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BEING A WHO CAN BE DIFFICULT TOO B Y

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After 12 hours a week of rehearsal for 12 weeks, opening night for the Musical is Nov. 17. Seussical is a musical about most of the Dr. Seuss books into character roles. The musical is told by the “narrator” or the Cat in the Hat and there are 30 different parts. Sirl expects more parents and kids to go to this production than the others that PHS has preformed. “I hope to have the name Seuss attract kids and parents to the show,” drama teacher P.J. Sirl said. Sirl has directed 38 shows for PHS but this is his first play that is sung from the beginning to the end.“Casting Musicals is always more difficult because you have to get people who can sing and be able to move,” Sirl said. Stage crew manager Nikko Sablan is doing his third year of stage craft and puts in anywhere between two to seven hours after school everyday.

“We spend a lot of time after school enjoys being on stage. “My favorite thing about Seussical is how because with the size of the class it’s very difficult to have everyone work together to it’s mostly for little kids but there is meaning for everyone who goes to see the play,” Tapia get the job done,” Sablan said. Senior stage craft member Drake Ihlen said. Last year she was a helps out after school for two “SEUSSICAL Wickersham for the Kid to three hours every school IS LIKE MY Sap Forest Theatre and day five days a week. CHILDHOOD that gave her tons of Ihlen joined stagecraft as practice for the musical just another class to take for COMING TO because since she was his senior year, but now he L I F E ,” seven she has been doing really enjoys the class and CONNOR JOHNSON productions. likes to be involved with the SENIOR “Even though I have to class. practice at home a little, I “I’m like Nikko’s work monkey, whatever he needs I get right on already know the tone of my parts so it gives it,” Ihlen said. “I imagine that backstage on me an advantage,” Tapia said. Over the summer Tapia was in a production opening night is going to be really stressful because I can imagine everyone freaks out a with Sirl and she said that’s what made her want to try out for this musical. lot.” “I plan on trying out for every school Sophomore Renee Tapia plays Sour Kangaroo in the musical says that being in production for PHS until I graduate,” Tapia Seussical is a way to make her day better. said. “Doing shows makes my day better She has been acting since she was little and because I always have something to look

forward to at the end of the day, even if my day is horrible.” Senior Connor Johnson, who plays Horton in the musical, is doing his seventh production with the school’s drama program. This is his first musical and says it’s very different than any other productions he has done. “Tryouts were very scary, not because I’m shy or anything but because there could always be someone better that could kick you out of the spot you wanted,” Johnson said. Johnson has done so many plays because when he graduates he wants to be a drama teacher. “Every production I do I get more into them, I learn more and more and it makes me want to be a drama teacher,” Johnson said. Johnson is the lead for not only this play but he was also Winnie the Pooh during last years play as well. “Seussical is like my childhood coming to life,” Johnson said.


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2 GUYS TAKE ON BURGERS AND FRIES Mouths water in anticipation as we await the opening of the Puyallup Five Guys Burger on River Road in November. To subdue our need for grease, salt and cheese we checked out the local burger joints. B Y

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HERFY’S BURGERS 12011 Me Meridian dian an Avenue venue e East, Pu Puya Puyallup, WA 98373

ed with ith a smile il at Herfy’s fy’s B fy We were welcomed Burgers, where we were served hot, juicy bacon burgers. The interior of the restaurant was openly decorated with a hint of retro style, reminiscent of the burger stand’s heyday. Complimentary, salty fries warmed our lonely hearts, as we were the only two customers present on that rainy day. The burgers more than hit the spot and were very flavorsome. For the small price of just over $4 per burger, the food was more than satisfactory yet considerably greasy: a bad sign for any health advocate. THE RAM RESTAURANT AND BREWERY 103 35th Avenue SE,, Puyallup, WA 98374

seated se att th Ram, we e co While waiting to be seat the Ra couldn’t help but notice a prominent Puyallup Vikings banner, hung high from the ceiling. A bit of school pride, as well as a warm fireplace helped us to feel right at home. Football games filled the screens of at least six television sets. Seated next to the kitchen, we could see the chefs working at full speed to accommodate a slew of hungry customers. After a reasonably long wait, two of the most bizarre yet scrumptious burgers (one sported a yolky egg, the other contained a mountain of bleu cheese and fried onions) landed on the table. After devouring the jumbo meal, we waited quite an unnecessary while for the check. All in all, the price of about $10 per burger reflected the inherent quality of the Ram’s burgers, though the wait was rather long. DON’S DRIVE-IN uth Meridian, Meridi ridi dian, Pu Puya up WA 98371 925 South Puyallup,

ll b When you first walk into the small burger-joint known as Don’s Drive-In, located off of South Meridian, you don’t really expect to find anything special about the place. The interior is somewhat bland, the walls are painted white and the furniture does not enhance the design of the room in any way. In fact, there is barely any color or decoration in the entire restaurant. On top of that, the building is pretty cramped so we do not recommend bringing a large group of friends. What really surprised us about Don’s, however, was the exceptional service provided by the restaurant’s employees. The meal was prepared in a short couple of minutes and they charged us only about $4 per meal. But most importantly, the food was delicious. The burgers we had were far better than anything offered at fast food joints and at Don’s the burgers are almost as cheap. There are no special ingredients that make this burger different from something you could dish up at

kes the home, yet the simplicity of it is what ultimately makes meal delicious. nd Overall, Don’s Drive-In is a decent restaurant and deserves a visit or two next time you’re looking for a quality burger place in town. OUT N ABOUT an Avenu nue East, nu st,, Pu 73 14212 Meridian Avenue Puyallup, WA 98373

h Blink and you’ll miss it. This mobile drive-through burger joint is located on a small U-Haul lot just off of South Meridian. There isn’t anything too special about it. The food is better than something you’d find at McDonalds or any other fast food restaurant and is only priced at about $3. However, it is not much different from any of the numerous other burger joints that you’ll find around Puyallup. Out N About has gotten a reputation for its unique style of food service, but in nely reality it’s just another average burger joint on a lonely street corner. FIVE GUYS BURGERS AND FRIES th Place ce, Re Renton nton on, WA 9 57 910 N 10th Place, Renton, 98057

nt att Fi The time that we spent Five Guys in R Renton was absolutely extraordinary and the opening of the new location in Puyallup is definitely something worth looking forward to. fortable When we first got there we were met with a comfortable atmosphere, excellent service and a meal that was so good, it was fit ced the overall for a king. The stylish décor and good music enhanced pitality that made quality of the restaurant and created a sense of hospitality you feel as comfortable as if you were at home. The walls of Five rant from local Guys were lined with positive reviews for the restaurant ence there would newspapers, hinting to customers that their experience be anything but ordinary. As for the food, the fries are hand-cut and fresh, which was evident by being superior in taste, in comparison to those fried at rger we ordered fast food joints. To our delight, the bacon cheeseburger on: not necessarily tasted incredible. The beef was cooked to perfection: ained rich flavor. undercooked, but cooked just enough so that it retained de this burger taste The strips of bacon added the extra flavor that made divine. rs only cost about Like every other burger on the menu, our burgers uys serves quality $5 each, an exceptional deal. Above all else, Five Guys food and that is what has brought this restaurant chain so much success. Five Guys is truly in a class of its own.

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MARIS FARMS HAUNTED WOODS This haunted attraction, held at Maris Farms in Buckley, takes you on a 30+ minute walk through a corn maze, woods and themed rooms set in-between. After waiting in line to purchase our $15 wrist-band to get in, we were quickly ushered toward the seemingly endless line into a barn. Actors hired to scare unexpecting visitors outside the actual event include a bloodthirsty clown on stilts and a zombie whose eyeball was on the verge of falling off his face. After nearly two hours of waiting, our time had come. Frantically, we were squished into a black, blow-up tunnel that could only lead us to our doom. Expect plenty of costumed actors to jump out at you. As a reward, I screamed at the top of my lungs at them. Sometimes because it was actually scary, other times because it was fun. Though very little of it was in the actual woods, those parts were the spookiest. The decorations were minimal during these stretches, so it just felt like you were wandering through the creepy woods at night. The corn maze was almost as frightening with the flashing strobe lights above you, allowing the actors to flash before your eyes and disappear the next second. During our trek through the haunted maze, there were groups not far ahead and behind us, which brought slight comfort and even humor when we heard the enthused reactions to the frights we just experienced ourselves. Well worth the long wait in line, the Haunted Woods definitely ranks as number one of my list of favorite attractions. Z A C H

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*Each indicates a one(least) to five(greatest) rating we’ve given to the reasturant.

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Dressed warm and prepared for fright, two reporters walk you through these “haunted” amusements.

KUBE 93 HAUNTED HOUSE Held in the old Georgetown Morgue in South Seattle, the KUBE 93 Haunted Morgue had set me up for a scary time before even getting within 10 miles of the building. Pulling up to the lot, I was greeted with the delightful screams of adolescent girls getting spooked by the actors hired to roam the crowds outside of the eerie, windowless house. Waiting in line went by quickly, which led me to assume they were pumping people through pretty fast. There was a point when a hunch-backed, creepy, tall, zombie-esque man barged outside through a side door and scared the greater half of the line. Screaming ensued. “Do not touch the actors because they will not touch you,” a sign read on the side of the building. Phew! What a relief. Once you get inside, you completely forget they can’t touch you and your fear level rises back up. It felt like more of a maze than an actual haunted house as my group was crammed into a single-file line through the overly-decorated halls. The actors’ costumes were very well done and they were very dedicated to their parts. From their mannerisms to their voices, each character was unique. I’m not sure what that means for their mental stability, but it did make for a more authentic, scary feel. From the fake hanging bags of dead bodies to the guy following you around with an oversized wrench, I can almost guarantee you will be screaming at some point; if not the whole walk through. Unfortunately, this haunted morgue was incredibly short, as I feared. My final verdict? The KUBE 93 Haunted Morgue ranks high on my scary-scale, but I wouldn’t pay the $16 for the short walk-through again.

BLACK LAKE HAUNTED ASYLUM The Black Lake Haunted Asylum is located in a dark corner of Downtown Tacoma’s Freighthouse Square. The tour is conducted in groups of four to six “patients,” lasts 15 to 20 minutes (less if you’re a fast runner) and is not recommended to children under the age of 13. As my first ever visit to a haunted attraction, I showed up mentally prepared for the worst. Two hefty men in their mid-30s wearing creepy Halloween costumes “greeted” my group and I with chainsaws as we waited in the very short line. As I toured the 22-room asylum, I clutched the arms of the two people closest to me, not even knowing for sure if they were people I came with. I continued to remind myself that the actors inside wouldn’t touch me but that didn’t stop them from getting– what seemed like– centimeters away. At one point, one of the blood thirsty psychos referred to me as “little girl” from over my shoulder. The creepy factor goes up immensely when you’re the one being targeted out of a group of six people. I jumped at almost every corner as maniacal clowns cranked torture devices and patients turbulently convulsed in their straitjackets. Although horrifying, the rooms were decorated wall to wall with intricate props that probably took months to set up and the actors were terrifyingly in character. The only disappointment for me was the slightly steep $13 admission, considering that Maris Farms Haunted Woods was only two dollars more and twice the length. I plan on attending the Black Lake Haunted Asylum again next year to check out the newest addition– a separate haunt for brave adults only.

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Affirmative Action has effects ation of race as a factor in deciding who to admit to universities,” Orfield said. College-bound seniors are feeling the heat of stress as they In 2003, the Supreme Court decided that racial preferences at start their college applications, even in the cold fall and winter public universities are legal as long as they aren’t too unreasonseason. ably applied. Senior Zoe Vigna hopes to get accepted into all six colleges she “I think I have a small advantage, considering my race and applies to. gender,” Vigna said. “But nowadays everybody “I want to have as many options as possible,” is considered a ‘person of color’ so things have “ I W A N T T O H A V E equaled out more.” Vigna said. One issue that is controversial to the admis- A S M A N Y O P T I O N S Marie Gryphon, a scholar with the Manhattan A S POSSI BL E .” sion process is affirmative action. Institute’s Center for Legal Policy, believes that According to Stanford’s Encyclopedia of Phiaffirmative action is a myth, in the sense that it losophy, affirmative action is defined as posioffers concrete benefits to disadvantaged stutive steps taken to increase the representation of dents. women and minorities in the areas of employ“Affirmative action does not send more miZOE VIGNA ment, education and business from which they norities to college,” said Gryphon. “Most four SENIOR have been historically excluded. year universities are not selective; this means “Affirmative action is not the same as equal that race-based preferences are relevant only to opportunity,” Associate Professor of Psychology at the University the 20-30 percent of colleges that have substantially more apof Texas, Russell Eisenman said. “Failure to recognize the differ- plicants than spots.” ence between the two results in policies that can generate racial Eisenman has personal experience with the study of separation.” quota systems from being on a university selection committee at Gary Orfield, professor of education at UCLA, claims that he is the University of Texas. worried about the survival of affirmative action. “When it was decided in advance that we would select a mi“Affirmative action’s survival depends on one question–wheth- nority, we ended up choosing someone who had not been the er or not the educational value of diversity justifies the consider- top candidate for that position,” Eisenman said. B Y

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ons: how many is too many?

while applying to their respective colleges, sometimes relieving the stress. e stu“I started applying to colleges in August,” Wolter said. possi- “For the most part, I have been going through the applicad only tion process by myself, but my mom has helped.” Nadeau has primarily made her own decisions when selecting her potential colleges, but she has also had some outside influences. YOU KNOW “My friend Elena Apostle has influenced RE YOU WANT some of my college choices,” Nadeau said. O, YOU JUST “Universities with good academics and D TO APPLY athletics influenced my choices everyERE AND BE where else.” DON E .” According to counselor Lesley Baczuk, when choosing how many colleges to apADI WOLTER ply to, students need to consider a few SENIOR factors. “It really depends on the student,” Baczuk said. “If you really want to go to one specific college ms, is and it is your absolute choice, apply with early decision.” state Baczuk strongly advises students learn the difference and advantages with both early action and early decision amily when applying to colleges. O R

With early decision, you make a promise to your col- go to, a second choice and a back-up college you’re sure lege of choice that you will attend their school when ac- you will get in to,” Baczuk said. cepted. Students are left with one last question: are there disadEarly action, on the other hand, gives the opportunity vantages to applying to many schools versus one or two? to submit applications early and can help get you consid“I don’t think there is anything wrong with applying to ered while still allowing you to apply to other colleges. a bunch of colleges,” Wolter said. “It’s really just what you Wolter feels confident in her decisions and is excited to feel you need to do.” finish the application process. The application fees that come along with all the college “I think there is an advantage in only applying to one applications are a big disadvantage of applying to multior two colleges,” Wolter said. “If you know ple schools, according to Baczuk. where you want to go, you just need to “ I L I K E K N O W I N G “The time and fees spent on applying T H A T I A M D O I N G to all these colleges is very worth it to apply there and be done.” Nadeau is more comfortable knowing A L L T H A T I C A N . ” me,” Nadeau said. “I like knowing that I she can still weigh her options and figure am doing all that I can.” what is in her best interests later on. Seniors worried about how many col“With applying to multiple colleges, leges to apply to and struggling to come you have a lot of options,” Nadeau said. up with money for the piling application “If you only apply to one or two colleges fees shouldn’t stress. MADDY NADEAU and then decide you don’t want to go “Always ask yourself how much money SENIOR there anymore, it could be too late.” you can get with financial aid with this According to Baczuk, all counselors suggest you apply school,” Baczuk said. “Often times the private colleges to three colleges. that are more expensive are the ones that offer the most “A school that might be a stretch but you really want to financial aid.”


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E DI TOR-I N- CH I E F......................... A DR I A OL SON MANAGING EDITOR..................CHRIS UTTERBACK OPINION EDITOR...................ANNA WULFEKUHLE FEATURES EDITOR.................ISA AC SCHOENFELD FOCUS EDITOR.......................K ATHRYN RUSSELL A&E EDITOR........................... JESSICA DICKINS SPORTS EDITOR.............................................. NEWS EDITOR..............................PAUL A BISI A R A D M A NAGERS..........................SA R A PA RLIM A N ........................................BRIANNA PEDICONE CIRCUL ATION M A NAGER.......... A L L ISON SUL L I VA N PHOTO EDITOR.................................SONIA XU GRAPHICS EDITOR..........................ANA DUEÑAS GRAPHICS.................................SANGWOO SHIN PHOTOGRAPHERS..................ELIZABETH NYBERG .................................................ANN NGUYEN REPORTERS...................................AMY CURTIS ...................................................JESSE GILES ..................................................ZACH HALTE ..........................................SAMANTHA STURM ..........................................AMANDA SWEENEY ................................................SIERRA TRYON ..............................................JACOB WATKINS ......................................SYDNEY WEATHERBEE ADVISER.............................SANDRA COYER, MJE PUBLICATIONS POLICIES: EDITORIAL POLICY:

The Viking Vanguard operates as a limited forum. The Viking Vanguard’s duty is to expand student perspectives, maintain community relations and act as a student publication advocating voice. Besides providing an opportunity for the exchange of viewpoints, The Viking Vanguard serves as an academic tool by which students can voice opinions as well as highlight issues facing today’s students. LETTER POLICY:

The Viking Vanguard accepts unsolicited copy from businesses. Only signed and dated letters with addresses and phone numbers from community members, or grade level from students will be accepted. Letters must be limited to 350 words and will be published as space is available. The staff reserves the right to edit any letter without changing its content. All letters are the sole opinion of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of The Viking Vanguard staff. Letters to the Editor may be submitted by E-Mailing them to thevikingvanguard@gmail.com, or mailing them to The Viking Vanguard c/o Puyallup High School.

A future-oriented mindset in and of itself is not a bad While we mean in no way to devalue a college education thing. or the admirable pursuit of knowledge, these statistics It is not harmful. are startling. With nearly one quarter of these graduates But, when that mindset becomes an obsession and unemployed, it is no longer logical to assume that a degree infatuation, it can become dangerous. will absolutely ensure employment. In kindergarten, our teachers warned us about what Still, sometimes a framed indication of years spent was in store for us in first grade. studying is equated to a rite of passage into maturity, into In first grade, the teachers warned us what was in store adulthood. for us in second grade. More and more, college is encouraged among younger This chain continued to sixth grade when they warned students. Sixth-graders wander the halls of elementary us about junior high. schools sporting drawstring backpacks and T-shirts When we were in junior high, they declaring “I’m Going to College!” “YOU CAN CHANGE warned us about high school. It’s no wonder that students get so anxious THE WORLD, Now that we’re in high school, and overwhelmed— we are constantly WHETHER YOU they’re warning us about college. waiting for something that will signal to us The Viking Vanguard’s advice to H A V E A 1 . 0 G P A O R that real life has started. 4.0 GPA .” you is this: work hard in school. Do We have all wondered, while sitting in a your best to earn the best grades you math class, “when will I ever use this in real can. We support college, as well as life?” technical school, apprenticeships, We consider our scholastic careers to be OUR VIEW military and the other alternatives stepping stones to this utopian “real life.” available. Every grade level can become but one more We also acknowledge that college road block between us and this “promised is not right for everyone. There are endless possibilities land.” post-high school that do not include a degree. When are they going to reveal to us that we have been Recent statistics have shown that student loan debt now living real life this whole time? exceeds the amount of credit card debt in America. The educational system makes it seem as if a college The pressures of paying for college, if not with grants and education is the key to happiness. Our educators want the scholarships, create murky waters for some, inundated by best for us: that is undeniable. the responsibility of financing one’s education. Where then has the twisted idea come from that our Most statistics in favor of traditional college graduates self-worth and GPAs are inextricable? In fact, they have no state that the “typical college graduate” will earn more correlation. money, live longer and be happier. You can change the world, whether you have a 1.0 GPA However, not every graduate is “typical.” According to or 4.0 GPA. a report from Northeastern University, only 55.6 percent Your value as a person cannot be measured on the AP of all 2009 college graduates are working in a job that scale or on how many extracurricular activities are on requires their college degree. Twenty-two percent hold a your resume. job that does not require a degree. We are all humans with value and neither grades nor The remaining 22.4 percent are not working at all. appearance nor personal achievements alter that value.

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The Viking Vanguard publication staff accepts advertisements for most products available to the public. However, the staff reserves the right to reject, edit or cancel any advertisement at anytime. Advertisements shall be free of implications that the staff deems offensive in light of normal public standards (WIAA 18.20.0 and 18.20.1). Ads violating this policy will not be accepted. The staff will not accept advertising for products or groups which are racist, sexist or illegal for high school students. Advertisements do not necessarily reflect the views, endorsements and/or positions of The Viking Vanguard, student body, faculty, administration or school board. CORRECTIONS:

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Be a superhero for the earth! Please, do your part and recycle The Viking Vanguard. HEY! HEY YOU! YES YOU! LOOK TO THE RIGHT! DO YOU WANT TO SEE YOUR NAME IN THE PAPER? WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR AND DROP IT OFF IN RM. 313 OR IN MRS. COYER’S BOX.

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Student defends literary validity of ‘Harry Potter’ series K E L S E Y H A R R I S O N S E N I O R

My AP Senior English class is supposed to read outside material in preparation for the AP test this spring. When my teacher said we were only allowed to read “real literature” and used Harry Potter as an example of what is not considered “real literature”, I was more than a little miffed. I would never ever expect to see Harry Potter appear on the AP exam, but the idea that it isn’t “real literature” really put me off. J.K. Rowling is a truly wonderful and inventive author and has touched the lives of millions through her books. She has used her knowledge and resources to connect time, space and cultures alike.

She references Shakespeare’s A Winter’s Tale when Hermione is petrified in Chamber of Secrets. Remus Lupin is named specifically because Remus is one of the legendary founders of Rome who was said to have been suckled by a wolf as a child and Lupin means wolf in Latin, suggesting he is a werewolf. Nicolas Flamel was a real alchemist in the 14th and 15th centuries and claimed to have made a philosopher’s stone. He is mentioned in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and credited as being one of the creators of the stone. Aragog, the name of the acromantula in Chamber of Secrets, is a combination of Arachne (from the legend of the ancient Greek woman who was turned into a spider by Athena) and

Gog, a giant who appears in both the Bible and early British legends. Philosophy is also abundant in the series. I did a whole project in Advanced Debate last year on the philosophies that appear throughout the series. Jo Rowling waited seventeen years to write the line Dumbledore would say to Harry at King’s Cross Station in Deathly Hallows: “Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?” J.K. Rowling has created such an intricate piece of work that 8.3 million copies of Deathly Hallows books sold its first day of release, July 21, 2007. It is not a children’s book, it is real literature.


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BREAST CANCER ‘UN’AWARENESS

We buy the ribbons. We wear the pink. We support the cause. But how much do we actually know about breast cancer? Of course it is a part of every health education class. We learn the facts, like how certain foods (such as kiwi, for example) help prevent breast cancer; we learn how to check for breast cancer; we learn to search our family history for possible heredity. What a lot of people don’t know is that, thanks to research, breast cancer is in no way a death sentence and, depending on the stage, actually has an incredibly A . SU L L I VA N excellent prognosis. CIRCUL ATION With early detection, such as a tumor less than two centimeters which mammograms can easily pick up on the prognosis is 92 percent or higher, according to Cancer Monthly, a free e-newsletter. So that means the sooner you start your screening, the better, right? Not usually. Research shows that women who start their annual tests before age 50 show more false-positive results, which causes unnecessary anxiety. If a person has a higher risk for developing the disease, thought, they should seek medical advice from their doctor. Another point is that many people tend to think that breast cancer targets women older than age 50. However, recent research shows that this point may

be invalid. Those who have hereditary gene mutations, dubbed BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported to contract verage of six to the cancer at an average eight years before their ied the relatives who carried same genetic mutations. This could be due to advancement screening in efficiency of people who fit this category are methods, but the tart screening five to 10 years before recommended to start iagnosed. their relative was diagnosed. ising and somewhat sickening littleThe most surprising known fact about breast cancer surrounds the products that supposedly help. True, much of it has helped fund research that has “helped save lives and significant lity of care and survivorship for tens improved the quality of thousands of breast cancer patients,” states the search Foundation, which aims to find Breast Cancer Research ase prevention. In fact, a long list of a cure and increase accomplishments and breakthroughs are listed on their website. med supporters despise “pinkwashing,” However, informed which seizes and manipulates everybody’s support. There n 9mm handgun with pink pistol grip is a Smith & Wesson ple, and KFC has offered a “Pink Bucket” for sale, for example, deal in the past. ink there is a bucket full of validity to Personally, I think these arguments. Guns and heart attacks combined kill more people in the United States than breast cancer does. Obesity is also a leading risk factor in developing breast cancer. Other companiess continue this pattern. BMW donates

$1 for every time one of its cars participates in a test drive, but some pollutants emitted from the car while the test drive takes place have been linked to cancer in general. Many cosmetic companies promise proceeds to fund research, but chemicals in the products that they make also increase a person’s risk of cancer. Just because something is labeled with a pink ribbon clearly does not mean you should buy it. Beware the pinkwashers. Even companies with healthy products have a maximum amount of money that they donate; if that maximum has been reached by the time you buy your pink water bottle, your purchase profits only the manufacturer. Check out different deals. Learn different percentages. Ask different questions. Or just donate directly. Be smart when you think pink. Contributing to research is extremely important, but I think it is far more important to know your pink-dos from your pink don’ts. Otherwise you could be on cancer’s side.

Stress thwarts over-achieving, sleepless junior

They all said junior year would be stressful. They all said I’d be pulling my hair out two months in. My response? “Oh please, I can handle it.” It wasn’t until I was halfway to school one day that I noticed I was wearing two left shoes. It was then I realized I was in too deep. That’s the funny thing about stress; it reveals itself in unusual, creative ways. My personal experiences have been unique, to say the least. B. PEDICONE Frustration takes place on those AD M ANAGER days where everything goes wrong. Not to mention the four hours of sleep that drive me into zombie mode. My friends comment on my physical and mental states, agreeing that I exceed my maximum level of stress and look like a raccoon. That’s due to the bags under my eyes that grow darker every day. My hair is barely restrained in a ponytail as I struggle to keep my eyes open. I must admit at the end of a long week, I do look like the living dead. I blame high school. It seems as though there are six teachers a day who all think that their class takes precedent over the others. Six homework assignments can ruin the whole H AV E

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evening. out the window and taking a nine hour nap. Every so often those few tedious math problems are I go to sleep, wake up and do it all again. impossible to figure out, social studies is overloading There’s a more entertaining side of me when I become and foreign language class feels like, well… a foreign stressed, one less serious and more fanatical. language. Most of the time I’m not in my right mind. By the end of the night I feel like my head is going to It’s a feeling I know well that causes me to do something explode. only a really exhaustedly manic person would do. My math homework lies sprawled out over my desk, Often I trip over anything and everything: chairs, desks, Spanish on the floor and social studies crumpled up in a feet, shoelaces, banana peels and air. paper ball against the wall. My voice gets high and squeaky like Oh, and that English essay that’s due a singing chipmunk and occasionally I “I MUST ADMIT tomorrow is still at the bottom of my fail to reach my mouth when drinking a A T T H E E N D O F A beverage. backpack, untouched. Besides the schoolwork, Key Club, L O N G W E E K , I D O I’m sure I’m quite the show for my LOOK LIKE THE Honor Society, band and basketball only friends. L I V I NG DE A D.” add stress. As well as for myself, sometimes my The pressure of being an active student own stupidity makes me laugh so hard to and getting involved to get into a quality the point of tears. college seems cliché and uncomplicated, I’ve learned to just shake it off and BRIANNA PEDICONE AD MANAGER but while the extra time spent doing prepare for the next potential foolery I’ll extracurricular activities may be fun and commit. make worthy experiences, my sleeping pattern quickly There’s no cure for stress, especially in junior year. becomes abnormal. There’s no excuses for late assignments and bad Clubs and sports are passions of mine, so giving them grades. up is not an option. So I’ll continue diving into more than I can handle I shall become nocturnal and be up with a task until the because I’m sure it’ll pay off in the end. early hours of the morn. I’m quickly discovering that everyone was right about Then the time comes when a force hits me. junior year, but somehow I’ll survive it. All of a sudden, I can’t think straight and everything On the bright side, my sleep deprivation has really seems like a tangled mess. taught me to appreciate those few hours of slumber. Headaches kick in and I feel like throwing all my books

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Q: What is your favorite thing about autumn?

“THE COLORS AND THE AUTUMNSC E N T E D C A N DL E S.”

“I LIKE HALLOWEEN BECAUSE I GET TO SEE M Y PA R ENTS DRESS UP IN GOOFY OUTFITS AND I GET TO L AUGH.”

“THE COLD AIR KEEPS EVERYONE INSIDE, WHICH ISOLATES THE GLOW ING BEAUTY OF WHAT WE CALL N AT U R E .”

“IT’S ALMOST C H R IST M A S.”

“I LOVE WHEN ALL T H E GR E E N L E AV E S I USUALLY SEE AT THE PA R K T U R N G OL D.”

MORGAN NORSTREM SOPHOMORE

KELSEY CARTWRIGHT SENIOR

NOLAND MOORE JUNIOR

T YLER DEVANEY SENIOR

ANNETTE BURNETT TEACHER

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‘NEW HEIGHTS’ MARCHES TO BEAT OF VIKING DRUMMER

Senior Bobby Walker recently drummed for Seattle-based band New Heights, who opened for Far East Movement, B.O.B and Sean Kingston. While fame may come with Walker’s talent, recognition is not his main focus. sound,” Walker said. “We wanted to shoot for pop culture.” or many kids, it is a dream to be Walker wanted to be clear that in a band, become famous and they had not changed their Christian have thousands of people who values; they just wanted to reach more love your music. people. For senior Bobby Walker, he is almost “[Bobby’s] Christian values help there. His band has recorded an album, build his talent, he has great morals played a show with an audience of over behind him that shape his talent,” 6,000 people and has been recognized Rachel Garnett said. by many famous artists. The band met with John Howard, Walker has played drums at who agreed to produce a record with Foursquare Church since he was their new secular sound. 9-years-old and is still playing today. “[The band] wanted to make one According to more full-length album the school’s band and if it didn’t work then “WE WANTED TO instructor Eric Ryan, GO FOR A MORE they would end it,” Walker Walker is a great S E C U L A R S O U N D . said. WE WANTED TO drummer and is very Their new CD started SHOOT FOR POP influential. getting some attention CU LT U R E .” “Bobby is a great and the band did a show percussionist,” Ryan in Seattle called the ISA said. “He inspires BOBBY WALKER (International Secret SENIOR other musicians.” Agents) Festival. About a year and a “July 31, we played in half ago, Walker was asked by Seattle the ISA show at the Showbox Sodo,” band “New Heights” to play with them, Walker said. “The show was not easy to the band has been together for almost get into.” seven years before Walker joined. The band was recognized at the show, “They never really had a set by both the ISA and the band Far East drummer,” Walker said. “They met me Movement known for their popular through friends and asked me to do a song “Like a G-6.” gig.” “The Seattle show was basically an The band played mainly worship audition,” Walker said. “From there music before acquiring Walker, two we were invited to play the ISA in San of the band members being worship Francisco and in Los Angeles.” pastors. The band was finally getting “The band members are Travis, who recognized and they were to play a huge is a worship pastor, guitarist Chris who show in Los Angeles with thousands of is also a worship pastor and bassist people. Tyler; we call him Taco,” Walker said. “The concert was at Long Beach “They were shooting for a mainly with about 6,000 audience members,” Christian band dedicated to worship” Walker said. After Walker joined, the band decided Alongside Walker’s band were artists to change their sound. including Far East Movement, B.O.B “We wanted to go for a more secular and Sean Kingston. B Y

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Playing alongside such large artists Walker wanted to be clear that they would seem like an unfathomable are not trying to force people to change dream, but for Walker that dream has their faith or belief, but influence become a reality. people to make good choices. “This is my dream and it is all “When they see us up there, having suddenly happening,” Walker said. fun and still making good choices, “Over time I didn’t realize what was maybe they will want to too,” Walker happening until I looked back.” said. According to Walker, the fans really The group is still continuing as enjoyed the show and it is something a band and Walker has been doing he wants to continue in. frequent shows, while also keeping up “People loved the show,” Walker said. with school and keeping up with his “When you get than much appreciation, worship. it’s a great feeling; this is something I “We have been playing weekend want to do with my life.” after weekend and in November we are Although Walker wants his band to going to Boston and New York to play,” be a huge part of his Walker said. “But I still play “THIS IS A life, he still wants to worship at Foursquare MINISTRY IN continue spreading and it’s my senior year, ITSELF; I THINK worship throughout which is a lot more chill, it the world, maybe T H E A T M O S P H E R E doesn’t feel like that much [IN OUR SHOWS] taking on both at the pressure.” IS ALMOST MORE same time. Amongst the band’s IMPACTFUL “I want to go to success, they have THAN PLAYING school for ministry,” produced a successful CD CHRISTIAN Walker said. “And and have been opening for M USIC .” this is a ministry musician Clara C. in itself; I think the “Our CD ‘Something to BOBBY WALKER atmosphere [in our Believe in’ has been doing SENIOR shows] is almost very well,” Walker said. more impactful than playing Christian “We have also recorded a track with music.” producer Aaron Sprinkle who has Walker believes that by playing his worked with bands such as Anberlin shows and also being a good role model, and Under Oath.” he is influencing a more diverse group Walker has gone very far in reaching of people, people that might need it. his dream; he has played with major “I like being that light,” Walker said. artists and has already started to “At a Christian concert, most of the influence thousands of people. people will be Christian, but at a pop According to Garnett, Walker is concert, I will be able to reach out and very talented and deserves all of the try to influence more people.” appreciation he has gotten. According to Ryan, Walker is a good “Bobby is very, no, extremely influence on his fellow classmates. talented,” Garnett said. “I have seen “Bobby is a great musician,” Ryan Bobby’s shows almost weekly, Bobby is said. “Any great musician is inspiring a rockstar.” to others.”


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A TASTE FROM AROUND THE WORLD Half of this year’s foreign exchange students were interviewed about the differences between living in the United States and their countries of origin, including the food differences. B Y

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Iqra Zafar, Pakistan Unlike the European-based students, junior Iqra Zafar is from Pakistan. Zafar is excited about her first trip away from home. “I came to explore the world. I’ve never left Pakistan and America is the world. I’ve met so many different people since I’ve been here; other foreign exchange students and people who have moved here,” Zafar said. Coming to the States has come with some shocks as well. “There are no shorts in Pakistan and the food was a big adjustment for me,” Zafar said. As Zafar talks about the food of her homeland, her mouth waters and her eyes glisten with desire for some of her native spices. “[I’ve missed the] spices and the food production because we use sugar cane in Pakistan, dried fruits and mangos,” Zafar said. “We eat rice with everything, chicken bivyani. There are lots of sweets in the Middle East; we are very sweet people.” According to Zafar, most of the encounters with her friends are at school or on the holidays they like to perform in their schools theatre club. “I pray for peace between America and Pakistan, because deep down everyone is the same and has humanity. I’ve learned that more since I’ve been here,” Zafar said. “Everyone here has been so friendly and caring; I haven’t faced any discrimination from anyone.”

Lara-Sophie Buckow, Germany Junior Lara-Sophie Buckow is from a small village next to Hamburg called Jork. Her favorite foods are lasagna and German chocolate. Buckow enjoyed spending time with her three best friends who are also doing exchange programs, one is in Michigan, one is in England and one is in Scotland. “We have sleepovers, a lot of sleepovers. We watch movies in the cinema and go shopping. Whenever we are together, we take at least 100 pictures,” Buckow said. Buckow’s exchange program helped prepare her for the changes that America brought. “I knew it would be different. I was prepared it wouldn’t be like home, they told me a lot. I take things how they are. My organization told me nothing is better or worse, just different,” Buckow said. Buckow is hoping to gain more friends while at school. “I’ve met a lot of friendly people, but there are lots of people who don’t know me yet. I’m always open to meeting new people,” Buckow said.

Melis Bünder, Germany

Jaja Poenateotai, Thailand

Also from Germany, sophomore Melis Bünder from Cologne, Germany is about to celebrate her sweet sixteen is excited about this new experience. “I’ve been here for two months now and I really like it here. I hope the next eight months are just as good or even better. I’m really excited for tennis in the spring with my new friend, Lauren Zehnder,” Bünder said. Bünder’s biggest shock coming to America isn’t one of the first things to come to one’s mind when one might think of cultural shocks. “The bread. [In Germany] it’s crusty; it’s so soft here,” Bünder said. In Germany, Bünder likes to hangout with her friends, have parties, go to the cinema and go to her favorite ice cream parlor. “My favorite food is the ice cream from a parlor in our village called ‘De Bona’,” Bünder said.

Bari Cerna,Czech Republic Senior Bari Cerna is from the Czech Republic. A N A D U E N A S | G R A P H I C In the short time Cerna has been in the states she has noticed some differences from back home. “In Czech the main meal is lunch, the traffic is more strict and the people [are different],” Cerna said. “[In America] when someone is new they all want to talk to them and have a conversation but then when I see them again they ignore you. And religion, I come from one of the most Atheistic countries in the world and here a lot more people go to church.” Although excited about her exchange program, Cerna misses parts of her life back home. “I’m very homesick. I miss my family, my friends and the food. My favorite food back home is potato dumplings, sauerkraut and roasted pork,” Cerna said. Cerna is hoping to get more out of this trip than just bettering her English skills. “I want to learn how to be independent and grow spiritually,” Cerna said.

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Junior Jaja Poenateotai comes from the capitol city of Bangkok, Thailand. Her favorite food back home is Padkra-pao, which is spicy basil pork; at least five stars to Poenateotai who like all her dishes very spicy. Poenateotai points out the lifestyle changes she notices as she spends her year in Washington. “Everybody wears shoes inside their homes and at American high school everyone is a stickler about being on time [for class/school]. In Thailand it isn’t a problem if you are a little late,” Poenateotai said. “Also, girls and boys are allowed to kiss and express their feelings at school.” On Thursdays the boys have to go to the military so the girls have free time to go shopping,” Poenateotai said. Before coming to high school, Poenateotai had some apprehensions about how she would be treated. “I like Washington State and this school. A friend of mine who went to America last year and she didn’t have many friends because she was Asian,” Poenateotai said. ”She said there was a lot of bullying. I am really glad that there is no bullying here and that no one looks down on me.”

Denisa Tomeckova, Slovakia Another new addition to school is junior Denisa Tomeckova from Slovakia. Tomeckova’s favorite dish from back home is one of her grandma’s recipes called Bryndzove Halusky, which translates into Sheep and cheese dumplings. Tomeckova was shocked at the size of our school. “[This school is] huge. My school in Slovakia has 400 students,” Tomeckova said. Tomeckova says the things she does with her friends are just like the teenagers in the states. “For fun my friends and I hangout, we go to the cinema, café and bowling,” Tomeckova said.


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SWIMMERS SAVE BREASTSTROKE brought the community together for one event and helped bring the irls swim teams from Rogers, Emerald Ridge and district together for one Puyallup participated in the second annual “Save purpose.” the Breast Stroke” bake sale and swim meet Oct According to Coach 7. Casi Messineo, the girls The event was a fundraiser in support of breast cancer showed a lot of respect awareness. The effort raised a total of $749. and involvement during “It went really well. Puyallup took first place, Emerald the fundraiser. Ridge was second place and Rogers was third place— The swim meet required we also gave individuals awards for first through sixth them to reach out and place,” Coach Andrea Stammen said. “All the schools help make a change. had people that placed; all teams had best times.” “[The meet] basically The meet was organized by varsity swimmer senior showed what our team Mackenna Krohn. is all about,” For Krohn, the idea was Messineo said. “IT BROUGHT sparked from a similar event “We’re always THE COMMUNITY which had been organized by T O G E T H E R F O R O N E proud of them. EVENT AND HELPED I the water polo team. was proud “Water polo had been B R I N G T H E D I S T R I C T to send them doing it and all the money T O G E T H E R F O R O N E out into the PU R POSE .” [they raised] went to Susan G. community Komen. So then I took the idea because they ANDREA STAMMEN and made one for the swim are great COACH team too,” Krohn said. “This representations year we tried to make it more of our philosophy A N A D U E N A S | G R A P H I C S local, so the funds went to the breast health center at and our school.” Good Samaritan [Hospital].” The meet not only Pink Check:Senior Mackenna Krohn presents a check for $749 to the breast health center at the Good SamariA lot of bonding and teamwork occurred during the supported breast cancer tan Hospital. The money was raised though a swim meet fundraiser hosted by the girls swim team. Donations meet, according to Coach Stammen. awareness but also taught were made, rubber wrist bands sold and pink treats were sold at the swim meet. The rivalry of the teams was put aside in the name of the team important themselves and to open up a better cause. lessons, according to Stammen. “The girls from all three teams sat together; the “It really emphasizes to the girls one of our main their focus,” Stammen said. “They were able to deliver coaches from all three teams sat together; the parents purposes in coaching the swim team, which is to the check as a team, which was their reward and they from all three teams sat together,” Stammen said. “It make the kids realize that the world is bigger than just really enjoyed it.” B Y

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And the crowd goes mild:

Athletic programs have not been drawing the crowd they used to.

and volleyball games, some sports teams have rarely ever team does not get recognized for its success as much as been backed by their fellow classmates. it should. For example, senior boys varsity runner Nathan Lindsley gets inspired when she knows she has people As the end of October approaches, athletes continue to McLaughlin says that the cross country team doesn’t get supporting her during a meet. She says she uses that push through the fall sports season. a throng of people showing up to its races. positive energy to perform to the best of her ability. However, sporting events this year aren’t drawing nearly They’ve won every meet this season, recently defeating “Whatever the excitement in the room is, that’s how as much popularity as they have in the past. Bethel and Spanaway Lake 15-50 in both varsity and much you’re going to put into your race,” Lindsley said. “Compared to prior years, especially in the away games, junior varsity. “If no one is cheering, you’re not going to feel good about there used to be a lot more students at sports games,” Mae “The cross country team is yourself.” Wisor, co-president of the booster probably one of the best it’s been in It is clear from what these athletes have “IF NO ONE IS club said. “Now there’s not as several years,” McLaughlin said. “We C H E E R I N G , Y O U ’ R E said that it means a lot to them when a many.” plan, hopefully, on placing top five fellow classmate goes out of his or her way NOT GOING TO According to Wisor, student at State this year. All of our top seven F E E L G O O D A B O U T to provide them with encouragement. attendance at sporting events guys are pushing hard to get there.” “You’re going to get the support from your YOU R SE L F.” has gradually declined since her The team demonstrated its skill parents and your family; that goes without involvement in the booster club when it placed first at the Fort saying,” Wisor said. “But just having your began three years ago. Steilacoom Invitational: a five friends there to support really helps you a PEYTON LINDSLEY The lack of support from the kilometer race in which more than lot while you’re playing.” JUNIOR student body is concerning to her, 50 high schools across the state Sports such as basketball and boys as well as a number of other staff competed. swimming are approaching quickly. members and student athletes Although the team has had such success, many of the Baseball, soccer and track begin directly afterwards. MCL AUGHLIN alike. runners wish that more students would come to watch According to sophomore and junior varsity volleyball Both groups agree that student them race. player Gabi Touriel, it’s important for students to support representation at sporting events is necessary to “I think a lot of students don’t realize how good of a of all these activities. effectively uphold all school activities, whether they are program we are, how much success we’ve had and what “I honestly don’t think kids should just support sports, music programs or other events. a great group of kids we are,” McLaughlin said. “I think volleyball,” Touriel said. “I think the student body should “It’s important for students to support each other in all that by coming out and supporting us people will see how be supporting all sports. Our sports represent us as a events,” Wisor said. good of a team we are.” school. Why shouldn’t you support that?” According to Athletic Director John Wetterauer, Like many other athletes, McLaughlin attending athletic events not only benefits those who appreciates it when his fellow students cheer participate in the sport, but everyone who is a part of the him on as he competes. student body. For McLaughlin, having Funds that are raised at sports events people lined up along the “WE BASE OUR ultimately benefit every student no trails and cheering for him is BUDGETS UPON matter what he or she is interested in, strong motivation to run as INCOME THAT according to Wetterauer. hard as he can. W E H AV E F ROM Ticket sales at sport events compensate T H E S E C O N T E S T S , “Having someone that I for a significant portion of the costs know that comes out and SO ATTENDANCE necessary to support the numerous cocheers for me and says my REALLY HELPS curricular and extracurricular activities name… it makes me push OU R I NCOM E .” offered. harder and want to show them “We base our budgets upon income how Puyallup cross country JOHN W ETTER AUER that we have from these contests, so is such a great program,” ATHLETIC DIRECTOR attendance really helps our budgeting,” McLaughlin said. Wetterauer said. ”Not only are our athletic teams, but our In addition to the cross country team, the activities as well are based upon the amount of revenue girls swim and dive team has won many of its we have coming in.” races throughout the fall season. As a 16-year staff member and three-year athletic They had an 8-1 record as of mid-October director, Wetterauer has gained enough experience to and placed first at the SPSL Autumn Relays, understand why the number of students at sporting an event Sept. 23 in which 17 other schools events has decreased. participated in swimming and diving “I think in the day and age we live in, there are many competitions. competing avenues of entertainment,” Wetterauer said. “We’ve only lost one meet this season and “There are so many different things that people do with that was only by four points,” senior swimmer their spare time.” Peyton Lindsley said. Although student attendance has declined at football Despite this, Lindsley feels that the swim B Y

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Volume 100, Issue 2