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mesquite | moapa valley | arizona strip | southern utah complimentary issue


November 1 - December 31, 2019 Volume 12 – Issue 6 PUBLISHER & EDITOR Kathy Lee MANAGING EDITOR Mandi Miles ART DIRECTOR / LAYOUT Erin Eames COPY EDITOR Lynessa Eames PROOFREADER Rayma Davis WRITERS Ashley Centers, Stephanie Frehner, Patti Valis, Doug Pederson, Allan Litman, AlixSandra Parness, Jenny Riddick, Donna Eads, Elspeth Kuta, Marsha Sherwood, Kim Smith, Kaylee Pickering, Soon 0. Kim, Michelle Brooks, Helen Houston, Anita DeLelles, Judi Moreo, Keith Buchhalter, Mitch Oldewurtel, Karen L. Monsen, Sydney Hatfield, Susie Knudsen, Merrie Campbell-Lee, Valerie King, Linda Faas, Lisa Larson, Mindee West, Kim Otero, Karter C. Poole, Gerri Chasko, Jayne Kendrick, Amy Bradshaw, Kelsey Stipek, Paul Benedict ADVERTISING SALES Kathy Lee ADVERTISING EMAIL ads@ViewOnMagazine.com SUPPORT STAFF Bert Kubica Cheryl Whitehead DISTRIBUTION View On Magazine Staff WEB DESIGN Trevor Didriksen PUBLISHED BY View On Magazine, Inc. Office (702) 346-8439 Fax (702) 346-4955 GENERAL INQUIRIES info@ViewOnMagazine.com ONLINE ViewOnMagazine.com Facebook Twitter Instagram

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2007-2019 View On Magazine, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without the express written permission from the publisher, including all ads designed by the View On Magazine staff. All articles submitted by contributing writers are deemed correct at the time of publishing, View On Magazine, Inc. and/or any of its affiliates accept no responsibility for articles submitted with incorrect information.


Letter from

the Editor

Dear Readers,

Giving and receiving, that’s what this time of year is all about. Our Giving can easily be sorted into 3 important categories: giving to others, giving to family, and giving to self. Giving to others: How about checking out new opportunities to give this year. Volunteering for community events as well as churches will offer opportunities to give to children in need. Giving to family: May I suggest a simple gift of you and time. An example might be a casual dinner out or even at home. But make it special. Giving to self: If we forget to take care of ourselves, then we might not have the energy to take care of others during this busy holiday season. Perhaps you could treat yourself to a massage, or a bubble bath with candles & music. Finding meaningful opportunities to give can be difficult, to assist in your efforts we have included an extensive holiday events calendar. It is our hope that you can take some time to fit a few of them into your bustling holiday schedule...we know that your heart will be fuller if you do. To refocus on the reasons we have to be grateful, make sure to read “The Spirit of Gratitude” by Elspeth Kuta. I’m grateful for the special people in my life, this article helped me to be grateful for even more. Any more details and I will give it away...let’s just say it’s a MUST read. To ease the financial burden that the holiday season can bring, we suggest you take a look at “The Hidden Cash in Your Drawer” by Kelsey Stipek. I tried it, and will tell you - it’s amazing to see just how much cash you can gather from items taking up space. While we’re on the subject of looking for items to sell, check out our articles on “Rooster Cottage” and “Sell it Again Sally” These are two upscale consignment stores where you will find gorgeous, almost new items, at a fraction of their new cost. It seems that they are flooded with great values at Christmas time, so go in and check them both out. Rooster Cottage in Mesquite, NV, and Sell it again Sally, in St. George, UT. It’s a great way to work on your holiday gift list. Please make sure to read the article on the “1000 Flags Over Mesquite”. It is an emotional and moving event that you won’t want to miss. Visit our website at ViewOnMagazine.com and like us on Facebook to keep up on the current events that we could not include in this issue. And as always visit our advertisers, for it is because of them and their decision to invest in our magazine, that we get to continue to greet you every other month with yet another informative issue of ViewOn Magazine. By patronizing our advertisers, you support our business community and all of the wonderful benefits we derive from living in this amazing area. This will be an especially fun holiday season for me as I get to spoil my two new grandbabies! My wish for you and yours is that you have a beautiful and Happy Holiday Season!

Kathy Lee,

Editor-in-Chief

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frequent contributors

Mitch Oldewurtel is Senior Vice President of Investments with Silverleaf Wealth Advisory of Raymond James. Using a sound investment strategy he provides consistent, professional advice to guide clients in strengthening their knowledge base in the areas of retirement, tax-advantaged investing, and advanced estate planning. He enjoys spending time with his wife, Diana, and their two dogs. He loves to travel, ski, and golf in his spare time. Mitch can be reached via Office: 435-414-8355 or Cell: 480-353-8805.

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Elspeth Kuta is the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum Coordinator, where she says it is her privilege to share the local history of Mesquite and surrounding areas with the community and visitors alike. She and the museum strive to bring history to life, and preserve and protect the local tales of yore.

Karen L. Monsen is a freelance writer who lives in St. George, Utah. She covers outdoor topics, nature, science, research, and human impacts. She taught French and Social Studies in public schools, served as a technical training coordinator, and designed and delivered business and technical writing seminars for corporate clients.

David Cordero is the Communications and Marketing Director for the City of St. George. A Southern Utah resident since 2006, he has extensive experience in marketing, public relations, writing and public speaking. He has won several awards for his writing on a variety of subjects, including sports, the military community, and education. He has served in a variety of volunteer capacities for several local nonprofit organizations, including Utah Honor Flight, American Legion Post 90, Washington County Children’s Justice Center, Red Rock Swing Dance and as a coach for his son’s youth athletic teams.

Donna Eads and her husband moved to Mesquite in 2010 from Palm Desert, California and loves the small town atmosphere. Her writing experience extends from high school and college newspapers to professional manuals as a critical care nurse. Her passion for tennis is evident in her frequent articles for ViewOn Magazine.

Linda Faas and her husband arrived in Mesquite in 2004. They love the friends they have made here, and love exploring the beauty of the surrounding desert. Linda has immersed herself in community life and volunteers with education nonprofits. She is a reporter and feature writer for local and regional publications and is always seeking new adventures.

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Judi Moreo is one of the most recognized personal growth trainers and coaches in the world. She is the author of 11 books, including 2 international bestsellers, You Are More Than Enough and Conquer the Brain Drain. A self-made success, Judi started her first business with $2,000 and a lot of chutzpah. Judi learned to succeed step-by-step over many years, and now has a worldwide following of clients who are enjoying outstanding success as a result of her guidance. You can reach Judi at judi@judimoreo.com or (702) 283-4567. Rob Krieger is a 20 year PGA Member & former Director of Golf in Mesquite & Greensboro, NC. He is currently the Director of Instruction at both his own Red Rock Golf Center and the Southgate Golf Club in St. George, and is experienced in teaching all skill levels from beginners to low handicappers. Rob has been writing for ViewOn Magazine since 2010. For help with your game or to schedule a lesson, check out his website www. stgeorgegolflessons.com or email Rob@sgugolf.com. Anita DeLelles, LMT is a certified Equine and Small Animal Acupressure Practitioner with accreditation from Tallgrass Animal Acupressure Institute. Her studies included two consecutive summers in Bath, England, as well as coursework in Colorado and California and a BFA from UNLV. Anita is certified in small animal massage from the Northwest School of Animal Massage as well as human massage. In 2014 Anita and Ron opened WOOF! Wellness Center and launched their website ShopMeoow.com.

Helen Houston is the owner of Hues & Vues — Inspired Walls and Windows. Helen also owns a new business, Staging Spaces & Redesign —Designing Your Home to Sell. She holds certifications as a Drapery and Design Professional, Certified Staging Professional, and Certified Color Consultant. She has been a contributing writer for ViewOn Magazine for the past ten years. Her creative writing features articles on home fashion, home staging, and entertaining. Helen is a published author in several national design and trade magazines. She can be reached at helen@huesandvues.com or helen@stagingspaces.biz or call (702) 346-0246. Celece Krieger is the owner of The Travel Connection. Travel is her passion and she’s spent the past 28 years planning dream vacations around the world. Her favorite vacation is the South Pacific with her “toes in the sand.” Reach her by phone at (435) 628-3636, in office at 1363 East 170 South, Suite 202 in St. George, or by email celece@stgeorgetravel.com. Keith Buchhalter is the Public Affairs Specialist for Overton Power District #5. Born and raised in Guatemala City, he moved to Mesquite, NV, in 1999. Keith has held a variety of positions in local organizations. He was part of the Mesquite Chamber of Commerce Board from 2013 - 2017. He is Past-President of the Rotary Club of Mesquite, and he is currently serving as Assistant District Governor for Rotary's District 5300. He also serves as a Trustee for the Mesa View Regional Hospital Board.

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Message from the Mayor I

believe it was Winston Churchill who said, "We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give."

Don't know about you, but I find that during the Holiday Season, I often spend a lot more time in reflection of how my year has been. What have I done during the year to make my little corner of the world a better place to live; for myself, my family, my neighbors, and my community. Everything in our lives is a reflection of the choices we have made. And If you seek a different result, make a different choice. What a wonderful opportunity the Holiday Season gives us to find ways to fill our lives in service to those we love, and to those we may not even know. Have you ever done something for someone, knowing that they will never know the source of that service? How did you feel after that? It truly is a fantastic feeling. Try it if you haven't. You will be a better person for doing that. We may give without loving, but we cannot love without giving.

The true spirit of this season to me would be that we find ways to appreciate all that is given to us. Perhaps this is the time all of us pledge to be more humble and compassionate to all living beings...including ourselves. As we seek that perfect gift for those special people in our lives, may I suggest these: To your enemy, forgiveness. To an opponent, tolerance. To a friend, your heart and loyalty. To every child, a good example. To yourself, respect. To all, charity. This is my holiday wish for you: peace of mind, prosperity throughout the whole year, happiness that multiplies, health for you and yours, fun around every corner, and the energy to fulfill all your dreams. May your holidays be full of the joy you are seeking...

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Mayor Kenneth Neilson Washington City


Contents

FEATURES

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Cover: Illustration by Mandi Miles www.mandimiles.com

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48 Cedar City

The Most Wonderful Time

Golf Fore Kids

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Calendar of Holiday Events Wreaths Across America


Contents

VIEW ON 13 34 FITNESS 44 ORGANIZATION 46 PETS 70 THE ARTS 76 OUTDOORS FINANCE 80 85 MOTIVATION ENERGY 91 92 DESIGN 94 BUSINESS 99 CHARITY

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INSPIRATION Great Holiday Gift Ideas

Fudge or Fitness? You Don't Have to Choose

Organizing Your Holiday

5 Tips & Gift Ideas

Liven Up Your Fall & Winter with Exciting Events at the Center for the Arts at Kayenta

Arrowhead Trail & Roundabouts

Safe Online Holiday Shopping

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The Benefits of Getting Organized

Holiday Lights: Don'ts and Do's

A Design For All Seasons

A Historic Holiday Shopping Experience at Green Gate Village

Growth in Giving

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Moapa Valley M

oapa Valley is truly home to my husband and myself. We love the small-town atmosphere, where our neighbors are our friends and our friends are like family. We relish the peace and tranquility, far away from the noise of the big city. Where we can sit on our porch, watching the beautiful sunsets, listening to the crickets, the tree toads and other wildlife. Where we can relax in the pool or hot tub and stare at the abundance of stars. Moapa Valley has endless possibilities for outdoor activities. We are the gateway to beautiful Lake Mead and the spectacular Valley of Fire State Park, both of which offer something for everyone yearround. We also have numerous trails, perfect for 4-wheeling or horseback riding. We are beyond blessed to call Moapa Valley home. -Lois Hall

St. George F

riendly, inviting, genuine. These are just a few of the great qualities so many of our residents possess; it’s why I love St. George.

I have either lived or worked in St. George for nearly 14 years. Beyond the eye-popping beauty of our natural surroundings and mild winter climate (put away that snow shovel, it has no use here), you will see a community that values family and service. The spirit of St. George’s residents shines bright in many ways, be it through exceptional volunteerism for various events like the St. George Marathon or IRONMAN 70.3, the way citizens value our traditions such as the Dixie Roundup Rodeo or Washington County Fair and how many are willing to help those in need. I love St. George. I have a feeling you do, too. -David Cordero

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Mesquite

W

ith three kids in tow, Ed and I took a leap of faith and moved to a small town in the desert. As Southern California transplants weather certainly was not the reason for us relocating, but clear blue skies, stars for days, low cost of living, and less crime were at the top of the list. We wanted to let our kids run free and enjoy the freedom of a small town. Twentyfour years later and Mesquite is still our home, a perfect place to raise kids and even grandkids. We have met the nicest people and have more friends than we can count. We feel safe in the community and well protected by our local Police and Fire Departments. We are looking forward to many years of retirement in Mesquite. -Darlene Montague

A

Hurricane

s a youth, Hurricane was just another little podunk town that was a pit stop on the way to Lake Powell and one of the last places I ever thought that I would live! Fast forward 30+ years and a lot has changed, I find myself not only living in Hurricane but loving it! A few reasons why: The amazing sunsets. The natural desert landscape. We often see cars pulled off the road with people taking pictures. Well, next time try to see the natural wonder around us, that we take for granted every day, through their eyes. The endless list of outdoor activities. From the world-class golf to the red sands of Sand Mountain. Hiking and mountain bike trails that draw worldwide attention. Miles upon miles of off-road trails with untold scenery around every turn. Quiet hidden serenity from a paddleboard at Quail Creek Reservoir is breathtaking. Hurricane is the true hub of activity for the greater Zion area.

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And finally the people. There are some wonderful down to earth people in Hurricane. Yes, these are just a few of the reasons why I love Hurricane! -Lon Allen

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Grea t

view on INSPIRATION

HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS

By Judi Moreo

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ith the holiday season upon us, our thoughts turn to giving and receiving. It's time to start the list of everyone for whom we must buy gifts. During this busy season, it is easy to lose perspective. Giving can become something we have to do instead of something we do out of love and joy. The fear of offending someone because we forgot to put them on the list sends us to the store to buy generic gifts "just in case" we forgot someone. The holidays become more stressful than joyous. We dread the event and only celebrate when it's over. It's all so complicated. There is another way. It requires a shift in our thinking. What if, instead of worrying about how much we are spending and on whom, we focused on giving kindness, love, joy, and peace to each other? There are many ways to do just that. The best part is that whenever we give the gifts of the heart

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instead of the gifts from the store, we also receive. My friend, Karen Phillips, gave me a wonderful list of Great Holiday Gift Ideas. The gifts on this list are so wonderful that you don't even need to wait for a holiday to deliver them.

THE GIFT OF AFFECTION Be generous with appropriate hugs, kisses, pats on the back and handholds. Let these small actions demonstrate the love you have for family and friends.

THE GIFT OF A CHEERFUL DISPOSITION The easiest way to feel good is to extend a kind word to someone. It's not that hard to smile and say "Hello" or "Thank you."

THE GIFT OF A FAVOR Every day, go out of your way to do something kind for someone.

THE GIFT OF LISTENING BUT...you really must listen. No interrupting, no daydreaming, no planning your response. Listen with your heart. Your gift will tell them, "You're important to me. I care about you."

THE GIFT OF SOLITUDE There are times when we want nothing more than to be left alone. Be sensitive to those times and give the gift of solitude to others when you can tell that it's needed.

THE GIFT OF A COMPLIMENT A simple and sincere "You look great today!" "You did a super job!" or "That was a wonderful meal" can make someone's day.

THE GIFT OF LAUGHTER Clip cartoons. Share articles and funny stories. Make someone smile or laugh today. Your gift will say, "I love to laugh with you. You're special to me!"

THE GIFT OF A WRITTEN NOTE It can be a simple "Thanks for the help" note or a full sonnet. A brief, handwritten note may be remembered for a lifetime, and may even change a life.

THE GREATEST GIFT OF ALL : THE GIFT OF TIME This gift is so important and meaningful to others that you may never know its full impact. The fact of "Just being there" and spending time visiting, sharing, sitting quietly in the house - watching the peaceful look upon the person's face - should warm your heart. This gift will tell the person that in today's busy world, "You are so important and mean so much to me that I will drop everything I have to do to spend my time with you. I love you!" Take the time to make a call, pay a visit or write a note instead of spending your time hunting for parking places at the mall. Remember to give the gift of your smile when you meet people. Share a kind word whenever you can. Allow yourself to be calm and enjoy the beauty of the season. Practice forgiveness and gratitude. Each of us was born with our own unique gifts, share those gifts and look for the gift in others. This year brings the joy back into the holidays. Be generous in giving of yourself. And while you are at it, why not give yourself a special gift. The following exercise will help regain perspective and relieve stress. Take a walk, meditate or find a quiet place to be alone with yourself so you can clear your mind. Let yourself feel. Allow your emotions to come up. Listen to and respect each feeling until you can gently let it go. Remain in a quiet state of mind until there are no more emotions coming up. Let yourself relax in a calm, peaceful state.From this peaceful place, think about everyone on your gift list. Recognize whether you are giving joyfully from the heart or simply doing what you think you are required to do. Give yourself the gift of truth about your feelings. It's the best gift you will get this year. I'm wishing you the happiest of holidays. V

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Photo Credit: Jay Dash Photography

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By Kaylee Pickering

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ith the holiday season before us, there is no better place to be than Cedar City. As snow comes to cover the vibrant backdrop of red rocks, Cedar City comes alive with the spirit of ‘fire and ice’; creating a truly unique winter wonderland for all who visit. Dazzling light displays, joyful celebrations, an opportunity to step back in time for a frontier Christmas, and more await you around every corner.

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Christmas at the Back Porch | Red Acre Farm

Come Home for the Holidays with Christmas at the Homestead The dulcet tones of carolers drift through the air as snow crunches underfoot and families rush from cabin to cabin enjoying peppermint popcorn and searching for Santa Claus among the twinkling holiday lights. Weaving throughout the carriages and carefully curated exhibits of the museum, children will find activities and crafts; adults will find music filling the space as local groups perform, and everyone in attendance will find their holiday spirit in full swing. Christmas trees decorated in traditional hand-crocheted ornaments, carefully spun wool, and one made of telegraph insulators that blink in morse code, are waiting around the park. Keep an eye out for Santa’s Playland in the old Deseret Schoolhouse and meet the man himself in the Historic Hunter House. The week of festivities wraps up with the Holiday Market. Here shoppers will have a chance to immerse themselves in a pleasant holiday shopping experience among artisans and craftsmen. These individuals are hand-selected to provide shoppers with a wide array of choices as well as reimagining the sights, sounds, smells, and ambiance of a pioneer Christmas. Christmas at the Homestead | December 2nd - 6th | 5:30 to 8:00 each evening Holiday Market | December 6th - 11:00 am to 8:00 pm | December 7th - 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

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Feel Like a Kid Again at the Annual Storybook Parade Beloved childhood characters come to life in the annual Storybook Cavalcade Parade on Main Street in Cedar City. See the woman who lives in a shoe, a snow flurry or two from everyone’s favorite snow queen, and beloved superheroes as they welcome the holiday season in style. Now in its second decade, the parade features dozens of floats, marching bands, hundreds of costumed characters, and Santa! Watch the parade November 2nd at 2:00 pm from 400 South to 200 North Main Street Dressed in their Christmas Best The annual Holiday Tree Jubilee is a must-see for any holiday adventure in Cedar City. For 36 years, the Holiday Tree Jubilee has been the perfect way to kick off the holiday season. Wander through trees donated and decorated by local businesses, organizations, and individuals while bidding on any that catch the eye. This event is a great way to enjoy time together and visit Santa Claus while supporting a great cause. All proceeds from donated trees create revenue for the annual Shop With a Cop event. Find your favorite at The Barn at Cedar Meadows | November 30 | 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm Christmas in the Country From a holiday bazaar to the official lighting ceremony and Santa Claus, enjoy two days of celebrations to unwrap the magic of Christmas. Christmas in the Country is a holiday staple for families throughout Iron County as they gather in the “Mother Town of Southern Utah”, Parowan. With more than 65 vendors this interfaith celebration has something for everyone. Iron County FairGrounds, Parowan UT | November 29th and 30th | 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

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Brian Head tubing | Photo Credit: Arika Bauer

An Unparalleled Holiday Getaway Enjoy a white Christmas nestled among the Greatest Snow on Earth™ at Brian Head Resort. Rent a cozy cabin with an incredible view of glistening ski slopes before an incredible red rock background. At over 10,000 feet the snow here is just about perfect and there is plenty of it! Grab your board and hit the slopes or brace yourself for a fast downhill race on the tubing hill. On weekends, take advantage of the night tubing option for an unbelievable view of the stars and keep a close eye on their calendar of events for additional holiday activities including the Torchlight Parade and fireworks on New Year’s Eve. The Perfect Pine This holiday season, spend a day with the family playing in the snow, drinking hot cocoa, and adventuring out into Dixie National Forest in search of the perfect Christmas tree. Whether the tree cutting is already a household tradition, or this year marks the start of a new one, it is a great way to get outside, explore our backyard, and spend time connecting with family. For a truly unique experience that your family will treasure for years to come, rent snowmobiles or snowshoes and experience the forest in a new way. V Happy Holidays from all of us at Visit Cedar City Brian Head! For more information on holiday activities, exploring the national parks in the off-season, and so much more, head over to www.visitcedarcity.com.

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The Spirit of

Gratitude

Some of the things the early settlers were grateful for... By Elspeth Kuta | Virgin Valley Heritage Museum

I

t's that time of year when we start to reflect on how fast the year has gone by and what we have to look forward to. With so little, the early settlers of the Valley were a spunky bunch and maintained a positive outlook on life. Here are a few images that tell their story and the things they were grateful for:

Sports The local communities were always competing with each other and loved the opportunity to participate in sports.

The Valley was grateful for all of the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) workers that helped with flood retention in the Valley. Shown left: CCC foreman J.L.Pulsipher.

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The rock church 1890s in Bunkerville. The building was multi-purpose, church, school, and events all happened here.

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PRODUCTIVE LAND

MARRIAGE & FAMILIES

This is the Rebers in a Pomegranate grove

Charles and Lorena Hardy on their wedding day in 1891.

SOCIALIZING was part of life mostly done at church activities.

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HORSES, TRANSPORTATION AND A PLACE TO SHOP Hughes General Store

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Bridge Day 1921 Now the people of the Valley could cross from one side of the river to the other without fear of quicksand or flood.


Education Schooling was always a high priority.

The settlers of the area loved life and celebrated every opportunity to express gratitude; especially for births, marriages, and family achievements. They accepted challenges with grace and determination, relying upon their faith and courage to overcome obstacles. As a result, they have laid a solid foundation for us to enjoy today. We at the museum wish everybody all the best for the Holiday Season and New Year. V

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By Lisa Larson

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hen it comes to the holidays, it’s important to remember what matters most. Whether your priorities include spending time with your family, maintaining traditions, making new memories or just enjoying the spirit of the season - Tuacahn’s Christmas in the Canyon has what you’re looking for. “This is Tuacahn’s Christmas card to the community and a way to say ‘thank you’ for supporting us all year,” says Kevin Smith, Tuacahn CEO. With a glow that makes Tuacahn’s already impressive red rock canyon even more beautiful, more than 250,000 twinkling lights are just the beginning of the festivities planned this year. All the classic Christmas in the Canyon favorites are on the docket, including train rides on Old Salty, a visit from Santa Claus, hot chocolate, beautiful music and, since it is better to give than to receive, some fantastic shopping opportunities. “The Tuacahn Gift Gallery is going to be an experience in and of itself,” Smith says.

Smith is particularly excited about some of the creatively decorated trees planned for the interior of the Gift Gallery. And the fact that when you work up an appetite shopping, you can pop over to the Tuacahn Café for delicious soups, salads, and sandwiches. “We’ll have some holiday soups, holiday desserts and of course our signature hot chocolate,” Smith says. Just outside the wall of windows in the Tuacahn Café, the very heart of the Christmas season — a live reenactment of the nativity — unfolds each Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Monday evening from Nov. 29 to Dec. 23. Put on by an all-volunteer cast and enhanced by the kinds of high-quality sets, costumes, and music you’d expect from Tuacahn, this centerpiece of the Christmas in the Canyon event is a family tradition for many people in the community. “Some of the people who volunteer as the cast for the nativity have been doing it for so many years, they’re becoming trained pros,” Smith says. “Others are brand new to the show. It’s really fun to see both.”

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But, if you’re looking for high-quality professional theater, of course, Tuacahn offers that too. ‘Elf the Musical’ It’s a story that has quickly become a favorite Christmas tale — a film that is watched and re-watched alongside classics like It’s a Wonderful Life and A Christmas Story. But seeing Elf the Musical come to life on stage is an experience you simply have to add to your holiday plans. Directed by Peggy Hickey — who amazed audiences with this summer’s production of A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder — the story behind Elf the Musical retains much of the storyline from the 2003 film Elf featuring Will Ferrell. Buddy, an orphan child, crawls into Santa’s open sack one Christmas Eve and is accidentally transported to the North Pole, where he is raised as an elf. Of course, time and Buddy’s human growth patterns quickly highlight his physical differences and ultimately lead to Buddy asking questions about his parentage. With Santa’s permission, he embarks on a journey to the distant land of New York City, to find his birth father and his true identity, all the while spreading Christmas cheer. “It’s really a charming, funny show,” Hickey says.

That fact came as a bit of a surprise to Hickey herself. Prior to her first experience directing this show, Hickey says she was a bit cynical about the project. But just like the cynical characters that eventually find their hearts softening to the magic of the message, Hickey says once she was exposed to the production she became enchanted by it. “It was a complete surprise to me how well crafted it is,” she says. “It’s shockingly uplifting for any bah humbuggers out there.” Elf the Musical takes place beginning Nov. 29 inside the newly renovated indoor Hafen Theater. Tickets start at just $29. For more information on show dates and times, log onto www.tuacahn.org or call 435-652-3300. “Part of our mission is to be a family-friendly entertainment facility,” Smith says. “Christmas in the Canyon and all that it offers is a great capstone to our year.” Christmas in the Canyon opens Nov. 29 and runs Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Monday through Dec. 23. Tickets to the live nativity are $3 and can be purchased in advance online. For more information log onto www.tuacahn.org. V

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By Kim Smith

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ow does one know it's almost Christmas in Southern Utah? Just walk through the doors of Sell It Again Sally Consignment Store and discover the lit trees, vast assortment of ornaments, and Christmas Villages on display. Trees and decorations are accepted beginning in late September. Every year for the past 10 years, the ladies at Sell It Again Sally have put on their elf hats and welcomed thousands of Holiday shoppers. Something new, gently used, and in great condition comes through the doors every day. One never knows what grandma and grandpa brought with them from their home of 40 years on the east coast!

The newly married couple looking for their first holiday decorations or the family looking for a change and not wanting to break the bank will be delighted at the items that were once grandma's treasures but are now looking for a new home. Just about any furniture or home decor you may need or want can be found at Sell It Again Sally Consignment store. Melissa and Kim, along with their elves have been known to put up a 6-foot tree, fully decorated with lights within an hour; they sell the same tree, reverse the process, and start all over on a new tree minutes later. Themed trees have been all the rage, and they so enjoy putting together

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beautiful trees with a twist or two. Sometimes they use ideas from the culture and traditions of the local southwest desert people. Customers have been thrilled to find variety ranging from traditional evergreen fir trees with colorful lights and every imaginable ornament, to a hot pink tabletop tree with feathers! Sell It Again Sally is the one-stop shopping place for handmade stockings and an ever-changing selection of ornaments. Oh, and don't forget the yard decorations; you can find treasures like Santa in his sleigh with all his reindeer; as well as a family of snow people. The holidays bring family and friends together, and having your home filled with festive decorations as well as beautiful furniture is so inviting. Just picture a gently used, but new-to-your home dining room table that will seat your entire family. Many of the dining room sets have matching sideboards and buffets to display and serve delicious holiday meals. From the formal front room to the dining room and family room, Sell It Again Sally has it all: Modern, Traditional, South Western, Shabby Chic, and everything in-between.

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Come and walk through Sally's wonderland to find grandpa's rocking chair, the new-to-you curio cabinet for all your favorite knick-knacks, and that shabby sleek dresser. Our store is filled with all the furniture and home decor that anyone could want. Should you be looking to add to your beloved collection of Snow babies, hand-blown glass ornaments or vintage ornaments, just ask to be put into the "Wish Book". Over the years we have seen just about everything and the prices are very reasonable. Looking for that special gift, but need to adhere to a budget? We have gifts starting from $5.00 and also accept Visa, Master Card, checks and cash. Delivery and pick up's can be arranged by appointment for an hourly rate. The Holidays bring family and friends together, let Sell It Again Sally Consignment Store help with the decorating, and let the festivities begin. Melissa and Kim wish you Happy Holidays! V Sell It Again Sally Consignment store is located at 1397 W. Sunset Blvd., St George, Utah 84770 just across from Taco Bell. They welcome new consignees by appointment. Please call 435-275-0006.

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FUDGE or FITNESS?

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You Don't Have to Choose By Ashley Centers

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appy Holidays Readers! This season is my absolute favorite. Thanksgiving is a production in our home, with Mama and I cooking for days to feed the 20 or more who will come to our house for dinner. I absolutely adore the lights and music of Christmas. Every year 'White Christmas' is on the watchlist as well as 'Meet Me In St Louis' to sing along with Judy Garland to 'Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas'. New Year’s Eve we always do a traditional dinner and ring in the New Year. To say I LOVE the holidays is a major understatement! This time of year is amazing but also difficult to navigate for those of us with health and fitness goals. I'll tell you from experience when I see the mouthwatering foods my family brings for Thanksgiving. The cookies my aunt sends at Christmas, or better yet the 3lbs of fudge my 85 year old Mamaw makes just for me. It can be hard to remember all the hard work I put into my health and fitness and just dig in a little too much. In the back of my mind, I start to feel guilty, little by little, until finally, I would say to myself, "ok, after the New Year, I'll get back on track." And usually that was true, but here is what I've learned over the last few years of really committing to my wellness. I don't have to feel guilty and I don't have to let it needle me into not enjoying the holidays the way I ought to, for the reasons I ought to, like spending much needed time with my loved ones. I simply have to select a little less of the things I want to eat at the family dinner, put a limit on how many of Aunt Jane's cookies I can eat in a day, and limit myself to one piece of Mammaw Annie’s Fudge per sitting. Easy. Guilt Assuaged. I'm not compromising what I want, simply modifying it to a manageable level. Another thing I have learned is to not allow the busyness of the holidays to get in the way of my routine. If I'm traveling, I have exercises prepared in short intervals that I can do with little to no space or equipment. If you have access to a fitness facility or equipment, keep on your routine or modify or shorten it for any time constraints you have, or make it more fun by inviting some of your family and making it a challenge you can all laugh about over dinner. Maybe go down to the park and shoot hoops, or toss the football around the yard. The holidays don't have to be a detriment to your health and fitness, so long as you make wiser, healthier choices during them. I know the struggle of not wanting to offend your cousin who made a third of the pumpkin pie's by not trying a piece to compare to the other two, but being honest and telling cousin so-and-so why you’re not digging in for your second or third slice is a better option than having to burn off 300 extra calories later.

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Yes, these choices are hard but in hindsight, is it harder than the effort you have put in the entire year to get to where your pants zip easily every time? Or that favorite blouse you've been waiting to wear finally fits like you want it to? The easy answer here is NO. NO, it's not harder to be honest with your family and yourself and say, “I have limitations because I'm working on being a healthier me all the time, and not even Mammaw Annie’s fudge is coming between me and my goals and the work I’m putting into them.” THE SMALLEST CHOICES YOU MAKE WILL SHOW UP FOR YOU IN THE BIGGEST WAYS. So how do we maintain wellness during this time of year? Here are a few ideas to help... 1. WATER Drink lots of water especially before sitting down to any big meals. Have a glass with your meal so you feel full faster and try not to give in to the sugar-loaded holiday beverages as they add tons of calories to your intake. 2. CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM IN THE KITCHEN If you are the one cooking for the holidays, you DO NOT, I repeat, you DO NOT have to sample every dish made 13 times before it gets to the table. 3. HAVE A PLAN Here are a few workout ideas: IF YOU HAVE NO EQUIPMENT, try a couple of 5-minute circuits with as many reps as possible of: Air Squats Wall or Counter Push-Ups High Knees or Step-ups, IF YOU HAVE SOME EQUIPMENT available try: band standing wide rows dumbbell overhead presses dumbbell lunges. As many reps as possible (AMRAP for short) workouts are a great way to get a heart and body pumping in a short amount of time, and can typically burn as many calories as your regular slower-paced workout. And the above-mentioned exercises hit all of our least favorite "problem areas". 4. ULTIMATELY ENJOY YOURSELF - BUT SET PARAMETERS. You can have everything you want in moderation. Trust me. It will make for a much happier 2020 when your resolution doesn't have to be to lose the 10 extra pounds you gained during the holidays! V Ashley Centers is the General Manager at Anytime Fitness, Mesquite, Nevada. Her fitness background comes mostly as a competitive Powerlifting Champion. She enjoys helping her members on their own health and fitness journeys! Ashley can be reached at 702-346-3121.

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Junior Golf is Growing in Mesquite By Marsha Sherwood

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irgin Valley Junior Golf reached a record number of 110 members this season. Junior golf also had 2 of the youngest members to ever receive the player of the year award. 9-year-old Palynn Zarndt for the girls division and 11-year-old Viktor Cu for the boys division took home the honor for the Players of the Year. To earn this award, players earn points for attendance to the clinics, a rules test, tournament participation, and tournament wins. The VVJGA summer program consists of 9-nine one hour instruction clinics, directed by Oasis golf pro Tom Winchester at the CasaBlanca Golf Course. Helping with instruction are head pros and assistants from Conestoga, Oasis, and Falcon Ridge Golf Courses. Following the clinics, we start off with our Night Golf event that is held at the Palms and sponsored by Mesquite Tile & Flooring. Six tournaments follow every Tuesday held at Conestoga, Falcon Ridge, Oasis Canyons, CasaBlanca, Oasis Palmer, and the Palms golf courses.

Parents willing to come and drive our juniors make the event run much smoother and easier to tolerate in Mesquite's extreme heat. We end the summer season with an awards banquet hosted at Conestoga and sponsored by Golf Mesquite. This season the junior's participated in a fundraiser selling candy and popcorn provided by Danielle's Chocolates. Top sellers were Donovan Gonzales, who sold over 18 packets; followed by brothers Dane and Gray Martino. Virgin Valley Junior Golf program is available to everyone age six to eighteen. We provide golf clubs for those who do not have them, with many sets that were donated and cut down to size for the kids. A new scholarship program is in place, with a goal to award two youth per year for those that have gone through our program. Due to the great support we get from our local businesses, we are able to keep the cost at a minimum. Laura Petersen was brought

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on board this year to help find sponsors and support for our organization. Helping with our program and sponsoring juniors this year was Eagles Landing, Bob Ault of ERA, City of Mesquite, City Wide Real Estate, Premier Properties, Deep Roots Harvest, Mesquite Ford, Hughes General Contractors, Connie Pease, The Nevada Open, David Bennett of Fidelity, The Elks Lodge, George Rapson, Todd Petersen of Keller Williams and Stateline Casino. Along with these sponsors, several local businesses donated gifts for our banquet: Mesquite Gaming, The Eureka Hotel, Felisha Baeza of The View, Baja Imports, Dr. Blazzard DDS, Mesa View Hospital, Dr. Harris DDS, Star Nails, Desert Oasis Spa, The Perfume Store, Coyote Springs, Kelle Prisberry and Debra Shaw. Virgin Valley Junior Golf’s goal is to teach our youth the game of golf. This includes not just how to play but it teaches the integrity of the game. We feel that golf is a big part of Mesquite's future and hope that our program continues to grow. V If you are interested in donating or would like to join the program, contact Marsha Sherwood, Laura Petersen or Tom Winchester at the CasaBlanca or Palms Golf course 702-346-4067 or 702-346-6764.

Above: Viktor Cu Below: Palynn Zarndt

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Holida ys the Mesquite Police Department Way By Kimberly Otero

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his holiday season is expected to be warm and wonderful thanks to our residents who show tremendous support for our winter programs. We start off our holiday season by designing our float entry for the City’s annual Parade of Lights which invites friendly competition among the entries through a canned food drive. We absolutely love this event which provides a valuable service to those in need and would appreciate donations of newly purchased canned food to support our cause. Donations can be made between now and December 5th at the police department located at 695 Mayan Circle. We look forward to December when residents and businesses who participate in Project Blue Light create a glow of blue throughout the month in our community. The department invites all who would like to participate to place a blue light or any expression of blue on your home or business in support of law enforcement and in remembrance of those officers who have lost their lives in service to their community. Feel free to send us a picture of your blue lights through Facebook messenger at Mesquite NV Police or through our email at policerecords@mesquitenv.gov. The generosity of the community is evident in their support of our Shop with a Cop program. This allows our officers to provide a bright Christmas for 60-80 elementary school children. Donations allow officers to spend one on one time building relationships with the students while spending the morning shopping for Christmas presents. We

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appreciate Elks Lodge #2811 and thank them for their annual participation in providing lunch for the officers and students as a way to wrap up the morning activities. Donations to the program are accepted through December 21st at the police department located at 695 Mayan Circle. The Mesquite Police Department wishes your holiday season to be merry and bright. While no one expects unfortunate things to happen they occasionally do. With that in mind Sgt. Wyatt Oliver would like to offer the following holiday safety tips: While out shopping stay alert and be aware of your surroundings. Try not to let your guard down because you are in a hurry, and remember not to set your wallet or purse inside of your shopping cart. When out shopping, only take the amount of cash you expect you will need for that trip, leaving most of your cash at home or in the bank. Would-be thieves really like to watch parking lots of shopping centers during the holidays. They will watch for people who leave new merchandise in plain view inside a vehicle and walk away without locking the doors. If you do need to leave merchandise inside of your vehicle while you continue shopping, try to lock the merchandise in a trunk, or hidden under other items so it is out of sight of people walking by your vehicle. Try to park in a spot that is well lit and close to the store. The chances of your car being stolen or burglarized are reduced if you simply lock the doors and keep the windows up. Safeguarding your car

La Sagrada | Photo: Uniworld Boutique River Cruises

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and valuables can be summed up in three simple words: LOCK your car, TAKE your keys with you, and HIDE the valuables in your car. We also want our community to be informed in case of emergencies such as flooding and prolonged police activity. The Mesquite Police Department has the ability to send out emergency alert text messages and we would like to send one to you. Signing up is simple. Send a text to 888-777 and put 89027 in the message. You will receive a return message acknowledging that you have signed up for emergency alerts. You will know when an emergency alert is from us when you see Mesquite PD as part of the message. We count on our partnership with the community to keep our citizens safe. As always, if you see something that does not feel right, say something. Our nonemergency line is available 24/7 at 702-346-6911. V

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view on ORGANIZATION

O rganizing You r Holiday By Sydnee Hatfield

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an you believe it’s the holiday season?! This year has just flown by, and I would love to share my tips and tricks for avoiding the stress that can sometimes accompany us during the holidays. Keep one phrase in mind, any time you are out shopping or while you’re planning out any holiday activities, “less is more.” We tend to go all out for the holidays and then end up frazzled, overwhelmed and exhausted. Our time is precious, and toward the end of the year that time runs away from us as fast as it can. If we keep things minimal and learn to prioritize the way we spend our time, we may end up with more of it. We usually know well in advance if our children, family, church or businesses have holiday events that we want to attend. Once we know the details of the events, we can add them to our calendar and then work backwards. Planning out our calendar creates flexibility and keeps us aware of what’s

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coming. When we work backward, we can get more done, and it gives us a deadline that will keep us on track. Before you go gift shopping, set out specific time frames and tasks to minimize distractions. Prepare a list of who you are buying gifts for, and precisely what you plan on getting them. Buy with intention, quality over quantity. For loved ones, perhaps buying an experience or adventure together would be a better use of your money (rather than just getting a typical gift), like having a yummy meal at their favorite place, theater tickets to a show they’ve always wanted to see, skydiving, getting a massage, or taking a trip somewhere unique. Along with shopping for gifts, if you are going to host a holiday party, or plan on bringing any treats or side dishes to an event, block off enough time for gathering supplies as well as time to cook or prepare those dishes.


Knowing that the big events and plans are scheduled avoids the hassle when last-minute things show up --because they will show up. I can just quickly check my calendar and move things around as needed, instead of dropping everything and wondering how I will be able to get it all done. As for holiday décor, less is still more. Our homes can be overcome with holiday decorations that make us look around and wonder, “has the store thrown-up decorations on every square inch in here?” Before you start setting up the house with decorations let's go through everything and make sure we keep only what we love and will use. Start in small batches by gathering up all the decorations you have for the approaching holiday and sort into like things, you may find that you have duplicates. Let go of (donate) things you no longer love and trash any broken or beyond repair items. Don’t keep things because you feel guilty getting rid of it, because your grandma's best friend made it, or the little kid down the street. They gave the item to you, and you are free to give it away if it doesn’t bring you happiness. Do you really want to make space, pack and unpack it every year? Save yourself the time and stress by just letting it go. We should focus our décor on a few key areas in our homes like the entryway and family room, or wherever your family spends the most time. This way we will be able to appreciate each unique piece. It also creates a quicker setup and takedown when the holiday is over. Once the holidays have passed, which will be in the blink of an eye, its time to pack up and store all these fun things again! Much like before the decoration setup in our house we should group things into like items and pack accordingly. With fragile round glass ornaments, we can store them in plastic apple containers, or smaller ones into reusable egg cartons. If any light bulbs burn out, replace them before storing them, or if they go out completely you can recycle them at retailers like Home Depot, Walmart or ACE Hardware (check with the store). I store each strand of lights in its own gallon, or two-gallon plastic bags to prevent tangling. Store all the items you plan to keep in watertight bins or clear plastic containers. Label so things are easily identified and keep all the items in the same location if possible. Color coding the containers or labels also makes things very clear for the next year. Use large bins for light items like pillows, linens or gift wrap, and small bins for heavy items like holiday lights. Keep in mind, that any prep work you do before storing things this year, will save you time unpacking next year. V I hope these tips and tricks help save you a few minutes of breathing room this holiday season. If you have any organizing questions, please feel free to call me at (702) 715-0564 or shoot me an email at Organizedparadise@outlook.com. I will see you in the spring! Happy Holidays from Organized Paradise!

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Tips H Gift Ideas

to Bring Holiday Cheer to Pets and Pet Lovers By Anita DeLelles

1.For the Dogs in your Life An interactive toy to stimulate and entertain. One idea is a chew toy by SteelDog. It looks like your typical stuffed dog toy, coming in various animal shapes. But it has no stuffing. Instead, there’s a tennis ball hidden inside! With no stuffing, it’s a safe alternative to cheaply constructed toys, durable and interactive. Your dog, no matter what size, will enjoy the crinkle and (eventually) the ball hidden inside.

2. For the Cat-Lovers

What could be more fun than a paper bag for a cat? Any cat parents will tell you, they love to play and hide inside. This clever new product is a paper bag designed just for cats! They are made of heavy-weight paper, have holes cut in the sides for your cats to reach in or out, and have bright colors with funny sayings printed on them, they are fun, stylish and allow cats to play hide and seek, or pounce and play.

3. For Pet-loving Humans What about a beautiful pet portrait? Whether it’s a photo or painting, a portrait is a lasting keepsake for pet-parents. Schedule a time to take the pet to a pet photographer or commission a painting from a local artist before the holidays. Or, give a gift certificate that can be used at a future date. Professional photos can also be turned into beautiful canvas prints, pillows, or mugs. This gift will be treasured forever. ||VIEW VIEWON ONMAGAZINE MAGAZINE|| Nov/Dec Nov/Dec 2019 2019


4. For your Local Animal Shelter or Rescue Sanctuary Consider the gift of time. Volunteering at a local rescue or shelter is always welcomed. Spending just a little time can help bring comfort and reassurance to a frightened lonely pet. This also gives the regular care-givers and volunteers a little time to spend with their pet companions at home, allowing them to take a break from the very emotional work they do every day.

5. For the Service Providers Don’t forget the pet sitters, care-givers, vets, groomers, etc.. in your pet’s life. These professionals grow to love each and every pet they meet as if they were their own. A small gift or card is a great gesture to show your appreciation at holiday time. And one more thing: Resist the temptation to give a pet as a gift. Every pet is a commitment and responsibility for love and care over the pet’s entire life. This should be a well thoughtout decision by the one who will be responsible. Give instead the support things they may need if they do get that puppy, kitten or any other critter. Food, training classes, and toys are all thoughtful gifts. Once a friend or family member has made a commitment to care for a new pet, offer to choose that pet together. Check rescues and work with reputable breeders for a dog or cat to suit their lifestyle. Consider the many shelter animals desperately waiting for a new, forever home instead of purchasing a pet from a pet store. You may be unwittingly supporting inhumane breeding facilities. Talk to a professional in the pet industry for more information on holiday ideas. You’ll find many of the products and services mentioned at WOOF! Wellness Center. Above all, be informed and enjoy the holidays! V

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Golf F re Kids 2019

15th Annual Event By Mindee West

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f all the wonderful charity golf events held in Mesquite, possibly one of the most anticipated is the annual Golf Fore Kids Tournament. Every year golfers assemble at four local courses and bring toys, bikes, balls, scooters, dolls and art supplies to donate to local children. Trailers are filled to the brim, Santa’s helpers work overtime, and because of the generosity of our local citizens, hundreds of kids will smile a little brighter this Christmas season.

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This year marks the 15th Annual Golf Fore Kids Event. As usual, Falcon Ridge, Palms, Canyons, and Conestoga golf courses have graciously donated their course for the day. Golfers will tee off at 9 a.m. and be treated to lunch afterward at the CasaBlanca event tent. There will be prizes for closest to the pins, winning teams, and a large raffle that never disappoints. Hole sponsorships are available for $50 for one course or $150 for all four courses. The individual or company name and any other message requested will be printed on a sign and posted on a tee box for all golfers to see. And like everything else, 100% of the funds go directly to the kids. If you wish to sign up for a sponsorship you can do so online by going to www.golfforekidsnv.org or by calling Karen Fielding at 702-378-9964. Tee time reservations will only be taken online. If you wish to play in the event you can sign up by going to www. golfforekidsnv.org. The site will open October 1st and times will fill up quickly, so don’t wait too long to reserve your spot. You can make your selection of course, but it is on a first come – first serve basis. Thank you to all the wonderful people who have made this event a success! Golf Fore Kids has raised almost $576,000 in cash and toys for local children in our community. What started as a small tournament at one course has grown into a huge event with 580 golfers, dozens of volunteers, trailers full of toys, and hundreds of happy children. Thank you for your continued generosity and let’s make this the best year ever! V Tournament Date: Thursday, December 12, 2019 – 9:00 a.m. Shotgun Golf Locations: Falcon Ridge, Palms, Canyons & Conestoga Golf Courses Lunch Location: CasaBlanca Event Tent Entry Fee: Minimum of $50 unwrapped toy(s) Hole Sponsorship: $50 for one course or $150 for all 4 courses Sign up at www.golfforekidsnv.org starting Oct 1st.

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Prepare Your Home for the Holidays with SUU Community Education

By Susie Knudsen | Photos courtesy of SUU Community Education

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et Southern Utah University’s Community Education program help you prepare your home for the approaching holiday season with classes in home decor, entertaining, cooking and crafting handmade gifts for friends and loved ones. Learn about creating an inviting atmosphere that conveys warmth, comfort, and emotions important to you and your family during “The Art of Making a Home” taught by instructor Nicole Funderburk on November 5.

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A master hobbyist at home decor and entertaining, Funderburk believes in crafting an environment that conveys intended emotions. When preparing to invite guests for dinner, she enjoys taking the time to make the event a little bit special. “Really, when we take the time to set up our home for others, we are treating ourselves as well.”

A hand-crafted piece of art can often be appreciated more than gifts that money can buy. In the “Alcohol Ink Painting” class create unique artwork to take home or give to someone you care about. Learn blending, highlighting and layering skills to start additional projects at home. With ease of application, alcohol ink is a choice medium for beginning and experienced artists.

Funderburk says she also strongly believes in vulnerability. “There is something so powerful about breaking bread together and for some reason, we tend to put it off because our home isn’t perfect, or the timing isn’t perfect,” she says. “It’s not all about being perfect, it’s about connecting.”

Give the gift of learning this holiday season. Gift certificates are available for SUU Community Education classes. Help your friends or loved ones make time for themselves to develop a talent and learn something new. V

Spice up your holiday cooking with “Meet the Chef” taught at Southwest Tech’s demonstration labs on November 6. This fun, favorite class features a local chef who will instruct on how to prepare a favorite dish along with helpful tips and tricks in the kitchen. Get creative while checking items off your Christmas gift list with a “Soap Making” class on November 4 or an “Alcohol Ink Painting” class on November 16. Learn from an experienced soap-maker about how good the gentleness of handmade soap is for your skin. Explore scents and possible ingredients while making a one-pound batch to take home and enjoy yourself, or wrap to give as thoughtful gifts.

The SUU Community Education program offers classes, workshops, and events for the purpose of generating fun, cultural, educational opportunities for those who love to learn. While increasing participant knowledge, programs are designed to provide non-credit experiences for community members wishing to develop new hobbies, skills, and areas of personal interest. Taught by local experts, more than 1,300 participants have engaged in SUU Community Education offerings since the program’s launch in 2018. To register for classes visit suu.edu/wise or call SUU Community Education at (435) 865-8259. For those who need assistance enrolling in a class, drop by the SUU Alumni House at 351 W. University Boulevard, Cedar City, Utah.

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Southern Utah By Karter C. Poole

TURKEY TROT 5K FUN RUN| St. George November 16 | 9:30am Race Fee: $5 + 5 cans of food This fun run 5K is geared toward raising food for the Utah food bank. This will not be an official timed race and there will not be race results available. For more information and to register online visit www.sgcity.org/sportsandrecreation/races. SEEGMILLER FARM HARVEST FESTIVAL | St. George November 16 | 10:30am - 1 pm Free Admission Featuring pioneer games, dancing, a Farmer's Market, pie-eating contest, and more. The Hela Seegmiller Historic Farm is located at 2592 S 3000 East, St. George, Utah. Tours of Seegmiller Farm will also be available.

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JUBILEE OF TREES | St. George November 21-25 | 10am - 8pm* Cost: $5 Adult - $1 Child (15 & under) General Admission The Jubilee of Trees is a holiday fundraising event that benefits advancing neuroscience services at Intermountain Dixie Regional Medical Center. Ring in the holiday season by attending this communityloved tradition. There will be beautifully decorated trees, entertainment, special events including a Teddy Bear Picnic, Fashion Show, Gala, and more. *Please note that general admission hours will end at 4:00 pm on Friday for the Gala Dinner & Auction. For more information and to buy tickets to the special events, visit: DixieRegional.org/JubileeofTrees ZION JOY TO THE WORLD | Springdale Various events happening throughout the season. Visit www.springdaletown.com for a complete listing of events.


HOLIDAY INN | St. George November 21 - December 21 | 7:30pm Cost: $18-$22 Presented by St. George Musical Theater, this special holiday musical is a theatrical presentation of the White Christmas movie from the fifties. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.sgmusicaltheater.com. A CHRISTMAS CAROL | St. George November 27 - December 28 | 7pm Cost: $17-$23 Presented by Brigham’s Playhouse, this adaptation of the classic "A Christmas Carol" is a new style and modern-day production written by executive producer and owner Jamie Young with original music written by Taylor Williams. A Christmas Carol is about Everett "Rett" B. Blithe, a crotchety man that refuses to see the good in anything but money. He transforms throughout the show as he travels through his Christmases past, present, and future with Marley, his former business partner. Ages 5 and up welcomed. For More information and to purchase tickets, visit www.brighamsplayhouse.com. TUACHAN’S CHRISTMAS IN THE CANYON | Ivins November 29 - December 23 | 6pm - 8:30pm Cost: See individual events below Come celebrate Christmas at Tuacahn this holiday season! With over 250,000 twinkling lights, synthetic ice skating, a live nativity show, train rides, and a visit with Santa Claus, you don’t want to miss Tuacahn’s Christmas in the Canyon event! Live Nativity | Shows at 7pm & 8pm Cost: $3 individual or $20 family This 20-minute telling of the birth of the Christ child is sure to become a family tradition. Updated with new music and narration, live animals, and acting by volunteer groups, there is no better reminder of the true meaning of Christmas! Presented in our outdoor amphitheatre. Old Salty Train | 6pm - 8:30pm Cost: $2 per person Take a train ride through the majestic red rocks of Padre Canyon on the Old Salty Train, provided by Ruby’s Inn. Santa Claus | 6pm - 8: 30pm Free Come visit and take a photo with Santa on our plaza! Admission is free to visit Tuacahn and enjoy the lights, music, and ambiance of the holiday season during Christmas in the Canyon! It's Tuacahn's way of saying "thank you" to the community for its support and to remind us all of the true meaning of Christmas. The Cafe at Tuachan will be open for dinner and treats! Visit www.tuachan.org for more information and to purchase tickets.

CENTER FOR THE ARTS AT KAYENTA | Ivins There are many wonderful holiday shows and events happening at the Center for the Arts at Kayenta this year. Please read their article in our View On the Arts section. For more information and to buy tickets visit www.kayentaarts.com.

DICKENS CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL | St. George December 4-7 | 10am - 9pm Cost: $7 Adult - $5 Child The Dickens' Festival is not just another craft show, but a unique and unusual entertainment and shopping experience. Olde English shops, hundreds of period costumes, fortune tellers, orphans, royalty, and the REAL Father Christmas all combine to offer our guests a Christmas experience like no other! Event held at the Dixie Convention Center, 1835 Convention Center Drive, St. George, Utah. HOLIDAY SOCIAL AT TONAQUINT | St. George December 7 | 11am - 12:30pm Cost: $ Detailed below Ho-Ho-Ho. The Tonaquint Nature Center is celebrating the holidays early with the Grinch. Kids and families are invited to join us for games, holiday crafts, treats, and visit with the Grinch. Crafts are $1 each, decorate-your-own cookies for 50 cents each, popcorn is 25 cents per bag. If you want to have a picture taken with the Grinch and have us print it out it is only $1.50. Tonaquint Nature Center is located at 1851 S Dixie Drive, St. George, Utah. For more information call 435-627-4590.

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HANDEL’S MESSIAH | St. George SOUTHWEST SYMPHONY WITH LIETOVOICES! December 8 & 9 | 7:30pm Cost: $8-$12 The Messiah of all Messiahs! The Southwest Symphony’s Messiah is a must-see, must-hear holiday event. Every bar of Handel’s greatest masterpiece — whether upon the first encounter or at a yearly ritual — speaks to us with passion, beauty, spirituality, and joy. A Baroque-era oratorio, Messiah, is a Southern Utah holiday tradition and worldwide favorite. LietoVoices! will join the Southwest Symphony and featured soloists to present selections such as “For Unto Us a Child is Born,” “Glory to God” and the venerated “Hallelujah Chorus.” Performances are held at the Cox Performing Arts Center, Dixie State University Campus, 325 S 700 East, St. George, UT. For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.swsutah.org. KONY COINS FOR KIDS | Washington County Dec 17 | 5pm | Shop - Walmart on Telegraph Dec 18 | 8am | Wrap - Dixie Convention Center Dec 19 | 4pm | Deliver - Dixie Convention Center Donations welcomed! Dedicated to the goal of providing Christmas for disadvantaged children in the Washington County area of Southern Utah, KONY Coins for Kids is one of the greatest ways to experience the true meaning of Christmas; that of giving. Find out how you can get into the spirit of the season by reading about the project in our Spotlight article and by visiting their website at www.coinsforkids.net.

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CHRISTMAS ON BROADWAY | St. George December 18 - 23 | 7:30pm* Cost: $13-$15 A Stage Door favorite holiday production, Christmas On Broadway will now Include the magical production of Elf Jr. and a visit from Santa. A joy for the whole family. *Saturday Matinee, Dec 21 at 2:00 pm. Performances held at The Electric Theater, 68 E Tabernacle, St. George, Utah. For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.thestagedoortheater.com. CHANUKAH MENORAH LIGHTING | St. George December 22-30 Free Admission The Jewish presence in St. George in past years has been virtually non-existent, but as our general population grows all populations grow. Last year saw our first ever Menorah lighting in the town square where such events traditionally should take place. Several hundred people attended and Mayor Pike introduced the event. This year Rabbi Mendy Cohen, founder of Chabad St. George expects 300 at least. Menorah lighting will take place at the St. George Town Square, 50 S Main Street, St. George. In addition to food and singing, Rabbi Cohen will explain the meaning and miracle of Chanukah. *At the time of printing, the city permit had not yet been issued. To find out the exact date and details of the lighting visit www.JewishSouthernUtah.com.


Cedar City

STORYBOOK CAVALCADE CHILDREN’S PARADE | Cedar City November 2 | 2pm Free Celebrate the holiday season at the annual Storybook Cavalcade parade on Cedar City's historic Main Street between 200 South and 400 North. This popular event is now in its second decade in Cedar City; delighting children and families with dozens of floats, giant helium balloons, marching bands, and hundreds of costumed characters, superheroes, and storybook celebrities. The Storybook Cavalcade is the largest parade of its kind in the Intermountain region, drawing thousands of spectators each year from Cedar City and throughout the region. KANAB HOLIDAY KICKOFF | Kanab November 28-30 Cost: Varies per event Kickoff the Holidays with us in Kanab, Utah over Thanksgiving weekend. Throughout the weekend, you can find events and activities all over our beautiful town. Join us for a ride on the Polar Express, a fun run with the K-Town Turkey Trot, Breakfast with Santa, and the Christmas Light Parade & Lantern Festival. Bring the whole family for some small-town fun! See www. visitsouthernutah.com/Kanab-Holiday-Kickoff where you will find a schedule of events for the weekend, information for purchasing lanterns, ride Polar Express tickets, Breakfast with Santa, and more. *Tip: For quick links to register for individual events or to purchase your lanterns ahead of time, scroll to the bottom of the page.

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY | Parowan November 29 & 30 Free Admission Celebrate Christmas in the Country. The event includes a holiday bazaar, Santa parade, Christmas concert, candlelight parade, lighting ceremony, and much more. Friday, November 29th Holiday Bazaar, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Iron County Fair Building, 50 S 600 E, Parowan, Utah. Interfaith Christmas Program, 7:00 pm, Aladdin Theatre, 57 N Main, Parowan, Utah. FREE admission – donations accepted. Saturday, November 30th Santa’s Parade, 10:00 am, Parowan Main Street *Santa will be at the Fairgrounds after the Parade. Holiday Bazaar, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm, Iron County Fair Building, 50 S 600 E, Parowan, Utah. Candlelight Walking Parade, 6:00 pm, Parowan Main Street (beginning at 500 N Main St). Everyone is invited to bring their own light/candle and join the parade. Town Lighting Ceremony, 6:15 pm, Parowan Town Square, 100 South and Main Street. Christmas Concert, 7:00 pm, Aladdin Theatre, 57 N Main St, Parowan, Utah. FREE admission – donations accepted. For more information call 435-477-8190 or visit www.parowan.org/events. CHRISTMAS ON THE MOUNTAIN | Duck Creek Village November 30 | 12pm Free Join us at the Duck Creek Village Center (next to Aunt Sue’s Chalet) for kids crafts, drinks, treats, and Santa from 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm; then at 6 pm line up at Duck Creek Dance Hall (next to True Value) for the Candlelight Walk to the Village Tree Lighting Ceremony (battery-powered candles provided). Refreshments & caroling along the way. Duck Creek Village is located just off of Scenic Highway 14, 29 miles east of Cedar City. For more information visit www.duckcreekvillage.com. HOLIDAY TREE JUBILEE | Cedar City November 30 | 5pm – 8pm Cost: $10 - $20 family donation Join us for the annual Holiday Tree Jubilee Christmas fundraiser as we kick off the holiday season! See Santa Claus and enjoy time together, while also creating revenue for a Shop With a Cop. Event held at The Barn at Cedar Meadows, 1419 W 3000 N, Cedar City, Utah. For more information call 435-531-8319.

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CHRISTMAS AT THE HOMESTEAD | Cedar City December 2 - 8 | 5:30pm – 8:00pm Cost: $2 per person or $5 per family Celebrate the season with local entertainment, crafts (Candle Dipping & Printing Press Christmas Cards), and appearances from St. Nicholas. There are activities, decorations, and festive fun for all at the Frontier Homestead State Park Museum, 635 N Main St., Cedar City, Utah. For more information, including the craft and entertainment schedule, visit www.FrontierHomestead.org. HAWAIIAN COUNTRY CHRISTMAS SHOW | Cedar City December 4 | 5pm Cost: $5 - $20 Presented by Polynesian Heritage Entertainment. Come out and enjoy some family fun, shopping at vendor booths, Santa, and of course a fantastic show with live music and live dancers! The last show sold out days before the event, so be sure to purchase tickets in advance. VIP section includes reserved seating, a Lei, and prize drawings. The event takes place at the Heritage Theatre located at 105 N 100 East, Cedar City, Utah. Tickets are available in advance at the Heritage Theatre Box Office. For more information find them at www.Facebook.com /Polynesian-Heritage-Luau or call Ravahere Amo Ashdown 808-232-9586. HOMESTEAD HOLIDAY MARKET | Cedar City December 6 | 11am – 8pm December 7 | 9am – 3pm Cost: $1 Do your Christmas shopping at the Homestead Holiday Market! The market captures the sights and sounds of a traditional pioneer artisan fair; providing a truly unique holiday shopping experience. This two-day event includes folk music, original art, and traditional crafts, with Western traditions, seasonal/traditional foods, and historic American Christmas. The Market will feature approximately 30 artisans from all over the region with hand-crafted wares. Visit with Santa, enjoy the holiday spirit, browse unique, handcrafted items, and find the perfect gift for everyone on your list. For more information call 435-586-9290 or visit www.FrontierHomestead.org.

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CHRISTMAS AT THE BACK PORCH | Cedar City December 7 | 10am – 6pm Free Admission Mark your calendar, you don’t want to miss all the baked goods, samples from the farm kitchen, cheese tasting, fresh wreaths and swags, Christmas trees, and giveaways every hour. Enjoy a hot eggnog donut, sip hot chocolate and apple cider while you walk the farm, or shop for thoughtful gifts and fabulous real food for the holidays. Event held at Red Acre Farm CSA, 2322 W 4375 N, Cedar City, Utah. Rain, shine, or snow it will happen! For more information call Red Acre Farm 435-865-6792. HANDEL’S MESSIAH | Cedar City ORCHESTRA OF SOUTHERN UTAH December 8 & 9 | 7:30pm – 9:30pm Free Admission Orchestra of Southern Utah’s annual presentation of Handel’s Messiah, held at the Heritage Center, 105 N 100 E, Cedar City. Through the generosity of State Bank of Southern Utah and the Leavitt Group, admission is free but tickets are encouraged. Seating is on a first come first served basis so arrive early for best seating, empty seats will be released at 7:15 pm. No babies or children under six please as the performance is recorded. Messiah, one of the most performed works of classical music in all of history, is the masterpiece of Handel. The Orchestra of Southern Utah and the Orchestra of Southern Utah Choral usher in the Christmas season, alongside talented soloists, as they explore Messiah’s descriptive scriptural text and bring to life the story of birth, death, and divinity. For more information call 435-592-6051 or visit www.myosu.org.


THE NUTCRACKER BALLET |Cedar City THE MOSCOW BALLET December 10 | 7:30pm - 9:30pm Cost: $30 (adult) and $15 (student) Join Clara as her enchanted present leads her on a wonderful Christmas adventure to a magical land in this beautifully performed Great Russian Nutcracker. Based on the Alexander Dumas version of the story "The Nutcracker and the King of Mice" written by E.T.A. Hoffman, the Nutcracker Ballet is a magical experience sure to become a favorite holiday tradition. The event takes place at the Heritage Theatre located at 105 N 100 East, Cedar City, Utah. Tickets are available in advance at the Heritage Theatre Box Office (on the day of the performance the box office will be open 90 minutes before showtime), or online at www.nutcracker.com/buy-tickets. No Children under 6. General Admission. Seating begins at 7:00 pm. For more information call the box office at 435-865-2882. LIGHTS AT THE FRONTIER | Cedar City December 12 | 6pm – 8pm Cost: Donation Bundle up warm, bring your family and friends, the grounds of the Homestead and experience the “Lights at the Frontier”! Every year the grounds of the park are decorated with beautiful lights for our Christmas at the Homestead and Holiday Market events. This year we’re opening up the grounds so that visitors have another opportunity to experience these decorations! Frontier Homestead State Park Museum is located at 635 N Main St, Cedar City, Utah. For more information call 435-586-9290.

CHRISTMAS AT THE VISITOR CENTER | Cedar City December 20 | 4pm – 6pm Cost: Free The Cedar City Visitor Center staff has collaborated with their neighbors at the Frontier Homestead to make this a holiday event you don’t want to miss! If you haven’t already seen the Christmas light display at Frontier Homestead State Park, this is the perfect opportunity to do so. Enjoy the beautiful holiday decorations and activities at the Cedar City Visitor Center, including live music by Simple Men (reuniting for a one-night performance), then head over and walk the magical Christmas light display on the grounds of the Frontier Homestead. Donation boxes will be available throughout the Homestead, and donations are greatly appreciated. For more information contact the Cedar City Visitor Center at 435-586-5124 BREAKFAST WITH SANTA | Cedar City December 21 | 8am – 11am Cost: $25 per family or $10 individual You will receive a $5 Arcade Card, donuts, chocolate milk, and Good Ole’ St Nick. A special showing of The Polar Express begins at 9:00 am, so bring your pillow & blankets. Be sure to get your picture with Santa too! Event held at Fiddlers Fun Center, 170 E Fiddlers Canyon Rd, Cedar City, Utah. For more information call (435) 586-6282.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL ON THE AIR |Cedar City December 19 | 7pm Cost: $10-$15 Don’t miss this hilarious holiday family-friendly offering which faithfully tells the Dickens classic Christmas story in the style of an old-time radio show. Complete with live sound effects, backstage antics, and an All-Star cast led by TV Star Tony Amendola. Tickets available online at www.simonfest.org.

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Mesquite & Moapa Valley By Linda Faas

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ur community can come together and make a difference at the time when everybody “needs a little Christmas.� This year the holidays will shine brighter as we each extend a hand of friendship to a neighbor. Throughout November and December, our local charitable organizations welcome your help to put a smile on the face of a child or a soldier and a warm meal on the table for a neighboring family. COLLECTION FOR ANY SOLDIER PROJECT | Mesquite November 1-22 Donations Needed Throughout early November the Mesquite Veterans Center welcomes financial donations, small wrapped food items, and useful gifts like stamps, pens, toiletries, and handwritten greetings for men and women who are active service members. A helpful list of ideas can be found on the AnySoldier website. Donations received by November 22 will be packed and sent in time to reach the soldiers for Christmas. Mike Gizzi of American Legion Post 24 is leading this project with the Exchange Club contributing postage and boxes. Call The Veterans Center 702-346-2735 for more information. MESQUITE HANGAR DANCE | Mesquite November 2 | 11am - 3pm Cost: $5 Donation This jolly event is a party with a purpose . Airport Manager Larry Lemieux and the Party People Group invites everyone to come to the Mesquite Airport, 1200 Kitty Hawk Drive following the Veterans Day parade. Food, live music, vendors, and nonprofit displays will be waiting to entertain and raise funds for the Mesquite Veterans Center. COWBOY POETS HONOR VETERANS | Mesquite November 9 | 1pm Admission Free Cowboy Poets pay tribute to Veterans. Event held at the Virgin Valley Heritage Museum, 35 W Mesquite Blvd, Mesquite, Nevada. Everyone is welcome!

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OVERTON POWER DISTRICT #5 FOOD DRIVE Moapa & Virgin Valleys November 2019 Donations Needed OPD5 and the schools in Moapa Valley and Virgin Valley team up to collect thousands of cans of food for those in need. Donations can be dropped at your nearest OPD5 office or at one of the local schools. Donations benefit the Cappalappa Family Resource Center and the Virgin Valley Food Bank.

Scouting 4 Food

SCOUTING 4 FOOD | Virgin Valley November 16, Saturday Donations Needed Cub scouts of the Virgin Valley will distribute food donation bags throughout local neighborhoods, preparing for the pickup by the Boy Scouts the following Saturday, November 16. Current dated canned food is welcomed. Donated food will be distributed through the Salvation Army in Mesquite and the Beaver Dam Food Bank in Beaver Dam, AZ. For more information, call the Salvation Army, 702-346-5116. Canned food donations can also be made directly to the Salvation Army or Beaver Dam Food Bank.

SALVATION ARMY COATS FOR KIDS | Mesquite November-December Donations Jackets and coats are welcomed this winter season at the Salvation Army office. Call 702-345-5116 and drop off donations during their business hours. Warm blankets are also welcomed. Iron Mountain Cleaners participates in this charity by dry cleaning items before distribution.


Santa and Mrs. Claus and the Salvation Army bikes

ANGEL TREE | Mesquite November - December Donations Needed Look for the Angel Trees placed throughout the community. Traditional Angel Tree assistance organized at the Salvation Army, asking members of the community to “adopt” a child, family, or senior and provide gifts of toys, games, books, hygiene items, etc. to the people they adopt. Recipient wish lists are compiled by The Salvation Army. Contact 702-345-5116 for full information. All gifts are distributed mid-December.

FESTIVAL OF TREES | Mesquite Mesquite Arts Council Festival of Trees, “So this is Christmas” November 13-16 Cost: $2-$3 + one can of food No Mesquite holiday celebration is complete without the annual Festival of Trees. Mesquite Arts Council invites all to trim a tree and attend the festival of crafters and holiday delights that returns to the Virgin River Events Center, 100 W. Pioneer, courtesy of Mesquite Gaming. Entry forms for the tree contest are available from Aleta Ruth at ruthsrus@gmail.com. The Festival officially opens November 13, with the opening ceremony at 6:00 pm. Musical entertainment will be staged during the festival hours: Wed-4 pm to 8 pm, Thur-3 pm to 8 pm, Fri-2 pm-8 pm, Sat-10 am-5 pm. Santa and Mrs. Claus make their appearance 1-3 pm on Saturday. The beautiful trees, boutique items, musical entertainment, tree auction, and prize raffles are sure to warm holiday hearts. Admission is $3, or $2 and one can of food. Call or text Aleta Ruth with any questions: 702-461-1403. Musicians, call Blair Adams to participate, 801-815-6812.

TOY ‘N JOY DISTRIBUTION | Mesquite November - December Volunteers and Donations Needed The Salvation Army needs Santa’s Helpers volunteers to help set up the toy shop after December 9 and help distribute the toys when families arrive at the Deuce gym. Sign up to help at the Salvation Army. Toys can be donated to The Salvation Army direct, or through Toys for Tots. Families who have registered with the Salvation Army will be invited to participate in the distribution of toys set for December 20 at the Deuce, which is adjacent to the Mesquite Recreation Center. TOYS FOR TOTS | Moapa & Virgin Valleys November - December Volunteers and Donations Needed Brenda Slocumb is the area chair for Toys for Tots. Toy donation boxes are placed at locations in Mesquite and Moapa Valley, and financial donations can be sent directly to Toys for Tots, PO Box 1266, Logandale, NV 89021. Unwrapped toys are collected in November, and are distributed through the Salvation Army in Mesquite and VFW Post Home in Moapa Valley in December. Advance applications are needed to participate in the toy distribution program, and those can be completed at the Moapa Library 1340 E Hwy 168, Logandale or at the VFW Post Home at 324 Whitmore, Overton, or at the Salvation Army in Mesquite. Applications can also be submitted online at www.toysfortots.org. For more information, call 702-596-6810. Blair Adams adds finishing touches to the Festival of Trees

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SALVATION ARMY BELL RINGING | Mesquite November 22-December 24 Volunteer Opportunity & Donations The familiar sound of the Salvation Army bell calls everyone to open their hearts and help fund this organization that is the clearinghouse for charitable giving in the rural Clark County area. Every donation counts. Every coin, every dollar dropped in the red pail goes to serve the needs of our local communities. Bell ringers are needed to help at Mesquite locations. Individuals or groups can volunteer to help “Do the Most Good” by calling the Salvation Army at 702-345-5116. When you answer the ringing bell, families who need food, clothing, transportation assistance, and other basic support will benefit from your generous donations.

Salvation Army Bell Ringers

TURKEY TUESDAY | Mesquite VIRGIN VALLEY FOOD BANK November 26 Donations Needed Registered clients of Virgin Valley Food Bank will be provided with the makings of a complete Thanksgiving dinner on Turkey Tuesday, November 26. Leslee Montgomery, Director of Virgin Valley Food Bank encourages donations of food and financial contributions during the weeks prior. Contact Leslee or the Food Bank at 312 W. Mesquite Blvd, Suite 107, behind the Mesquite Plaza facing First South Street. The Food Bank and Thrift Store accept financial donations year around.

Leslee Montgomery celebrates her 17th year at the Virgin Valley Food Bank

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COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER | Mesquite November 27 | 12pm - 6pm Free - Everyone Welcome! Everyone in the community is invited to the annual Thanksgiving Dinner at the Mesquite Senior Center, 102 W. Old Mill Road, on Wednesday, November 27, from noon to 6:00 pm. The dinner is sponsored by the Mesquite Athletic and Leisure Services Department-Senior Center Division. This free event is open to everyone to ensure that all members of the community, regardless of income, can enjoy a meal with others on this holiday. Mesquite wants no one to be hungry or alone on this special American holiday. The dinner is made possible through the generosity of individuals, groups, and businesses. Those interested in donating time, money, or product can call Krissy Thornton at the Senior Center, 702-346-5290. Help is needed for preparing and serving the meal, delivering meals to the homebound, and cleaning up. Entertainers are also needed. Early signup is appreciated. The Senior Center accepts current dated canned food that benefits the Salvation Army, with drop-off boxes available at the Senior Center doors. 5TH ANNUAL PARADE OF LIGHTS | Mesquite December 5 | 5:30pm Free - Everyone Welcome! Join the community in a night of wonder as Mesquite celebrates its 5th annual Parade of Lights. Starting at 5:30 pm, the parade will proceed from Arrowhead Lane past City Hall, bringing out the best of our businesses, organizations, and individuals in the community to help feed our families in need. Following the parade, kids can enjoy hot chocolate and visit with Santa at the City Hall Christmas Tree. Go to the website, mesquiteparades.wixsite.com to download an entry form, complete and return to the City Clerk, 10 E Mesquite Blvd, by 12:00 pm, November 27. VIRGIN VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM CHILDREN’S HOUR Mesquite December 7 | 10:30am - 11:30am Free Children are invited to hear stories and make Christmas decorations, 10:30-11:30 am. The museum is located at 35 W Mesquite Blvd. EUREKA HOMETOWN HOLIDAYS | Mesquite December 7 | 4pm - 8 pm Cost: $ Buffet Rates Local nonprofits “meet and greet” buffet diners at Eureka Casino Resort Town Square, explain their charity and raising funds to help their local recipients. Dinner served 4:00 pm8:00 pm at buffet rates. A portion of proceeds goes to the participating nonprofits.


Virgin Valley High School Music Students

VIRGIN VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL BAROQUE MASTERS | Mesquite December 10 | 7pm Free This free concert by Virgin Valley Choir, Orchestra, and Guitars is the students’ gift of music to the community. Concert held at the Virgin Valley High School theatre. Music of Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, and Corelli will be featured. The Choir will combine with adult members of the community in choruses from Handel’s Messiah, accompanied by the Chamber Orchestra. MESQUITE TOES TAP TEAM DANCE SPECTACULAR | Mesquite December 13 | 1pm and 7pm Cost: $ This season highlight will stage two performances at the Mesquite Community Theatre. Admission proceeds from these dance performances rotate among various deserving local charities. These benefit performances sell out, so buy tickets early. Tickets can be purchased at the Mesquite Community Theatre Box Office or online at www.mctnv.com.

MINISTERING ANGELS OF MOAPA VALLEY | Moapa Valley Ongoing | 9am We meet the 1st Friday of each month to crochet, knit, loom knit, tie quilts, and sew all sizes of hats, scarves, blankets, toys, booties, mittens, granny squares, and more for people in need in the Moapa Valley area. You can also make items at home and get them to Bev Qualheim or TC Carson anytime. We donate to UMC Vegas hospital, Lifting Hands International/St. George chapter, Homeless in Vegas and more as needed. We welcome anyone interested in learning how to make things too. We meet at 2555 N Joseph St, Logandale, Nevada (across from Moapa Valley High School). For more information, contact Bev Qualheim at bevq@bevscountry cottage.com. Join us! JUSTSERVE.ORG | Anytime & Anywhere There are so many wonderful service opportunities during the holiday season and all year long. Looking for a way to serve? Justserve.org is a great place to start your search! Looking for volunteers to help with your project? Let JustServe know about it www.justserve.org!

PLEASE NOTE: There are many more activities and service opportunities to attend and support throughout this holiday season; many of these you will find featured throughout the magazine. Please have a look and support those that may not have made it into the calendar.

*Dates and times of events are accurate at the time of print.

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Veterans Remembered in a Unique Way By Valerie King

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EMEMBER the fallen, HONOR those who have served, and TEACH the children the value of freedom. This is the core mission that draws thousands of people together annually to participate in Wreaths Across America ceremonies across the nation and lay Christmas wreaths on the graves of our beloved veterans. It is not about decorating these graves but paying tribute and saying thank you just one more time to the men and women who gallantly protected and defended our nation through their military service. It is truly a unique and humbling experience like no other.

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Arlington National Cemetery covered with wreaths laid by volunteers that went viral and launched Wreaths Across America. | VIEW ON MAGAZINE | Nov/Dec 2019 Last year volunteer truckers brought in 80 truckloads of wreaths to cover the entire cemetery. Photo courtesy of Wreaths Across America Foundation.


HOW IT GOT STARTED Wreaths Across America’s origin began when a gift was made in 1992. Morrill Worcester, owner of Worcester Wreath Company located in Maine found himself with a surplus of wreaths nearing the end of the holiday season. Worcester realized he had an opportunity to honor our country’s veterans. With the aid of then-Senator Olympia Snowe, arrangements were made for the wreaths to be placed at Arlington National Cemetery in one of the older sections of the cemetery that had been receiving fewer visits with each passing year. As plans were made, a number of other organizations stepped up to help, including a local trucking company and volunteers from the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars. The annual tribute continued quietly until 2005 when a photo of the thousands of wreaths at Arlington with their red bows set off against the snow went viral. Suddenly, thousands of requests poured in from around the country from people wanting to help and be a part of this veteran honoring tribute. WHY IT HAS GROWN In 2006, in response to thousands of emails and letters, the Worcester Wreath Company expanded its veteran wreath donations nationwide, but interest and demands grew much greater than they could realistically support and sustain. It was then, in 2007, when Wreaths Across America (WAA) was formed, a non-profit 501(c)3 foundation, thus enabling groups and organizations to support not only Arlington National Cemetery but many other participating cemeteries across the country.

Shivwits Band of Paiutes Princess assisting in the placement of wreaths on veteran graves at Shivwits Cemetery near Gunlock, Utah. Photo courtesy of Valerie King.

As awareness of the WAA program increased, so too did the interest in supporting it. Today, WAA is supported by an amazing framework of fundraiser groups, financial sponsors and citizen volunteers who are just as passionate as the Worcester family in honoring and remembering veterans in this unique way. In 2008, approximately 100,000 wreaths were laid on veteran graves at 300 locations. A decade later, that total grew to 1.75 million wreaths at 1700 locations. This upward momentum is expected to continue with 2,000,000 wreath placements likely to occur in the near term. PRESENCE IN SOUTHERN UTAH Presently, there are eighteen Utah cemeteries participating in Wreaths Across America; eight are located in Southern Utah. The Civil Air Patrol was instrumental in bringing WAA to the Southern Utah area just over a decade ago. In 2010, CAP squadron commander Lester Joslin secured wreaths sponsors for veterans buried at Tonaquint Cemetery in St George.

American Legion volunteer carrying wreaths to place on veteran graves at St George Cemetery. Photo courtesy of Valerie King.

In 2012, a second cemetery was added at the request of Color Country Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution who funded the wreaths for all Native American veterans buried at Shivwits Cemetery near Gunlock. Then in 2018, thanks to the generous donations of many, 3 new locations were added to the mix - St George Cemetery, Ivins and Santa Clara City Cemeteries. In all, 2200 veteran graves were honored this past year with Christmas wreaths, a significant jump from the 750 wreaths laid the year prior. The DAR chapter largely led the fundraising

Air Force ROTC and Civil Air Patrol cadets carrying the ceremonial wreaths representing each military branch for Wreaths Across America ceremony at Tonaquint Cemetery in St George, Utah. Photo courtesy of Valerie King.

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effort to cover St George Cemetery, partnering with local businesses such as Walmart, Wells Fargo, and Zion Harley-Davidson and garnering the support of veteran organizations like the Marine Corps League plus many individual sponsors who made it possible to purchase the 1100 wreaths needed. The other two cemeteries were funded by a private citizen residing in the Santa Clara area. In 2019, plans are in the works to add at least four additional cemeteries but the ultimate goal is to cover the grave of EVERY VETERAN buried in Washington County should funding permit it. Could it be 2019? WAYS TO SUPPORT IT Become a fundraiser group Be a wreath sponsor - $15 each Participate in a ceremony Volunteer to lay wreaths WHAT PART WILL YOU PLAY? Event organizers are already planning the Wreaths Across America ceremonies scheduled to occur on Saturday, Dec 14th. The WAA theme this year is “EVERYONE PLAYS A PART.� For more information on fundraising opportunities, wreath sponsorships, ceremonies and participating cemeteries (including 2 new locations near Cedar City just added by DAR Bald Eagle Chapter), visit Color Country Wreaths Across America Facebook page or send email to colorcountrywaa@gmail.com. V

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Wreaths Across America day at Tonaquint Cemetery in St George, Utah is an annual affair for some families who come year after year to participate. Photo courtesy of Valerie King.


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Virgin Valley Artists

Make Christmas Special R By AlixSandra Parness and Jenny Riddick

emember when you really wanted to make Christmas special for a loved one in your life? Perhaps you were good at knitting or woodworking, maybe you always loved to draw or paint. I, AlixSandra, remember a time I made a basket out of willow branches from our backyard as a gift in which to gather apples. Christmas is a time of JOY, a time for giving of ourselves in our own unique way, heart to heart.

There is a place in all of us that deeply appreciates the gift from the heart and what it takes to make something with the

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intention of knowing it will become a precious gift of love for someone, perhaps even you. And nowhere else does Christmas Joy shine brighter in Mesquite than at the Virgin Valley Artists’ Association’s (VVAA) and the Mesquite Fine Arts Center’s Gallery and Gift Shop Annual Christmas Boutique. The 14th annual Christmas Boutique begins Monday, November 18, and runs until Saturday, December 28, 2019. The Christmas Boutique will have late hours Thursday, November 21 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., which


is also the night of our Artists’ Reception and Open House (open to the public). You don’t want to miss this wonderful annual event. The one-of-a-kind Christmas sale will showcase the VVAA artists’ unique handcrafted items; every year the variety and quality of work never ceases to amaze. Art objects, small paintings, greeting cards, beautiful and fascinating jewelry, sculptures, pottery, fused glass, handmade soap, knitted hats, handmade textile purses, and wallets, just to name a few. At times, artists have even brought in woodcrafts and furniture, and the Gallery is proud to display them, as all of you are joyfully happy to see them. People who start their holiday shopping early at the Christmas Boutique will not only enjoy the creativity in all of the individual pieces but also the reasonable prices. The VVAA and The Mesquite Fine Arts Center want to make your Christmas shopping fun by offering wonderful gifts for family and friends as well as for those very special people in your life. Perhaps your children’s teacher or a neighbor, and, of course, finding those all-important gift-sized and giftpriced stocking stuffers. So come early and bring your gift lists so you don’t forget anyone! Our Fine Arts Gallery also offers art classes in watercolor, acrylics, drawing, oils, 3-D Paper Tole, pottery, basket weaving, and special workshops that bring out the artist in all of us. And did I mention the very low cost; so reasonable you can easily explore more than one avenue. V The Virgin Valley Artists’ Association and the Mesquite Fine Arts Gallery and Gift Shop’s Annual Christmas Boutique begins Monday, November 18, and runs through Saturday, December 28. The Gallery is located at 15 W. Mesquite Boulevard, Mesquite, Nevada, and is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday, or you can call the Gallery at 702-346-1338, visit the VVAA website at www.mesquitefineartscenter.com, or check us out on Facebook at www.facebook.com/MesquiteFineArtsCenter.

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Make Some Favorite New Traditions with These Ongoing Events at the Center forthe Arts at Kayenta Want to know the people in your neighborhood? These recurring events may well find a place in your cherished traditions. Come and be a part of your local community at these fantastic events. COYOTE TALES Quickly becoming the favorite event for locals, these open-mic style stories by amateur and experienced storytellers make for captivating entertainment. Each event has a theme on which stories are based. Preshow parties start at 6:30 pm and storytelling begins 7:30 pm sharp-ish. Visit kayentaarts.com or coyotetalesstories. com for info on the next Coyote Tales. MOVIE NIGHTS Once-monthly free events are an excuse to join friends and neighbors for a popcorn and movie at the theatre. Visit kayentaarts.com for info on the next flick. Popcorn and concessions are for sale, and cash contributions are welcome! VOYAGER LECTURE SERIES Come hear master astronomer and lecturer Ron Smith and other experts from our community share their insights on a range of awe-inspiring topics about the mysterious world we inhabit. The cost is $15, and the preshow social gathering starts at 6:30 pm.

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view on THE ARTS

Liven Up Your Fall & Winter with Exciting Events at the Center for the Arts at Kayenta

By Merrie Campbell-Lee

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ow in its third year, the Center for the Arts keeps the excitement coming with a lineup of shows and performances by some of the region’s—the country’s!—most talented performers. Don’t miss your chance to be awestruck, inspired, thrilled…bowled over! Look forward to the cold months by putting these events on your calendar for a fabulous fall and winter here in southern Utah. Hot tip: get tickets fast before they sell out. We can’t wait to see you.

“Synergy,” An Evening of Contemporary Dance by St. George Dance Company

Soiree Musicale Quartet Returns to Delight Audiences with Classical Music

When it comes to this contemporary dance event, the audience actually gets to see “synergy”—when the whole is greater than the sum of its parts—come alive in the form of movement. Come and be mesmerized by dance pieces performed by some of our region’s most talented contemporary dancers.

Soiree Musicale literally translates to “an evening of chamber music”— that’s music written specifically for fewer instruments and smaller settings.

Set to bold melodies of composers like George Gershwin and Duke Ellington, the show is a feast for the eyes and ears. Synergy Director Jenny Wood Jones is eager for audiences to see her troupe’s collaborative work. “They display the beautiful lines of athleticism and strong technique as well as the emotional depth of true artists,” she says.

Soiree Musicale features local musicians with world-class talent. On piano is Christian Bohnenstengel; playing the violin is Urs Rutishauser; on viola, Linda Ghidossi-Deluca; and on cello is Jessika Soli.

The concert is slated for November 2nd, at 7:30pm. Tickets are $25, $10 for students with current student ID. St. George Dance Co. thanks its sponsor, Xetava Gardens for their generous support of dance and dancers in our region.

The 3 Redneck Tenors Present “Opera in Blue Jeans & Tuxedos” Down-home laughs. Big city music. What on earth is a Redneck Tenor? Someone once described them like this: If Larry the Cable Guy, Il Divo, and Mrs. Doubtfire had triplets together, they would likely be the 3 Redneck Tenors. This weirdly awesome blend of crooning, country, and comedy wowed judges on 2015’s “America’s Got Talent” where they were finalists. Matthew Lord, Blake Davidson and Johnathan Fruge are classically trained vocalists who’ve been delivering down-home laughs and big city sound since 2006.

The intimate Lorraine Boccardo Black Box Theatre is the ideal setting for the spectacular combined sounds of piano, violin, viola, and cello. Come for an unforgettable experience.

This powerhouse trio will have you doubling over with laughter throughout their show. They’ll sing a smorgasbord of songs in all the cool categories… Gospel, Country, Broadway, Pop…even Classical.

The concert takes place on Saturday November 9th at 7:30 pm, tickets are $30 ($10 for current students) and can be purchased at kayentaarts.com. Soiree Musicale is sponsored by Eve Wetten. We thank her for her generous support of this concert.

The fun will begin at 7:30 pm on November 15th, 16th, and 6:00 pm Sunday the 17th Tickets are $30, $10 for students with current student ID. The 3 Redneck Tenors event is sponsored by Fusion Pharmacy. We thank them for their generous support in providing live entertainment of the highest caliber to our community.

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Kurt Bestor Returns for the Third Year with “Peace on Earth”—His Suite of Beloved Holiday Arrangements He’s a household name for many, but Kurt Bestor just wants to have you in his house for Christmas. But since space is limited at his place, Kurt’s invited you to his cozy holiday concert at the Center for the Arts at Kayenta. Bestor prefers the intimate theatre over the larger venues for this kind of concert, saying, “It’s as if close friends have joined me in my living room to hear Christmas arrangements that I hold dear.” This world-renowned musician returns for the third year with his “Peace on Earth,” concert series, which he hopes will instill peace into hearts for the holidays. Beautiful, unique, and richly layered, Bestor’s songs are on the holiday playlists of people across the (snow) globe.

A Diamond Holiday

Enchanted World of Dolls

An inspiring night of dance and musical theater. Come to the most festive, captivating dance and musical theatre concert in the region.

Step inside an enchanted world. With fire pits ablaze, trees shimmering with lights, and the air filled with holiday aromas and sounds, Kayenta is transformed from a desert paradise into a magical wonderland.

You’ll see scenes from the Nutcracker, Santa’s workshop of toys, angels ushering in the Nativity, the Rockettes, Irish dance and more. This truly spectacular show is put on by Diamond Talent‘s highly trained student performers, along with returning alumni. Concerts take place at 7:30 pm nightly December 12–14th & December 19–21st (including 2 pm Saturday matinees on December 14th & 21st). Tickets are $20 and $15 for students with valid ID. A Diamond Holiday is Sponsored by Minky Couture. We thank them for their generous support in providing live entertainment of the highest caliber to our community.

The concerts take place on December 5th and 6th 2019 and start at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $40 for premium seating ($45 after December 1st) and $35 for regular seats ($40 after December 1st) and $10 for students with valid ID. “Peace on Earth” is generously sponsored by Dixie Lumber and Minky Couture.

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Enjoy warm drinks and sweet treats as you stroll through the “Enchanted World of Dolls” lining the Center’s walls. Young actors come alive as mechanical dolls dressed in traditional costumes representing countries from around the world. Young and old alike will be swept into the joyous holiday mood by these captivating displays, and young visitors might be surprised by Santa, who’s making time to pay Kayenta a visit. Come and see the dolls before every Diamond Holiday concert from 6:30–7:25 pm, December 12–14th & December 19–21st (including 1:00–1:55 before the matinees on December 14th & 21st). Price: Free! Enchanted World of Dolls is Sponsored by Susan Broberg Law. We thank her for her generous support. V


The Villas at Ovation Sienna Hills Breaking Ground Soon By Doug Pederson WASHINGTON, UTAH

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vation at Sienna Hills is already growing. The active lifestyle village has announced the addition of 25 private villas. The new community is scheduled to open in fall 2020.

“We are very excited to announce the Villas at Ovation Sienna Hills,” said Ryan Haller, Chief Development Officer at PDCo, the developer building the Ovation campus. “This is in direct response to the comments and suggestions we’ve been hearing from the local community about how we can better serve active seniors.” The Villas will range from 1,280 to 1,316 square feet of living space designed for those living active lifestyles. In total there will be six floor plan options, each named for a famous Southern Utah landmark.

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One of the first of its kind, Ovation Sienna Hills is a micro continuing care rental community focused on wellness, fitness, and a full continuum of care. When completed, the development will feature the Villas along with the previously announced campus that will include multiple buildings featuring independent living, assisted living, and memory care. The development is near the corner of Washington Parkway and East Telegraph Street, just off Interstate 15 exit 13 in Washington City.

concierge services including drivers and golf carts to take residents anywhere they need to go on the Ovation campus.

“Those living at the Villas will find the best of both worlds,” said Haller. “Every home will have a full kitchen, 24/7 staff support, and access to a community clubhouse for events, and on-site pickleball courts. Plus, you’ll also have access to everything Ovation North and Ovation South offer.”

In addition to the features and amenities of the Villas, residents will have access to the two-building Ovation campus including the Red Rock Courtyard, a rooftop deck, a business center, a library, a theater room, a convenience store, and a chapel. Residents will also be welcome at Cassidy’s, a billiards room named in honor of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, which in 1968 was partially shot in the St. George area.

“Ovation continues to invest in the people and economy of Southern Utah,” said Pam Palermo, President of the St. George Area Chamber of Commerce. “The Villas is an exciting announcement not only because of the jobs it will create, but because it represents the newest opportunity for active adults to enjoy the wonderful lifestyle of our region.” “Just like at a country club, Villas residents will receive a culinary allowance good at any Ovation restaurant, bistro, or coffee shop,” Haller added. “That means you can cook for yourself in your own kitchen, join others in the Zion Clubhouse or outside for a barbecue, or take a short walk or ride over to Ovation North for a fine dining experience.” Restaurants include Millers@Washington, Bees Knees Bistro, and 1861 fine dining, named for the year the St. George area was settled. The Zion Clubhouse will feature a full kitchen, a fireplace for socializing, a patio and everything residents need for a private party or group activity. There will also be ample parking for visiting guests. The Zion Clubhouse will offer

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Next to the Zion Clubhouse will be two pickleball courts, available for quick games and tournaments with friends and neighbors. Other Villas amenities include house cleaning services, interior and exterior maintenance, landscaping, and concierge services.

“The addition of The Villas provides a new opportunity for active adults who want security and freedom but also want to know that help, services, and top-notch amenities are close by,” said Haller. “Having access to tai chi and yoga classes, along with a pool, and quality restaurants will be a nice perk.” Ovation originally broke ground in October 2018 and is expected to open in fall, 2020. An official groundbreaking ceremony for the newly announced Villas will be announced soon. V Those interested in learning more can visit Ovation’s Reservation Showroom in the Pineview Plaza at 2376 East Red Cliffs Drive. Located near the movie theater, Ovation is open from 9am to 5pm Monday through Friday and Saturdays by appointment. Information is also available at VillasAtOvation.com by calling 435-429-0000 or emailing siennahills@ovationbyavamere.com.


There's no place like

By Patti Valis

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et owners know all too well the challenges they face when trying to plan a vacation or simply a day or two getaway. Options range from taking your pet with you to boarding them. Taking your pet with you causes problems with activities and businesses not being pet friendly. Pet boarding means simply taking your pet to a kennel boarding facility and picking them up when you return home. I'm happy to say that there is a better option: Hiring a Pet Sitter! The advantages of hiring someone you trust to stay in your home with your pet/s are numerous:

Your pet will remain in their safe environment, comfortable in their own bed ….. or yours. Customary diets, medications and exercise/play routines are easily administered.

Water and feeding bowls are clean and free of germs. The risk of contagious diseases or potential injuries from other animals is eliminated.

But most importantly: your pet will receive personal attention, care, and love in the safety of their home.

The advantages of an in-home sitter aren't limited to your pets comfort and quality of care! Owners can enjoy many important perks as well, such as: Additional peace of mind

Picking up newspapers

Watering your favorite plants

Checking that the sprinkler systems are operating properly

Putting Trash out on collection days Getting your mail so you don't have to pause delivery

Emergency calls in the event of appliance failures: especially air/heating systems

Ensuring there is no water flooding from osmosis systems, water heaters or major leaks Lights, movement, and no vacant appearance at home base

There is nothing more gratifying than receiving the warm, enthusiastic greeting from our furry friends when you return. Whether it’s been 10 minutes or 2 hours the exciting “Hi hi…. I missed you….. Where have you been? So glad to see you're back,“ is definitely addicting! I'm extremely fortunate to receive this reception multiple times a day from some of the best! If you find any of the above appealing for your loved one, then know my services include all of them if desired! V No Place Like Home Pet/House Sitting. Please call Patti at (702) 443-4783 to schedule. I’d like to extend my thanks to all of my clients for such rewarding work and trusting me to provide their kids with companionship and unconditional love and care. This is exactly what they grant us daily and so effortlessly.

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We can’t return We can only look behind From where we came, And go round and round and round In the circle game. ~ Joni Mitchell lyrics "The Circle Game"

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view on OUTDOORS

ARROWHEAD TRAIL & ROUNDABOUTS By Karen L. Monsen

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rom animal paths, foot trails, and wagonways, to multilane highways, roads connect rural to urban, move merchandise, and propel us into the future if they don’t drive us crazy in the process. Looking at Interstate-15 from California to Utah, we can trace a road’s evolution from early Spanish trails through its not-so-well-known phase as the Arrowhead Trail and Highway 91 to reach St. George where roundabouts are increasingly popular. It’s a story worth telling. TRAILS BECOME ROADS Today’s Interstate-15 provides a direct route from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City over terrain previously traversed by Dominquez and Escalante in 1776 and later followed by wool merchants, Indian slave traders, 1849 fortune seekers, and Mormon settlers. The route incorporates sections of the Old Spanish Trail and places where Jedediah Smith trekked between 1826-1827, John C. Fremont traveled across Utah in 1844, and merchants traversed six states over 2,700 miles through mountains and deserts from Santa Fe to Los Angeles to reach California through the Cajon Pass. The Arrowhead Trail, intertwining and overlaying Spanish trails, originated on California’s western edge of San Bernardino County in Redlands where racecar driver Charles H. Bigelow lived in 1914 near an arrowhead-shaped land formation for which the trail was most likely named. It was the first all-weather road connecting Los Angeles to Salt Lake City and the major north-south artery through southwestern Utah. In a 2019 newsletter for the Desert Explorers (a 4-wheel drive club affiliated with Mojave River Valley Museum Association in Barstow, California), Bob Jaussaud describes the Arrowhead Trails Highway that Bigelow drove at least three times to promote a faster autoroute between Los Angeles and Salt Lake City by going through Las Vegas. In 1916, Bigelow organized an auto trip over the Arrowhead Trails Highway with members of his newly formed Auto Club of Southern California, the president of the Redlands

Chamber of Commerce, a Los Angeles Times reporter, a railroad representative, and a Nevada State Senator. They took two days to cross the Mojave Desert and reach Las Vegas. They continued through the Valley of Fire, on to Saint Thomas (former Mormon settlement now under Lake Mead), crossed the Muddy and Virgin Rivers, passed through Bunkerville, and per Jaussaud, paralleled the Virgin River to Mesquite Flat, a Mormon community settled in 1880. From Mesquite, Bigelow reached the Mormon outpost in Littlefield, Arizona at the mouth of the Virgin River Gorge. Jaussaud concludes, the early Arrowhead Trail joined the Old Spanish Trail and the Mormon Road in Beaver Dam and it continued over the Beaver Dam Mountains via Utah Hill following what was to become US Highway 466/91. SOUTHERN ROUTE In his book, The Arduous Road: Salt Lake to Los Angeles, The Most Difficult Wagon Road in American History, historian Leo Lyman wrote, “The Southern Route through later southern Utah, across the northwestern corner of Arizona then southern Nevada into California Southland, served a far more significant historic role in the opening of the Far West than is usually recognized.” Lyman believes at least seven thousand emigrants and freighters crossed on that trail. Quoting traveler diaries, Lyman depicted the route as “being alternately rocky and sandy, with up to a dozen steep-banked river crossings,” and “wretched roads,” steep mountains covered with volcanic rocks, river crossings with quicksand, desert expenses without water or forage and hardships that would deter others. In The Overland Journey from Utah to California, Lyman characterized “travel down the Santa Clara River and the pull over what was later called Utah Hill, officially the Beaver Dam Mountains” were among the most difficult stretches. Per Lyman, “The formidable Virgin Hill, unanimously rated the most difficult segment of the entire Southern Route, is six miles southwest of present-day Mesquite, Nevada and visible just north of I-15 prior to the highway climbing up the grade onto Mormon Mesa.”

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OLD HIGHWAY 91 BYPASS In 1926, the Arrowhead Trail was renamed US Highway 91 as part of the federal numbering system. In 1973, a bypass costing over $1 million/mile cut off 12 miles from Littlefield to Santa Clara, Utah creating what is now Interstate-15 through the Virgin River Gorge. Motorists can still follow Old 91 from Littlefield to Santa Clara where roadbed remnants protrude a hillside near the Jacob Hamblin Home and they can continue on intermittent Hwy-91 sections north of St. George. Highway 91 originally entered St. George at Diagonal Street near where a roundabout currently stands.

Hwy-91 at Ivins before Santa Clara

Old Hwy-91 Roadbed near Santa Clara

Old Hwy-91 North of St. George

ROUNDABOUTS Historically, roads between destination points are improved by removing hazards and reducing travel time as I-15 illustrates. However, traffic flow, not speed, led to constructing 12 roundabouts in St. George since the year 2000. City traffic engineer Monty Thurber reports that St. George’s first traffic-circle-roundabout was constructed at Diagonal and Main Street and the most recent was added in 2014 at 400 East and Tabernacle. The City Parks Department maintains the landscape and sculptures along streets and roundabouts as part of their Art Around the Corner outdoor gallery. Modern roundabouts are popular intersection alternatives in new subdivisions and commercial developments. The world’s first roundabout was built in 1907 for horse-drawn wagons where 12 avenues converge around the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. The earliest US roundabouts were built in Nevada in the 1990s and other places followed with their own controlled entry counterclockwise rotation circles that reduce intersection collisions, slow traffic, and limit impact points to glancing blows. Interstate-15, like its predecessor the Arrowhead Trail, leads people to explore new places and return to familiar ones. By traveling old trails and highways, we can connect to history along the same roads that move us forward—assuming we don’t get stuck in a roundabout. V

Editor’s note: We regret our error in including an incorrect photo on page 78 of the September/October 2019 issue of View On Magazine along with an article on the Fremont Indian State Park. The photo of a large petroglyph panel is from a different location and is not found at Fremont Indian State Park. Please forgive our posting error. It was the mistake of View On Magazine, and not of the author, Karen L. Monsen.

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view on FINANCE

SAFE

Online Holiday Shopping By Mitch Oldewurtel

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he holiday season is here, which means that time is running out to pick up the perfect gift for that special someone. And while trying to successfully juggle work, family, and social obligations of the season, who has time to slip off to the mall or closest big-box stores to fight the crowds for that last Snuggie? That’s one of the many reasons more and more people are turning to the Internet for holiday shopping. In addition to the time savings, online shopping can offer substantial savings to your pocketbook, a larger selection of items, and convenient return policies. And, all of this can be done while sipping a pumpkin spice latte in your pajamas from the comfort of your own home! While the convenience of online shopping can be enticing and can make getting all your shopping done in a breeze, there are risks involved such as becoming a victim of Internet fraud. Just like investing or choosing the right Financial Advisor, like anything else, there are risks. I don’t want to be a scrooge, so keep in mind that online shopping is generally safe, however, issues can be avoided with a little forethought and some common sense. The same advice should be used when choosing a Financial Advisor that is right for your portfolio, one that is a Fiduciary with your best interests in mind.

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So in the spirit of the holiday season please keep in mind these tips for staying safe online: SHOP WITH RETAILERS YOU KNOW: Stores you know are generally the safest (e.g., Amazon, Wal-Mart, Target, Lowe’s, etc.) and most large retailers have online stores that offer items similar to those available at their stores. Be sure that the website is spelled correctly and that the domain (e.g., .com, .net, etc.) is correct. Misspellings or incorrect domains can lead to websites that appear to be the store you were looking for but are actually sites designed to steal your personal information. LOOK FOR SIGNS THAT YOUR INFORMATION IS SECURE: Before you enter your credit card information on a website, make sure it has SSL (secure sockets layer) encryption installed. You can tell if a site uses encryption because the URL will start with https:// instead of just http:// (s stands for secure). In addition, a padlock will generally appear behind the URL or on the lower right corner of the computer screen. PROTECT YOUR COMPUTER AGAINST INTERNET THREATS: Protect your computer against threats by using anti-virus and anti-spyware software. Keep all software current with automatic updates. CREATE STRONG PASSWORDS: Passwords should be easy to remember and hard for others to guess. Passwords based on easily obtainable personal information (e.g., child’s name, pet’s name, etc.) should be avoided, and the longer the password the better. Passwords should include a combination of numbers, symbols, and upper and lower case letters. Unique passwords should be created for online access to all financial institutions. DON’T SHOP ON A PUBLIC COMPUTER: It is never a good idea to pay bills, perform banking transactions, shop or conduct other financial business on public or shared computers that are on public wireless networks. Only use your personal computer on wireless connections that you know are secure. USE COMMON SENSE: Watch out for scams. If a deal seems too good to be true, it probably is. Be wary of unsolicited email messages from charitable organizations or individuals asking for money. Don’t open attachments or click on the links in emails from unknown individuals or entities.

I hope you utilize these tips to keep your online shopping experience merry and bright. At the same time, you want to keep safe the money you’ve already earned, it’s good to use common sense by working with a Financial Advisor that holds themselves to a fiduciary standard. As an advisor, I have always worked in my client’s best interest by recommending objectives that are focused solely based on my Client’s individual goals and risk tolerance. My Raymond James & Associates office is located close to you in a central area easy for everyone to find or I can come directly to you, as I already have many clients in this area of Cedar City, Saint George, and Mesquite. Putting clients first is at our core, supported by a culture of conservative management, independence, and integrity – a combination that provides strength and stability through all kinds of market conditions and we take care of our client’s financial well-being through focusing on people, not products. I truly enjoy being an Advisor for Raymond James because along with a fundamental belief in doing what’s right, I can work with integrity on a daily basis and provide the highest caliber of service. I have over 25 years of experience working in several aspects of investments and different markets, focusing on the adult active 55+ communities. I also offer to clients a Trust and Charitable Planning Solutions and Services, if so needed. Just as you develop a long-term relationship with your doctors or attorneys, as your Financial Advisor, I want to establish a relationship that grows over time. I can provide you with access to some of the world’s most seasoned and respected investment professionals, a sophisticated trading and execution platform, and a vast spectrum of investment choices. Should you desire a second opinion or have any questions on your holdings, I create a comprehensive “no-cost” review of all outside investments such as IRA’s, 401K’s, Pension Plans, and Non-Qualified (taxable) accounts. I truly wish you and your family a safe and prosperous holiday season! V

Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member NewYork Stock Exchange/SIPC. Any opinions are those of Silverleaf Wealth Advisory of Raymond James and not necessarily those of RJA or Raymond James. The information has been obtained from sources considered to be reliable, but Raymond James does not guarantee that the foregoing material is accurate or complete. Any information is not a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making an investment decision and does not constitute a recommendation. Investing involves risk and you may or may not incur a profit or loss regardless of strategy selected.

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Mesquite's Veterans Day Parade

By Allan Litman

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esquite is excited, as the 24th annual Veterans Day Parade will soon be here. This year the parade will be held on Saturday, November 2nd and will start at the usual time of 10 a.m. The route starts by the Golden West Restaurant and Casino and continues to Arrowhead Lane. More units than ever are expected to participate and will come from as far as Salt Lake City, Utah. The parade was first held here in 1996 and was started by four local residents: Dave Riker, Tom McNulty, Dominic Montiglio, and Louis Neves. The family of Mr. Neves participates every year in honor of their father. Sue Barr was the secretary of the group for a number of years. Both Sue and her husband Lance are proud veterans and still residents of Mesquite. Other early committee members were Jeff Byrd, Cindy Sullivan, and John Paul. Some members have moved, and some have passed on, but the tradition of the Mesquite parade remains stronger than ever.

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In later years, veterans Harold Straley, his wife Pat, Ed Fizer and others took charge. I chaired the committee for 14 years until 2018. This year our Veterans Center will manage the parade under the direction of lady veteran Kristina Stevens. Prior to the parade, a service will be held at Veterans Park, starting at 7:45 am. Flags are placed on the graves of our veterans buried in both our cemeteries by our boy scouts and those attending our service that morning are encouraged to pay their respects. The parade starts at 10 am and will be followed by the third annual Hangar Dance at our airport. This event started by Larry LeMieux, is open to the public for a small admission fee, with the profits going to the Veteran Center. V

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view on MOTIVATION

The Benefits of Getting Organized By Judi Moreo

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etting organized is not just a good idea because the magazines on better ways to live tell us so. Whether in your personal life, your home, or your business, there are lots of benefits to being in control and developing a clutterfree lifestyle.

LESS STRESS When organized, you are automatically less stressed, you know where your keys, wallet, important papers, phone charger, and phone are. Similarly, if your project plan is up-to-date and you complete your reports on time, there’s no need to worry about on-the-spot requests for project updates or meetings. MORE TIME Planning your time and keeping up-to-date means you can allocate time for everything in your life, including downtime. Being organized means, you won’t get sidetracked or panicked by not being able to find important items. You’ll also be more punctual and more productive. READY FOR THE UNEXPECTED You can be prepared for last-minute invitations or requests because you’re not distracted by untidiness or the mental cloud of not being quite sure where things stand. This is true for everything from planning your company holiday party to that big community project you promised to oversee. BETTER HEALTH Studies have shown that being organized has demonstrable health benefits. Lower stress levels mean lower blood pressure and less body inflammation. Also, your immune system is stronger, and you’re less likely to be at risk of depression. This is a time of year when many people suffer from depression. Don’t let it be you. Better organization habits lead to better eating, exercise and sleep habits and that will keep you in a more positive frame of mind. THINGS DON’T FEEL SO OVERWHELMING Having your life running smoothly means you’re much calmer and in a better mental position to deal with things. You can look at your holiday to-do list without panicking because you know you can do it. Even though there is much more to do than usual, you know you can tackle the list task-by-task without feeling overwhelmed. MORE ENERGY It might seem counter-intuitive but putting effort into planning and organizing your busy life during the holiday season gives you more energy. You’re less stressed because your mind isn’t obsessing about all the stuff you have to do. When you have a plan, you’re in control and know you can get it all done. If your cabinets, drawers, desk, papers, ideas, decorations, and tasks are in order, you can see a way through. Life is no longer a chaotic mystery! Finally, being organized signals trust and reliability. If you are on time, follow through on your commitments and are ready for whatever comes at you, you will project an image of professionalism and responsibility. You will have less frustration and a much happier holiday season. You can do this. You are more than enough! V Though best known as a motivational speaker and personal development trainer, Judi Moreo is often hired as a coach by people wanting to increase business, write a book or speak on stages around the world. If your desire is to have more success, more recognition, more support, more peace of mind, and more happiness, let Judi help you build the confidence and skills to live the life you desire. (702) 283-4567

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ROOSTER COTTAGE

Fall Open House & Customer Appreciation Day By Carol Bulloch

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ooster Cottage Consignment Gallery is located at 748 West Pioneer Boulevard in Mesquite, Nevada. We have been in business for over 8 years now and have become an integral part of Mesquite and the surrounding communities. Rooster Cottage has a large inventory of “almost new� furniture and home decor items. We also have a Gift Boutique with a great selection of unique gift items, cards, jewelry, scarves, picture frames, and much much more! If you are one of our regular customers you know that the selection changes daily, there is literally something new to see every day, which is why our store is such a fun place to shop! Rooster Cottage is having our Fall Open House & Customer Appreciation Day on Saturday, November 9th, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. We invite you all to join us, this is a day we look forward to all year. We will have yummy refreshments, a free gift (one per household), drawings for gift certificates, new items in our gift shop and markdowns throughout the store. Come and spend the day with us! Dana and Carol Bulloch, the owners of Rooster Cottage, would like to wish our wonderful customers and consigners past, present, and future a happy Thanksgiving and a wonderful holiday season! We would also like to say Thank You to our fabulous employees. We are lucky to have such friendly, helpful and knowledgeable ladies working for us! Thank you to Mesquite and the surrounding communities for the continued support. Happy Holidays! V

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T-N-T

TNT for Christmas By Donna Eads

for Christmas

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he ultimate gift for any tennis player or fan is a trip to one of the ‘majors’. There are several tennis tour groups available but the Steve Furgal’s International Tennis Tours, Inc. is one of the best. Your trip is planned from start to finish with some of the best seats available at all their venues. Visit Melbourne, Paris, London, or New York City to see one of the major tennis tournaments. If that is not in your budget and you wish to stay closer to home, plan your trip to the Indian Wells BNP tournament in California during March. This tournament is noted as the ‘west coast US open’. Another idea is to attend a tennis camp or ranch. In Texas, the John Newcombe Tennis Ranch has been serving adults and juniors for 50 years. There are available centers around the entire country so just pick your state and you will find one ready to improve your game. Maybe go online to order courses if you cannot make this big trip. Many of these courses are less than $100 or get your own Lobster tennis ball machine with a smartwatch remote. For all of us club players, a new racquet is always a great idea. Many tennis websites such as Tennis Warehouse have a week-long trial time for you to use 4 to 5 racquets. As club players, a couple of good choices are the Prince Textreme Beast 100 Pro LB or Dunlop’s CX 200 Tour 18X20. So go online and use their racquet advisor to assist you on your trial of new racquets that match your playing level. If you don’t want a new racquet, try some new string such as Babolat VS Touch Natural Gut or Solinco Tour Bite 2.0. Of course, you must have a new bag to go with your new racquet. Wilson makes several backpack versions for all our bikers in the area. For the serious player that has more than 2 racquets, Babolat has their Team Line Max Backpack. For the ladies do not forget that there are beautiful tennis necklaces such as the racquet & ball lariat from Love Tennis by Hazel. A new outfit is always a great gift as well. Fila, Nike, or Lacoste have a wide selection just to name a few vendors. Now onto the game. Working on your game has to include your return of serve. First, work with your partner to see what the best idea is for your team. Here are three smart returns to consider. Lob into the backhand corner of your opponent’s court, neutralize a big serve with a deep shot to the middle of the court, or block the serve back as a drop shot, all tactics to consider. Note for 2020, the Mesquite Senior Games Tennis tournament will be later in March so our players and fans can enjoy the Indian Wells BNP tournament. Sign-up now for March 16th–19th and have fun now! See you on the courts and Happy Holidays! V

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L.V.C.V.A.

HOSPITALITY HERO AWARD GOES TO MESQUITE RESIDENT

Left to right: Cody Law- CEO Golf Mesquite Nevada, Olivia Gonzalez- Golf Mesquite Nevada Director of Operations, Oscar Goodman- Former Mayor of the City of Las Vegas, Showgirl and Ann Sunstrum- SNGA Executive Director (Initial Founder of Golf Mesquite Nevada

By Michelle Brooks

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year after year because they are comfortable with her, and she understands their needs and preferences. She is a great listener and her customers trust her to make good suggestions and handle their vacation plans flawlessly.

Over the years Oliva proved herself to be an exemplary employee. Promoted up through the ranks, she is now the company’s Director of Operations.

Cody told Olivia that she would need to attend a meeting with the L.V.C.V.A at the Venetian hotel in Las Vegas with him. As they waited in the hotel lobby for the “meeting” to start, former Las Vegas Mayor, Oscar Goodman, as well as Ann Sunstrum of the L.V.C.V.A and a founding member of Golf Mesquite Nevada walked through the Venetian’s front doors and presented her with the award.

livia Gonzalez was the second person ever hired at Golf Mesquite Nevada, a company that books golf vacation packages in Mesquite, when the company first started in 2002. Back then she worked part-time as a reservationist and didn’t realize that this would be a permanent job for her. But, as time went by, she found that it was a great environment to work in and she loved being there.

Cody Law, CEO of Golf Mesquite Nevada submitted Olivia for the Las Vegas Convention and Visitor Authority’s (L.V.C.V.A) Hospitality Hero Award for her sterling reputation with her customers. Oliva’s customers come back to her specifically,

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Oliva says she was very surprised and had no idea that she would be receiving the award that day. She is thankful for being recognized for her hard work and dedication and she would like to thank Cody Law and the L.V.C.V.A for the recognition. V


a Ȅecipe for success By Gerri Chasko

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n August of 2016, the Eureka Casino received a call from Virgin Valley High School. The Clark County School District had approved a culinary curriculum for the school and had hired an instructor, Chef Chris Noone. Unfortunately, the announcement was lacking some necessary components for success. Classes were to be held in an old Home Economics classroom that hadn’t been used for 7 years. There were no supplies – no food, no equipment, no refrigeration or small wares. The Eureka considered the value of a culinary arts program at the high school level. A culinary program might spark an interest in students to pursue careers in foodservice – chefs, sous chefs, prep cooks, line cooks, caterers, or kitchen managers. With an eye to the future, the Eureka stepped in and provided everything necessary to get the classes started, and have continued to provide support to ensure the success of the program. Now, four years later, the Culinary program is one of the most popular at the High School. Culinary 1 started with 65 students and has expanded to Culinary 1, 2 and 3 with over 200 students attending. Chef Noone has proven to be an outstanding instructor. While basic food preparation skills are covered, students attending the series can expect to learn how to work in the food and hospitality industry. Topics include plating, garnishing, safety, and sanitation regulations. A prime example of the class’s success is Logan Hendrick, a senior at VVHS, graduate of the Culinary series, and now a Eureka employee. For the last five months, Hendrick has been working in the pantry

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of Gregory’s Mesquite Grill. He’s been using skills he learned in class, but also skills taught to him by the more experienced restaurant staff. Logan admitted he was nervous at first but advises potential student employees not to be afraid to take advantage of the opportunities. After hearing about the origins and successes of the program Principal Riley Frei commented, “It’s exciting to know that we are providing real work experience to our students. Thank you to all our corporate partners for thinking outside the box and looking for ways to incorporate our students into their workforce.” Chef Noone agreed. “The students enjoy learning to cook for their families and friends, but knowing there are jobs they can step into right after graduation is an added bonus and motivator. Thank you to the Eureka for making this possible.” One afternoon the students tried their baking skills out on a new cookie, appropriate for the cool fall days. They were very pleased with the results and hope everyone will enjoy this recipe.

Chewȉ Moȁasses Cookies INGREDIENTS 1½ cups butter - softened 2 cups of sugar 2 large eggs, room temperature ½ cup molasses 4½ cups all-purpose flour 4 tsp ground ginger 2 tsp baking soda 1½ tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground cloves ¼ tsp salt ¾ cup coarse sugar DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350°. In a large bowl, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs and molasses. Combine the flour, ginger, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves, and salt. Gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well. Shape into 2 inch balls and roll in coarse sugar. Place 2½ inches apart on ungreased baking sheets Bake 13-15 minutes or until tops are cracked. Remove to wire racks to cool. V

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view on ENERGY

By Keith Buchhalter

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he Holidays are just around the corner, and it's that time of the year to find those boxes where we store our decorations. Outdoor Christmas lights are my favorite, and I love seeing the creativity and dedication of many when it comes to decorating their homes. Yes, we all have that neighbor that goes above and beyond. But let's be honest, it's a simple way to share the cheer and joy of the Holiday Season. Sharing is caring, and that's why, in this edition, I want to share with you the do’s and don’ts of outdoor Christmas lights.

Don'ts

DON'T hang lights by yourself while home alone and be sure to wear properly fitting clothing and gloves, so nothing gets caught or snagged. DON'T use a staple gun to attach holiday lights, it is an action that will get you on the naughty list. Not only will staples damage your home, but you could also damage the lights. One staple misfire can ruin an entire strand of lights. So, the first rule for safe decorating: Put down the staple gun.

Do's

DON'T overdo the power. If your lights continually trip the circuit breaker or GFCI, you probably have too many lights up.

DO plan your design. A good rule of thumb for decorating shrubs is 100 lights for every 1-1/2 ft. of tree or shrub you want to cover. Measure any straight lines you want to adorn with lights.

DON'T leave your lights on all hours of the night. Add a timer so you don't have to worry about burning energy at 5 a.m. This is a cost-effective way to enjoy your lights without paying for power used when no one can enjoy them.

DO invest in supplies rated for outdoor use. It's important to select lights, extension cords, power strips and timers that are rated for outdoor use; so they can stand up to moisture, precipitation, and weather changes. V

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view on DESIGN

Design

By Helen Houston

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for all seasons

hanging one or two large decorative accessories seasonally in a room can be a fun way to keep your rooms feeling fresh and interesting. We become accustomed to what we see every day, and over time we stop noticing the beauty of our things unless we occasionally move them around. To successfully freshen up interiors seasonally, ensure the vast majority of your rooms foundational items are neutral. Wall paint, upholstery, and rugs are all considered foundation items of a space. When these pieces are neutral, they give you a base to build upon. Although it may not be feasible or even desirable to change up the majority of the accessories in a room, changing out one or two major pieces each season is generally very doable. Focus on statement pieces that have visual impact and that are placed in a prominent location within a room to get the most bang for your effort. Here are some of the easiest and most inexpensive ways to change the appearance of your room:

photo credit: potterybarn.com

Decorative Pillows: Pillows can really change up the look of large items like your upholstery pieces and bed. If you’re lacking storage for the full pillow and insert change-outs, stick to your insert sizes and change out the pillow covers only. Pillow covers, when empty, fold flat to take up minimal space.

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Top of Bed: Your bed is likely the largest piece of furniture in your home, so what’s on it has a powerful impact on the visuals of your space. We spend about a third of our lives in bed, so make sure you love what you see and are comfortable sleeping with it. Changing up the duvet

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(or comforter), shams, decorative pillows and sheets are a quick and easy way to give your bedroom a seasonal makeover. Make sure that your seasonal options all work with the elements in your bedroom that will remain static, like your rug, wall color, drapery, and other large upholstered pieces.


Throws: Coordinate changing out your throw with changing out your decorative pillows for a more complete and directed change. Also, think about the different weights of throws available. You may want a lighter weight throw in a brighter color in the middle of summer and a darker, richer, and heavier throw in the winter.

Faux Fur Throws: westelm.com

Home Fragrance: Change scents with the season. A seasonal scent helps a room feel different, even if nothing else is changed. In spring, use a fresh citrus scent, in summer lemongrass mint and in fall use a five-spice or similar scent. In winter use sandalwood. Organic Elements: Change the organic elements in rooms to reflect the current season’s color palette. In summer and fall, you might showcase Golden Delicious apples. In the spring, bright green Granny Smith apples and Red Delicious in the winter. The same can be said for the color palette of orchids and cut flowers. By shifting their colors with the seasons, you subtly change the overall mood and tone of your rooms. Accessories: Not everything you own has to be out at the same time. You certainly wouldn’t wear every piece of jewelry you own at the same time, why is it any different for home décor? Rotating accessories is a wonderful way to truly appreciate all of the beautiful things you have accumulated over the years. Collect a few seasonal accessories and enjoy them for those exclusive times of the year. V Helen Houston is the owner of Staging Spaces and Redesign located in Mesquite. Helen is a credentialed Real Estate Stager, a certified color consultant, and professional custom drapery designer. Helen can be contacted at (702) 346-0246 or helen@stagngspaces.biz.

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view on BUSINESS

A HISTORIC Holiday Shopping EXPERIENCE By Ali Monsen

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ome for quality Christmas gifts, leave with a lot more! A truly unique shopping destination in St. George, Utah, Green Gate Village winds shoppers through a collection of beautiful shops with histories as vibrant as the handcrafted goods inside them. Each boutique is rich with culture, housed inside historic 19th and 20th-century buildings that have been preserved and restored over time. Step inside the first home ever built in St. George, enjoy an old-fashioned soda at the City’s earliest family-run business on record, and experience historic holiday spirit at the famous pioneer Christmas Cottage — all at your own pace – and all while perusing handmade jewelry, radical fashion wear, customscented candles, stylish home décor, and more! Enjoy a cultural shopping experience unlike any other, and don’t forget to take our Green Gate Village self-guided tour!

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Judd’s General Store, circa 1911 Located across the street from the Woodward school, Judd’s store has been a favorite place of every kid in town since 1911. Until it became a part of the village in 1982, Judd’s store was the oldest family-held business in St. George. Founded as a general mercantile, the store handled basic supplies – both groceries and dry goods, including clothes, kerosene, hay dry goods, and fabrics. Gas was even pumped at the curb, and one of the original pumps is now renovated and located in front of the store at its original location. The wood floors, custom shelves, and drawers are all original. Famous for hearty soups, warm breadsticks, nostalgic candy, and glass bottled sodas, it continues to be a favorite food stop for locals and travelers. Judd Bungalow, circa 1917 With a large part of the family assets located downtown, and in his new responsibility of operating Judd’s store, Joseph Judd built a family home on the corner of Tabernacle and 100 W. The structure was very modern compared to the neighboring adobe homes. The style, known as Prairie School Bungalow, had exterior walls of yellow brick – considered a luxury in these parts at the turn of the last century. Tapered columns and builtin cabinets with glass have been meticulously restored to their original luster.

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The Carriage House, circa 1911 (above left) The Carriage house stored the Judd family’s various forms of transportation. Originally, the only openings were large double doors facing the alley. During restoration, a front entrance and windows were framed into the 18-inch thick walls. Christmas Cottage, circa 1864 Originally located behind Andeline’s Gable House Restaurant on St. George Blvd. and 200 E, this is an original pioneer home. The “Christmas cottage” label stuck after Mike Andeline began selling holiday decorations from October-February in the home. Later, the Gable home was sold and demolished, while the cottage was taken down brick by brick and reassembled at Green Gate Village. Green Hedge Manor, circa 1872 The Green Hedge Manor was relocated to Green Gate Village from 239 S 200 E where it was built by the same Thomas Judd Sr., owner and operator of the Judd General Store. The home sat in the midst of huge Mulberry trees and behind a tall, untrimmed tamarack hedge surrounding most of the city block. In 1986, The Green Hedge Manor was scheduled for demolition by a local builder, with plans to build a condominium project on the property. Enough signatures from caring people in the community prevented the home’s destruction.

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Orson Pratt House, circa 1862 Named after the LDS Apostle who had built the home, the Orson Pratt House is recognized as the very first home built in St. George. The Pratt family only lived here for a short time before Orson was called to serve a mission in Austria. When purchased in 1981, the Pratt House was marked for demolition by the city due to significant decay. It has since been restored into a useable space. Bentley House, circa 1876 When William Bentley proposed to Mary Mansfield, he promised to build her a new home in the shadow of the Tabernacle. She accepted his proposal and construction began immediately. However, two weeks before their wedding day, he announced that he had sold the home to his brother. In her diary, Mary recorded, “I almost called the wedding off, but decided I was getting married ‘for better or for worse’ and I needed to learn that lesson right from the start.” When renovations began, hand-painted ‘oak’ doors and a ‘marble’ fireplace were found – still in their original condition – buried under decades of cobwebs and dust. Morris House, circa 1879 Originally built on the corner of 200 N Main for Orpha Morris, this home had deteriorated after many years of neglect and was marked for demolition to make way for


a new Post Office. Cables were wrapped around the home, and it was moved onto a truck bed for transportation; however, in the process, the truck broke an axle, and the house fell off the truck in a thunderous crash. It would have been easier to carry the rubble to the local dump, but with a significant amount of money already invested, the house was rebuilt with as much of the original material as possible. Tolley Cabin, circa 1881 The Tolley cabin was originally built on a small family farm in Nortonville, near Nephi. The house was the birthplace of 13 children. In the winter, the boys slept on the front porch enclosed with canvas and quilts. In the summertime, all the Tolley children slept outdoors under the apple trees. The Tolley home was moved to St. George in 1989 with the help of a historical architect who meticulously cataloged each board, doorframe, and window sash before it was dismantled. Also located in the vicinity of Green Gate Village are other historical landmarks such as the St. George Tabernacle and Brigham Young's Winter Home. St. George is a community rich in history as a crossroads of the American Southwest, and we want to share it with you. Happy holiday shopping and see you soon! V Green Gate Village | 76 West Tabernacle Street, St. George, UT 84770 | (435) 767-7658

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MESA VIEW MEDICAL GROUP

WELCOMES NEW SURGEON

By Soon 0. Kim, MD, General Surgeon, Board Certified

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is the season for moving and for meeting new people! Let me introduce myself: My name is Soon Kim, MD, and I am a Board Certified General Surgeon.

My husband and I have recently relocated to beautiful Mesquite from the New Mexico area and we are thrilled to make our home here. I look forward to providing general surgical care to patients in the Virgin and Moapa Valleys at Mesa View Regional Hospital. To give you a brief biography, I earned my medical degree from the University of Illinois, College of Medicine and completed my surgical residency at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Over the years I have been licensed in seven states as well as the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. With more than 27 years as a general surgeon, I have experience with a broad range of surgical procedures including endoscopy, gastrointestinal, and laparoscopic surgery. My preference is to provide laparoscopic surgery when appropriate as this approach is less invasive and more likely to have an increased cosmetically positive result.

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My practice philosophy is to under-promise, over-deliver and treat my patients with respect, honesty, and dignity. Now for more about making the most of your year! It's so easy to get caught up in the holiday season and forget to take advantage of your insurance benefits. However, the holidays are a good time to schedule doctors' visits and to have elective surgeries. It's also a good time to recover before you return to work in January! Gallbladder surgery and hernia repair are a couple of my most frequent procedures. Some other suggestions for end of the year services include; Colonoscopy, Endoscopy (GERO), screening Mammography and Pulmonary Function Testing. Whether you have already met your deductible or are using a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), you have until the end of December to make sure you get the most out of your benefits! Dr. Kim is currently welcoming patients of all ages.V Dr. Kim is located at Mesa View Medical Group, 1301 Bertha Howe Avenue Suite #8, Mesquite, NV. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 702-346-1700 or visit: MesaViewMedical.com.


view on CHARITY

Growth in Giving By Stephanie Frehner

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t has been just five years since Mesquite saw its first Parade of Lights. This year’s event is ramping up to be the biggest one yet. While the lights are pretty, and the creativity of participants seems to never end, it's giving back to the community that drives this event to the winner’s circle every year. The first Mesquite Parade of Lights was born out of a challenge in 2015 when founders Mike and Debbie Benham were told that it would never amount to anything. Critics insisted that people would rather stay home than to participate in another parade, especially in the cold December weather that can occupy Mesquite. But the community turned that challenge into a new tradition. After partnering with the Eureka Casino Resort and raising just 1,000 pounds of food in 2015, Benham had hoped to double it for 2016. With the help of some special people, and adding a partnership with the City of Mesquite, the 2016 parade raised over 6,000 pounds of food. The Benhams were shocked, as were the benefactors of the fundraiser, Virgin Valley Food Bank, and the Salvation Army. From then on, there was little doubt that this idea of yet another parade in Mesquite could make a difference on so many levels.

The statistics from 2017 and 2018 continued the upward trend, as each year does better than the rest. This year’s event, scheduled for December 5, is aiming to raise more than 10,000 pounds of food for the community. Food will be gathered from six locations: City Hall, Mesquite Senior Center, Mesquite Rec Center, Sun City Mesquite Rec Center, Fire Station 3 and Mesquite Police Department. Food is also gathered from participants’ entry fees of 15 lbs each as well as donations by spectators along the parade route who bring food the night of the event. The food is collected along the parade route by Mesquite’s Boy Scouts with shopping carts on loan from Smith’s Food & Drug Store and then distributed evenly to the Salvation Army and Virgin Valley Family Services, who both supply hundreds of families with food every week. Virgin Valley Food Bank Director Leslee Montgomery says that the event has helped immensely, especially during the time of year when many go hungry and resources are slim. “We serve over 300 families a month,” Montgomery said. “Having such a large donation in December helps keep our costs down when we take care of so many families.”

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Stephanie Woolley, Director of Social Services at the Salvation Army said that they also help more than 500 families a month, including emergency food boxes and senior food assistance. To assist in reaching this year’s lofty goal, Benham and the Mesquite Parade of Lights Committee decided to step up efforts in both parade participation and community involvement. The creation of the website, https://mesquiteparades.wixsite.com/parade, and a Facebook page, www.facebook.com/mesquiteparadeoflights, started early in July to boost awareness and diversify the experience for everyone. As the parade begins each year, several local Boy Scouts take shopping carts loaned by Smith’s Food & Drug down the parade route to gather canned food donated by spectators. Thanks to their help, the amount of food donated has continued to increase, as have the other aspects of the event.

This year’s theme is Parade of Music, giving participants a multitude of options for creating the perfect float. If a group chooses to use music as part of their display, it will be welcomed, but it is not required. With the creativity of Mesquite’s residents and businesses, simply displaying an interpretation of a holiday song could be the winning factor in winning a prize. In addition to previous years’ categories, Best Lights, Best Group Participation and Best Theme, this year’s celebration will add Mayor’s Choice and People’s Choice awards, with the latter available on Facebook after the parade. If more than 30 entries were received for the parade, there may be awards for up to three places in each category.

Aravada Ranch brought some beautiful horses to lead them down Mesquite Boulevard in the 2018 Mesquite Parade of Lights.

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The contest for Most Food will continue to be a friendly competition between the Mesquite Police Department and Mesquite Fire and


Rescue. All awards will be given at the Participant Awards Dinner on December 12 and will be released on the website and Facebook pages as soon as possible thereafter. The 5th Annual Mesquite Parade of Lights will begin promptly at 5:30 p.m. at Arrowhead Lane and will continue Eastbound on Mesquite Boulevard before making a final left at Willow Lane. Parade-goers are encouraged to bring two cans of food to donate to the event and will be collected by the Boy Scouts that will precede the floats on the south side of the boulevard. After the parade, children may gather at City Hall, 10 E. Mesquite Boulevard, to enjoy some hot cocoa and cookies donated by the Eureka Resort as well as partake in a photo opportunity with Santa and Mrs. Claus, who will be arriving with the 1963 Seagrave Fire Engine and Mesquite Fire and Rescue at the end of the parade. V For further information and to learn more about the Mesquite Parade of Lights, check out the website: https://mesquiteparades.wixsite.com/parade and Facebook page: www.facebook.com/mesquiteparadeoflights or contact Tracy Beck or Stephanie Frehner at 702-346-5295. The deadline for participants is Wednesday, November 27th at noon.

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ShowgiRls of Mesquite By Becky Boyd

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ou might see them in anything from sequined jackets and top hats while selling raffle tickets, to being decked out in full Showgirl regalia with feathered headdresses and welcoming you to a special event anywhere around town. As diverse as the costumes and members are, so are the groups they work with. Yes, I am talking about The Mesquite Showgirls. The organization started in 2011 by founder Jean Watkins and has grown in members and recognition over the past 8 years. Starting with just 3 girls at their first event the group now boasts about 12 Showgirls, 4 Guest Showgirls, 6 Cameo Showgirls and a handful of "show guys" too. The Mesquite Showgirls have now done over 500 appearances. The Showgirls are made up of women of all shapes and sizes with big smiles, volunteer hearts, and the love of their community. In fact, the majority of the ladies are 60+ in age (there might even be a few in their 70's but we won't tell who), so age or size has nothing to do with being one of the showgirls. While they might not sing and they might not dance, they have a lot of fun helping out local companies and organizations such as Eureka, CasaBlanca, Rising Star, Sun City, The Chamber of Commerce, and the Mesquite Community Theater by adding a little extra razzle-dazzle to their events with their fun costumes, bright personalities, and welcoming smiles. “Their costumes number well over 5,000 pieces and can fill a warehouse and vary in colors and designs for just about every occasion,” noted founder Jean Watkins. “The ladies involved in this organization play a very special role in the Mesquite community with their pleasing, outgoing personalities and are always asked to come back for the next fun event.” The Showgirls are an all-volunteer non-profit organization funded by an annual fundraiser, the “Denim and Diamond Valentines Day Dinner and Dance,” which will be held on Valentines Day, February 14th, 2020. They recently added a new fundraiser. Making its debut this year, the Showgirls held a Bingo Bash in October to raise funds. The Mesquite Showgirls are always looking for new members so if you're looking for something fun to do while dressing up in amazing costumes, helping out the local community and meeting other ladies close to your age, then consider joining this amazing group of gals – no matter what event they are involved in FUN is the name of the game. V For more information about Mesquite Showgirls, to join, or donate contact Becky Boyd at (801) 699-9947.

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Mesquite’s Newest Shopping Experience By Jayne Kendrick

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emember when a walk down Main Street was really a stroll and you stopped to window shop and look at anything and everything. It was an enjoyable excursion that lasted all day long and, of course, would include lunch at your favorite diner. There were dime stores and shoe stores, Ladies and Men’s apparel stores and even haberdasheries. Shopping was enjoyable. Stroll down Main Street in Mesquite, where? Well… maybe not right now as we have streets that are main thoroughfares but give it time and with Mesquite’s growth we will have a “Main Street”. Meanwhile, take a stroll through Auntie Jayne’s Collectables, Gifts, and Sundries located inside the office of JL Kendrick Company Inc., a bookkeeping and tax practice at 742 West Pioneer Boulevard Suite F. The idea to open Auntie Jayne’s came while Owner, Jayne Kendrick was contemplating about what to do with the interesting items that were inherited from her Mother and Grandmother, As an avid fan of the TV show American Pickers, and knowing that our visitors and Snowbirds would love more places to shop, the store became a reality in late July.

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Although the store is a bit small, you will find eclectic and unique items from all over the world. “Our Purpose is to Re-purpose” and with one-of-a-kind old and new items, we can create some really great and different gifts or gift baskets for anniversaries, birthdays, baby showers, hostess gifts, weddings, or just because. Currently, the store is open Thursday– Saturday 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM, but if someone is at the office on the other days, please feel free to drop in and they can assist with any purchases. We will buy, sell or trade and are currently seeking products such as jewelry, soaps, lotions, cards or agricultural products to buy and display. To add to the whimsical nature of the store, there will be pre-potted plants of succulents, flowers, indoor plants, pre-packaged food items, and essential oils. The staff would love to see you and share with you the stories and many items we currently have for sale. After all, everything has a story! V

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SP TLIGHT ON

KONY Coins for Kids

PROVIDING CHRISTMAS PRESENTS FOR UNDERPRIVILEGED KIDS FOR 31 YEARS

By Michelle Brooks

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hirty-one years ago, a couple of people at a Washington County, Utah radio station, "99.9 KONY Country" wanted to help a few struggling families buy Christmas presents for their kids. Today, KONY Coins for Kids raises money to help up to 2700 kids in Washington County have the Christmas they deserve. Brian Musso and his wife, Kathy were no strangers to helping families provide happy Christmases for their children. In 1998 they had long been sponsoring a different family each Christmas who needed help with Christmas dinner and Christmas presents for their kids. That year, due to their own difficulties, Brian and Kathy found that they were unable to accomplish their standing tradition. That is until they walked into Walmart to find a whole bunch of people scurrying around with clipboards and toy-filled shopping baskets, smiling, laughing and having a great time. Brian and Kathy stopped one of the intriguing shoppers and asked, “What is everyone doing?” They were told that they were shopping for Christmas presents for KONY Coins for Kids and that each person carried a clipboard that listed the wants and wishes of children whose parents were unable to provide the items themselves. Their next question was, “How can we help?”

They jumped in immediately. The group needed help with wrapping presents, they told them, and Brian decided to stop by at lunchtime the following day and wrap as many presents as he could. Once back at his office that afternoon he found that he couldn’t concentrate, he wanted to go back. Since Brian is self-employed he decided to leave the office and headed back to the wrapping party where he stayed until they were finished at 11:30 that night. Brian also learned that they needed delivery people to deliver all the wrapped presents the following day. All the delivery people dress up as Santa Claus, so Brian followed suit and recruited some elves that were otherwise his kids and they set off to make a lot of kids really happy. Brian remembers one boy in particular that he met on his maiden voyage. He and the elves were handing out presents to siblings at a particular house. Suddenly a young boy spoke up and asked, “Santa, why don’t you have any presents for me?” After the initial shock and then the realization that the boy’s name somehow had not made it on the list, Santa Brian replied, “Well, the elves must have messed up!” and he asked the boy what it was that he really wanted for Christmas.

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Santa Brian and his elves raced back to see if there was anything left, praying that there just happened to be a Lego set lying around. But a football and a few army men were the only toys that didn’t make it to a child’s home that day. So, it was another trip to Walmart where Brian bought the coveted Lego set for the boy. When the board members found out what had happened, they thought he would be a good fit for their team and asked him to join their ranks. Brian has now been on the Coins for Kids board for twenty-one years and he has been the group’s Chairman for fourteen years. He says this charity is his passion. In the thirty-one years since its inception, the KONY Coins for Kids program has grown by many hundreds of volunteers and many hundreds of kids. In 2009, at the height of the recession, Coins for Kids provided Christmas presents for 2700 kids in nine hundred families. Thankfully that is not always the case but the number of children they help each year can still be an amazing 1800 kids from up to six hundred families. On the volunteer side of things, up to six hundred dedicated people turn out every year to make Coins for Kids happen. They shop, wrap and deliver and it’s all done in just three days.

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On day one, five to six hundred shoppers descend on Walmart. With clipboards in hand and smiles on their faces, the group zips around the isles, collecting toys and supplies for the kids on their lists. Brian says it’s like Black Friday, but everyone is happy and having a great time.

Brian explained that Coins for Kids is a two-way street, making a difference for those who need help and the people that are helping. It provides hundreds of families with help at Christmastime and it provides many opportunities for those that want to help but may not have money to spend.

Day two is wrapping day. Four-hundred volunteers turn out to wrap up to six thousand presents. That is a heck of a lot of wrapping paper! They start at 8:00 A.M. and usually finish around 1:30 in the afternoon. There are no more late nights as there were in the old days thanks to the hundreds of dedicated wrappers.

All the money to make this magic happen is raised locally and the charity does not receive any grants or funds from the government. Their yearly goal is to raise $125,000 to pay for presents, wrapping paper, and supplies. One hundred percent of the members of the board, shoppers, wrappers, and Santas alike are volunteers and there is not one paid employee in the group.

Day three is delivery day. All deliverers still get a Santa costume although not all have their own elves to bring along. Delivery is facilitated in any way each Santa can get the presents to the kids. One group of ten to fifteen Santas from Bikers Against Child Abuse roll into their assigned neighborhoods together, bike engines roaring. Not quite the excitement of having reindeer and a big slay roll up but still pretty amazing, I’m sure! Many of the same people volunteer year after year, some have been there since the beginning, thirty-one years ago. Brian expressed how enjoyable and reassuring it is to see the same faces in the same places every single year.

Families can use KONY Coins for Kids up to three times in a ten-year period. Around Thanksgiving, volunteers begin doing interviews at their application center. Parents that pass the means test are asked how many children they have and what they want and need. That information is loaded into a database and becomes the lists our happy shoppers eventually carry on their clipboards. From just a few families thirty-one years ago to nearly nine hundred families today, KONY Coins for Kids and its hundreds of amazing volunteers are able to help struggling families have a very Merry Christmas year after year. V If you would like to learn more about KONY Coins for Kids, please go to CoinsForKids.net or call 435-634-6210.

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Rediscovering the Greater Mesquite Arts Foundation By Christopher K. Finnegan

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ince its humble beginnings in 2007, the Greater Mesquite Arts Foundation (GMAF) has helped sculpt the arts and culture scene in Mesquite, Nevada. Initially seeing the need for a local community theatre in town, they decided to create one and took it upon themselves to do so. Using a $300,000 grant awarded to them by the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Mesquite (RDA) that same year, they began renovating what used to be the Virgin Valley High School (VVHS) auditorium turning it into what is now the Mesquite Community Theatre (MCT) in the process. After theatre renovations were complete, GMAF entered a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the City of Mesquite to manage the newly created space.

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Over the next 10 consecutive years, they proficiently managed the MCT with resounding success! During this time GMAF helped solidify the burgeoning local arts and culture scene by giving much needed financial support to many of the now thriving non-profit arts organizations in town like the Virgin Valley Artists Association (VVAA), Virgin Valley Theatre Group (VVTG), and Mesquite Toes Dance Troupe among many others. In 2016 the RDA granted GMAF an additional $60,000 for a much-needed theatre lighting upgrade project. Upon completion of theatre upgrades in 2017, the VVTG agreed to officially take over theatre management under a new MOU with the City of Mesquite.


It was shortly after the theatre management transition took place that GMAF having completed its original mission with aplomb, quietly vanished. The organization became almost completely inactive and remained so until January 2019 when it was brought back to life with an almost entirely new board of directors, vision, purpose, direction, and determination for success! It’s new purpose to vastly bolster and broaden the local arts and culture scene while providing new and unique arts-related experiences to the citizens of Mesquite and dramatically increasing the visibility of local non-profit arts organizations and artists outside of town. Through the establishment of strategic partnerships with non-profit arts and culture organizations located both in and around town, GMAF is actively positioning itself to best achieve its new vision establishing Mesquite, Nevada as a “Destination for the Arts.” Since being reformed, GMAF has provided sponsorship for marketing efforts by the Mesquite Toes Dance Troupe and co-produced a very successful Variety Show Fundraiser for the Women’s History and Culture Center in June 2019 at the community theatre.

They’re also actively working towards bringing amazing talent from all over the world into Mesquite to perform in the various wonderful venues around town throughout the year. Some of the events on the horizon include various film festivals, an art & wine festival, a Day of the Dead festival and many, many others. Sarah O’Connell and Eat More Arts Vegas have partnered with GMAF to bring Vegas arts and culture to Mesquite and vice versa. This year is the first year GMAF was invited to attend the 6th Annual Las Vegas Valley Theatre Awards as the official arts and culture representatives of Mesquite. Irma Varela of the Winchester Dondero Cultural Center in Vegas has partnered with GMAF to help them develop multicultural arts experiences for the vastly underserved minority communities in town. If you or someone you know is interested in partnering with GMAF, joining their organization, volunteering in general, or simply wish to share artistic talent with others, please don’t hesitate to contact them! V For more information please visit: www.MesquiteArts.com or call Chris Finnegan, GMAF President at (702) 482-9656.

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Hidden Ca$h In Your Drawer By Kelsey Stipek

We all have jewelry that is hiding away in an old jewelry box or some forgotten drawer that we either bought for ourselves, received as a gift, or inherited from loved ones. After trying, and failing, to give the jewelry to our kids, we think to sell these items for cash. The price of gold, diamonds and Rolex watches have reached all-time highs. Now is the ideal time to clean out your old jewelry box and safety deposit box to liquidate the value it holds into cash you can use today. You may not realize it, but a broken and worn bracelet is worth just as much as a new bracelet. Your smaller diamonds are always worth money and your larger diamonds are now worth a great deal more.

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Many companies blow through town promising to pay the highest amounts. Have you ever stopped to think about the costs that these traveling buyers have to pay to visit your town? They pay for newspaper ads, television ads, and radio ads to inform you they are coming. They also rent convention space, hotel rooms, personnel, food, airfare, rental car, etc. All of these costs have to be paid BEFORE they make any profit from buying your items. Who do you think is paying for all of these costs? That's right‌ you are! They have to pay you much much less for what your items are truly worth in order to cover these costs. As an alternative, you may think to go to a local pawn shop for a quick liquidation; NEVER DO THIS. Your items are worth


real money and worth much more. Some people are unaware that pawn shops try to cut you down to the lowest possible price when purchasing your items. They are not in the jewelry business. They do not keep your items, they sell your items. YOU DON'T NEED THESE GUYS and you can do the EXACT same thing! Don't give away your money, this money belongs to you. Don't be fooled. Cut out these middlemen, no pawn shops, no traveling jewelry buyers. You can receive the same high amounts they do.

So where should you go? Go straight to a custom jeweler that manufacturers their own jewelry. When you are deciding on which jewelry store to take your items to, be sure to select a reputable long-standing jewelry store. Someone who has been in business for decades, there aren't many left in the world. But there IS ONE‌ and they are VERY close to us! Michael E. Minden Diamond Jewelers has been servicing the greater Las Vegas area for over 30 years and has earned the highest reputation as the most trusted jeweler in Las Vegas. Michael E. Minden Diamond Jewelers has extensive knowledge in the industry, strong reliable roots within the

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community, and has the integrity to tell you the true value of your items! They are licensed and their expert staff evaluate your items in front of you. They purchase unwanted gold, diamonds, jewelry, watches, and silver- in any condition to repurpose the materials to create their beautiful custom jewelry. It is worth the drive to Las Vegas for all of the additional money you’ll receive. I know what you're thinking, Las Vegas and a lot of traffic, but let me tell you the secret time to travel to Las Vegas to avoid traffic. You want to arrive in Las Vegas around 10 am, Michael E. Minden Diamond Jewelers is really easy to get to, take the I-15 freeway and exit off Spring Mountain Road. Located in the Fashion Show Mall, there is free self-parking or free valet parking at Saks Fifth Avenue, take the elevator to the top floor and you'll have a wonderful visit with the Michael E. Minden Diamond Jewelers staff. They'll treat you kindly, respectfully, they’ll pay you right away and you'll be back home by 1 pm and you'll miss all the traffic! If you leave Las Vegas after 3:30, traffic starts to get busy. Come in the morning, leave in the early afternoon. There are 12 wonderful places to eat lunch in the Fashion Show Mall, it's safe, it's clean and best of all, you'll go home with lots of money in your pocket! V Michael E. Minden Diamond Jewelers, Las Vegas’ favorite family jeweler, one location, the most honest, open every day. never go anywhere else whether it be a repair, an upgrade, a birthday or anniversary your celebrating or even just to get your jewelry cleaned and inspected. Call for your appointment, all evaluations are free! Located at 3200 Las Vegas Blvd South Suite #2475 , Las Vegas, NV 89109 | (702) 253-5588

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INTRODUCING

Jessica Gorgoglione, WHNP-BC

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did not discover my career path until I became a mother. It actually happened during delivery when I watched a look of terror spread across my husband’s face and knew he was not going to be much help. The team of nurses was my rock, and I realized I wanted to be a nurse and help people, too. After I graduated, all the labor and delivery jobs were full, so I took a position in the cardiac unit, crossed trained to ICU, and became a Stroke certified nurse. This gave me a great foundation in general health and wellness. After seven years, I decided to follow my true calling and went to work in an OB/GYN clinic. This is where my story of how I ended up in Mesquite begins. I worked with Dr. Susan Howey, who taught me everything she knew so that I could educate our patients. What I love about clinic nursing is that we get to know the patients, their families, and we follow them for years. They feel like friends! I decided I wanted to return to school and become a Women's Health Nurse Practitioner. When Dr. Howey, my mentor and now my dear friend, decided to move to Saint George, Utah, I had to adjust my dream of working with her as an NP.

After I graduated from Loyola University-Chicago, I practiced in a community health clinic for low income/underinsured patients for 18 months. This wonderful experience helped me find unique ways to help people with little or no resources. Then I received a call from Dr. Howey who said her colleague, Dr. Edward Ofori, was looking for an NP. I enjoy the windy, -20 degree, gloomy days and nights of Chicago as much as the next girl, but my husband and I had discussed moving west when our youngest graduated from high school. Once I met Dr. Ofori and his staff, I was sold! I am excited to be part of an OB/GYN clinic that has served the community for over 15 years. I am confident that I will live up to the expectations of my job, because I genuinely care and want to provide the best care for our patients. Now, since moving from a colder, unpredictable climate, my new challenge is to switch my love of Netflix binges for the great outdoors! V

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One Thousand Flags By Paul Benedict

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he Exchange Club of Mesquite invites you to again be part of an awe-inspiring Mesquite tradition as they present the 14th annual One Thousand Flags Over Mesquite Field of Honor© to our military and our veterans.

Over Mesquite

The field of 1000 American flags will be assembled on the west field of the Mesquite Recreation Center on Sunday morning, November 10th, and will stand proudly until November 17th, 24 hours a day, rain or shine. Of course, the field is lighted at night, and volunteers from our community will maintain a watchful vigil at the field every minute of every day.

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The Exchange Club of Mesquite Foundation is a major supporter of local veterans’ programs and services right here in the Virgin Valley, and One Thousand Flags Over Mesquite is a primary fundraiser. We invite you to sponsor a flag for $35 each, and you will be given a ribbon of remembrance to attach to your flag in honor of or in memory of an important veteran in your life. There is room on the dedication tag to add your own words of recognition. Remember, One Thousand Flags Over Mesquite honors every veteran, living or deceased.

We welcome help from young and old alike in setting up the field at 9:00 AM on Sunday, November 10.

On Veterans Day, Monday, November 11, at 6:00 PM, your presence is encouraged at a stirring ceremony at the field, including special musical performances, guest speakers, and presentations.

Visit the field – once or often. The sense of patriotism you will feel cannot be described; you simply have to experience it for yourself. Be sure to bring your camera, as the precision and grandeur of the display is truly memorable, day or night.

One Thousand Flags Over Mesquite will conclude with a final inspiring ceremony on Sunday, November 17 at 2:00 PM, which will include a dignified flag retirement ceremony by Mesquite Fire and Rescue.

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After the closing ceremony, you are welcome to either take the flag you sponsored home to display proudly, or donate it back to the project, to be included in next year’s One Thousand Flags Over Mesquite. In either case, keep your dedication ribbon as a reminder of your special veteran. The Exchange Club offers special thanks to some of our major supporters: Eureka Casino & Hotel, Adonai Landscaping, Bank of Nevada, The Lindi Corporation, and H&R Block. V For more information, please call 702-377-1465 or visit us on the web at www.healingfield.org/mesquite19/.

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BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY

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BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY

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BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY

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BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY

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ADVERTISING DIRECTORY

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Ace Hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Mesa View Medical Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Aguilar Mobile Carwash. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Mesquite Fine Arts Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111,118

All Secure Storage LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Mesquite Link Realty LLC - Deb Parsley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

Anytime Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Mesquite Tile & Flooring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Aravada Springs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Mesquite Veterinary Clinic – Peggy Purner DVM . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Area Senior Centers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Mesquite Women's Clinic - Edward N. Ofori. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

Arizona Horseride. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Mitchell Oldewurtel - Raymond James & Assoc. . . . . Inside Back Cover

Auntie Jayne's Consignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Moapa Valley Mortuary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Bank of Nevada. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

Mortgage Mate LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Beehive Homes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

MPD/OHV Inspections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Bob's Tax Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

MVP Productions – Kris Zurbas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

C & J Shutters, Blinds, Flooring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Nevada Bank and Trust. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Center for the Arts at Kayenta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

NRC - The Reserve - Shawn & Colleen Glieden. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

City Wide Golf Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

NRC – Boulder Heights – Shawn & Colleen Glieden. . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Clea's Realty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Odyssey Landscaping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Coyote Willows Golf Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Oral & Facial Surgery Center of Mesquite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Danielle's Chocolates and Popcorn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Ovation by Avamere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Back Cover

Dave Amodt Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Pioneer Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Deep Roots Harvest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Pirate's Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Del Webb – Sun City Mesquite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Polynesian Pools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115,118

Desert Oasis Spa & Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

Preston's Medical Waste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Desert Pain Specialists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Preston’s Shredding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

ERA – Sharon Szarzi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Rager & Sons Refrigeration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Eureka Casino Resort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover,

Red Rock Golf Center - Rob Krieger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Eureka Casino Resort - Book Your Holiday Party. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Reliance Connects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Farmers Insurance – Bill Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

Re/Max Ridge Realty – Cindy Risinger Team. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52,53

Friends of Gold Butte. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Re/Max Realty - Patricia Bekeris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Front Porch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Rooster Cottage Consignment Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Galaxy T Graphix - Tara Schenavar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45,116

Shop, Eat, Play Moapa Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Great Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Silver Rider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

GRI Firearms LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Staging Spaces and Redesign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Guillen – Heating, Cooling & Refrigeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

State Farm – LaDonna Koeller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

Hangey's Custom Upholstering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

State Farm - Lisa Wilde. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

Heritage Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Sugars Home Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Iceberg Air Conditioning & Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Sun City Realty - Renald Leduc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Judi Moreo – Speaker, Author, & Coach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104, 117

The Inside Scoop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Katz KupCakery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

The Lindi Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Keller Williams – Beverly Powers Uhlir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

The Party People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66,83

Keller Williams - Michelle Hampston & Tiffani Jacobs. . . . . . . . . . . 18

The Travel Connection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Ken Garff Mesquite Ford – Dave Heath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Tuacahn Amphitheatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Kids for Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Virgin Valley Dental. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Kitchen Encounters/Classy Closets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Virgin Valley Heritage Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

La dé Paws Grooming Salon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Virgin Valley Mortuary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Lamppost Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Washington Federal Bank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Mary Bundy Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Xtreme Stitch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Mesa Valley Estates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,111

Yogi Window Cleaning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119

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November - December 2019

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November - December 2019

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