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Language Learning at VIS   Completion date: June 2018 


Table of Contents The School’s Language Policy

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The Language Curriculum Review Committee

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Primary School Secondary School

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The School’s Language Philosophy

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The structure for the delivery of languages at VIS

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The Language of Instruction - English

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English A

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Primary English Language Secondary English Language and Literature

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German A

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Mother Tongue Languages

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Language Acquisition at VIS

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English Language Acquisition (ELA) and English B German B Romance Languages - French and Spanish

20 22 24

Appendix

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Academic Language (English) Languages B Secondary School

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The School’s Language Policy

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The Language Curriculum Review Committee

The Language Curriculum Review was led by the Secondary Principal,  Elisabeth Stanners and comprised the following members: 

Primary School

Christine Lang – Principal Vanessa Reid – Subject Leader: Language  Paola Devenport – Department Leader: ELA  Sabrina Hafenscher – Department Leader: German A and B  Tamsin Roberts – Mother Tongue Coordinator  With contributions from:  Matthew Kimber – IBPYP Coordinator  David Steele – ELA teacher 

Secondary School

Kathleen Waller – Department Leader: Language A English Noemi Linnau – Department Leader: German A and B  Victoria Rodriguez – Department Leader: Romance Languages (French  and Spanish)  Eva Fuchs – Department Leader English B (ELA)   Bettina Schwarz- Mother Tongue Coordinator (IBMYP)  Henrike Schauer – Mother Tongue Coordinator (IBDP)  Klaus Redl – Second in Department: German A and B  With contributions from:  Joe O’Rourke – IBMYP Coordinator  Will Johnson – IBDP Coordinator       

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The School’s Language Philosophy

The  aim  of  this  document  is  to  outline  the  language  philosophy  of  the  school,  highlighting  the  practical  meaning  of  the  opening  statement  of  the  Language  Policy  of  Vienna  International  School,  adopted  in  2011:  ​All  teachers are teachers of language.  The  VIS  learning  community  views  language  as  the  foundation  of  all  learning.  It  is  the  pre-eminent  way  of  knowing or meaning-making system,  alongside  and  interacting  with  other  meaning  making  systems  such  as  mathematics,  art  or  music.  Language  is  the  indispensable  tool  for  developing  cognitive  skills:  “We  build  our  understanding  of  the  world  by  1 interacting with knowledgeable others using language. ”  Teachers  at  VIS  do  not  take  language  for  granted,  by  viewing  it  as  a  2 neutral  ‘conduit’   that  simply  transports  the  content  of  their  teaching.  On  the  contrary,  in  recognition  that  this  content  itself  is  constructed  in  language,  teachers  across  all  curriculum  areas  are  naturally  involved  in  3 addressing students’ language and literacy development.   All  faculty  at  VIS  bring  considerable  knowledge  of  and  facility  in  one  or  more  languages.  We  recognise,  however,  that  ​knowing  language  is  not  enough  to  be  effective  teachers  of  language.  We  need  also  to  ​know  about​ it.  There are three major aspects to what we know about language:  1. Language  changes  depending  on  subject  matter.  These  changes  are  not  limited  to  subject  specific  vocabulary,  but  also  extend  to  the  varying  grammatical  choices  needed  to create successful texts  in varying subject areas.    2. Language  changes  depending  on  who  is  communicating  with  whom.  Friends  talk  and  write  to  each  other  in  a  different  way  than  they  would  to  complete  strangers; likewise, teachers make different  language  choices  when  talking  to  each  other, with students or with  parents.    3. Language  changes  depending  on  whether  it  is  spoken  or  written.  Written  language, in its power to categorize, discipline and structure  4 thought,  characterizes  the  process  of  education.   Written  texts  in  the various subject areas are structured in different ways.    Polias, J: The role of language in learning ​How Language Works, ​DECS South Australia 2011  Reddy, Michael (1993). “The Conduit Metaphor.” In Andrew Ortony (ed.), ​Metaphor and Thought  (pp. 164-201). Cambridge U.K.: Cambridge University Press.  3 Christie,F​, ​http://www.interstrataltension.org/?p=1159  4 Halliday, MAK, ​Language in the order of nature I​ n Halliday MAK and Martin JR (1993): ​Writing  Science: Literacy and discursive power  1 2

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This knowledge  about  language  can  be  represented  usefully  for  students  in a simple graphic:   

  At  one  end  of  this  language  continuum,  there  is  everyday  language,  spoken  by  a  novice;  at  the  other,  there  is  technical/descriptive/creative  language,  written  by  an  expert.  To  the  Basic  Interpersonal  Communicative  Skills  (BICS)  of  the  left  end  of  the  line  needs  to  be added  5 the  Cognitive  Academic  Language  Proficiency  (CALP)  of  the  right.   VIS  teachers  recognise  that  student  ability  to  ‘shunt’  along  this  continuum  in  both  directions  is  key  to  them  being  truly  inquiring,  inspired  and  involved  learners.  To  this  end,  all  teachers  are  teachers  of  language in at least two  ways:    Firstly,  students  learn  from  their  classroom  and  subject  area  teachers  the  text types/genres, which are key to successful learning within those various  subject  areas.  With  this  guidance,  students  learn  how  language is used to  achieve  different  purposes  in  the  context  of  their  learning  across  the  curriculum.     Secondly,  as  part  of  this  instruction  in  appropriate  text  types,  all  teachers  6 support  students  with  explicit  language  scaffolding.   In  whatever  language they might be working, VIS students are often still learning    ● which language choices are possible,  Cummins, J: Bilingualism and special education, 1984  “​Language is fundamental to all learning and each subject has its own language, which needs to  be learned in context. Each teacher must be a language teacher and explicitly teach the  vocabulary and structures of their discipline, differentiating according to the needs of all students.”  VIS Language policy, beliefs and practices, p4  5 6

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● which language choices are appropriate, ● which language choices are available. 

Given the multilingual student body at Vienna International School, it is  essential that we use a common language to talk about language and  provide our teachers with explicit vocabulary to use when teaching and  scaffolding language.     

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The structure for the delivery of languages at VIS

Vienna International School has curricula in the following language  programmes:    Language of Instruction  Grade Levels  EY  GP  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  English                            Language A Courses  Grade Levels  EY  GP  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  English A                          German A                            Language Acquisition Courses  Grade Levels  EY  GP  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  ELA / English B                          German B                          French B                          Spanish B                         

11 12      11  12          11         

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Additional languages facilitated outside the timetable Grade Levels  EY  GP  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  Mother Tongue*                              Latin**                                  *facilitated outside the timetable / not following IB requirements except in  Grade 11 and 12  ** not following IB requirements but recognised by the Austrian  Stadtschulrat     

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The Language of Instruction - English  

Language wraps itself around, in, through and between everything that  we teachers and learners do in the classroom. (Ron Ritchhart 2002:141)  We define language of instruction as the language adopted by the  school to deliver the curriculum.    At VIS the language of instruction is English and we take a shared  responsibility for developing our students’ academic language, across all  areas of the curriculum. Literacy expectations in today’s complex and  global society encompass more than the basic skills of reading, writing,  speaking and listening. With expanded access to information and rapidly  growing technological tools, use of oral and written language skills are  necessary to critically reflect on and analyze multiple sources of  information, explore different perspectives, pose and solve problems and  work collaboratively and cross-culturally in finding the student’s own voice  and interpreting that of others.     A student’s development of language is the responsibility not only of the  school but also of the student and of the home. Together, all these  stakeholders are accountable for successful language development:  students are responsible for demonstrating their command of the  language; teachers are accountable for improving their students’  language; parents are partners with their child and his/her teachers in  developing language.    Our responsibility is to develop our students’ capacity in language in  academic contexts, such that they can function at an age-appropriate  level in all their language skills equally: reading, writing, listening and  speaking, and that they have an understanding of the language that  comes from experiencing and interacting with the literature and the  culture that underpins it. Our English for Academic Purposes Continuum  recognises the developmental stages of language and that language  learning is a progression.    Specifically, during the Primary School literacy-focused units and in the  Secondary School English Language A classrooms, the language of  instruction is developed reciprocally with English literacy, thereby  developing both further reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in  relation to an appreciation for literature as an art form.  Students study a  variety of genres and medias originally in or translated to English, including  interpretation from multiple critical perspectives, appreciation of  aesthetics, and contextualization in the real world and the ongoing 

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literary dialogue, which now includes a variety of new textualities in conversation with classical texts. Students learn a critical and analytical  approach to reading text types and recognizing the beauty within a wide  variety of literary forms.    Our teachers not only have the responsibility to teach subject specific text  types but to explicitly model and teach the language of instruction  (English) across all disciplines, using a common meta-language as laid out  in our curriculum. Students learn language and literacy through inquiry  and concept-based learning in authentic contexts. This further involves  the use of transferrable strategies and tools across the curriculum (as  articulated in our AtL continuum) to develop collaborative practices.  7 Shared systems track the progress of each student and their language  profile. Tracking progress includes rubric-based assessment in alignment  with the PYP, MYP, and DP curricula and other reference frameworks used  to support students in becoming independent learners, who drive their  own learning through effective feedback and goal-setting.    Many of our students are multi-lingual and their ability to apply language  and literature skills across languages and to use language in a variety of  transdisciplinary academic contexts is key to successful language  learning. The love of learning language fosters authors and readers and  enables students to become inquiring, involved and inspiring citizens in a  global community.    Language empowers our students to be ‘risk-takers’ with the means to  recognise and explore multiple perspectives and viewpoints and to reflect  critically on events and actions; to explore multiple perspectives for  intercultural understanding and awareness, international-mindedness,  multilingualism and multiculturalism. In turn, and in accordance with our  Mission Statement, we seek to empower our students with language in  order to engage them to take meaningful Action that will affect positive  change in our world.  The Language Review Committee made the decision to adopt the AERO  8 Standards as the basis for the English for Academic Purposes Continuum.    

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Using the LAC http://www.projectaero.org/aero_standards/ELA/AERO-ELA-Framework.pdf 

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English A  

Primary English Language

The purpose of the Primary School Language continuum is to ensure that  the knowledge, skills and understandings​ needed for students to thrive as  learners are taught​ in a coherent and developmentally appropriate  sequence.     Inquiry is the leading pedagogical approach in a PYP curriculum.  Language is central to inquiry and is essential in cognitive development.  Students listen, speak, view, present, read and write as they inquire and  9 construct meaning. Language is taught in relevant, authentic, and  meaningful contexts and occur as ‘natural moments in student  10 development’ . The learner’s prior knowledge and understanding serve  as the basis for teaching and learning. The teacher implements a  well-planned, comprehensive programme that reflects a gradual release  of responsibility from teacher to students, scaffolding students to learn just  11 beyond what they can do independently (ZPD) . Collaboration is  emphasised and, where appropriate, language is taught through the  Programme of Inquiry (ex. ATL, key concepts, knowledge, skills and  Learner Profile).     Through the integration of a variety of instructional strategies, students are  empowered to learn language, learn about language and learn through  12 language . Skills and strategies are taught explicitly through mini-lessons  and the use of authentic texts within a Workshop Model. ​ Learner agency,  autonomy and self-efficacy are encouraged and celebrated. Teachers  strive to develop a caring and inviting community in which strong and  supportive relationships are built and all students feel accepted, involved  and confident to take risks.   

​International Baccalaureate Organization (2007) Making the PYP happen: A Curriculum framework for international primary education, Cardiff, Wales. P. 68-70  10 V​ygotsky, L.S. (1978). ​Mind in Society: The development of higher psychological processes​,  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. ​p. 117.  11 ​Vygotsky, L.S. (1978). ​Mind in Society: The development of higher psychological processes​,  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  12 ​Halliday, M., (1993). Towards a language-based theory of learning. ​Linguistics and Education,​   5(2),  9

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Secondary English Language and Literature  

G6

G7

G8

Language and  Literature 

Language and  Literature 

MYP

Language and  Literature 

G9

G10

DP G11 / G12 

Literature

Language and  Literature 

Language and Literature 

Language and  Literature 

"Literature is where I go to explore the highest and lowest places in human  society and in the human spirit, where I hope to find not absolute truth but  the truth of the tale, of the imagination and of the heart." - Salman  Rushdie    Our VIS English A Language and Literature programme focuses on two  main aspects: studying the text as an art form and helping students find  their voice.    Literature’s etymology is simply “the written word,” but when we talk  about ​literature​ in English class, we mean a text as a piece of art.   Language and form, words, visuals, and even sound can come together  to make a text we can read, appreciate, and investigate.  We help  students cultivate an appreciation of the aesthetic in texts by  understanding the way language and forms create meaning and beauty.   As John Keats tells us in “Ode on a Grecian Urn”: “Beauty is truth, truth  beauty.” We also help students understand how culture and identity  have reciprocal relationships with literature.  Culture and individuality can  be reflected in texts, but literature can likewise affect the changes in  societies and individuals. As we study literature through a conceptual  and inquiry-based approach, students learn big ideas as they read the  world around them.  We help students understand the dialogue of  literature by teaching classical or canonical texts juxtaposed with  contemporary or avant-garde examples. Students sometimes have a  choice in the texts they study and are frequently given access to ways of  extending their investigations through inquiry and pleasure reading.    The second main area of our focus is helping students find their voice.  Everyone has a story to tell: whether it is to assert one’s opinions about a  novel, to share one’s understanding of the world through one’s own  poetry, or to articulate one’s perspective persuasively in a speech. We aid  students in discovering ways to express themselves in various types of 

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written and oral expression. Students cultivate their independent voice and perspective by learning from other writers’ styles, understanding  structures that make ideas clear, and engaging in activities to expand  their creativity, critical thinking, and language skills. ATL embedded in the  curriculum also allow us to help students use these varied language skills in  a variety of situations.    Our curriculum is guided by the MYP and DP Language A curricula and  also sits within the ​AERO-VIS Reading & Viewing, Writing, and Language  curricula that guide English as the language of instruction through our  entire school. Students transfer their learning about language between  subject areas. In our English A courses, literature-specific language is  developed to give students an opportunity to dive deeper in this subject  of stories, ideas, imagination, and the human experience. As they gain  perspectives of understanding, they achieve access to ethical reasoning  and self-discovery as they write the future of our world.     

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German A This section of the document outlines the structure of the German A  programme at VIS in the context of our overall language philosophy.    At VIS German mother tongue speakers and schooled bilingual students  are catered for through German mother tongue classes. The German  Language and Literature programme encourages students to maintain a  competitive German level in order to succeed in academic  environments.    The German Language and Literature programme has been designed to  meet the needs of students who have Germans as their mother tongue or  best language. Bilingual students need to be literate in German orally and  in writing. Our goal is to maintain a mother tongue level when the world  around our students becomes increasingly complex and academic.   

PYP German Language A

The Primary School offers two German A Levels for Grade 1 to Grade 5  ● Level 4 = German A  ● Level 5 = German A Advanced  There are no specific German levels in Grade Primary and ELC. All  German A levels follow the ​Austrian German Language Curriculum​ and  the ​Bildungsstandards.​     PYP German Language A Levels at VIS    ELC 

GP

No Levels No Levels 

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

Level 4

Level 4

Level 4

Level 4

Level 4

Level 5

Level 5

Level 5

Level 5

Level 5

 

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MYP German A Language and Literature at VIS

In the Secondary School the German mother tongue course follows the  MYP Language and Literature programme. The expectations and  assessment criteria are the same as for mainstream English. There are two  mixed ability mother tongue classes per year level which share the same  syllabus.    Diploma students have the option of taking the German Language and  Literature or the German Literature course at both Higher and Standard  levels.    MYP German A Language and Literature Levels at VIS    G6 

G7

G8

G9

G10

DP

Literature Language  Language  Language  Language  Language  Language  and  and  and  and  and  and  Literature  Literature  Literature  Literature  Literature  Literature     

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Mother Tongue Languages At VIS English is the language of instruction in which all academic subjects  are taught. English is a second language for many students. Thus  bilingualism is the normal outcome as the school language is different  from many students’ Mother Tongue.    Growing numbers of “third culture kids” cause us to re-assess the place  and definitions of “mother tongue”, “first language”, “home culture” and  “cultural diversity”.    At VIS we understand the term Mother Tongue to mean one, all, or some  of the following:  ● students’ home language or languages, whether spoken with their  mother, father or other members of their family  ● a language or languages in which a child is orally fluent at an age  appropriate level  ● a language or languages in which a child has been educated to an  age appropriate level  ● a language or languages to which a student turns to express deep  emotion    13 There is a lot of research to show that children who have a strong  foundation in their Mother Tongue(s) are successful at school.    “Language is the primary vehicle of learning and every teacher is a  language teacher. Language is a gateway to culture.” (Davey) Therefore,  the importance of recognizing and valuing Mother Tongues is significant.  'Meaningful interactions between teachers and students and among  students in the context of mother tongue and cultural identity are one of  the most valuable tools for motivating students, engaging them  academically, and connecting them  14 to student life (Cummins 2001, 2006; Gallagher, 2008)'     A large number of research studies show very clearly that bilingualism can  increase children's language abilities and help their progress in school.  However, for children to experience these beneficial effects of  13

Benson, C., & Kosonen, K. (Eds.) (2013). Language issues in comparative education: Inclusive teaching and  learning in non-dominant languages and cultures. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers; Cummins, J. (2000). Language,  power and pedagogy. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters; King, K., & Mackey, A. (2007). The bilingual edge:  Why, when, and how to teach your child a second language. New York: Collins; Kosonen, K. (2005). Education  in local languages: Policy and practice in Southeast Asia. First languages first: Community-based literacy  programmes for minority language contexts in Asia. Bangkok: UNESCO Bangkok.  14 Taken from „Developing Global Citizenship at VIS“ 

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bilingualism it is important that ​all​ their Mother Tongue languages continue to develop.    Language is learned primarily through communication with other people.  Research shows that the more communication children experience at  home the better developed their language skills will be. This is especially  important for the development of Mother Tongue skills since the language  is seldom reinforced by the child's environment outside school.    However, it is important that students continue to develop all their  language skills equally: reading, writing, listening and speaking.    In that process parents play an important role. It is their responsibility to:  converse with their children,  ● encourage them to take an active interest in reading books and other  print materials for pleasure,  ● encourage them to research in their Mother Tongue(s) to support their  school learning,  ● expose them to experiences that involve their Mother Tongue(s)  15 ● enroll their children in a Mother Tongue class at VIS     We believe that the use of the Mother Tongue at home will benefit our  students’ progress in English and other school subjects.    The above does not just support the development of students’ Mother  Tongues, but helps them to understand the meaning and importance of  culture; knowing themselves through an understanding and experience of  their own cultures allows them to understand and value the cultures of  others.    Students who have formally studied their Mother Tongue(s) have the  advantage of greater global mobility and increased opportunities for  academic study and employment.    Wherever possible, therefore, VIS encourages Mother Tongue  maintenance by the appropriate dissemination of information through  16 students and parents, by timetabling a Mother Tongue slot for such  classes during the day or after school, by allowing students in all grades to  present Mother Tongue as an elective, and by giving credit for the time 

In the case of German Mother Tongue students where German A is included in the VIS timetable we still encourage parents to ensure that their children have additional exposure to the language.  16 Mother Tongue classes have to be privately financed by the parents, though some organizations  (e.g. the UN) and countries refund some or all of the cost.  15

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and effort spent on this study by including Mother Tongue studies on report cards and records. 

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Language Acquisition at VIS

“Only when people learn to converse will they begin to be equal.”  -​Theodore Zeldin    “The kind of conversation I like is one in which you are prepared to  emerge a slightly different person.”​ - ​Theodore Zeldin    As global citizens our aim is for our students to speak more than one  language in Communicating in different languages enables students to  foster an understanding of different perspectives and cultures which in  turn develops international mindedness.    Concept based curriculum offers students opportunities to engage in  language learning in a meaningful way.    As responsible citizens, they explore target cultures and current events as  well as topics relevant to their lives. All stakeholders collaborate to  strengthen links that allow students to experience connections to the  target language community. This could include guest speakers, cultural  events and trips.    All teachers understand their role in offering students authentic curriculum  links to extend their language learning.    In order to insure a whole school consistency and continuity, the  language acquisition curriculum is structured in the following way:    PYP - 3 language acquisition levels  MYP - 5 language acquisition levels  DP - 3 language acquisition levels    The language acquisition curriculum is externally referenced to allow  external comparison and internal alignment.     

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English Language Acquisition (ELA) and English B

"Language is the medium in which teaching and learning take place in  schools; the medium through which we transform and develop our  thinking about concepts; and in this way language and content are  inextricably linked" (Halliday, 1993)    At VIS the Language Acquisition programme supports students whose  mother tongue is not English* to acquire the English language skills  necessary to participate successfully and confidently across the  curriculum.    The Language Acquisition programme has been designed to meet the  needs of students who have English as a second or additional language.  Our goal is to develop English language skills, which allow children to be  successful in their academic work as well as in everyday communication.  We have adopted the IB language continua in which is organised in  phases.    The Primary School offers a discrete programme for the IB PYP Language  Scope & Sequence Phase 1 and 2. Students in the IB PYP Phases 3 and 4  are supported in the classroom.    The Secondary School delivers the Language Acquisition programme as a  discrete curricular programme. Students in the IB MYP Language  Acquisition Phases 2 and 3 take Language Acquisition classes inplace of  English, Romance Languages, Science and Humanities.    Students in the IB MYP Language Acquisition Phase 4 course take  Language Acquisition classes inplace of English and Romance  Languages.    Diploma students have the option of taking the English Language B  course at both Higher and Standard levels.     

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PYP ELA / English Language Acquisition Phases at VIS PYP Phases 1 and 2  ELA​ I​ ntensive Programme  1 

PYP Phases 3 and 4

English Language Acquisition In Mainstream Classroom 

English Language Proficiency  

In Mainstream Classroom

Expected Number of Years in Each Phase 2  3  4  5 

MYP English Language Acquisition Phases at VIS  MYP Phases 2 and 3  English Language  Acquisition 

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1

MYP Phase 4

English Language Acquisition

6

7

MYP Language and Literature  DP English A  DP English B 

Expected Number of Years in Each Phase 2  3  4  5 

6

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German B This section of the document outlines the structure of the German B  programme at VIS in the context of our overall language philosophy.    All students at VIS learn the language of their host country in order to  enrich their interactions with the local community. Learning German is not  only about acquiring the skills to communicate in the language, but also  about developing a thorough understanding of the culture and history of  German speaking countries in order to expand their  international-mindedness.    The German Language Acquisition programme has been designed to  meet the needs of students who have German as second or additional  language. Our goal is to develop German language skills, which allow  children to be successful in their academic work as well as in everyday  communication.    The Primary School offers three German Language Acquisition Levels for  Grade 1 to Grade 5    Level 1 = German B Beginners  Level 2 = German B Intermediate  Level 3 = German B Advanced    There are no specific German levels in Grade Primary and ELC. All  German B levels follow the ​Austrian German as a foreign language  curriculum.​ The Primary German levels do not correspond to the five PYP  language acquisition phases.    PYP German Language Acquisition Levels at VIS  ELC 

GP

G1

G2

G3

G4

G5

No Levels

No Levels

Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

Level 2

Level 2

Level 2

Level 2

Level 3

Level 3

Level 3

Level 3

Level 3

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The Secondary School offers four or five Language Acquisition Phases in each year level of the MYP depending on the students’ needs.  Diploma students have the option of taking the German Ab Initio  (Standard Level) course or the Language B course either at Higher or  Standard Level.    MYP German Language Acquisition Phases at VIS  G6 

G7

G8

G9

G10

DP

Phase 1

Phase 1

Phase 1

Phase 1

Phase 1

Ab Initio

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 3

Phase 3

Phase 3

Phase 3

Language B

Phase 4

Phase 4

Phase 4

Phase 4

Phase 4

(Phase 5)

(Phase 5)

(Phase 5)

Phase 5

Phase 5

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Romance Languages - French and Spanish   G6  Phase 1 

G7 Phase 1 

G8 Phase 1 

G9 Phase 2 

G10 Phase 2 

DP Language  B     

  Phase 2  Phase 3  Phase 3          Phase 4    In  an  increasingly  interconnected  world,  the  ability  to  communicate  in  multiple  languages  is  an  invaluable  tool  that  serves  students  for  life.  In  Secondary  school  at  VIS,  once  a  student  has  joined  the  mainstream  classes  in  English,  they  are  offered  the  opportunity  to  study  either  French  or  Spanish,  in  addition  to  mandatory  German  lessons,  to  broaden  the  scope  of  their  multilingualism.  Our  curriculum  aims  to  construct  learning  around  relevant  and  authentic  situations  to  prepare  students  for  real-world scenarios.    From  ​G6-G10​,  we  work  under  the  MYP  framework,  which  aims to develop  a  respect  for,  and  understanding  of,  other  languages  and cultures, and is  designed  to  equip  the  students  with  a  skill  base  that  facilitates  further  language  learning.  Under  this  framework, the proficiencies of students are  differentiated  and  combined  into  manageable  phases  that  allow  the  teacher  to  concentrate  on  the  needs  of  all  the  students,  and  to  plan  teaching strategies and experiences that benefit the entire group.    In  ​G11  and  G12​,  we  follow  the  curriculum  of  the  DP  program,  based  around  five  central  themes:  identities,  experiences,  human  ingenuity,  social  organization,  and  sharing  the  planet.  DP  students  have  the  choice  to  study  the  language  at  either  Standard  or  Higher  Level,  the  latter  of  which also incorporates a literature component into the curriculum.     

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Appendix Academic Language (English)   

Yellow: Primary School only Pink: Secondary School only   

Overview Outcomes 1. Comprehension  and collaboration 

Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas  and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.  Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and for including visually, quantitatively, and orally. 

Spea king and  Liste ning 

Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.  2. Presentation of  Knowledge and  Ideas 

Present information, research findings and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization,  development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and  audience.  Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to  express information and enhance understanding of presentations.  Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks,  demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or  appropriate. 

Lang uag e Fou ndat ions 

1.Conventions of Standard English 

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing 

2.Knowledge of Language 

Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for  meaning, style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or  listening. 

3.Vocabulary acquisition and use 

Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful  word parts, and consulting reference materials, as appropriate.  Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in  word meanings.  Acquire and use a range of general academic and domain-specific  words and phrases. Demonstrate independence in gathering  vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important  to comprehension or expression. 

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1. Key Ideas and Details 

Read closely to determine what a text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it.  Cite specific textual evidence when writing or  speaking to support conclusions drawn from the  text.  View, respond to and describe visual information. Make logical  inferences and critically analyse a range of visual texts.  Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their  development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.  Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and  interact over the course of a text (includes visual texts, e.g., films,  plays). 

Read ing and  Vie wing 

2. Craft and Structure 

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and  analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.  Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences,  paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter,  scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. ​In visual texts,  analyse how form (e.g., shape, colour, symbols and composition) is  used to achieve a particular effect.  Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of  texts, including visual texts. 

3. Integration of Knowledge and  Ideas 

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including print and digital resources.  Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text,  including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and  sufficiency of the evidence.  Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in  order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors  take. 

Read ing Fou ndat ions 

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4. Range of Reading and Level  of Text Complexity 

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 

5. Print Concepts

Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print. 

6. Phonological Awareness 

Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes). 

7. Phonics and Word Recognition 

Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 

8. Fluency

Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. 


1. Text Type and Purposes 

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.  Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex  ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective  selection, organization, and analysis of content.  Write narratives to develop real and imagined experiences or events  using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured  event sequences. 

2. Presentation, Production and  Distribution of  Writing 

Writin g

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and  audience.  Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising,  editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, recognising that the  writing process is recursive.   Develop fluent, legible handwriting style which supports effective and  efficient written communicate.  Use digital tools, including the Internet, to present and publish writing  and to interact and collaborate with others. 

3. Research to Build and Present  Knowledge 

Conduct short, as well as more sustained, research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under  investigation.  Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources,  assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the  information while avoiding plagiarism.  Draw evidence from literary or informal texts to support analysis,  reflection, and research.  Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research,  reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a  day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. 

   

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Languages B Secondary School  

Comprehending spoken and visual text STRANDS 

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

i. listen for specific purposes and respond  to show understanding 

identify basic facts,  messages,  main  ideas and  supporting  details in  everyday  situations 

show understanding  of  messages,  main  ideas and  supporting  details in  familiar  situations 

show understanding  of  information,  main  ideas and  supporting  details,  and draw  conclusions  in familiar  and some  unfamiliar  situations 

construct meaning  and draw  conclusions  from  information,  main  ideas and  supporting  details in  familiar and  unfamiliar  situations 

ii. interpret visual text that is presented with  spoken text 

recognize basic  conventions 

recognize basic  conventions 

understand conventions 

interpret conventions 

iii. engage with the text by supporting opinion  and personal response  with evidence and  examples from  the text. 

engage with the spoken  and visual  text  by identifying  ideas,  opinions and  attitudes and  by making  a personal  response to  the text. 

engage with the spoken  and visual text  by identifying  ideas,  opinions and  attitudes and  by making  a personal  response to  the text. 

engage with the spoken  and visual text  by identifying  ideas,  opinions and  attitudes and  by making a  response to  the text based  on personal  experiences  and opinions. 

engage with the spoken  and visual text  by identifying  ideas,  opinions and  attitudes and  by making a  response to  the text based  on personal  experiences  and opinions. 

Comprehending written and visual text

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STRANDS

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

i. read for specific purposes and respond  to show understanding 

identify basic facts,  messages,  main  ideas and  supporting  details 

identify basic facts, main  ideas and  supporting  details,  and draw  conclusions 

show understanding  of  information,  main  ideas and  supporting  details,  and draw  conclusions 

construct meaning by  identifying  stated and  implied  information,  main  ideas and  supporting  details,  and draw  conclusions 

ii. interpret visual text that is presented with  written text 

recognize basic aspects  of format  and style,  and author’s  purpose for  writing 

recognize basic  conventions  including  aspects of  format and  style, and  author’s  purpose for  writing 

understand basic  conventions  including  aspects of  format and  style, and  author’s  purpose for  writing 

interpret basic conventions  including  aspects of  format and  style, and  author’s  purpose for  writing 

iii. engage with the text by supporting opinion  and personal response  with evidence and  examples from  the text. 

engage with the written  and visual  text  by identifying  ideas,  opinions and  attitudes and  by making  a personal  response to  the text. 

engage with the written  and visual text  by identifying  ideas, opinions  and attitudes  and  by making  a personal  response to  the text. 

engage with the written  and visual text  by identifying  ideas, opinions  and attitudes  and  by making a  response to  the text based  on personal  experiences  and opinions. 

engage with the written  and visual text  by identifying  ideas, opinions  and attitudes  and  by making a  response to  the text based  on personal  experiences  and opinions. 

Communicating in response to spoken, written and or vi STRANDS

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Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4


i. interact and respond  communicate in various  appropriately  situations  to simple  short phrases 

respond appropriately  to spoken  and/or written  and/or visual  text in a  limited range  of familiar  situations 

respond appropriately  to spoken  and/or written  and/or visual  text in a range  of familiar  and some  unfamiliar  situations 

respond appropriately  to spoken  and/or written  and/or visual  text in a range  of familiar and  unfamiliar  situations 

ii. express thoughts, feelings, ideas, opinions  and information in  spoken and written form 

interact in simple and  rehearsed  exchanges,  using  verbal and  non-verbal  language 

interact in basic  structured  exchanges  on a limited  variety of  aspects  within familiar  situations 

interact in rehearsed and  unrehearsed  exchanges  on a limited  variety of  aspects  within familiar  and some  unfamiliar  situations 

engage in rehearsed and  unrehearsed  exchanges to  share ideas  on topics  of personal  and global  significance 

iii. speak and write for specific purposes. 

use basic phrases to  communicat e  ideas,  feelings and  information  on a variety  of aspects  of everyday  topics 

use phrases to communicate  ideas,  feelings and  information  in familiar  situations 

express ideas and  feelings, and  communicate  information  in familiar  and some  unfamiliar  situations 

express ideas and  feelings, and  communicate  information  in simple and  complex texts  in familiar and  unfamiliar  situations 

iv. communicate with a sense of  Audience, register,  purpose and  style 

communicat e with a sense  of  audience. 

communicate with a sense of  audience. 

communicate with a sense of  audience and  purpose. 

communicate with a sense of  audience and  purpose. 

Using Language in spoken and written form STRANDS 

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Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4


i. organize thoughts, feelings, ideas, opinions  and information in  spoken and written form 

write or speak using a basic  range of  vocabulary,  grammatical  structures and  conventions;  when  speaking,  use clear  pronunciation  and  intonation 

write or speak using a basic  range of  vocabulary,  grammatical  structures and  conventions;  when  speaking,  use clear  pronunciation  and intonation 

write or speak using a range  of vocabulary,  grammatical  structures and  conventions;  when  speaking,  use clear  pronunciation  and intonation 

write or speak using a range  of vocabulary,  grammatical  structures and  conventions;  when  speaking,  use clear  pronunciation  and intonation 

ii. develop accuracy when speaking and  writing in the target  language. 

organize basic  information  and use a  range of  basic  cohesive  devices 

organize information  and ideas and  use a range of  basic cohesive  devices 

organize information  and ideas and  use a range of  basic cohesive  devices 

organize information  and ideas into  a structured  text; use a  wide range  of cohesive  devices 

iii. use language to suit the  context 

use language use language  to suit the  to suit the  context  context 

use language to suit the  context 

use language to suit the  context 

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Profile for Vienna International School

Language Learning at Vienna International School  

Language Learning at Vienna International School  

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