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THE ’BIRD THE VIDETTE PRESENTS

THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 2014 Vol. 126 / No. 92

videtteonline.com

Chi Omega to host

March Madness Page 3

’Birds defeat Msu, 77-67, in cbi first round page 20

Photo via Chi Omega website


NEWS

02 Friday

THURSDAY

53°F Low 37°F Precip 10% High

It’s getting nice out — you could even walk to a concert…

Saturday

65°F Low 34°F Precip 10% High

45°F Low 24°F Precip 10% High

WHAT IS THIS WARMTH???

Dance all day to the best song ever (or just watch).

03.20.2014

Sunday

37°F Low 23°F Precip 0% High

Is winter coming back? I sure hope not. Source: National Weather Service

The Bird’s Eye So you think you know your Illinois State University campus, eh? Each Thursday, The Vidette features a unique view of a reasonably common site on campus. If you think you know where the photo was taken, email your response to vidette_birdseye@ilstu. edu. We will draw a name from the correct submissions, and the winner will receive a pair of Vidette sunglasses.

Vivian / Staff Photographer

The winner from last week is Jim Watson. The photo was of CVS Pharmacy on Fell St.

HAVE YOU EVER PULLED AN ALLNIGHTER IN COLLEGE TO FINISH A PROJECT YOU PUT OFF UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE? 30% s ai d NO

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Pet of the Week Kyra is six years old. She “herds” a lot, but only out of protectiveness. Sent in by Alex Bertacchi Passett.

“Kyra”

If you think your pet has what it takes, send us an image of your pet at vidette_submissions@ilstu.edu

The Vidette The Vidette is published daily Monday through Thursday every week, except for final examinations, holidays, and semester breaks. Students are responsible for the content of the Vidette. The views presented do not necessarily represent, in whole or part, those of the Illinois State University administration, faculty, and students. The Vidette is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press and the Illinois Press Association Subscriptions are available by mail to anywhere in the United States for $150 per calendar year. © The Vidette 2013 University & Locust / Campus Box 0890 / Normal, IL 61761–0890

When I go t back fro m drill, my friend said I missed a good par ty. I thought b ack to fas t-roping o ut of a helicopt er. Zip 100 feet, ju st like that. Who a! I just shook my head and smiled . If you a sk me, I didn’t miss a th ing.

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NEWS

THE ’BIRD

@Salon to inspire with poetry, art and music

2013 First place sorority: Zeta Tau Alpha

03 2013 First place fraternity: Sigma Chi

Jessica Smith Staff Writer

ISU’s Creative Writing Program and McLean County Arts Center will host @Salon from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday at the McLean County Arts Center in downtown Bloomington. The first @Salon was held in April 2011 at a gallery on Main Street in downtown Bloomington. It has been an annual event in Bloomington-Normal ever since. Based on literary salons of the 17th and 18th centuries, @Salon is a modern twist that aims to amuse, entertain and inform participants. Attendees can enjoy a multitude of art forms, including poetry, paintings, sculpture, performance art and music. @Salon will include presentations and performances by local and regional artists and poets. “We are committed, as an Illinois Arts Council funded program, to showcasing Illinois artists,” Dr. Duriel E. Harris, associate professor in ISU’s creative writing program, said. Students in ISU’s Graduate Creative Writing Program will present their works-in-progress and invite the audience to engage in open see salon page 7

Photo Courtesy of Chi Omega

Photo Courtesy of Chi Omega

Let the madness begin

The theme of this year’s March Madness dance competition is Artist Evolution. Hosted by Chi Omega, campus fraternities and sororities will perform routines in hopes to recieve money for their personal philanthropies. Jenna Zbinden Staff Writer Chi Omega will host the annual March Madness at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the Braden Auditorium in the Bone Student Center. Every year, this philanthropy event invites both sororities and fraternities to participate in a dance competition to raise money for Make-A-Wish Foundation. There are 20 groups competing this year for first, second and third prizes. Cash prizes are distributed to the winners to be put towards their philanthropies. All proceeds from the event will go to Make-A-Wish Foundation. “Last year we raised $30,000 for Make-A-Wish Foundation and we are hoping to raise more this year,” Meagan Keenan, chairwomen of Chi Omega’s March Madness event, said. The groups create a choreographed routine around two minutes long that is based on a new

theme each year. This year’s theme is Artist Evolution. Competitors were encouraged to choose songs by artists that have made significant progress in their musical careers. Four judges will critique the fraternities and sororities on their routines based on the theme. Chi Omega will perform first. While the theme of the event is released, all sororities and fraternities keep their songs and routines as secretive as possible to maintain the suspense. Alpha Gamma Delta’s Lauren DeRosier is one of four coaches for her group of 78 girls competing this year. The sorority has been practicing twice a week for two hours to prepare for the event. “We participate in March Madness every year,” DeRosier said. “It is such a great tradition for the Greek community and all the money goes to a great cause.” DeRosier said the girls are never required to par-

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ticipate, but they always have girls willing to participate in the competition. “I am so unbelievably excited for March Madness this year,” DeRosier said. “It will be my last performance with my Alpha Delta Gamma girls which makes me sad, but I am so proud of all the hard work and dedication they put into our performance.” Phi Sigma Sigma co-coach Emily Gibbons is also looking forward to the competition. Phi Sigma Sigma has placed several times in the past but Gibbons says she is more focused and excited when the performance turns out well. “I hope we win but at the end of the day I just want us to do our best,” Gibbons said. The group of 77 girls is also practicing for two hours twice a week until the performance. Due to the amount of groups competing this year, there was limited space to rent for practicing. The sorority has been practicing in smaller groups but has come together this week to finalize the routine.


OPINIONS

04

03.20.2014

Vidette Editorial Board

Integrating special and general education A new trend is becoming more prevalent in the United States Public Education program. More and more public schools are starting to integrate their disabled population into their general education classrooms. Most of these classes are co-taught, where two teachers exist in the room at all times. One teacher is the general education teacher who teaches the lesson planned for the day while the other, the special education teacher, monitors the comprehension of the lesson among the special needs students. The special ed teacher’s main job is to ensure the comprehension of the lesson, while quelling any disruptive behavior that may affect the normal students negatively in the classroom. This is an exciting concept, and this editorial board believes this method is an exceptional way to encourage diversity and a sense of community in the classroom. Schools should always encourage diversity in the academic environment. Children learn from other children with different cultural, social and economic backgrounds, and the same goes for the disabled. Students will have the opportunity to help (and learn from) the disabled students, while gaining valuable experience on diversity in the real world. In the workplace, diversity exists in all different aspects, and students can benefit from early exposure to diversity. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states that students shall

be placed in the “least restrictive learning environment” possible, and for some disabled persons, normal classrooms would be a viable option for them to succeed. Obviously, those with absolutely crippling disabilities might not succeed in a “normal” environment, but this environment for this type of people would be considered restrictive. Placing

these individuals in regular classrooms would impede the progress of the other students, as well as the disabled. They would distract others, and the desire to be diverse should not be prioritized above the well-being of the classroom, therefore severely disabled children should probably be placed in an environment more suitable for them. But, if the disabled child can handle working in a regular classroom environment, they should have every opportunity to do so. This environment will give them the most opportunity to succeed, and give the child a chance to establish strong peer relationships with the non-disabled population. These connections are important to a child’s success in the classroom. According to Education.com, being a generous friend and the developing strong social skills is a crucial stepping stone towards success in school. Friends provide much needed emotional and social support, which can improve the selfesteem, motivation and willingness to learn as an individual. Diversity is all around us, and schools acknowledge everyone’s differences. We all have different learning abilities, learning speeds and motivations when it comes to academic work. It is exciting to see schools giving disabled children a chance to mingle with the integration of the special education population into general education classrooms. If this persists, special education will change as we know it but it will change for the better.

Editorial policy is determined by the student editor, and views expressed in editorials are those of the majority of the Vidette’s Opinions Council. Columns that carry bylines are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the Vidette or the university.

Putin needs to receive a stronger message MY VIEW Nick Ulferts Columnist

In February, Sochi 2014 had all eyes on Russia. A month later, all eyes are still on Russia, but this time for much darker reasons. While the Winter Olympics symbolized global unity, Russia’s annexation of Crimea threatens to symbolize just the opposite.

Many Americans (myself included) didn’t know much about Crimea until recently, or that it even existed. The tiny country is only home to about two million people, and yet the international strife over Crimea is anything but small. For those that aren’t quite familiar with the situation, here is a very simplistic synopsis of the situation. Following the recent Ukrainian revolution, Russian troops moved into Crimea. Soon after, Crimea declared itself “independent” and its citizens overwhelmingly voted to become a part of Russia. This of course was in direct violation of the Ukrainian constitution, which Crimea is supposed to follow. Many questions have surrounded the supposed election, from the presence of Russian troops causing fear and intimidation which swayed the election, the possible existence of fraud and of course the relatively swift occurrence of the election. All

of this has led to the United States and the international community warning Russia to back down and refuse to annex Crimea. Unfortunately, Vladimir Putin gave the equivalence of the middle finger and annexed Crimea anyway. It’s clear the United States and other world powers cannot allow for the essential theft of a country’s land to be taken by another, but most are divided on what exactly to do. Travel bans have been placed on several Russian officials, but this is unlikely to deter Putin much. It seems clear that Putin is not going to react to what many believe are “soft” sanctions. Instead, the rest of the world needs to send a much stronger message that involves consequences for what Putin has done, in order to let him know that his actions will not be tolerated. Given the current political state of the Ukraine, there is little they can really do to stand up for themselves.

They are essentially depending on the international community to come to their aid. To neglect to do this is to not only allow for Putin’s actions to go unpunished, but it opens the door for him to conduct even more transgression on the Ukraine. There is a climate of fear, that perhaps Russia will continue its march and conquer more of the country. “Many Ukrainians in Ukraine now believe that a Russian invasion of mainland Ukraine is inevitable. If it happens, war will break out and thousands will die,” said Alexander J. Motyl, a Ukrainian-American writer and professor at Rutgers University-Newark. The United States, and the rest of the world, can send a strong message without any military intervention. Strict trading sanctions, the blocking of certain exports and commercial industries, and a move to become less dependent

ARE YOU ATTENDING THIS YEAR’S ‘CHI OMEGA MARCH MADNESS’?

Today’s Redbird Rumble or Fumble: ?

Nick Ulferts is a junior English education major and columnist for The Vidette. Any questions or comments regarding his column can be sent to nlferts@ilstu.edu

GO TO VIDETTEONLINE.COM TO VOTE!

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?

on Russian trade would send an incredibly strong message. While unfortunately the Russian people would experience the hardships of this hit to their economy, it would also ideally get them more aware of what Putin is doing to isolate Russia from the rest of the world and perhaps inspire protest. In 1936, Adolf Hitler seized Rhineland, much to the outcry of several countries. Nothing was done to stop him. That action was one of the many seeds that led to World War II. We must not let history repeat itself, and it is imperative that the countries of the world, and their people, send Putin a strong message that preying on smaller countries will not be tolerated.

Redbird Rumble or Fumble? To President Obama for proposing the idea of discontinuing the manufacture of pennies. Nobody likes pennies, but they do come in handy. Redbird Rumble: To Michigan’s future plan for affordable college education. In exchange for “free” tuition, students will be required to pay a fixed percentage of their future income to a fund that helps pay for other students’ educations. No interest rates or loans. Redbird Fumble: ISU provost Sheri Everts will be moving on to be Chancellor of Appalachian State. Congratulations, but you will be missed.

Compiled by The Vidette Editorial Board

Redbird Rumble: To the upcoming International Fair in the Brown Ballroom. Check it out from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 22.

Redbird Rumble: To McLean County rejecting the one percent sales tax increase for public school funding. We are all about helping schools, but on a college budget we are relieved.


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THE ’BIRD

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NEWS

06

03.20.2014

Parachute drops into Blo-No

Top: Parachute, Left: My Red & Blue, Right: Skyler

Jessica Smith Staff Writer The long awaited Parachute concert, presented by University Program Board (UPB), will be landing on ISU’s campus at 8 p.m. Thursday in the Brown Ballroom of the Bone Student Center. The event is free to all Illinois State students who present a valid student ID and $5 for general admission to the public at the door. Doors open at 7 p.m. Parachute has performed in Times Square on

**All photos courtesy of artists’ websites

New Year’s Eve, appeared on NBC’s The Tonight Show, ABC’s Good Morning America and Jimmy Kimmel Live, and have had songs featured in shows such as MTV’s The City along with CW’s One Tree Hill, Vampire Diaries and 90210. Parachute’s songs “She is Love” and “Something to Believe In” reached the top 15 on iTunes while the song “Kiss Me Slowly” was number one on the iTunes rock list. The two opening acts for the concert are Skyler, an up-and-coming solo artist, and My Red & Blue, a pop/rock project of Nashville singer Ben

Eggebrecht. All three acts were chosen by the Center Stage Committee of the UPB, who first heard Skyler while at a conference the UPB attended in the fall. “We heard his music and felt that he would be the perfect fit for an opening act for Parachute,” Jenna Cusumano, Center Stage Chairperson of UPB, said. Each act has a similar musical style and their set lists will include catchy pop rock songs. Parachute’s songs often focus on love or problems in

life. Skyler’s songs show off his musical talents as a multi-instrumentalist, and My Red & Blue evokes a sense of nostalgia, inspired by Eggebrecht’s childhood and the innocence of youth. The concert is sure to draw crowds, especially as it is free to students. Cusumano suggests that attendees get in line early to get a good seat. “I expect the event to be pretty popular among the students and the community. We will be capping the event at 1,000 people so if you want to make sure you get in, I would come early before doors open.”

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07

THE ’BIRD

TV-10 station to celebrate 40 years

T yrianna Jones Reporter ISU’s student-run television station, TV-10, is celebrating 40 years of bringing news to the campus and the community on March 21 and 22. This weekend will give old and new alumni a chance to network and reunite. It will also allow current TV10 or broadcast students to meet the alumni and see what opportunities this station has provided. TV-10 News Director Laura Trendle-Polus said this is not her first anniversary celebration, but is still expecting it to be the best one yet. “I’ve been teaching for 10 years now so I’ve got 10 years worth of my students who will come back, plus my old colleagues and my old friends from when I was a student,” Trendle-Polus said. On Friday night, four different bars in Uptown Normal will host the Alumni Kickoff Parties for different eras of alumni to socialize and catch up with friends. The eras range from 1974-1984 at Brewe-Ha’s to 2003-present at Maggie Miley’s. The four eras are also related to the four different news directors that TV-10 has had since establishment

in 1974. The event starts at 7 p.m. and there will be TV-10 students at each location to greet people and answer questions. Beginning at noon Saturday, there will be a TV-10 open house in the lower level of Fell Hall. Alumni will be able to take pictures and see all the awards and accomplishments the station has made since they graduated. They will also be able to watch archived newscasts of themselves and take home a copy. Students and alumni are welcome to submit samples of their work for the Video Show and Tell at 4 p.m. in Schroeder 130. They must be under three minutes, uploaded to YouTube or Vimeo and emailed to Bob Carroll. “We have students in charge who will set a program and show a piece and then call the person who made it up to the front of the room so they can answer questions and tell a little about it,” Trendle-Polus said. The final event will be the Alumni Reception from 6:30-11 p.m. at the Alumni Center. A DJ from ISU’s own WZND will be providing music for the night. There will also be heavy hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar and a variety of displays. This is a business casual event and is $25 for registration.

Archive Photo

Christen Roberts, crew member of ISU’s TV-10 does a sound check to prepare for an afternoon newscast.

salon continued from page 3

Expires 6/1/2014

discussion with the artists and give feedback on their work. The program will also feature renowned artists, including the critically acclaimed poet CM Burroughs, who currently teaches poetry at Columbia College in Chicago. Burroughs was nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and was a finalist for the 2009 Gift

of Freedom Award; her work has appeared in multiple journals and she was also the recipient of several fellowships and grants. Works by featured artists will be available for purchase and refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public.

Continue reading this online. videtteonline.com/salon

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SPORTS

08

03.20.2014

Redbirds vs. Morehead State

Nick Thompson/Photographer

After seven weeks of not playing, John Jones returned from injury last night.

Nick Thompson/Photographer

Nick Zeisloft went 3-for-6 beyond-the-arc and compiled 13 total points in last night’s game against the Eagles.

Nick Thompson/Photographer

Paris Lee (left) scored three points last night, while Daishon Knight (right) scored 18 to lead the Redbirds.

Nick Thompson/Photographer

Tony Wills came off the bench to score seven points for the Redbirds. Nick Thompson/Photographer

Bobby Hunter (above, left) scored 16 points, while Reggie Lynch (above, right) scored 12 points and compiled 13 blocks.


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BLOOMINGTON BAR PAGE THE ’BIRD

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10

03.20.2014

Welcome Transfer Students!

THE ’BIRD

11


12

Q&A

Imagine for a moment that you are on death row for a crime that you did not commit. This sounds like an impossible situation, one that could only happen on television, but unfortunately, this isn’t the case. Next Thursday, March 27, the School of Theatre will open “The Exonerated,” a play by Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen. The show details the stories of six individuals who were on death row and then exonerated by the justice system after new evidence revealed their innocence. Dr. Cyndee Brown, associate professor in theater, shared her experience directing this a powerful and important piece.

What can you tell us about the story of this piece and the impact it has had? This is a play that was taken from interviews, court transcripts and court records of all kinds. It details the experiences of six people who were convicted of crimes and sentenced to death and eventually exonerated because they were innocent. In some ways it puts a microscope over the legal system, our court systems. Obviously, it puts a microscope over the issue of the death penalty as well. This play also, the playwrights speculate, had something to do with governor George Ryan’s decision to commute the sentences of everyone on death row here in Illinois. He saw this play when they brought it to Chicago and he did see it and spent hours after the play talking to the actors. And of course he never said, “I decided to do this

FEATURES

03.20.2014 by KAYLA STRONER Senior Staff

Cyndee Brown

Director of ‘The Exonerated’

because I saw The Exonerated,” but they speculate that they had a part in the commutation of those sentences.

Where did Blank and Jensen get the inspiration to begin a project like this? The playwrights have actually written a book about their process called Living Justice. Jessica brought Erik to a social justice presentation with someone on death row, and they managed to somehow get a hook up to the prisoner and had a brief conversation with him. That’s when they heard his voice and it became real for them and they said, “This is wrong. We need to do something about this.” So they went to someone, and they were told if they could get something together before the election that year, they could have X number of thousands of dollars to complete the project. After that, they spent months driving to people’s homes and listening to their stories.

What is your perspective on the death penalty after directing The Exonerated? Frankly, for a long time I didn’t think about the death penalty. I didn’t have to think about the death penalty. After working on this play and doing the research, however, I am becoming very much opposed to the death penalty. We make mistakes, and that is the kind of irrevocable mistake we can’t make and just say “oops!” This play has affected me in ways that no other play I have ever directed has. As I told someone before, I think I am going to have to do something. Not just talk about it, not just think about it, not just do a play and walk away from it. I don’t think this one is going to let go of me in that way. We have also had some very interesting conversations with people affiliated with the criminal justice system with the cast.

Photo courtesy of Cyndee Brown

Many of these people, or at least the exonerees in this play, were just in the wrong place at the wrong time, and what do you do about that? Most of the students didn’t know what their rights were, which really frightened the member of the criminal justice system!

Will those attending the play learn about what those rights are and see how they can be overlooked? They will see what happens to these people because they trusted the criminal justice system. They think, “I was innocent, and they’ll know I was innocent, so I’ll do what they tell me.” There are cases of people making up evidence. “Prosecutorial misconduct” is a phrase that is thrown about a lot, where the prosecutors lie and misrepresent and mislead. And I don’t mean to disrespect public defenders. They have a heck of a job to do, and most of them do it remarkably well, representing people who are very difficult to represent.

We did reach a point in the conversation when our member of the criminal justice system said, “I don’t think we’re going to be able to fix it. I don’t think we’re going to be able to change it.” And so the cast said, “What do we do?” And I said, “We’re doing it when we do this play, right?” To think, as an artist, that you can contribute to a conversation that’s this important. That has been a mantle that these actors have truly put on and thought, “This matters.” PREVIEW

DETAILS WHAT The Exonerated WHEN 7:30 p.m. March 27-29 and April 1-5. 2 p.m April 5. WHERE Centennial West 207 COST $10 for students, $12 for non-students INFO Call (309) 438-8783


FEATURES

THE ’BIRD

13

Letters of recommendation help earn scholarships Vanessa Nagel Reporter

Everyone has heard the tale of “the poor college kid.” If you feel that you fall into that category, there are a number of ways to dig yourself out. Earning scholarships is one way to help students combat tuition costs and save more money. Submitting a well-done application will make all the difference.

The Department of Education and colleges collaborate to award $46 billion in scholarship money each year. Private companies, foundations and civic groups award an additional $35 million per year. Departments on Illinois State University’s campus offer a variety of scholarships in plenty of majors. For example, the School of Communication (SOC) awards two different scholarships within the mass media major, in addition to scholarships in public relations, journalism and communication studies areas. To give students easy access to the application procedure, opportunities are posted

“My college experience wouldn’t be the same without DCFS Scholarship Program and scholarship advisor Laura Gutierrez. With their assistance, it created more opportunities for my college career.” Sallie Young Senior mass media major and earner of DCFS Scholarship

on the SOC website and periodically they’re shared through e-mail blasts. Though each scholarship is individually different, mostly they provide year-round opportunities. Many students will take advantage of that by applying during the summer to start utilizing those funds in the fall. Sallie Young, senior mass media major, earned a spot in the Department of Children and Family Service (DCFS) Scholarship Program. Young said the third time applying was the key. The program is available to any Illinois state funded community college or university. The benefits are available for four years, or until the date on which the participant receives a bachelor’s degree. These benefits have drastically changed Young’s life in a positive manner. “My college experience wouldn’t be the same without DCFS Scholarship Program and scholarship advisor Laura Gutierrez. With their assistance, it created more opportunities for my college career,” Young said.

MCT Photo

Building strong relationships with professors is key when receiving useful letters of recommendation for scholarship applications. “I was able to travel to New York City with National Student Exchange Program.” “Last semester, I studied abroad in South Korea all while paying Illinois State University’s tuition. I gained so many new experiences, met some great people, tried new food and made networking contacts. Overall, this scholarship produced fascinating experiences and opportunities that give my résumé a competitive edge for future employers.” Young said that financial aid can be unpredictable, and each year students will not necessarily acquire the same funding. “This year, I ran out of grant money and thank God I was blessed to have DCFS Scholarship Program to cover my full tuition,” Young said. “The best way to have a

plan B is to have money from scholarships.” Julie Navickas, academic advisor in the School of Communication, presses the importance of taking the application process seriously. She said most students take adequate time throughout the summer to work on their applications, as the process is not a lastminute ordeal. Especially since multiple applications require essays and recommendation letters explaining specifically how students can relate scholarships funds to their current work and why they deserve the award. Navickas said the first step toward obtaining an effective letter of recommendation is to approach instructors that know you on a

personal and academic scale. Many students struggle to build these relationships in large classes, but other resources are always available. “It’s an awkward kind of process especially if you’re coming from lecture based classes, they know you’re in seat 56, but they don’t know anything about you outside of that,” Navickas said. “A nice way to approach that is to build relationships with graduate assistants or teaching assistants, people who support that classroom.” “They are extremely good candidates. That’s what their role is, to support the instructor in different functions, so who’s to say they couldn’t support them in that role too?”

College Mentors for Kids to take part in 5K walk and run Melanie Lowe Senior Staff A registered student organization on campus since 2004, College Mentors for Kids (CMFK) has made a difference in a number of children’s lives. The non-profit organization has spread to 23 different college campuses in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, New York and Ohio. More than 1,900 college students have volunteered at these locations, helping to mentor more than 1,700 children. College Mentors for Kids’ overall goal is to connect college students with kids who are in need of their attention most. Today, Illinois State has one of the largest, most successful College Mentors for Kids chapters.

Courtesy of CMFK

According to CMFK member Sarah Hall, the RSO brings at-risk students to campus to teach them about higher education, commu-

nity service and diversity. “Each elementary student is paired with a college student mentor. The kids look up to the college

students and build very strong connections with one another,” Hall said. In light of their mission, College Mentors for Kids will be hosting a 5K walk/run Saturday, April 5 to further support children in need. Registration for the event will begin at 1 p.m. on April 5 and the 5K will start at 2 p.m. The walk/run will take place around the Quad. But walking isn’t the only activity to engage in during the 5K. The event will also feature a raffle with a number of desired prizes. “Some of the prizes will include a $100 Visa card, a $100 Wal-Mart card, a $100 Jewel card, two St. Louis Six Flags tickets, two Cubs tickets, Vera Bradley baskets and much, much more,” Hall said. The registration fee for the 5K is $15, all of which will go towards

College Mentors for Kids. The registration fee includes registration, snacks and a water bottle. Students can purchase CMFK 5K t-shirts in either short or long sleeve for $10 and $15. PREVIEW

DETAILS WHAT College Mentors for Kids 5K walk/run WHEN at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 5 WHERE ISU Quad COST $15 Registration Fee INFO Contact ilstucmfk@yahoo. com


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FEATURES

THE ’BIRD

Jeff “Horti” Hortillosa & Q A

15 by KAYLA STRONER Senior Staff

Guitarist for “Whiskey Shivers”

If you’re a fan of bluegrass, “Old Crow Medicine Show” or “The Avett Brothers,” you should definitely check out Austin-based folk group “Whiskey Shivers.” Their unique style, which they call “trashgrass,” combines the instrumentalism of bluegrass with the tempo and attitude of Rock ‘n’ Roll. Jeff “Horti” Hortillosa, guitarist and one of the group’s vocalists, spoke about his experience in the band.

Tell me the story of “Whiskey Shivers.” How did you come together? The band itself is based out of Autsin, Texas. I have been here for about three years. The other guys have been here for about five. We all came together in 2009. Bobby and James went to college together. They met up with our bass player, Andrew, on Craigslist. Joe stepped in to play washboard on a gig on the fly. Their original guitarist actually ended up moving back to California, and they happened to meet me that same night. I was out and there were these guys playing the same kind of music that I played, so I went up asked them if I could sit in. They said yes, and then I asked them if they were looking for a guitarist. It was pretty crazy!

Photo courtesy of Jeff “Horti” Hortillosa

How would you define your sound? How would define the term “trashgrass”? We play bluegrass with a lot of very fast instrumentation. We all like and were influenced by Bill Monroe, Doc Watson. We were influenced by a number of newer bands, too, like “Old Crow Medicine Show.” We call what we do “trashgrass” because, essentially, we like to play really fast, with a lot of hutzpa. In that way, it’s a lot more like Rock ‘n’ Roll than bluegrass in nature. What’s important about our band is that, yes, everyone in is

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a great individual player, but what we are as a whole is better. When we sing together, it’s bigger than all of us.

What’s next for “Whiskey Shivers?” We are going to finish up this tour, and then we are going out to California to do some festivals. We like to pick up gigs between our official tour dates. Touring is intense sometimes, but it’s work, and it’s always good to be working. We also have a new album, [self-titled

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SPORTS

16

03.20.2014

Dick Jerardi: Atlantic 10 success isn’t by accident By Dick Jerardi Philadelphia Daily News Everybody agreed that the 2012-13 season was going to be the best ever for the Atlantic 10. With recent Final Four participants VCU and Butler new to the conference and the tournament moving to the justopened Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the league was poised to become even more of a national factor. When five teams (Saint Louis, VCU, Butler, Temple and La Salle) ended up in the NCAA Tournament, it was obvious that everybody was right. It was a great season for the league. Still, even as La Salle was set to play in the Sweet 16 as the final A-10 team alive, the storm clouds hovered over the league. The Big East football/basketball split had gone from rumor to reality. The A-10 was going to get raided to help complete the new 10-team Big East. Temple was already leaving to play football. That was a huge loss, as Temple was the best basketball program in league history. Then, it was announced that Xavier and Butler were leaving for the Big East. So, what would become of the A-10? Surely, it would slip into irrelevancy as two of its five 2013 NCAA teams and another annual NCAA team were out the door. Well, at least they had that one great, final season. Fast-forward to this past Sunday and that

sox Continued from page 20

Chris Sale, who recorded a 3.07 ERA, with 226 K’s and 1.07 WHIP in 30 starts, Sale finished the season in the top-20 pitchers in the league. And yet, he managed to finish with a losing record — something that can only be explained by a horrendous performance swinging the bats from these White Sox. They averaged over 100 less runs than the rest of the American

was the A-10 with six teams in the NCAA: A-10 Tournament champion Saint Joseph’s, Saint Louis, VCU, George Washington, Massachusetts and Dayton; two holdovers from 2013 and four new teams. Turned out everybody was wrong about 2012-13 perhaps being the league’s best season. Its best season just happened. “The teams won the games they had to win,” commissioner Bernadette McGlade said. “You can’t trick the committee. You’ve got to get the job done by getting the right kind of non-conference wins and staying in the top of your league. It’s been good to see the results.” All of the A-10 teams are in the main 64team draw, bypassing the First Four. By the end, none of them was even close to being left out of the field. “I said before this season that historically we’ve lost Rutgers, Penn State, West Virginia, Virginia Tech, and gotten better then, too,” La Salle coach John Giannini said. “It’s a basketball-centric league. When you have schools that are committed to basketball and have tradition, you probably will keep being good.” The conference also will be judged by NCAA results, as it should. But getting a bid is a reward for a season. One game can be an aberration. A season really cannot. None of this success is by accident. “We have scheduling guidelines that we put in place about four years ago,” McGlade said. “They weren’t always popular, but we

League and had one of the worst on-base percentages to boot. This will not do. To make a long story short, if this team wants to win, they are going to have to start playing better across the board. There’s a lot of work to do, but a lot of time on the clock. It’s tough to say just what needs to change — they have the talent, but they’ve yet to start acting like it. It’ll be interesting to see, but I’m making the call now. Another season of stinky Sox.

SPORTS BRIEFS:

Baseball series vs. BU moved to Indiana State

The Redbirds will now play three games versus Bradley at

Bob Warn Field. Illinois State will host Bradley for a doubleheader with game one beginning at 12 p.m. CT Friday. Both games will be a full nine innings. The series will conclude with one game at 12 p.m. CT Saturday. Admission and parking will be free, however please note that Terre Haute, Ind., is in the Eastern Time Zone. Bob Warn Field is located at 931 N. 1st Street in Terre Haute, Ind.

have to play in the tournament. The results proved that the A-10 teams can do that, so they were rewarded. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski took a small shot at the A-10 over the weekend while shilling for the ACC. “It’s numeric,” SJU coach Phil Martelli said. “These six teams got bids, not the Atlantic 10 got six. The idea that well, if they played in our league … If we played in your league, we would have different facilities, maybe different coaches and different players. But I think it’s marvelous what has happened. The challenge at the other schools today is they’re going to say next year, ‘We want to be one of those six.’ “ The league simply knows how to do it. It has a new, eight-year media package with CBS, NBC and ESPN. And when the defections happened, there was no panic. “We looked around the room and we really liked who we saw sitting around the room at our spring meetings,” McGlade said. George Mason had joined to make it 13 teams. Davidson will join next season to make it 14. “We knew how deep the league was and we knew the tradition of the A-10,” McGlade said. The tradition will be on display in Buffalo, Raleigh, San Diego and Orlando Thursday and Friday. And if it can get a team or teams through to New York, Memphis or Indianapolis next week, even Coach K might take notice.

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thought it was important that everybody stick to it. It’s not just good for your top teams to have a good RPI. You’re only as strong as your weakest teams.” Scheduling is an art that most of the A-10 teams have mastered. There is a formula and they know it. SJU played at Vermont and home against Boston University this season. The games figured to be wins against teams from lesser leagues, but the bet was that they would be two of the best teams in their leagues who would compile very good records, which would help the Hawks’ RPI. The Hawks won both games. The bet paid off when Vermont and BU won their leagues’ regular seasons and finished with a combined record of 4620. Even though UMass finished sixth in the conference, it got the third-best A-10 NCAA seed because of non-con wins against LSU, Nebraska, New Mexico, Clemson, BYU and Providence. If your sixth-place team can do that, your league has to be very good. GW beat Creighton, Miami, Maryland, Manhattan, Boston University and Georgia. VCU beat No. 1 seed and ACC champ Virginia. Dayton beat Gonzaga and California and won at Ole Miss. The committee really liked that the league teams scheduled all these games. It liked even more the fact that they won so many of them. The committee wants to know if you can compete with the types of teams you will


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THE ’BIRD

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18 redbirds Continued from page 20

because the NCAA requires membership of six schools for a conference to be officially recognized. The MIC consisted of only five members until last season when Lindenwood joined the conference. ISU’s last MIC Championship title came two years ago and was the Redbirds’ first conference championship in more than 10 years. Illinois-Chicago is the defending champion of this event. The Redbirds look to win their third-straight MIC Championship all-around title, as junior Sami King was the all-around champion in last year’s event and spring 2013 graduate Kim Genereux took the all-around title in 2012. The Redbirds have two defending first-team All-MIC competitors in this upcoming weekend’s MIC Championship. First-team All-MIC honors are awarded to individuals who finish in the top-three in any event in the MIC Championship. King’s all-around title in the 2013 MIC Championship earned her first-team All-MIC honors and she also qualified for the NCAA Regional. Sophomore

03.20.2014

Amanda Mohler’s first-team All-MIC honors last season came way of a second-place performance on the beam and third-place finish on the uneven bars in last season’s MIC Championship. Additionally, senior Elise Gray earned first-team All-MIC honors in 2012 thanks to earning third place on vault at the MIC Championship. The MIC Championship marks the fourth meet this season that Illinois-Chicago and ISU have both been a part of together. The Flames and Redbirds matched up in a dual meet in Chicago last week where UIC emerged victorious. The two teams will be facing off against one another for the secondstraight meet Saturday. In addition, in the Illinois-Michigan Invite Feb. 1, ISU and UIC teamed up to face off against Central Michigan and Eastern Michigan. The state of Michigan upended the state of Illinois in the meet. Finally, at the Illinois Classic on Feb. 21, ISU and UIC both competed where the Redbirds took fourth place out of four teams and the Flames took second place out of four teams. Archive Photo

Sophomore gymnast Amanda Mohler earned all-MIC honors last season.

part of a healthy breakfast Today’s Birthday (03/20/14). The Sun entering your sign today energizes your ambitions to launch your next year. Make bold plans. Go for endurance. Disciplined communication skills are key for growth this year; keep learning new tricks. Happiness and fun at home increases with beauty and art. Positive changes arise in family. Dreams can come true this year. Focus on love. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 9 — You’re immensely popular now. The Sun enters your sign today, setting off an intense action phase, a growth surge. Follow the numbers. This month, you rule. Pursue your most passionate ambitions. Regular rest keeps you

charged. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — Focus on cleaning up old projects over the next month, with the Sun in Aries. Solitude and clear space inspire you. There’s plenty of work. Watch for hurt feelings. Work it out and your partnership brings home the bacon. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is an 8 — Team projects flow with greater ease this month, with the Sun in Aries. Your social network benefits you professionally, so get out and play. Balance providing great service with maintaining health and vitality. Bring home a light heart. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 6 — Increase productivity. Move your career agenda forward this month, with the Aries Sun. You can gain respect and author-

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day is a 6 — Give home and family more attention this month, with the Aries Sun. Get friends to help with a project, and invite them for something delicious afterwards. Renovate something you already have. New paint works wonders. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is an 8 — With the Sun in Aries this month, you have curiosity, passion and the ability to express and communicate powerfully. Indulge in studies. Write, record and film what you’re learning. The one having the most fun wins. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 7 — Your craftsmanship is admired and sales are up this month, with the Aries Sun. You have energy and power to spare. Travel could be fun... a business trip? Network with friends and partners in your industry.

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Spring 14

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Aries. Negotiate a plan, and define who does what. Your enthusiasm is contagious. Apply talents and cleverness for a fruitful and profitable collaboration. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — Work gets busy this next month, with the Sun in Aries. Follow your plan, and get help from friends and associates. Make sure to stay rested and energized. The Moon’s in your sign, and confidence rising. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 5 — Friends offer plenty of encouragement. This month offers high-energy fun, with the Sun in Aries. You’re especially attractive. Play with children grows you younger. Ponder deep questions with childlike wonder. Enjoy the ones you love. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — To-

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For Rent

ity, if you apply yourself. Hold your temper, even when others don’t. Heed a caring critic. Find the fun. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 5 — Indulge your curiosity this month, with the Sun in Aries. Conditions are good for study, travel and expansion. Invest in home, family and real estate. Your attention turns to the future. Let your energy fill the house. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 7 — Your resourcefulness helps you achieve the impossible. This month with the Sun in Aries, financial planning comes easy. Gather information and consult an expert. Handle tax issues early. Find your sense of humor in absurdity. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is an 8 — Partnerships grow stronger this month, with the Sun in

Fell; spacious, furnished 1 and 2 bedrooms. One block from campus. Start at $380. Class Realty. (309) 454‑2960 Willow West 100. 4 bedroom home with basement, 2 bath. 1,600 total per month plus deposit. Please call AB rental 309‑ 827‑7747 808 S. Linden. Large 1, 2, 3 & 4 person units. All utls incl. Next to the trail. Pool on site. Start at $370. Class Act Realty. 454‑2960 Vernon Stables. Furnished 2 bed/1 bath. Utilities included/free internet. Washer/dryer in unit. $535‑$545 per bedroom SAMI 888‑4600

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Help Wanted

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Childcare LPN Assist in administering psychotropic medications and providing medical intervention as appropriate for children in The Baby Fold’s residential treatment centers, ages 6‑13, with severe emotional and behavioral disabilities. 10 hrs/wk, 7‑9 AM, M‑F. Must be LPN or RN. Applications and additional information avaibile at www.TheBabyFold.org or 108 E. Willow Street in Normal. FT summer childcare needed. 3 boys, 35+ hrs/wk, need car. Send letter of interest to leonarddpm@hotmail.com

Food & Drink Gill Street Sports Bar and Rest. Now accepting apps. for immediate positions. Servers, cooks, bartenders. Part and Full time. Apply in person. 3002 Gill St. in Blm.

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Outdoor/Athletic Local Student for work on non farm rural property. Experience with mowing and outdoor project helpful. Part‑time for spring, summer, and fall. Call John 728‑ 2920 Gymnastics/Tumbling Instructors and Day Camp Staff: We have openings for gymnastics & tumbling instructors as well as summer day camp counselors in the area’s largest, best equipped gymnastics facility‑‑Rising Stars Academy. Seeking dependable, high‑energy individuals willing to work w/ children of all ages and ability levels in our classes and day camp programs. Experience is preferred but not necessary; we will train the right individuals. 2902 Gill St, Bloomington (off of Airport Road). 309‑ 662‑3330. Stop by for an Application or print one off at www.risingstarsacademy.com

Roommates Wanted SUBLEASING SAMI has subleases available www.sami.com (309)888‑4600

Service Offered $3 bar ride Th/Fri/Sat 2‑15 riders. Groups over 6 the caller rides free. Call 309‑262‑8747 for ISU surroundings.


19

THE ’BIRD

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03.20.2014

White Sox have some work to do to avoid last year’s stink ZACK FULKERSON Sports Columnist

T Nick Thompson/Photographer

Daishon Knight (left) fronted ISU in scoring with 18 points, while Bobby Hunter (right) followed with 16 points in last night’s contest against Morehead State.

ISU grabs CBI first-round win over MSU tawni ricketts Sports Editor

In its first College Basketball Invitational (CBI) post-season tournament appearance in program history, the Illinois State men’s basketball team earned a firstround win over Morehead State in a 77-67 decision Wednesday night at Redbird Arena. With the win, Illinois State will continue on to not only play in, but host the quarterfinal round of the CBI against Texas A&M on Monday, March 24 at Redbird Arena. The Aggies mark the first-ever Southeastern Conference (SEC) opponent to play at Redbird Arena and only the second (Mississippi) to play in Normal. “[Playing Texas A&M] is a great opportunity. They are a terrific team,” ISU head coach Dan Muller said. “An SEC team coming in here on a Monday night, hopefully we’ll have a terrific crowd. Our guys will be excited.” Postseason play of any kind is new for this season’s Redbird squad as Nick Zeisloft and John Jones, who were on the team when ISU

appeared in the 2012 NIT, did not play due to redshirting and ineligibility, respectively. This year’s team is the least experienced program in Division I basketball this season. “I think the experience to be able to go out and play with that type of [tournament] pressure, [where] you have to win to keep playing, is an important skill to have for a team or a program going forward,” Muller said. “We want to be winning tournaments. This experience is critical for this team. They handled it very well and I thought we learned a lot over the last week and half about that.” ISU accepted the invitation to play in the CBI Sunday night after bowing out of the Missouri Valley Conference championship tournament in the quarterfinal round against Missouri State. “We love the game of basketball,” ISU junior guard Bobby Hunter said. “The Missouri Valley Conference tournament didn’t work as we planned, now we get another chance to play in a tournament and we accepted that and we’re kind of using that as preparation for next year in the Missouri Valley and to get better.” Daishon Knight led the Redbirds in their offensive campaign with 18 points, while Hunter (16 points), Zeisloft (13 points) and Lynch (12 points) rounded out the Redbird quartet in

double figures. John Jones, who returned to the lineup from injury for the first time since Jan. 25, finished with six points, including a slam dunk to close out the first half. “John was great — [played] 12 minutes in the first half of his 17 [total],” Muller said. “His physicality helps us. I thought for his first game back in seven weeks he was terrific. I’m excited he got to play tonight and he’ll get another game this year.” The Eagles maintained a small, single-digit lead over the first six minutes of play before Knight nailed a trey to give ISU its first lead of the game at 8-7. The teams would continue to exchange baskets throughout the first half but ISU would grab the 33-25 lead at the half. Coming out of the locker rooms, the Eagles went on a 12-5 run to cut the ISU lead down to one point at 38-37. Knight then scored fivestraight points for the Redbirds to make the score 43-37 with 16 minutes left in the second period. Morehead State would get as close as eight points, but the Redbirds held on, growing their lead to as much as 18 points with 2:40 left in the game, to secure the 77-67 win. ISU will take on Texas A&M Monday at Redbird Arena, time is to be determined. The cost is $5 for students, $10 for upper bowl tickets and $15 for lower bowl tickets.

Redbirds set to host MIC Championship Todd Marver Senior Staff

The Illinois State gymnastics squad will host an event this weekend that none of the current Redbird gymnasts have experienced on their home floor. For the first time in five years, ISU will serve as the host for the Midwest Independent Conference (MIC) Championship, which will take place at 4 p.m. Saturday at Redbird Arena. Centenary, Illinois-Chicago, Southeast Missouri State and Texas Women’s have served as the hosts for the event in the last four years since ISU last hosted the event in 2009. “It’s rare that we host both the conference and Illinois Classic meet in the same season,” ISU head coach Bob Conkling said. The MIC is home to schools that have women’s gymnastics programs in which the primary conference the school belongs to does not sponsor women’s gymnastics. In ISU’s case, the Missouri Valley Conference does not sponsor women’s gymnastics, so the ISU gymnastics program is a member of the MIC as well as five other schools in a similar situation including Centenary, Illinois-Chicago, Southeast Missouri State, Texas Women’s and Lindenwood. The MIC was not officially recognized by the NCAA previous to last season, the 2012-13 campaign,

see ‘redbirds’ page 18

Archive Photo

Junior Sami King was named the all-around champion in last year’s MIC Championship.

hank the Lord that the weather is finally warming up. Scents of Spring are finally starting to float, and the mountains of snow are finally starting to melt. Football is long in the books. The NBA is starting to wind down, while March Madness is starting to heat up. Basketball just isn’t even on my mind. No — I need a little baseball in my life. With just over 10 days on the countdown until opening day, I can’t stop thinking about days at the ballpark. And yet, unfortunately, I have similar sentiments to last year when it comes to my favorite team; the White Sox have a lot of work to do. As I had predicted, we’re coming off of a tough season. I don’t say that to pat myself on the back. In fact, I say that quite regrettably. At 63-99 I’d say we probably lost a few more games than even I would have predicted. But you can’t argue with those numbers. The Sox finished at the absolute bottom of the AL Central, the absolute bottom of the MLB in batting, the absolute bottom of the MLB in fielding and well near the bottom in pitching overall as well. If the boys in black want to change that this year, they’re going to have to make some changes. Maybe the pitching staff needs to step it up a bit, but they’re undoubtedly the least to blame. Granted, saying that they’re the best unit on the team isn’t saying much. But nonetheless, the stats are on their side. Last season, they edged the American League average in ERA just slightly, posting 3.98 compared to the league’s 3.99. They recorded 90 quality starts, well exceeding the AL, and topping the National League and MLB averages. Batting averageagainst, strikeouts, earned runs — their peripherals are all on par with the league averages. After launching our winningest pitcher on the season, Jake Peavy, the starting-five will certainly see (at minimum) a new face. But if our pitchers can hold last season’s pace, they are by far the least of our worries. I’m guessing you won’t gasp and clutch your pearls when I say that our fielding needs some serious work. Second to the Houston Astros, the Sox defense had the most errors of any infield in the league. They racked up a whopping 121 — about 40 more than the AL average, and about 30 more than the League average. Third baseman Connor Gillaspie, and shortstop Alexei Ramírez are foremost to blame, committing 17 and 22 errors respectively. And with each settling in to his position for the upcoming season, it is too early to tell whether we can expect much different. What should surprise absolutely no White Sox fan is that we need the bats. Plain and simple.

see ‘sox’ page 16


The Bird 3.20.14