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SELECTED WORKS

VICTOR STOLBOVOY

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ABOUT

VICTOR STOLBOVOY

CURRENT EMPLOYMENT

victors@student.ethz.ch +41 78 689 33 32

March 2015 - current Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich, Assistant 3D modelling and digital fabrication

BIRTHDATE/BIRTHPLACE LANGUAGES 11.01.1990, Saint-Petersburg, Russia

Russian

English Fluent German Fluent Russian Native Lower intermediate Chinese

EDUCATION

CORE SKILLS

2006 Gymnasium 1502, Moscow

Autocad Modelling/Drafting

NATIONALITY

Archicad Modelling/Drafting 2006-2010 Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology BSc Applied Mathematics and Physics

Rhinoceros+VRay+ Modelling/Drafting/ Grasshopper+ Rendering Python Photoshop Image processing

2011-2014 Moscow Architectural Institute BSc in Architecture unfinished, changed to ETH

Illustrator Drawing Indesign Layout

HS 2014 - current ETH Zurich DARCH BSc in Architecture in progress HS14 Studio Prof. Emerson FS15 Studio Prof. Emerson HS15 Studio Prof. Angelil FS16 Studio Asst. Prof. Hebel

Modelmaking Casting Concrete/ Gypsum/Ceramics, Laser cutting, CNC

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FOUR PROJECTS EXECUTED AT THE ETH Colleagues: HS14 Victor Lepik FS15 Djuna Stรถckli HS15 Marcelo Rovira FS16 Tolga รœnver

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STADTTERASSE BUCHEGGPLATZ Autumn Semester ‘14 Studio Tom Emerson

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ANALYSIS & OBJECTIVE

Bucheggplatz

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The most important deficiencies of the current Bucheggplatz which were identified are the lack of sheltered resting places and of proper catering. They prevent the visitor from recognizing the positive qualities like the state of constant movement, which is most spectacular at night and the urbanity of the place. The cars, busses and trams appear to move in a carefully orchestrated choreography. A place that addresses these deficiencies must embrace the spectacle, but should also offer sheltered spaces. To achieve these apparently contradictory objectives elevating the structure and arranging the spaces vertically are proposed. New building offers a platform for the visitor to observe the Bucheggplatz. This new perspective changes the relationship of the visitor to the square by highlighting the positive qualities of it. The structure also helps to increase the visibility of Bucheggplatz in context of the whole city. The project can be extended to a series of structures providing another linking layer to the city, improving the avareness of citizens, stimulating interaction and thus enriching the fabric of the city.

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THE PROJECT

The structure

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View from top level of the structure

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Axonometric section

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Frontal and lateral view

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by Victor Stolbovoy& Victor Lepik

Buchegg Café, 2014, ETH Zürich

Superimposition of existing and new structures Connection points

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Siteplan

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by Victor Stolbovoy& Victor Lepik

Buchegg Café, 2014, ETH Zürich

Construction detail Lightweight metal frame structure

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Model of the existing building with conceptual model of the structure Cast concrete 17


Model of the existing building Cast concrete

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Model of the existing building Cast concrete

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STUDENT HOUSING ROSENGARTENSTRASSE Spring Semester ‘15 Studio Tom Emerson

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ANALYSIS & OBJECTIVE

$ $$ $

71 72 33

71 72 33

$ $$ $

$ $$ $

Pedestrian Circulation drawn by Gamze Atas & Liene Wild

Rosengarten Atlas, 2015, ETH Zürich

The Site (on the right) Drawing by Gamze Atas & Liene Wild / Studio Emerson

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Rosengartenstrasse is a highly frequented street. The plot is situated at one of its main junctions.The site is encircled by roads. Several pedestrian crossings and under-pathes lead to it. However the main feature of the plot is the bridge which connects two otherwise separated parts of Wipkingen. This infrastructure inspired our project. The building is constructed as a continuing ramp. Starting form the busstop underneath the bridge it follows the surrounding slope one level above the pedestrian path and the street, forming a roof for the walkway. As the plot reaches its highest point at the upper busstop the ramp leaves the walkway but continuous to follow the form of the site. The facade is completely built out of glassbricks. There are small windows in the rooms and the niches in front of them. Within the building the structure of pillars, beams and separation walls made out of bricks can be distinguished. As a building for students for whom studying and the transfer of knowledge is very important, the building serves as a continuous space for these activities. There are desks placed in niches in the corridor. The common spaces on each room as well as two double-story halls contain space for more students to gather.

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THE PROJECT

Site plan, 1:500, Djuna Stöckli / Victor Stolbovoy

Project Rosengartenstrasse, 2015, ETH Zürich

Site plan

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Floor plan (ground floor), 1:100, Djuna Stöckli / Victor Stolbovoy

Project Rosengartenstrasse, 2015, ETH Zürich

Ground floor Access from the bridge

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Floor plan (3. floor), 1:100, Djuna StĂśckli / Victor Stolbovoy

Project Rosengartenstrasse, 2015, ETH ZĂźrich

Third floor Student rooms, corridors, dining hall, restrooms

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Section, 1:100 Djuna Stöckli / Victor Stolbovoy

Project Rosengartenstrasse, 2015, ETH Zürich

Section

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Structural axonometry, Victor Stolbovoy & Djuna Stöckli

Project Rosengartenstrasse, ETH Zürich, 2015

Structural axonometry

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Model, Segment of the structure Concrete, Cast as one piece

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View from Nordstrasse

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View from Rosengartenstrasse

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View from the bridge to the entrance of the building

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Hall interior

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Image of an Interior, Djuna Stöckli / Victor Stolbovoy

Project Rosengartenstrasse, 2015, ETH Zürich

Room interior

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EASTOPIA Autumn Semester ‘15 Studio Marc Angelil

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ANALYSIS & OBJECTIVE

Stadion Narodowy, Stadion Dziesięciolecia Warsaw, 1955 New National Stadium built above the old one (below) 38


The project focuses on transformation of The National Stadium of Poland. Busy motorways and railroads define the edges of the site. To the south the Polish national stadium stands with its extruded metal sheet facade. The site has a great history. The biggest events in modern Polish history can be told just by telling the history of the site. It has been a battle field, a site for recreational sports, a place to grow crops during the second world war, a symbol both for the socialist and the neoliberal Poland as well as the face of the 2012 UEFA Eurocup. Its former history has been erased by the tabula rasa planning created for the last Eurocup which Poland hosted. Today the site is dead. The new stadium hosts only a few football games per year and is otherwise seldom used. The rest of the site is a field of gravel working as a place for locals to do donuts with their cars. In the northern part a clandestine market has appropriated a piece of used land. The site is located in the neighbourhood of Praga. Formerly it was a worn down working class neighbourhood that is undergoing a gentrification process. To the north you find big housing blocks and to the south smaller scale neighbourhoods with were several embassies have their residences. West of the site is the riverside of the Wisla river. The riverbank is cut off of the site by the highway that runs along the coastline. On the contiguity of the road there is a playground. Closer to the river there is a sandbank where people take evening promenades, young people drink beers and chat. To the east is the lush Skaryszewski park. Also separated by the a road. In the bushes surrounding the stadium you can find human feces and heroin needles. The other part is closed of the public by a security fence protecting the stadium from its surroundings. Our proposition seeks to discover the possibilities and limitations of overlaying historical maps as a design method for architecture and urban planning. How does the past define the future? How do the different architectural units relate to each other? How can we manipulating the past to become the progressive future?

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THE PROJECT

Archaeology of the site from 1867 till present

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GRIDS

FUNCTIONS

EXHIBITION

AGRICULTURE

SPORT

MARKET

The historical information separated into formal and functional parts

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One of proposals for the site

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Proposal axonometry

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Proposed functions Exhibition space

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Proposed functions Market

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Site

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Integrated construction Explosion axo of facade of one of the buildings (parking)

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Exhibition space model Cardboard

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Residential building model Cardboard

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Parking and exhibition model Cardboard

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Site model Cast ceramics

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BUILDING FOR DISASSEMBLY Spring Semester ‘16 Studio Asst. Prof. Dirk Hebel

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ANALYSIS & OBJECTIVE

The future site (green and orange buildings) as seen from the construction site of new police building

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As opposed to conventional the project starts at the smallest scale. The connection principle and the detail are taken as a source of inspitation for the larger structure of the building. The starting point is pinned connection, defined as a connection where two structural membest are held together by the third one. The main feature of this connection is that it cal allow movement and become a hinge. We tried to understand, combine and implement the principles of his type of connection at all scales, starting from literally connecting two load-bearing beams up to spatial pins which hold together the building and the block. Starting at the scale of the construction detail we chose to use metal structure. Metal structures are flexible and allow a diversity of shapes and sizes. However, taking questions Building for Disassembly, and economical efficiency we chose a grid structure as a basis for the building. On the next scale levelel of the room, the idea of pinned connection manifested itself in the concept of movable walls and tra nsforming spaces, which can react to different situations during their lifetime. Fixed between floor and ceiling, and once detached, being able to move along the dedicated rail system these walls represent the idea of motion inherent to hinged connection. Placed within a strict structural grid moveable walls allow for customization of uniform apartment types, and different spatial qualities in same boundaries. On the larger scale, the principle of pinned connection or the hinge was used for spatial layout of apartments within the building. Both of them are held together by a system of longitudinal and transversal spatial pins which on one hand tie the building together allowing for connection of its parts and on the other hand bind the outside of the block with inside. Corridors serve as longitudinal pins and social spaces allow vertical connection between corridors on different levels. Social pins also provide a place for interaction between the residents and can have different functions like libraries, workshops, laundries. The building is concluded with a flat roof which is also programmed. Different segments of the roof are defined as: a) a public garden where each apartment has a small area to grow plants; b) a roof terrace; c) glass pavilion with a restaurant and meeting place; 4) an area dedicated for solar energy production to reduce the environmental impact of the building.

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Study of pinned connections Employing pinned connection to create a spatial structure

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Study of pinned connections Pinned connection detail

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Study of pinned connections Abstract pinned connection model

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THE PROJECT

Floor plates

Rail system of movable walls

Rail roller Door frame

Floor heating

Locking lever access hatch

Floor heating panels

Primary load bearing stud Konterlattung Locking mechanism

Wall spacer

Height adjustment slot

Height adjustment pin

Wall hinge

Impact sound insulation

Secondary load-bearing structure

Beams of primary load-bearing structure Inner wall segment

Bolted connection

Insulation plates

Wall rails

Prefabricated facade

Suspended ceiling

Insulated konterlattungpanel

Window frame Prefabricated fixed inner wall segment

Rails for tiles installation

Stonecycling tiles

Proposed structure of the building

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Exploded fixed inner wall segment: Inner shell Studs with insulation Outer shell


Floor cover (Parkett) Subfloor with heating

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Lattung (BSH) Impact sound insulation (Rubber)

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Load-bearing structure w. insulation (Steel) 200

Outer shell (Stonecycling) Outer shell mount

(Aluminium)

Installation space/ Rails (Steel)

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Ceiling plates (Hartfaserplatte)

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Weather sealing Isulated konterlattung

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Studs with vapor resistant insulation

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Cover plate (Wood fiber)

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Installation space/ Lattung

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Inner shell (Hard wood fiber plates)

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Section through the facade/window

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Apartment types and combination of apartments into the fabric of the building

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Section perspective through the public space of the part of the building at Ernastrasse

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Two types of transformable flats adapting to needs of inhabitants

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Plan of the ground floor in the site

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Facade: Hohlstrasse (above), Hohlstrasse (below)

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Cortyard Rendering

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Social space Rendering

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Transformation of an apartment Model photograph

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Architecture student portfolio ETH DARCH  

I'm searching for collaborations and an internship, please find my e-mail in the CV section.

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