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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

` 200 JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020 THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

INDIA

THE SECRET GARDEN

*Shalini Misra mows her lawn!

L A ST LAAGROUNDBREAKING NDSC APE PRIVATE HOUSE IN DELHI

BATHROOMS THAT MAKE A

SPLASH!


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Kar i m Rashi d

NEW DELHI.MUMBAI.HYDERABAD


CONTENTS J A N UA RY- F E B RUA RY 2 0 2 0

28 30

EDITOR’S LETTER CONTRIBU TOR S

DIS C OVE RIE S

40

SWINGER Nishita Kamdar unveils Sway, a collection of contemporary furniture from her new artisan studio, POD, which she co-founded with architect Veeram Shah.

44

TASTEMAKER Malini Vachani Akerkar recounts how her creative journey led her to design Tarun Tahiliani’s atelier in Mumbai.

` 200 JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020 THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

INDIA

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

THE SECRET GARDEN

` 200 JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020 THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

INDIA

THE SECRET GARDEN

BATHROOMS THAT MAKE A

SPLASH!

*Shalini Misra mows her lawn!

*Chhatarpur, not Scotland!

L A ST LAAGROUNDBREAKING NDSC APE PRIVATE HOUSE IN DELHI

pg 48

L A ST LAAGROUNDBREAKING NDSC APE PRIVATE HOUSE IN DELHI

BATHROOMS THAT MAKE A

SPLASH!

ON THE COVER

Interior architect and designer Shalini Misra and her Charles Jencks-designed lawns in Chhatarpur, New Delhi. (‘Laa Laa Land’, pg 174) Photographer: Ashish Sahi

SARANG GUPTA

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST


contents

48

CONTEMPOR ARY CLASSIC Galerie G Isa moves

58

SARI, NOT SARI Rashmi Varma Varm andd Malika

60 67

Bal into a new space in Mumbai’s Ballard Estate, and b artists Idris d Khan h opens with a commanding show by and Annie Morris.

neith a dress, nor a Verma design an outfit that is neither bo h. sari, but a fluid combination of both. SNEAK PEEK AD puts together togethe a roadmap p too

help navigate the 2020 edition of the h India d Art Fair, highlighting the unmissable exhib exhibits andd artists. ART & DESIGN PLA N NER A comprehensive p

list of art, design and cultural even h year. events ffor this

73

TRENDSPOTTING Our carefully curated selection of stylish products is all the design inspiration you need.

80

R SVP The who’s who of design and architecture met at the launch of Kohler’s new experience centre in Shakti Mills.

87

HELLO, SUNSHINE AD presents a curated selection of design objects, all of which add a touch of fresh style to your spaces this new year.

112

RITEN MOZUMDAR AD takes a look at Chatterjee & Lal’s major retrospective on the life and work of Riten Mozumdar that opens this month.

COURTESY OF AIRBNB

pg 152


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contents

AD X JITISH K ALLAT The artist brings together Ellipsis, his largest and ever-evolving work on canvas, as well as his installation Covering Letter to his latest solo exhibition at Mumbai’s Famous Studios.

131

AD X A XEL VERVOORDT Axel Vervoordt gives AD a peek into his book Portraits of Interiors, brimming with quiet images of homes that explore an equilibrium between art, architecture and nature.

143

AD

152

THE GUEST ROOM Travellers to

160

SOFT PLAY In ‘Permeated Absence’, her latest solo show at Nature Morte, artist Dhruvi Acharya meditates on the notions of death, loss, longing and memories.

X R AHUL MISHR A Mishra becomes the first Indian designer to be invited to showcase at Paris Couture Week.

Rajasthan can now book a stay at Airbnb’s most luxurious holiday rental yet. AD spends some time in the Gudliya Suite of rooms in Jaipur’s 300-year-old City Palace.

ISHA SHAH

pg 168

123


168

MA XIMUM SUNSET In the hands of interior architect Tanya Singh, Tarini Jindal Handa’s sea-facing apartment turns into a canvas that captures the pink haloed light of the setting sun.

174

LA A LA A LA ND Architect and interior designer Shalini Misra invites AD into The House of Light, her New Delhi home, designed in collaboration with the legendary Charles Jencks and his daughter Lily.

192

BOMBAY DECO Architect and interior decorator Annkur Khosla revives an apartment in a 1920s’ art deco building in Mumbai that captures the essence of the city’s love affair with architecture.

pg 152

COURTESY OF AIRBNB

contents


contents

pg 174

202

204

WITH LOVE, FROM SPAIN AD visits the

Roca Gallery in Barcelona, a neon-blue LED-clad monolith that encapsulates everything the Spanish bath brand stands for. WATER WORLDS The trends that will make your bath or powder room the talk of the town—for all the right reasons.

212 218 224

SCOUTS A round-up of some of the best products that you need to own this season. STOCKISTS An A-Z listing of the stores in

our pages.

THE MOOD Designer Raseel Gujral Ansal on the important things on her mind and her mood board.

ASHISH SAHI

T H E BATHROOM REPORT


EDITOR GREG FOSTER MANAGING EDITOR Komal Sharma ART DIRECTOR Ashish Sahi DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Almas Jani COPY DIRECTOR Tyrel Rodricks SENIOR STYLIST Samir Wadekar JUNIOR STYLIST Mitalee Mehta FEATURES WRITER Ritupriya Basu PHOTO ASSISTANT Sarang Gupta EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Shalini Kanojia WATCH EDITOR Rishna Shah MANAGER SYNDICATION Michelle Pereira SYNDICATION COORDINATORS Giselle D’Mello DIGITAL EDITOR Aditi Sharma Maheshwari ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR Kriti Saraswat-Satpathy DIGITAL WRITER Avni Raut

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Sunil Nayak SENIOR MANAGER - COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION Sudeep Pawar PRODUCTION MANAGER Mangesh Pawar PRODUCTION CONTROLLERS Abhishek Mithbaokar, Geetesh Patil

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Sunil Sethi Nonie Niesewand Divia Patel Neha Prasada Namita A Shrivastav Divya Mishra Gauri Kelkar Gayatri Rangachari Shah Arati Menon

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ricardo Labougle Neville Sukhia Tom Parker

CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER ARJUN MEHRA PUBLISHER Armaity Amaria ASSOCIATE ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kapil Tolani, Loveleen Kahlon (New Delhi) SENIOR ADVERTISING MANAGER Aditi Sharma (New Delhi) ACCOUNT MANAGER - ADVERTISING SALES Varun A Sama ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR Yesha Patel ITALY SALES REPRESENTATIVE Angelo Carredu US ADVERTISING MANAGER Alessandro Cremona ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - DIGITAL SALES Abhay Srivastava (New Delhi) SENIOR MANAGER - DIGITAL SALES Joita Basu MANAGER - DIGITAL SALES Shilpi Mishra MARKETING DIRECTOR Madhura Phadnis SENIOR MARKETING MANAGER Jaymin Dalal HEAD - ADMINISTRATION Boniface Dsouza PR DIRECTOR Swati Katakam Samant SENIOR PR EXECUTIVE Waheeda Abdul Jabbar Machiwala HEAD - EVENTS Fritz Fernandes SENIOR MANAGER - EVENTS Khushnaz Daruwala MANAGER - EVENTS Vania Scott PROJECT & MARKETING MANAGER Olinda Rodrigues CREATIVE DIRECTOR - PROMOTIONS & CREATIVE SOLUTIONS Dipti Soonderji Mongia ASSOCIATE PROMOTIONS EDITOR Sneha Mahadevan SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Varun Patil, Atul Hirijagner PROMOTIONS WRITER Tina Jimmy Dastur MANAGER - CIRCULATION OPERATIONS Jeeson Kollannur CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Amrit Bardhan FINANCIAL CONTROLLER Rakesh Shetty SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Dattaprasanna Bhagwat ACCOUNTANTS Nitin Chavan, Anthony Paulose COMPANY SECRETARY & ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - LEGAL Mosami Kesarkar ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - VIDEO COMMERCIALS Kastubh Belur SENIOR MANAGER - PROCUREMENT Rahul Mulekar ASSISTANT MANAGER - PROCUREMENT Anubhuti Sharma ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - COMMERCIAL PLANNING Alisha Goriawala ASSISTANT MANAGERS - HUMAN RESOURCES Ria Ganguly, Neha Pednekar DIRECTOR - DIGITAL SALES AND BRANDED CONTENT Shreyas Rao DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR Kiran Suryanarayana HEAD - AD OPERATIONS Sachin Pujari SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER - DIGITAL Dipak Raghuwansi DIGITAL GRAPHIC DESIGNER Deep Shikha GRAPHIC DESIGNER - NATIVE Ayushi Teotia MANAGER - TECH PROJECT Vishal Ingale MANAGERS - AD OPERATIONS Vinayak Mehra, Reshma Nilankar SENIOR EXECUTIVE - AD OPERATIONS Akanksha Malik DIGITAL DIRECTOR Saurabh Garg SENIOR MANAGER - DIGITAL MARKETING & SUBSCRIPTIONS V Satyavagheeshwaran MANAGERS - DIGITAL MARKETING Priyanka Shivdasani, Akanksha Naik MANAGER - DATA & GROWTH Tanvi Randhar MANAGER - AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Kanupriya Kedia SENIOR EXECUTIVE - EMAIL MARKETING Tanya Chhateja EXECUTIVE DIGITAL COPYWRITER Pranjali Jakatdar DIRECTOR - DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS Salil Inamdar CLIENT DIRECTOR - DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS Aman Bahl ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - CLIENT SERVICING & PROJECT MANAGEMENT Neha Dhanani MANAGING EDITOR - NATIVE STORIES Shivani Krishan INFLUENCER MANAGER Insiya Bagasrawala SENIOR MANAGER - BRAND SOLUTIONS Abigail Rodrigues MANAGER - BRAND SOLUTIONS Sakhi Deshpande COPY EDITOR - BRAND SOLUTIONS Tanuj Kumar (New Delhi) CREATIVE PRODUCER Mandira Sharma DIRECTOR - VIDEO Anita Horam SENIOR CREATIVE PRODUCER - VIDEO Preshita Saha ASSISTANT CREATIVE PRODUCER Aditya Sinha EA TO MANAGING DIRECTOR Karen Contractor Avari

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i qr upa ndr i t z . c om


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THE SECRET GARDEN BATHROOMS THAT MAKE A

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*Chhatarpur, not Scotland!

L A ST LAAGROUNDBREAKING NDSC APE PRIVATE HOUSE IN DELHI

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ROLLING IN THE HAY

PHOTO: R BURMAN.

W

ould you like a picnic lunch from our vegetable garden?” asked interior designer Shalini Misra via text message. I already knew this was going to be a great day as we were shooting her majestic estate in New Delhi with a garden designed by the late, legendary landscape architect Charles Jencks. I won’t fawn too much over what a BIG DEAL it is to have Charles Jencks design your garden. But can you imagine what it took to persuade the manipulator of mountains, who worked mostly on public projects and almost exclusively in Scotland, not Chhatarpur, to create his only Eden that actually morphs into a house with architecture by Delhi-based Morphogenesis? He wasn’t exactly prolific, nor did he just lend his name. Yet this is the most classic Jencks landscape I’ve seen, referencing the famous “mounds” of his garden at Jupiter Artland in Edinburgh. And then he designed a vegetable patch to boot?! Shalini, who is also the owner, must be made of more mettle than her cashmere-clad charm suggests. I’d met Shalini a few times over the last four years as we entered the slow song and dance that is often required to persuade homeowners to open their doors (or massive gates, in this case) for AD. We’d wined and dined in Mumbai and Milan (she is based mostly in London) while the house was under construction and as I did my best to secure what would be one of the most important gardens in India for our cover. But over beans and Barolo in her home’s pretty dining courtyard, this was the first time we really got to know each other. I immensely enjoyed our picnic, the conversation peppered with so many delicious stories about Shalini’s neighbours—almost none of which are printable. Oh, she’s sharp. Part of my pitch to Shalini had been a witty portrait of her mowing her lawn. On the day of the shoot—I’m delighted at how it turns out—the freshly painted lawnmower juxtaposed perfectly with her heels and Balmain jacket. It’s a classic Condé Nast image, I grandly think to myself, until Shalini shares a reference of Eva Longoria doing exactly the same in a ballgown on Wisteria Lane. Make no mistake, Shalini Misra is no desperate housewife. Watch out, Delhi, you’ve seen nothing like this before.


by


contributors J I T I S H K A L L AT

MOHAMAD ROSHAN

ASHISH SAHI

artist Jitish Kallat has exhibited widely across the world at major museums, galleries and art institutions. In 2017, the NGMA in Delhi presented a mid-career survey covering 25 years of his work. His solo exhibition at the Frist Museum of Art in Nashville opens in March 2020. He was the curator and artistic director of Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2014. In this issue, we see his newest, 60-foot-wide artwork, Ellipsis (pg 123), opening at Mumbai’s Famous Studios.

ALMAS JANI

AXEL V E RVO O R D T interior architect The Belgian designer has crafted some of the most soulful interiors worldwide. As his new coffee table book, Axel Vervoordt: Portraits of Interiors comes out, AD excerpts a few leaves out of his exceptional body of work (pg 131).

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

KUDRAT PARDIWALA

GETTY IMAGES

deputy art director In her eight glorious years at Condé Nast, AD’s deputy art director has been integral to the way the magazine looks and feels today. “It’s been a heck of a rollercoaster ride with never a dull moment— unforgettable all the way!” says Jani, who is moving on to new adventures.

A LO K NA N DA ad man Founder of his eponymous design and branding consultancy, Alok Nanda came on board to design AD’s annual ‘Art & Design Planner’ (pg 67), specially created by Mahesh Ramparia, creative director of the agency. “For us, typography always comes first, hence you see the vintage etchings juxtaposed against the contemporary typography.”


contributors R AHUL MISHR A

MANIL GUPTA

ARPITA AKHANDA

MEHTAB MANN

designer Rahul Mishra’s eponymous label represents the finest handwoven, hand-embroidered and hand-crafted fashion in India, for the world. This year, he becomes the first Indian designer to be invited to show his collection at the prestigious Paris Haute Couture Week. For AD, he previews five exquisite drawings from the collection with full detailing and landscape inspirations (pg 143).

VA R U N R A N A writer Varun Rana is a fashion journalist and commentator whose writings have appeared in GQ India, Harper’s Bazaar India, Vogue India, The Hindu, Mint and others. He currently works at Good Earth as Content Lead. For this issue, he writes on fashion designer Rahul Mishra’s official entry into the coveted Paris Haute Couture Week calendar (pg 143). “This is a turning point in the history of Indian fashion, and there is no designer better suited to represent the country on this august platform.”

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

US H M I TA SA H U curator Ushmita Sahu is a visual artist, scholar and independent curator based in Santiniketan, West Bengal. In this issue, she collaborates with Mortimer Chatterjee and Tara Lal to provide insight into the works of artist-designer Riten Mozumdar (pg 112).

M O RT I M E R C H AT T E R J E E & TA R A L A L gallerists Mortimer Chatterjee and Tara Lal have been hosting exhibitions nationally and internationally for 14 years. For AD, they provide a sneak peak to a major retrospective on the artist-designer, Riten Mozumdar (pg 112): “We are thrilled to make known the extraordinary legacy of this somewhat forgotten figure.”


contributors

N O N I E N I E S E WA N D writer Previously at Vogue UK, then architectural correspondent for The Independent, Niesewand has written and published 11 books on design. She contributes to print and digital editions of Surface NY and House & Garden. “Writing about the House of Light (pg 174) has been a very personal journey, remembering Charles Jencks and understanding Shalini Misra’s vision for a family home.”

B H A R AT H R A M A M RU T H A M

ZEINAB AL HASHEMI

ARUN DAS

photographer A qualified architect, Ramamrutham’s photographs have been featured in a number of books, monographs and publications, both Indian and international. For ‘Maximum Sunset’ (pg 168), he shot Tarini Jindal Handa’s Mumbai apartment designed by Tanya Singh.

A S H I S H SA H I AAKRITI MANDHWANI

photographer “Shooting AD’s cover story (pg 174), a secret garden by Charles Jencks in Chhatarpur was like walking into an artwork. All the mounds completely protect and hide homeowner Shalini Misra’s home from all the outside chaos of Delhi. It’s a different world that I was privy to,” says Sahi.

writer Radhika Iyengar is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in Al Jazeera, Open, Vogue India, Huffington Post, Platform and Scroll.in, to name a few. In this issue, she highlights the must-sees at the India Art Fair 2020 (pg 60). “This list is by no means an exhaustive one, but if you often find yourself flummoxed by the multitude of art galleries at IAF, this list will tell you where to begin.”

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

ASHISH SAHI

R ADHIK A IYENGAR


contributors ISHA SHAH

SARANG GUPTA

photographer Isha Shah is a Mumbai-based photographer whose work has featured in AD Italia and AD China. She has worked on several national and international projects. In this issue, she shoots ‘Maximum Sunset’ (pg 168). “To capture the scale of the space, along with the intricate detailing done by Tanya (Singh), was exciting, challenging and creatively satisfying.”

NANDINI THILAK

R ASEEL GUJR AL A N SA L designer The Delhi-based luxury designer opened up her personal mood board to AD (pg 224). “It was a wonderful pause in the trajectory of everyday life.”

FRANK SCHMID

writer Nandini Thilak is an art historian, writer, and curator based in Stuttgart, Germany. She is a doctoral candidate at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. In this issue, she writes an insightful essay on the latest work by artist Jitish Kallat (pg 123).

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

HUMA SHAIKH designer A consulting designer from London, currently based in Mumbai, Shaikh has lent her unique eye to the art direction of AD’s January-February issue. “At the start of one’s career, it is a pleasure to be working with a fun team that’s open to new ideas!”


FINE TEXTILES . UPHOLSTERY . RUGS . BESPOKE FURNITURE


OUR ROUND-UP FROM THE FRONT LINE OF DESIGN: TRENDS, OBJECTS, STYLE, EVENTS

discoverIES

green fields This month, art patron Shalini Passi’s foundation, MASH Sculptural Space, opens a group exhibition titled ‘We are Still Alive: Strategies in Surviving the Anthropocene’ from 21 January to 2 February 2020, in the sculpture garden of the India International Centre in New Delhi. Curated by Arshiya Lokhandwala, it features sculptural works by seven artists, one of which, Goat Eater by Priyanka Choudhary, found its way into ’s January-February issue. Here’s to a wild, sustainable and climate-conscious 2020!


swinger

Architect Nishita Kamdar, co-founder of POD, on the ‘Cocoon’ swing from the Sway collection.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

PHOTO: SARANG GUPTA.

Architecture, emotion and craftsmanship meet and mingle in Sway, a collection of furniture by POD


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P

TEXT: DIVYA MISHRA. PHOTO: SARANG GUPTA.

OD is an abbreviation for ‘Pieces of Desire’,” says Nishita Kamdar, co-founder—with architect Veeram Shah—of her eponymous architecture studio, and now, POD. The idea of POD was born out of two motives: Kamdar’s, to fill the gap in the market with designs that were sophisticated as well as affordable; and Shah’s, to immerse himself in a research-driven unlearning experience that would also result in good design. The idea took hold in March last year, and by April, the studio was ready to go. The team today comprises six architects (including Shah and Kamdar) and six artisans, all of whom are encouraged to “express themselves and bring together Indian craft traditions with modern ideas”, says Kamdar. Within five months, the studio was ready with its first collection. Crafted in a material palette of teak, brass and metal, Sway—as its name implies— is a collection of indoor and outdoor furniture inspired by the swings seen in traditional Indian homes. “We did rigorous research to find pieces rooted in Indian tradition, and the swing fit the bill,” says Kamdar. But that might be as far as the resemblance goes. The Sway pieces are clean-lined and geometric, with softly rounded corners. The range of pieces features softly polished dark wood highlighted by brass accents and cane-work, upholstered in neutral, natural fabrics. The studio also weaves environmental awareness into its designs with reclaimed teak. “We want to be very conscious about our choices; hence, at every stage, we try to reuse and reduce the waste that we produce,” says Kamdar, adding, “The pieces have to be designed for longevity, functionality, aesthetic appeal, and fit into the context of your home. That’s what makes a design good.”

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020


Tastemaker For Malini Vachani Akerkar, a journey that began 25 years ago as a hunt for artisans in Rajasthan, culminated in her designing a sophisticated atelier for Tarun Tahiliani

T

wenty five years ago, Malini Vachani Akerkar found herself trampling through the interiors of rural Rajasthan with a bag full of very serious cash, bodyguard in tow. She was looking for craftspeople—potters, textile weavers, artists who painted tribal art on walls of buildings, and furniture makers in Churu who sold their wares to Pottery Barn. None of this had been part of her plan. It all started when danseuse Protima Bedi visited Under The Over—a South Mumbai restaurant Vachani Akerkar ran with her

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husband, chef Rahul Akerkar, in the early 1990s. Bedi came in for a meal, met the couple, saw how lovingly the eatery had been decorated...and asked the restaurateurs to move. Bedi’s plan was to have them come down to Bengaluru to run a 10-room resort she was building there, adjacent to her dance school, Nritygram. “It was all quite mad. But it worked out really well, because our lease was running out and the landlord was making it really difficult,” says Vachani Akerkar. The couple moved to Kuteeram >

TEXT: ROSHNI BAJAJ SANGHVI. PHOTO: SARANG GUPTA.

Malini Vachani Akerkar at the Tarun Tahiliani atelier in Mumbai.


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< (which is now a Taj property), and lived in a hotel manager’s

house on the grounds of the hotel, which Vachani Akerkar slowly made their home filling it with beautiful objects and memories. “I was a collector; Rahul and I collected art and knickknacks on our travels,” says Vachani Akekar. “Bedi saw the way I did up my house there, and said ‘I want you to do the interiors of the hotel’.” So off Vachani Akerkar went, looking for artefacts to populate the space designed by Gerard da Cunha, with colour and texture, accessories and art. It was also the beginning of the journey that led to her most recent design project—clothier, couturier (and her cousin), Tarun Tahiliani’s brand new Mumbai atelier. The space sits within the Italian-designed Villar Ville, in Colaba—a building where his maternal grandfather had a duplex penthouse. This emporium of bespoke luxury wedding wear occupies two rooms above Tahiliani’s landmark, sea-facing boutique in the early Edwardian building. The space has a distinct elegance that ties into the Tahiliani brand language and legacy. While Vachani Akerkar has been best known as one half of the restaurateur couple that helmed Indigo, Indigo Deli, and most recently the award-winning 100-seater Qualia in Parel, what’s less known is that she’s also an accomplished, self-taught, multidisciplinary designer, artist and curator. In 2005, she was co-owner and curator at the erstwhile Mahalaxmi lifestyle store Palate. She has also sold paintings (created out of a hobby she picked five years ago up on a whim), curated a jewellery show (a meticulous edit of semi-precious versatile Art Deco ornaments), and is currently working on a large canvas that will be displayed in

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PHOTOS: SARANG GUPTA.

Interiors of the Tarun Tahiliani studio.

Qualia’s wine library. Along the way, she helped conceptualise, design and decorate all the restaurants the Akerkars have been involved in. “I belong to a family that had great aesthetes, were great collectors of art and design,” she says. “And I didn’t [at first] know that I had a good eye like the rest of the family.” Vachani Akerkar studied microbiology at the Imperial College of Science and Technology, but realised early on in her education that it was not a field she wanted to pursue. So the city of London, with its profusion of art, art history, and design, became her campus, and that’s when her interests flourished. With Tahiliani’s atelier, Vachani Akerkar has taken what was essentially a small apartment in the building, and enhanced its original structure with surface finishes, lighting, and colours that showcase the clothes instead of taking away from them. “Tarun is a maximalist,” she elaborates. “I’m somewhere in between. It’s a small space, so whatever I have put in, was needed.” Expect to find vintage mirrors with mother-of-pearl frames, Osler chandeliers, and classic louvered doors. But also know they’re all understated. To Tahilani’s beige and taupe palette, she’s added charcoal accents. The lighting has been done by Kanchan Puri-Shetty (who also did the lighting at Qualia), and instead of false ceilings, lights float below and reflect off the space’s original vaulted coffered ceilings. These can be set to replicate daylight, and nighttime lighting, so that brides can see how their ensembles will look at any time of day. “I’m very familiar with this building,” Vachani Akerkar says. “It was my first [family] home.” Tahiliani’s atelier is a project that brings her back to where it all began.


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contemporary classic The new Mumbai outpost of Gallery Isa is immediately one of India’s finest art spaces

TEXT: RITUPRIYA BASU. PHOTOS: SARANG GUPTA.

A

Artists Annie Morris and Idris Khan in the new space for Galerie Isa in Mumbai. Both were given carte blanche to scale up their artworks for the inaugural exhibition, a joint display of their work.

long-shuttered space, tucked away on the ground floor of Kamani Chambers in the historic district of Ballard Estate, recently transformed into a new home for Galerie Isa. The hunt for a new address began in 2016, when founder Ashwin Thadani realized that the gallery’s growing programme called for a more expansive exhibition space. “We were quickly running out of space at the last venue; it didn’t give us enough room to be brave with our ideas,” says Thadani. The last iconic building to be designed by 19th-century British architect Frederick William Stevens (best known for building what is today known as the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus), Kamani Chambers’ heritage and architecture instantly appealed to Thadani. Like many of Stevens’s projects in India, this too was designed in the neoclassical style, and elements of it—high ceilings, arched doorways and Corinthian pillars—continue inwards into the sweeping hall, which forms the nucleus of the space, spread over 5,000 square feet. During his travels across Berlin—which he visits every year—Thadani had been to a number of galleries that had private viewing rooms. They were an addition he was eager to make in the new space for Galerie Isa. When he brought interior designer Shreya Tanna on board, she carefully carved out areas for a viewing room and an open library, without restructuring the stone arches and towering pillars that lent the space much of its character. “We wanted to design a fluid space that allowed free movement and invited the visitor to explore the area. At the same time, we had to maintain the privacy of each of the spaces designed,” says Tanna. “We did not wish to put any physical barriers, so we turned to the materiality of the space to achieve this.” Tanna retained the exposed, five-metre-high structural ceiling and the diagonal marbled flooring, and painted >


Founder Ashwin Thadani in his private office at the new Galerie Isa space.

< the space in white, allowing the light filtering in from the large windows to flow through the area. She stripped the walls of the library down to their rawest form, exposing the brickwork of the structure, which immediately offset the stark white of the gallery. In mid-December last year, the gallery was inaugurated with a joint exhibition by artists Idris Khan and Annie Morris. The duo were given carte blanche by Thadani to use the space as they wanted and scale up their artworks in response to it. Morris stunned with a 3.5-metre-tall totem sculpture, while Khan conjured a 2.5-metre-tall piece using three glass sheets, his largest glass artwork till date. “This space isn’t just a new address. It has given me permission to be braver, bolder and more ambitious with my work,” says Thadani, pointing to the gallery, that was, not so long ago, a rundown and unused space; now, it is alive with possibilities. JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|51


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sari, not sari It’s a dress. It’s a sari. It’s a super-stylish combination of both by Rashmi Varma and Malika Verma

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TEXT: DIVYA MISHRA

W

e loved the idea of it representing youth,” says Malika Verma, when asked why she and co-founder Rashmi Varma decided to call their label ‘Kumari’. Literally translated, the word means ‘maiden’—an apt name for this venture between the two childhood friends. Malika and Rashmi have both worked extensively with saris—Rashmi, as a designer, and Malika as a diligent chronicler of the garment and the many ways of wearing it. So their coming together to found a label centred on the sari was almost a given. The sari-dress itself is part of Rashmi’s eponymous ready-towear line. The garment became a wardrobe staple for many women, and, Rashmi adds, “Over the years, it became clear that it needed to be on its own.” Kumari is its logical extension. Featuring the fluidity of the sari drape and a silhouette reminiscent of an evening gown, the garment combines the three pieces of the traditional sari (blouse, petticoat and sari) into one sexy, structured, toga-esque outfit. Kumari comes in four styles: imaginatively restored vintage saris, basic solids, bridalwear and a floral series. “The little black dress needed a new avatar!” says Malika. Kumari might just provide it.


SNEAK PREVIEW From Olafur Eliasson’s crystal orbs to India’s biggest commissioned canvas by Sameer Kulavoor, here’s what not to miss at this year’s India Art Fair (30 January to 2 February)

SUDHIR PATWARDHAN

Represented by Vadehra Art Gallery, usually the artist’s solitary, often male figures are found in the interiority of their middle-class homes. In Light Rain, 2019 (pictured) he moves outdoors, where he presents a not-so-stifling, rain-washed cityscape and an autobiographical figure with the characteristic shoulder droop.

ANDY WARHOL For the first time, India Art Fair enthusiasts will get the opportunity to be in presence of the iconic 1979 BMW M1 Art Car, which was hand-painted by the legend himself. A spirited mesh of colours, this fourwheeled artwork gives a firm nod to the Warholian palette.

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VASANTHA YOGANANTHAN

Represented by Jhaveri Contemporary, the artist shoots exclusively on analogue. His work is situated at the intersection of documentary, home-grown folklore and fictional retelling, and he often collaborates with traditional artists to achieve deftly hand-coloured photographs.

SAMEER KULAVOOR Sameer Kulavoor’s reflections of every day street-life often focus on the otherwise invisible classes—fruit sellers, scavengers, hawkers. For 2020, Kulavoor will design IAF’s façade, which will cover three exhibition tents. “Titled This is Not a Still Life, it will be India’s biggest commissioned canvas yet,” says fair director, Jagdip Jagpal.

TEXT: RADHIKA IYENGAR. PHOTOS COURTESY OF (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) GALLERY ISA; ARTS OF THE EARTH; JHAVERI CONTEMPORARY; SAMEER KULAVOOR; BMW GROUP INDIA; VADHERA ART GALLERY

IDRIS KHAN British artist Idris Khan’s indigo wonders are often born out of laborious acts of layering and repetition. Last year, Khan, represented by Gallery Isa, presented a series of drawings made using rubber stamps, titled 21 Stones. He returns this year with The Old Tune (2019), a print that recalls Khan’s process of superimposing texts, images and sheet music to create abstract art.

AVINASH KARN Avinash Karn’s contemporary rendition of the Madhubani art form is visually arresting. The iconic Natraj, depicting the magnetic sway of the cosmic dancer, Shiva, has been reproduced across centuries. Represented by Arts of the Earth gallery, Karn, whose fine-lined artworks are often suffused with motifs, paints Natraj on clay coated jute, using Shiva’s third-eye and phallic symbolism.


PICHVAI MINIATURES

The spellbinding Pichvai paintings celebrating Krishna’s life, painted on large, wallmounted scrolls of cloth, originated in Rajasthan about four centuries ago. Tradition and Beyond Foundation founded by Pooja Singhal, zealously works towards revisiting and reintroducing this delicate artwork in contemporary context through miniature format, confirming the art form’s brilliant versatility.

OLAFUR ELIASSON

Berlin’s neugerriemschneider gallery brings down the DanishIcelandic artist’s Dew Reflector to India Art Fair—a large sculpture made of nearly 200 mustard-hued crystal orbs that either look like an assembly of goblin eyes or large water droplets. Having an otherworldly presence, the artwork is aligned to Eliasson’s practice of spatial experiments that prod viewers to question their reality, encouraging multiple perceptions.

RASHEED ARAEEN

SASKIA PINTELON

Belgium-born, Sri Lanka-based artist Saskia Pintelon’s practice is often immersed in a grayscale universe. Represented by Saskia Fernando Gallery, Colombo, which is debuting this year, Pintelon’s stark, yet deeply meditative paintings and mixed-media collages carry a degree of irreverence and a carapace of inscrutability. They are often anchored in thematic explorations of gender, solitude, ageing and beauty.

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RITESH MESHRAM Represented by Chemould Prescott Road gallery, Meshram’s raw, minimalist works invite multiple readings. For instance, his Landscape of Elements (2019), displaying a family of half-undones—jagged, broken metal outlines—could be interpreted as relics belonging to an ancient world. Created through painstaking measures of beating, moulding and soldering stainless steel, such works reflect Meshram’s conceptual and forging competence. MRINALINI MUKHERJEE Mukherjee is one of the country’s most exemplary Modern artists. Earlier this year, The Met Breuer, New York, held a major retrospective of the late artist, showcasing her immense body of work. Mukherjee’s unconventional, yet ingenious knotting treatment of dyed hemp to make symbolic sculptures was ground-breaking for her time. Post the mid-90s, she began experimenting with mediums such as ceramics (pictured) and bronze to make elaborate, telling sculptures.

PHOTOS COURTESRY OF (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) PICHVAI TRADITION AND BEYOND; OLAFUR ELIASSON AND NEUGERRIEMSCHNEIDER; CHEMOULD PRESCOTT ROAD; DAG, DELHI; SASKIA FERNANDO GALLERY; AICON ART.

Eighty-four-year-old Araeen, who has been widely exhibited across the globe, is a pioneer in minimalist sculptures; the simplicity of his latticed creations enthrals viewers. Rasheed Araeen’s multihued, gridded cubes can be moved around to disturb the original form and rebuild anew.


EXPERIENCE LUXURY

Makers of the iconic brand Hindware, Brilloca launches Lacasaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a high tech experience centre in New Delhi that will change the way consumers see bathrooms As the idea of self-care takes firmer root in culture, more and more bathrooms are becoming spaces for rest, reflection and escape. Way beyond mere functionality, these rooms have moved into the realms of the aspirational, and use the highest quality bathware, fittings and tiles to create atmospheres of quiet opulence that are as calming as they are inspirational. To cater to the rising demand for such spaces, last year in December, Brilloca opened the doors to Lacasaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;its luxury experience centre. Inaugurated by Sandip Somany, the Chairman and Managing Director of Brilloca Limited, and leading Bollywood actor Jacqueline Fernandez, who is the Brand Ambassador of Queo, the two-storey centre spreads over 7,000-square feet of prime real


SPECIAL FEATURE

estate in New Delhi’s Lajpat Nagar, and contains a number of design-led nooks to give consumers a sense of the spaces before they choose their own. This it does through high-tech digital-integration that customers will experience as soon as they step in, via the LED wall of the store facade. A live shower display, as well as a 3-D visualizer are other technological highlights that make this experience centre one of a kind. Of the space, Sandip Somany says, “It showcases our evolution and our range of differentiated product portfolio in sync with aspirational customer preferences.” Within the store, customers are sure to be spoilt for choice, as the

centre houses luxury brand QUEO, the wellness brand Amore, the super-premium brand Alchymi, as well as legacy brands Hindware Italian Collection, and Hindware. It also showcases the newly launched premium tiles brand, Neom-Neo Modern Tiles by Brilloca. The ultraluxury products have been curated into inviting spaces that elevates the consumer experience from mere acquisition, to an immersive aesthetic one.

For more information, visit the experience centre at 52, Ring Rd, Block H, Lajpat Nagar III, New Delhi - 110024. Call: 9773964569


DEC 2019 150

20 FOR 2020

• PEOPLE TO KNOW • PLACES TO GO • BOOKS TO READ

THE VOGUE ART REPORT

TAKASHI MURAKAMI, BANKSY MORE

+

MORE THAN JUST A PRETTY FACE


India Art Fair 30 January – 2 February, New Delhi indiaartfair.in

Brussels Antiques & Fine Art Fair 26 January – 2 February brafa.art/en

The Winter Show 24 January – 2 February, New York City thewintershow.org

Jaipur Literature Festival 23 – 27 January jaipurliteraturefestival.org

Paris Haute Couture Week 20 – 23 January fhcm.paris

Maison & Objet 17 – 21 January, Paris maison-objet.com

Imm Cologne 13 – 19 January imm-cologne.com

Spoken Fest 11 – 12 January, Mumbai kommuneity.com/spoken

Singapore Art Week 11 – 19 January artweek.sg

Mumbai Gallery Weekend 9 – 12 January mumbaigalleryweekend.com

January

TEFAF 7 – 15 March, Maastricht

Geneva Motor Show 5 – 15 March gims.swiss

The Armory Show 5 – 8 March, New York City thearmoryshow.com

March

ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) 17 – 20 May, New York City icff.com

Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este 22 May – 24 May, Lake Como concorsodeleganzavilladeste.com

April SP-Arte 1 – 5 April, São Paulo sp-arte.com

Photo London 14 – 17 May photolondon.org

NYCxDesign 12 – 20 May nycxdesign.com

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair 8 – 10 May, New York City 1-54.com

Frieze New York 7 – 10 May frieze.com/fairs/frieze-new-york

May

RT SIGN ER


June EDIT Napoli 5 – 7 June editnapoli.com Liste Art Fair 15 – 21 June, Basel liste.ch

September

8 - 11 October, London 1-54.com

FIAC 22 – 25 October, Paris fiac.com

AD Design Show 30 October – 1 November, Mumbai architecturaldigest.in

Moscow Design Week Dates TBC moscowdesignweek.ru

World Design Summit Dates and Location TBC worlddesignsummit.com

Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève Dates TBC gphg.com

December

Beirut Art Fair 17 – 20 September beirut-art-fair.com

London Design Festival 12 – 20 September londondesignfestival.com

Design Miami Dates TBC designmiami.com

Hornbill Festival Of Nagaland Dates TBC hornbillfestival.com

Kochi-Muziris Biennale 12 December onwards kochimuzirisbiennale.org

Art Basel Miami Beach 3 - 6 December artbasel.com/miami-beach

La Biennale Paris 17 – 21 September labiennaleparis.com

Angkor Photo Dates TBC, Cambodia angkor-photo.com

Maison & Objet 4 – 8 September, Paris maison-objet.com

Open House London 19 – 20 September openhouselondon.org.uk

Magnetic Fields Dates TBC, Alsisar magneticfields.in

Ziro Music Festival Dates TBC, Arunachal Pradesh zirofestival.com

Monaco Yacht Show 23 – 27 September monacoyachtshow.com

Serendipity Arts Festival Dates TBC, Goa serendipityartsfestival.com

DATES AND LOCATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Art Basel 18 – 21 June artbasel.com

Contemporary Istanbul 23 – 27 September contemporaryistanbul.com

DESIGN: ALOK NANDA.

The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia 17 – 26 June, London olympia-antiques.com Masterpiece London 25 June – 1 July masterpiecefair.com

Apple Worldwide Developers Conference Dates TBC, San Jose developer.apple.com/wwdc

Google Zeitgeist Conference Dates and Location TBC zeitgeistminds.com

Les Rencontres d’Arles 29 June – 30 September, France rencontres-arles.com

ART & DES PLA


July

Paris Haute Couture Week 5 – 9 July fhcm.paris

Bregenz Festival 22 July – 23 August, Austria bregenzerfestspiele.com

India Couture Week Dates TBC, New Delhi fdci.org

August

Copenhagen Fashion Week 4 – 7 August copenhagenfashionweek.com

Burning Man 30 August – 7 September Nevada burningman.org

Vogue Wedding Show Dates TBC, New Delhi vogue.in/vogue-wedding-show

Mountain Echoes Literary Festival Dates TBC, Bhutan mountainechoes.org

Lakmé Fashion Week (Winter/Festive) Dates TBC, Mumbai lakmefashionweek.co.in

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair

Frieze Masters 8 – 11 October, London frieze.com

Frieze London 8 – 11 October frieze.com

PAD London 5 – 11 October pad-fairs.com

Gastronomika 4 – 7 October, San Sebastian sansebastiangastronomika.com

October

Tata Literature Live! The Mumbai LitFest Dates TBC, Mumbai tatalitlive.in

Salone Del Mobile.Milano Shanghai Dates TBC salonemilano.cn

Abu Dhabi Art Dates TBC abudhabiart.ae

Dubai Design Week Dates TBC dubaidesignweek.ae

Art021 Shanghai Contemporary Art Fair Dates TBC art021.org

Paris Photo 12 – 15 November parisphoto.com

Artissima 6 – 8 November, Turin artissima.art

MAMI: Mumbai Film Festival 5 – 12 November mumbaifilmfestival.com

November

2020 T SIGN ANNER


Architectural Digest Design Show 19 – 22 March, New York City addesignshow.com

Art Basel Hong Kong 19 – 21 March artbasel.com/hong-kong

Design Shanghai 12 – 15 March designshanghai.com

Lakmé Fashion Week (Summer/Resort) Dates TBC, Mumbai lakmefashionweek.co.in

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair 22 – 23 February, Marrakech 1-54.com

ARCOMadrid 26 February – 1 March ifema.es

Design Indaba 26 – 28 February, Cape Town designindaba.com

Frieze Los Angeles 14 – 16 February frieze.com/fairs/frieze-los-angeles

World Sacred Spirit Festival 13 – 16 February, Jodhpur worldsacredspiritfestival.org

Dhaka Art Summit 7 – 15 February dhakaartsummit.com

Ambiente 7 – 11 February, Frankfurt ambiente.messefrankfurt.com

Udaipur World Music Festival 7 – 9 February udaipurworldmusicfestival.com

AD100 Dates TBC, Mumbai architecturaldigest.in

Art Dubai 25 – 28 March artdubai.ae

202

ZONAMACO 5 – 9 February, Mexico City zsonamaco.com

Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair 4 – 8 February stockholmfurniturelightfair.se

February

tefaf.com

PAD Paris 1 – 5 April pad-fairs.com

Venice Biennale Of Architecture 23 May – 29 November labiennale.org

Baselworld 30 April – 6 May baselworld.com

Condé Nast International Luxury Conference 29 – 30 April, Vienna cniluxury.com

Watches & Wonders 25 – 29 April, Geneva watchesandwonders.com/geneva

Photo2020 23 April – 10 May, Melbourne photo.org.au

Art Cologne 23 – 26 April artcologne.com

Art Brussels 23 – 26 April artbrussels.com

Salone Del Mobile 21 – 26 April, Milan salonemilano.it

Kyotographie 18 April – 17 May kyotographie.jp

Miart 17 – 19 April, Milan miart.it

Coachella 10 – 19 April, California coachella.com

The Met Gala 4 April, New York City metmuseum.org

Dak’art 2020 – The Dakar Biennale 28 May – 28 June biennaledakar.org

&D PLAN


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TRENDSPOTTING A curated collection of design for the home STYLIST SAMIR WADEKAR

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1. ‘Rhombus’ bamboo silk rug (10x7.9 feet) from the Forma collection, `1,22,000, Hands. 2. ‘Geo’ table with white marble top and oak base by Christophe Delcourt, Delcourt Collection. 3. ‘Cotone’ armchair by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, `6,21,432 for Cassina, Quattro Italia. 4. ‘Moonlander’ alabaster lamp by Dhruv Saxena, `9,500, Atelier DS.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020|

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1. ‘Xi’ (extra large) suspension lamp by Neri & Hu, `4,38,480, Poltrona Frau Group. 2. ‘Eos Wood’ side table by Ini Archibong, `6,86,270, Sé. 3. ‘Gradient Reflex’ rug by Giorgetti, Sources Unlimited. 4. ‘Eiffel’ console by Gianfranco Ferré Home, Seetu Kohli Home. 5. ‘Chassis’ armchair by Paola Navone, Baxter.

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1. ‘Kaplan’ mirror with marble and glass inlay, Visionnaire. 2. ‘Badessa’ lamp by Michele Reginaldi, `1,54,000, Firmamento Milano. 3. ‘Platano’ wallpaper by Inkiostro Bianco, `1,250 per square foot, Intersekt. 4. ‘Lope-1541’ dining table by Draenert, Plüsch.

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1. ‘Flag’ chaise in jequetibá wood by Studio Marta Manente, `2,27,000, 1stdibs.com. 2. ‘Cascading’ bookends, `70,000, Arnaya. 3. ‘Pirarucu’ (pink) armchair by Campana Brothers, Carpenters Workshop Gallery. 4. ‘Theo’ lamp, `24,780, Iqrup+Ritz. 5. ‘Mexican Gold’ onyx, Classic Marble Company.

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1. ‘Orb’ pendant lamp, `36,450, BoConcept. 2. ‘Prisma’ New Zealand wool and bamboo silk carpet (8x5 feet), `1,15,000, Qaaleen. 3. ‘Next 121’ cast polished aluminium chair by Paola Navone, Gervasoni. 4. ‘Ciara’ desk, `75,000, Blue Loft. For details, see Stockists. JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|79


EXPERIENCE WITH AN EDGE

Last December, the who’s who of design and architecture met at Shakti Mills, for the launch of Kohler’s new Experience Centre. Spread over 16,000 square feet, the space featured bathroom inspirations from seven of the most prominent and influential global architects. Stand-up comedian Anubhav Pal had a house full of architects in splits, while Ashiesh Shah turned DJ and Bikramjit Bose turned moments into pocket-sized Polaroid memories.

CONDÉ NAST’S ARJUN MEHRA, KIRAN SHETTY

ANCA AND AL AN

ABRAHAM

AD EDITOR GREG FOSTER, AD PUBLISHER ARMAITY AMARIA

THE GUESTS AT THE KOHLER PARTY

KUNAL KHANDELWA RANGWALA, NAMRATL, HUZEFA SAMEER BALVALLY, A TIDKE, (SEATED) BALVALLY, NISHITA SHILPA JAIN KAMDAR

LARRY YUEN

SURENDRA HIRANANDANI, PEARL AND HAFEEZ CONTRACTOR

JENNIFER RADEN

PHOTOS: KEDAR NENE PHOTOGRAPHY.

SALIL SADANANDAN, K DAVID KOHLER


VAIBHAV DIMRI, VIVEK GUPTA

RITHIKA JOLLY, SAMEER DATTANI

SHREYA MA AND THE KOLIK (SEATED CENTRE) HLER TEAM

ASHIESH SHAH

KOHELIKA KOHLI, NELSON KUBHEKA, PALLAVI CHOKSI, MOHAK TMEHTA, ASHA SAIRAM, ZUBIN ZAINUDDIN, KRUPA ZUBIN KARAN DESAI

SEEMA PURI, ZARIR MULLAN

APOORVA SHROFF, RAJIV PAREKH, EKTA PURI, MAITHILI RAUT

PHOTOS: KEDAR NENE PHOTOGRAPHY.

SANDHYA BISWAS

TWINKLE KHANNA

ALFAZ AND BRINDA MILLER

ABHA NARAIN LAMBAH, KAMAL MALIK

GREG FOSTER, PAULINE DE MUIZON, MANGESH LUNGARE


HELLO, SUNSHINE The objects and accessories casting sharp shadows in our home right now

TEXT: DIVYA MISHRA.

PhotograPher Jignesh Jhaveri . StyliSt samir Wadekar

WONDERWORLD OF BONSAI

Located at Babulnath in south Mumbai, Jyoti and Nikunj Parekh’s nursery creates bonsai of all sizes, shapes, and varieties—like this Ulmus parvifolia bonsai, better known as Chinese elm. This approximately five-year-old specimen is, as Jyoti describes, “a medium-sized bonsai in the informal upright style”. The couple, who consider bonsai “a living and ever-changing art form”, also conduct classes on gardening, landscaping, and of course, bonsai.

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020|

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GEOFFREY BAWA

“Light played a very important role in Geoffrey Bawa’s architecture,” says Shayari de Silva, curator of the Geoffrey Bawa Art and Archival Collections. “He also designed many of the artificial lights for his buildings; allowing him to control the way the fixture could be seen in the space and the quality of the light it emitted,” de Silva adds. Found in most Bawa residences, this ‘Triangular’ lamp, in powder-coated aluminium, was one of the architect’s favourite lighting fixtures, allowing for a pleasing pattern of light that also covered the light source; “An important aspect of any light fixture for Geoffrey,” says de Silva. It is still manufactured by the Bentota Workshop, who made all of Bawa’s furniture.

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ON OUR BEDSIDE TABLE

A follow-up to Vincent Van Duysen Works 1989–2009 (Thames & Hudson), this brand new monograph showcases the Belgian architect’s work through renowned architectural photographer Hélène Binet’s lens. For a sassy, fun memoir by a man who has the best stories and knows how to tell them, pick up former Condé Nast chairman Nicholas Coleridge’s The Glossy Years (Penguin).

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ROOSHAD SHROFF

This clever marble lamp is by Rooshad Shroff, whose eponymous design practice is based on the principle of integrated design with a focus on craftsmanship. This particular lamp reverses the idea of a traditional lamp by having an opaque shade made from a single block of black marble, hand-carved with fluting synonymous with fabric pleats. The light source is inside the white marble tube, which is hand-carved into a thinness that allows the light to pass through.

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Windflower THE FAN THAT LIGHTS YOU UP

Visit us at ACETECH 2020 Hyderabad on 24th, 25th and 26th January Hall-1 I Booth-C13


AUDEMARS PIGUET

Watchmakers since 1875, Audemars Piguet’s timepieces are beautiful enough to be classified as jewellery. This ‘Millenary Handwound’ watch—with a pink-gold case, a diamond-set bezel, a crown set with a pink cabochon sapphire, and 116 brilliant-cut diamonds—is the perfect example.


Experience Centre: 122, DLF Grand Mall, M.G. Road, Gurgaon, Haryana â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 122002 Email: info@coasttocoast.in / office@coasttocoast.in Contact Details : +91-11-47079901-08 / 9873599000 Website : www.coasttocoast.in


BHAANE

A retro interiors reference from the first Bhaane collection designed by clever new creative director Nimish Shah. Most recently seen on Sonam Kapoor (on whom it was paired with a long pleated skirt), this 100 per cent merino wool sweater is the epitome of the distinct urbancontemporary, tongue-in-cheek chic that Bhaane has come to be known for.

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accompanies the Talon collection. A crafted, modern design of a matte black scissor folding frame made distinct with oiled walnut arm rests, its plush leathered seat is finished with vintage buckle detailing. The collection’s black colour palette requires little adornment, softness in material detail brings the black to life.

DESIGNED FOR THE DISCERNING MAN

Investing in timeless pieces creates personality and distinction. With LOCO Design’s latest collection of tailored furniture and accessories—Talon—designed for the modern man, rest assured that your space will be an extension of your refined personality A man is known by the company he keeps. But he is also as much known by the clothes he wears, the books he reads and most importantly—the kind of home he lives in. Your man cave is your personal sanctuary—a place you will unwind in after a long day at work or host a formal office dinner. So, obviously it has to reflect your taste for finer things in life. The furniture in your home along with being a substantial investment, should also be functional, comfortable, and, at the same time, make a statement. Talon— LOCO Design’s latest collection of tailored furniture and office accessories, makes such a statement. Reflecting the finest in craftsmanship, innovation, and heritage and creating an air of ‘functional modernism’, the Talon collection as part of the gentleman’s office, offers contemporary furniture

pieces that embody exceptional character and are designed for refined living. With meticulous use of exquisite materials and timeless detailing, the collection is a play between carbon fibre, a techtonic material, and subtle form. Every piece reflects understated elegance while seamlessly blending tradition with a clean lined minimal style. Epitomising the refined man and his taste for all things polished, the Talon Desk will make for an aesthetic piece of furniture in your personal office. Pure indulgence for the home, the desk is made from a twill weave carbon fibre that is inset with a leather working surface, while the table’s legs are cast in brass metal finished in a juxtaposing antique finish. Papers and stationery are kept in order with the discreet Talon Tray, an upturned carbon fibre tray softened with an embossed leather inset. Alongside, the Talon File Manager with its soft-edged carbon spine gives the functional accessory a smart face. Inspired by the American director’s chair, the Retta Desk Chair

Parminder Pal Singh, co-founding director, LOCO Design, tells us more about the brand’s latest collection and their design values You recently launched the Talon collection as part of the gentleman’s office. What was the design philosophy behind the collection? The Talon collection is part of a wider brand aesthetic driven by technical materials and the innovations they afford. The materials themselves govern a design philosophy that is very technically oriented. The aesthetic that we work to achieve is minimal, where material and lean form become a language of their own. The complexities that arise from this blending are a challenge that we enjoy Why will the collection appeal to the modern man? A sharp, business like style connects with a latent desire, an imagined space of privacy and expression. We’re creating products and objects that satiate that part of the ‘modern man’, a-bit–dark… Gotham like, but–sophisticated.

For more information, visit www.locodesign.in, call 078381 39945, email mail@locodesign.in or follow @locodesignindia on Instagram, @LocoDesignIndia on Facebook and @LocoDesign1 on Twitter


NILA HOUSE

Part of the inaugural Nila collection that celebrates natural indigo, these two cushions also exemplify the Jaipur-based craft centre’s dedication to sustainable design. The ‘Scully’ cushion (left) was inspired by the soft geometries seen in the works of American artist Sean Scully; the ‘Zero Waste’ cushion was designed to use off-cut khadi waste in a contemporary way.

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FABINDIA

From the 60-year-old brand that made Indian craftsmanship chic comes the ‘Netra’ bamboo tray. Part of the brand’s Indigo collection, this hand-dyed, hand-woven object was crafted in Nagaland, and can be used as a serving tray, a home decor accent (it’s perfect for small plants), or a key-and-trinket basket.

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THE ANTIQUE STORY

Available for order at The Antique Story’s website, this ‘Nandigona’ (also called ‘Maisandaya’) is believed to be a manifestation of the divine spirit of a bull, and is worshipped as a part of Bhuta Kola rituals by the agrarian communities in parts of coastal Karnataka and North Kerala. The four legs of this hand-carved and hand-painted object represent truth, purity, compassion and generosity.

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FLOORING MADE FUN If we’re being honest, flooring is an oft ignored but nonetheless vital aspect of interior design. And promising a fuss-free flooring experience is Welspun Flooring’s range of innovative tiling solutions that promise to infuse plenty of character into your space When it comes to giving your space a facelift, you instantly think of what kind of walls you want and how you want your ceiling designed so that it matches the overall aesthetic theme of your space. But flooring tends to be an oft overlooked aspect of interior makeovers because replacing flooring can be a cumbersome process, what with its lengthy duration and accompanying mess. But good flooring actually goes a long way in lending a space character. And, it needn’t be a troublesome prospect either. Allow Welspun Flooring to transform the way you view—and approach— your floors. One of the country’s foremost experts on all things flooring, Welspun Flooring is part of the $2.1 billion Welspun Group and promises to bring an exciting flooring revolution to your space, courtesy an innovative solution that also happens to be the brand’s flagship product—the Click N Lock tiles.

As the name suggests, the Click N Lock tiles boast state-of-the-art technology that sees individual tiles seamlessly lock into one another. Gone are the days of noisy, dusty floor restorations. Should you decide to opt for the Click N Lock tiles, expect a noise-free, dust-free and glue-free installation process. Even better, these stain- and scratchresistant tiles can easily be laid over existing flooring should you not want to go through the trouble of dismantling your old flooring. And if that wasn’t enough, the brand is also committed to a five-year warranty on the Click N Lock tiles— proof of the product’s superior quality and durability. If you’re sold on the Click N Lock tiles, consider some of Welspun Flooring’s other offerings, too, such as their carpet tiles, broadloom carpets (wall-to-wall) and Greens (artificial grass that you can spread out over a terraced area to create a tranquil green zone). But whatever you do, we suggest you definitely

check out their Fusion Flooring (Mixn-Match)—an exciting product that offers you the freedom to experiment and create signature designs as well as a combination of hard and soft flooring for commercial purposes…all at bargain rates! Even as they continue to revolutionise the flooring industry, the brand has established a mammoth Rs 11.5 billion Welspun Flooring manufacturing facility in Hyderabad that is sprawled across an expansive 600 acres. The goal is to manufacture 10 million sq mts of flooring in the first phase, with a targeted turnover of Rs 1,000 crores in the next three to four years and Rs 7,000 crores by 2025. As of the end of 2019, they plan on having as many as 500 dealers and distributors so that they can continue offering you the finest quality and service. ‘Floor’ed yet? We sure are! For more information, visit www.welspunflooring.com


MUSELAB

The candy-coloured ‘Couverture’ chair was designed by the 2012-founded, Mumbai-based MuseLAB. Glazed in a gradient to create a unique design, the layered back and seat reveal their edges and explore the relationship between colour and form. Using MDF on a teak framework, the chair is finished in highgloss PU and polyester—and makes a great statement piece for your foyer.

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DELHI SHOWROOM: 218, 223 DLF Grand Mall, Second Floor, MG Road, Gurgaon | Tel: 124-4108800/9900 MUMBAI OFFICE: 1115-11th Floor, Hubtown Solaris, NS Phadke Marg, Andheri East, Mumbai - 400069 WWW.RAVISHVOHRAHOME.COM


500 BC

New-age lighting and design studio 500 BC was founded by Anandita Shah and Shiraz Noorani, and draws inspiration “from the ideology and artistic vision of ancient cultures and modern architects, art and cinema”, Shah says. The ‘Battersea’ lamp seen here is made in aluminium, stainless steel and teak, and derives its name (and form) from the Battersea Power Station in London, built in the 1930s. The light sculpture brings a quirky, Ettore Sottsass-esque vibe to your spaces.

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RITU KUMAR HOME These glasses from Ritu Kumar Home are part of the brandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Baagh collection, and take inspiration from the craft traditions of Machilipatnam, Andhra Pradesh. Available in a set of four, they feature printed decals, and gold and platinum plating.

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CASA PARADOX

The ‘Serpentine’ trunk was launched in December last year, as part of Casa Paradox’s Amazonia collection. Using the handcrafted crystal motif of a snake on plain micro-fabric, the trunk plays with juxtaposition—a key element of the aesthetic that has come to define the 30-year-old heritage brand. Assisted by Mitalee Mehta. For details, see Stockists.


From architects to interior designers, The List is an indispensable directory for every home decor solution. Search by service and location at architecturaldigest.in/the-list Want to be on the list? Write to thelist@condenast.in


PHOTO: ASHISH SAHI


RITEN MOZU M DA R From the early 1950s, as independent India began asserting itself on the international stage, Riten Mozumdar emerged with a spectacular late-modernist aesthetic across mediums: painting, sculpture, furniture, textiles, fashion and more. Today, 14 years after his death, a retrospective revisits the prolific pioneerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enormous contribution to art and design


PHOTOS COURTESY OF TIM PRENTICE ARCHIVES (PORTRAIT); HEIRS OF RITEN MOZUMDAR.

Above: Circa 1970 portrait of Riten Mozumdar. Right: Fish (top), Mach Ranga (centre), and Benu Bono (bottom)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;all three are silk screens on cotton, designed for Marimekko, Finland, by Riten Mozumdar, 1956-57.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF HEIRS OF RITEN MOZUMDAR.

Left: Jali furniture, 1966-67, made for All India Handicrafts Board, Riten Mozumdar. Below: Contemporary furniture designs by Riten Mozumdar. Facing page, left: Fabindia poster for an exhibition of handwoven textiles in Bombay 1978. Facing page, right: Fabindia Annual Report cover, 1969.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF FABINDIA ARCHIVES.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF HEIRS OF RITEN MOZUMDAR.


Facing page and this page, from left: Teenpahar, Bindu, Rasta and Kauna, 1966-2000, bedsheet designs for Fabindia, by Riten Mozumdar.


PHOTO COURTESY OF HEIRS OF RITEN MOZUMDAR.

Silk murals in Ashoka restaurant, Bengaluru, 1972, designed by Riten Mozumdar. Facing page, top right: Riten Mozumdar at his desk in his residence, designed in 1974 by Charles Correa and a top view of the same home. Facing page, bottom left: Riten Mozumdar â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Untitledâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, circa 1998, acid dye on silk.


TOP RIGHT PHOTOS COURTESY OF MADAN MAHATTA/PHOTOINK. ARTWORK COURTESY OF CHATTERJEE & LAL.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF MONIKA CORREA (PORTRAIT); HEIRS OF RITEN MOZUMDAR (REST).

Below left: Monika Correa in a block print on cotton sari named ‘Rome by Night’, designed by Riten Mozumdar circa 1970s. Bottom left: Dresses designed by Riten Mozumdar for Pallavi, a clothing label that exported to the Middle East and Australia, late 1970s. Facing page: Riten Mozumdar in New Delhi, posing with a selection of his Namdah carpets, circa 1970.


Riten Mozumdar, the youngest of nine siblings, was born in Kosur, Punjab, in 1927. His father, Surendranath, was a doctor by profession. Whilst still very young, his father passed away and his mother, Prembala, took over the responsibility of her children, bringing them up through the upheaval of the Independence struggle. Mozumdar trained in Santiniketan, West Bengal during the late 1940s. Made famous through the vision of Rabindranath Tagore, this was a time of great creativity at the institution. Young Mozumdar studied under brilliant faculty such as Benode Behari Mukherjee, who went on to play a mentor’s role in Mozumdar’s early professional years; indeed, it was on his recommendation that the graduate stayed for some months in Nepal, undertaking training in craft techniques. It was this early experience, working across mediums, that unleashed the polymath in Mozumdar. The mid-to-late 1950s would see Mozumdar travel, work and exhibit extensively in Europe and North America. It was during this time that he worked with Marimekko in Helsinki, producing designs that would lay the ground for his distinctive visual vocabulary. Once he returned to India, the 1960s and 1970s proved to be an incredibly productive period for Mozumdar, and his creative promiscuity was evident throughout. This was a moment in which both state and private industry were actively engaged in the formation of design solutions appropriate to a young nation. Mozumdar set to work on a dizzying array of activities, both on his own and as part of collaborative efforts: examples include furniture design and product design (Taaru, a Delhibased furniture company inspired by Scandinavian design, and the All India Handicrafts Board); textile design (M Print, Mozumdar’s own label, and Fabindia); fashion (Pallavi, a clothes line popular in the Middle-East and Australia); and exhibition design (in particular, for Sachdev Eggleston Associates, who were responsible for major expos of the period). In India, nearly everyone involved in the art and crafts sector would have encountered Mozumdar-designed objects and products in some form or other. In particular, his work with Fabindia achieved iconic status and, over the years, has become synonymous with the brand’s identity. The startling coloured geometric shapes, especially circular forms, printed on all manner of fabrics for use around the house, were seemingly ubiquitous in urban Indian homes in the 1970s and 1980s. Mozumdar counted many cultural titans of the period as his personal friends. Charles Correa became particularly close after the two met aboard a ship sailing to India from the UK in the 1950s; it was Correa who would eventually design Mozumdar’s Delhi home. KG Subramanyan, the great late modernist artist, was also a friend for many decades and it was he who urged Mozumdar to move back to Santiniketan in the 1980s. The spirit of the age was cross-disciplinary and encouraged artistic producers to seek out those of a similar mindset. Described by friends as shy and soft-spoken, Mozumdar was not one for continuous self-promotion. He was, however, very sure of his likes and dislikes, as his private notes and public statements make clear. In a recent interview, Monika Correa, artist and wife of the late Charles Correa, recalls Mozumdar’s heightened aesthetic taste. “Charles wanted to make some saris for me, so he and Riten went out to buy plain mull cotton for six saris and Riten pinned them on to his table. Charles made these strokes and borders and Riten steamed them. But when I wore the saris, they did not look as good as they had on the table…. Riten told Charles that they looked beautiful as a flat canvas, but when worn on the body, the sari takes on different curves. You have to place the block where it shows up. You have to understand the way the body moves.” Mozumdar’s later years saw him return to painting; 40 years after completing his art studies. Employing the technique of acid dyeing on silk, he consciously collapsed the boundaries between design and art. The artworks produced during this period combine elements of abstraction and calligraphy. Often referencing the poetry of Rabindranath Tagore, the letters play hide and seek with the viewer as they merge with swirling lines and blocks of colour. These exquisite paintings are the summation of a life engaged in creative pursuits. Taking stock of Riten Mozumdar’s career, it becomes clear that he stood out amongst his peers for the sheer breadth of his technical know-how. Those early years moving through Santiniketan, Nepal and then Europe and America, formed in Mozumdar a world view that set him apart. The key to his success was his ability to marry a love of local arts and crafts practices with a deep understanding of international design history. In bringing together the different strands of his practice, it is hoped there might be a renewed appreciation of this true pioneer. Chatterjee & Lal gallery in Mumbai is hosting a major retrospective on Riten Mozumdar from 9 January to 29 February 2020. Riten Mozumdar: IMPRINT is researched and co-curated by Ushmita Sahu. – By Mortimer Chatterjee, Tara Lal and Ushmita Sahu


Portfolio No.1

Jitish Kallat Ellipsis , the monumental 60-foot-long canvas that is the latest work by Jitish Kallat, is exhibited for the first time this month at the only space big enough to take it, the vast Famous Studios in Mumbai. The artwork began as canvases covered in grids meticulously hand-drawn in watercolour pencil. The introduction of water into this grid disrupted its stability, triggering gestures and forms that, in turn, led to others, opening up the canvas to force fields beyond a single artist-creator. The play of water is significant to the way the surfaces evolved. As Kallat puts it, all painting is really a story of repeated hydration and dehydration. It is the effect of water that allows the paint to move on the surface. Once on canvas, gravity acts on its liquescence, pulling it in various directions, cleaving the grid. The rate of dehydration preordained the texture the surfaces took on, creating cracks resembling parched earth in patches that dried swiftly. In this manner the surface of the painting, opened up to the elements, became a microcosm of the earth itself, imbued with the entropy of the universe surrounding it. Ellipsis 2018-20 Mixed media on linen 9 feet x 60 feet Famous Studios, Mumbai, 10-21 January 2020


Having burst onto the scene straight out of art school with a solo exhibition in 1997 at Mumbai’s Chemould Gallery, Jitish Kallat made his name as a painter, creating on his canvases, dense, hallucinatory surfaces packed with imagery that explored selfhood, mortality, and the passage of time against the backdrop of Mumbai’s teeming urban decay. Since then, he has explored diverse media, working with sculpture, drawing, photography, installations and videos. In 2014, Kallat expanded his practice outside the studio by curating the 2014 edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale titled ‘Whorled Explorations’; an enquiry across one hundred art works scattered across a historic port city, of the artist’s enduring interest in conflations of the cosmic and the everyday. In this journey, painting had taken a backseat. In fact, Kallat had completely stopped painting for about five years—until his 2017 mid-career retrospective at the NGMA in Delhi, which brought together many of his early painted works across various collections, and sparked a desire to work with canvas again. Thus began a slow and tentative return to painting, which in 2019, culminated in his largest work on canvas to date (60 feet at last count, made up of 5x9-foot panels), a still-evolving work titled Ellipsis. Together with the installation Covering Letter (terranum nuncius), it forms the artist’s latest solo exhibition. The artist who painted Ellipsis (as well as a related suite of paintings exhibited recently at the exhibition ‘Phase Transition’ in Paris: Galerie Templon, January 12-March 9, 2019) is a distinctly different person from the one who painted his early career canvases. If the earlier works saw him meticulously create preconceived imagery on canvas, Ellipsis evolved (and continues to evolve) through encounters where the artist is a third party, who lets the interaction of various elemental forces—air, water, gravity—as well as the canvas itself guide his gestures. Different segments of Ellipsis were painted separately over the course of many months and assembled together later. Sometimes, entirely new bridge forms emerged between two distinct frames as they were placed next to each other, while others were trimmed and discarded. This method of creation, akin to a one-manplus-the-universe version of the surrealist game Exquisite Corpse (in which a drawing or literary work was collectively assembled by passing a piece of paper between members of a group, with the contributions of each hidden from others by folding the paper, only to be revealed as a whole at the end of the game), was first used by Jitish in 2017, in a series of accordion-book-like folded drawings titled Tetralemma that were part of the exhibition ‘Covariance’ held in Brussels. Ellipsis too reads like an accordion book. Visibly split by joints, the painting can be rearranged at will to occupy different spaces. Its imagery, ambiguous yet perceivable as celestial diagrams, cosmological maps, mathematical graphs, geographical markings, topographical representations, botanical and microbial drawings and DNA diagrams, reminds one of the notebooks or blackboard ruminations of a renaissance man. The stream of disparate associations refuses a holistic reading, arresting the viewer in a state of ambivalence bordering on anxiety. Covering Letter (terranum nuncius) is among works by Kallat that read historic records back to the present, holding them up as mirrors against which to evaluate a changed world. The first Covering Letter, created in 2012, was a moving fog screen projection of the letter that Gandhi wrote to Hitler in 1939, appealing for peace a few weeks before Germany invaded Poland and set off the Second World War. Covering Letter (terranum nuncius) will also be a part of Kallat’s upcoming solo exhibition at the Frist Museum of Art, Nashville, in March 2020. It is assembled out of sounds and images representing the earth and humanity from the Voyager Golden Records which were sent into space by NASA in 1977 aboard Voyager space crafts 1 and 2. At Famous Studios, Covering Letter (terranum nuncius) is exhibited facing Ellipsis. As viewers enter the installation space, they are greeted by a friendly cacophony of greetings in 55 world languages that were among the sounds that the Golden Records carried into space. Images from the Voyager discs are also part of the installation. They include affective vignettes of human life, scientific and cosmological diagrams, representations of human anatomy and genetic makeup, animals, iconic architecture, and so on, often annotated with measurements; the cosmological and scientific diagrams here provide the viewer with entry points into the sea of references from which the artist drew the imagery used in Ellipsis. With these, the artist returns the message to a far more misanthropic world, as if to ask, “do we even recognize this version of ourselves anymore?” Ellipisis will show at Mumbai’s Famous Studios from 10-21 January 2020. — Nandini Thilak


Portfolio No.2

EXCERPTED FROM AXEL VERVOORDT: PORTRAITS OF INTERIORS (FLAMMARION, 2019). TEXT: MICHAEL JAMES GARDNER.

AXEL VERVOORDT

In this exclusive excerpt from his new coffee-table book — Axel Vervoordt: Portraits of Interiors — we take a look at the latest homes created by the uberinfluential Belgian interior designer. “My whole life has been inspired by the meeting of different worlds. Old and new. East and West. In conceptual ways: full and empty. Light and dark. Noble and humble. These ideas sparked a curiosity to seek connections and search for what’s universal between us. In many ways, this path led to the pursuit of knowledge and the discovery of many influences that take on greater meaning once they can be shared with others…. A guiding philosophy in life is the feeling of usefulness. I hope that you find [these pages] useful and inspiring. I hope that you’ll also join me in thanking the owners for their generosity in sharing their homes with us. Because, above all, these are private family spaces. Each place shows a lifestyle built around the owner’s family, created with their dreams in mind, and based on the way they want to live. Our practice is dependent upon the responsibility we feel to create environments that express purity and serenity while offering quiet space for spiritual inspiration. In a much too noisy world, this silence is essential.” – Axel Vervoordt Photographer: Laziz Hamani


Retreat on the Baltic Coast Boris Vervoordt and his team—along with Russian firm Desino, and architect Tatsuro Miki of Mood Architecture—designed this residence in which “each room serves as a frame to amplify a state of mind.” Top: Two Artist’s Models (1923–27) by Lomakina Maria Vladimirovna hangs over the fireplace in the master library, which features Yves Klein’s Plexiglas Table Bleue and Table Rose (1963), Giuseppe Scapinelli’s satinwood armchair (1950s), and furniture made in the company’s workshop. Above: Every room and corridor was designed to consider the presence of nature and time of day. A picture window frames Pierre Jeanneret’s teak desk (1950s) for Chandigarh, India, and a pair of early elm ‘Zig-Zag’ chairs (circa 1940) by Gerrit Rietveld.


Above: A winter view of the dense pine forest that surrounds the home is reflected in the swimming pool. “Everywhere in the home, the simplicity and natural look was determined by true materials—stone, wood, metal, plaster, earth—and precise design that required perfect implementation,” explained Dmitry Vorobyev from Desino. “We defended the architect’s and designer’s ideas every step of the way.” Below: Anish Kapoor’s Glow (2009), Günther Uecker’s Weisses Phantom (1995), and Jean Prouvé’s ‘Grand Repos’ armchair (1930) in the music room. The curation was based on intuition and intense thematic study, not always knowing where it would ultimately lead. Boris Vervoordt explains, “We were always interested in humanity—matter, spirit, consciousness, expression, void.”


Quiet Barn in Flanders Axel Vervoordt and architect Tatsuro Miki of Mood Architecture, in Belgium, restored this farmhouse near the Flemish coast. Above: The fireplace stone is a centuries-old, reclaimed washbasin that Axel inverted to show a previously hidden, unused side. Sadaharu Horio’s large painting is from a live performance at Palazzo Fortuny in Venice in 2013. The coffee table made in the company’s workshop mixes two walnut panels around black slate. Textile colours are inspired by shadow tones. Kosi Hidama’s new earthenware vase and Shiro Tsujimura’s Shigaraki slab dish (2003) rest on top of an 18th-century Italian chest with original patina. “It’s untouched,” says Axel, “If you restore it, the energy disappears.”


Above: “This is a dialogue of eternality and ephemerality,” says Axel. Shiro Tsujimura’s Tsubo vase (1997) is made from Iga terracotta with natural ash glaze. The oil-on-panel painting is by Hans Hartung (1960). The refectory table was most likely made by monks or shepherds from the Pyrenees (circa 1700). The walls are painted by Eddy Dankers.


Tokyo Town House A young family tasked Axel and architect Tatsuro Miki to build their dream home, in one of Tokyo’s prominent shopping districts. Above: The Wabi room expresses silence on the home’s lowest level. Painting by Yuko Nasaka (Untitled, 1969) on wall at left. Painting by Masatoshi Masanobu (Work, 1959) flanked by two linen-covered square panels that conceal speakers for a hidden film screen. Shiro Tsujimura’s round earthenware work with white glaze. Several pieces come from the company’s workshop, including the trio of Axel’s floating stone tables hand-carved in slate and the linen sofa. Palazzo Alverà in Venice (facing page) Axel and his wife May found this Venice apartment at the rear of Palazzo Alverà, a 14th-century palace that overlooks the Grand Canal from its main entrance at the front. Top: Atop the 18th-century Italian dresser is a trio of granite sculptures (1976) by Jef Verheyen and Dominique Stroobant—a gift Axel received that year from Verheyen. On the wall is Axel’s ‘Artempo’ disc made of wood. This found object embodies the belief that time can turn ordinary objects into art, through the patina of use. Bottom: “We painted the walls a rich red colour and installed wide poplar floors. With the fantastic ceiling, the atmosphere combines comfort, old luxury, and simplicity,” says Axel. Above the sofa is Ryuji Tanaka’s painting Shizen ’91 (Kyo) (Nature ’91 [Sounds]). Above the door is a painting by Masatoshi Masanobu (1965). The Italian walnut armchair is Louis XVI (circa 1780). Sofa and coffee tables are made in the company’s workshop.


Belgian Seaside Apartment The owners [of this apartment on the Belgian coast] desired a light, airy atmosphere—a place to relax that could simultaneously express elegance and ease. … [They] wanted a home that was also very practical, so the three bedrooms would be versatile enough to accommodate the children and grandchildren. The furniture was selected to be not only beautiful and comfortable but also functional. Above: Light, shape, and shadow are key elements. Jean Arp’s plaster sculpture Shadow Figure (Sculpture d’une ombre) (1960). Georges Cuyvers’s series of candlesticks, ‘Lighthouse I’ (2010), are hammered from a flat silver sheet and fit together like a puzzle. Teak and cane V-leg chairs by Pierre Jeanneret (circa 1955), made for Chandigarh. Oval dining table is designed by Axel in the company’s workshop. The hearth’s solid bronze plate will obtain a beautiful patina with age. Ibiza Island Retreat (facing page) Axel Vervoordt’s team worked with architect Tatsuro Miki to create an overall concept [for this holiday home]. Local architect Miguel Garcia Quetglas executed the result. Top: The art of stone setting was paramount, as seen in this interior dining room floor made with recuperated stone from Turin. On the wall is Japanese artist Ryuji Tanaka’s Kei 7 painting (circa 1962–64). Next to the window is Dominique Stroobant’s white marble sculpture B3, Hexaèdre (1971). Centre: The windows in the corridor leading to the master suite are placed in perspective to benefit from the island’s magic light. “The windows become like paintings,” says Axel. At the end of the corridor is a limestone fragment of a draped female figure (Gallo-Roman period, second–third century CE). Bottom: In the main drawing room, the seating area is centred around a walnut-and-slate coffee table made in the company’s workshop. May Vervoordt composed all of the textile colours based on the tones of the surrounding sand and rock.


Antwerp City Palace In 2019, this home, located in the heart of Antwerp celebrated 400 years of existence. From being occupied by a religious order of missionaries to being run as a hotel for three decades, today it is a family home, after a restoration process collaboratively carried out by the Vervoordt team and minimalist architect Kristof Goossens of Anversa Architecture and Development. Above: The kunstkamer houses a masterful 17th- and 18th-century art collection, including Allegory of Peace and Justice (circa 1580), by the Master of the Antwerp Bible Allegory, above the mantel. “The room evokes Antwerp’s Golden Age, so we searched for typical Flemish period furniture,” explains Axel. This includes a 17th-century Renaissance oak table made in the style of Hans Vredeman de Vries topped with an Antwerp cabinet. Facing page, top: A Renaissance sculpture of Hercules presides over the drawing room, known as the Louis XV salon. Above the original fireplace is Sir Anthony van Dyck’s portrait of an English lady-in-waiting. Furniture and textiles from the company’s workshop include a double sofa, bergère chair, and fabric selections by May Vervoordt. Rococo stucco dates back to 1740. Facing page, bottom: The ground floor drawing room with original pine floorboards. Bergère chair by Philippe-Joseph Pluvinet from Paris. Above the fireplace is a 17th-century portrait of a young gentleman by Jacob Ferdinand Voet.


INDIA

D E C E M B E R 2 019 ` 1 5 0

LUCKY

JIM

JIM SARBH PHOTOGRAPHED BY BIKRAMJIT BOSE


Portfolio No.3

RAHUL MISHRA The drawings you see in the following pages are collectors’ items. They represent the first Indian designs to ever walk the ramp on the official calendar of the prestigious Paris Haute Couture Week. And after famed couturiers Elie Saab and Zuhair Murad, Rahul Mishra has become the third Asian to be invited to show his collection by the world’s oldest fashion body, the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture de Paris. To say that he deserves this honour is an understatement. Since the inception of his label in 2008, he has worked steadily towards creating a contemporary Indian design vocabulary, is committed to reverse-migrate karigars to their hometowns, and has vowed not to use machined processes where hand-skills can be employed. Designing by these principles, he creates entire landscapes and ecosystems through hyper-detailed, three-dimensional embroideries rendered in exquisite placements over the canvas of the wearer’s body. Each design tells a story and is filled with memory. To Mishra, though, haute couture isn’t just about the number of man-hours spent on making a garment. “It’s an expression of poetry, originality, and personality,” he says. Having consistently received positive reviews from both Indian and international press, including Vogue’s Suzy Menkes, Mishra certainly has a signature that’s all his own. For AD, he pulls out drawings from his couture collection, inspired by the landscape of the Maldives. — Varun Rana


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THE POWER LIST

WHAT: The GQ 50 Most Influential Young Indians WHERE: Grand Hyatt Mumbai Hotel & Residences

GQ’s Che Kurrien & Karan Johar

Innovators, changemakers and pathbreakers of 2019 – all aged under 40 – were celebrated at GQ India’s fifth edition of the 50 Most Influential Young Indians party. The event kicked off with a Q&A between GQ’s Editor-in-Chief Che Kurrien and entertainment mogul Karan Johar, followed by comedian-host Rajiv Satyal keeping everyone in splits through the evening. The night ended with DJ Proof creating the perfect vibe for some networking and partying.

Yash

Poornamrita Singh

Kurt Inderbitzin, Anish Gawande & Indrani Pillai

DJ Proof


GQâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Almona Bhatia

Sahil Salathia at the Tissot display

Chris K Franzen

Elvis Brown

Glenlivet brand ambassador Stuart Baxter at the Glenlivet bar

GQâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winners of 2019

Sahil Soni

Madhu Dutta

Puneet Mathur

Pritesh Kumar

Mithila Palkar

Amyra Dastur Diva Dhawan

Rasika Dugal

Rizwan Bachav at the Mahindra Alturas G4 display


THE GUES

The motifs and emerald green of the entrance vestibule to the Gudliya Suite, in Jaipurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Palace, were picked from Samode Palace, Maharaja Padmanabh Singhâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favourite house in India. The armchair was found in the City Palace storeroom, and refurbished and reupholstered by an in-house team.


ST ROOM A guest suite within the private residential quarters of the City Palace Jaipur is now available on Airbnb, allowing paying guests to live exactly like the young Maharaja who lives upstairs WRITER GREG FOSTER

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF AIRBNB.

I

n 2003, The Mirror newspaper in the UK famously had a mole infiltrate the household staff of Buckingham Palace for two months. Of course, it was a catastrophic security lapse, the cause of outrage from the Prime Minister at the time, and deeply embarrassing for the Royal Family. Deeply embarrassing, indeed, particularly if you were looking at the interiors. Inside the grand gilded rooms, the shocking photos revealed beds covered in cuddly toys and a breakfast room accessorized withâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;gaspâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;boxes of Tupperware filled with the Royal cornflakes. Sad, sad, sad rooms, I distinctly remember. >


This indoor pool, which took two months to build, was found while expanding a bath. It was likely previously used as a hammam. Facing page: This dressing room and bar features a French conversation seat, the only new piece of furniture in the suite, and a nod to interior designer Claire Derooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heritage. The pendant light was purchased in one of the bazaars near the palace.


All the furniture in the bedroom is original palace furniture, refurbished by the in-house team. The motifs were inspired by designs found in the palace itself, and the colour, as with all the rooms, inspired by Samode Palace. The lights were picked up at a bazaar by the palace.


The bath features four day beds tucked into arched recesses from which, traditionally, poetry would be read to the bather. Just beyond the tub is the entrance to the shower.


< Since then, my impression of royal interiors has been bleak. Particularly in India, where so many of the maharajas have had to give up, transferring their family seats to large hotel chains, which simply install the same furniture and colours found in their corporate style guidelines. But not so in Jaipur, where I have been coming for some time now—not in some clandestine undercover Condé Nast follow-up to the Buckingham Palace exposé, but simply at the invitation of Padmanabh Singh, better known as Pacho, the impossibly cool 21-year-old maharaja, to one of his many, many parties. I can report back that the City Palace, the private residence where he lives with his mother, Princess Diya Kumari, his grandmother and siblings, is decorated in great style. On New Year’s Eve, for example, you alight at their private entrance to the palace, through a colonnaded entrance hand-painted on every surface and dripping with outdoor chandeliers. To your right, you pass a garden with a long waterbody of fountains, decorated as far as the eye can see with thousands of candles. Upstairs, on the Sukh Niwas terrace, where the party takes place and where the family spend most of their private time together, the outdoor day beds are plushly upholstered in shades of off-white that seem to match the fireworks. Inside the adjacent drawing room, crammed with homey family photos, the highlight is a rare Lalique dining table from the 1930s that is actually lit from within. For a few years now, the mastermind behind the decoration at these parties has been Claire Deroo, the 26-year-old French girlfriend of Pacho and an on-and-off resident of Jaipur for six years. And it is Claire who, last summer, was asked by Princess Diya, to redesign the Gudliya Suite, one of the guest bedrooms in the family’s private quarters at the City Palace. Not that they needed the extra space. The idea had come from Airbnb as a clever marketing initiative for both them and the city of Jaipur. It needn’t have become The Best Accommodation in Jaipur but that’s exactly what it is. “The only brief I had was no white walls. Pacho hates white walls,” says Claire, of the initial design direction. And so, bold colours define the suite, with each of the six rooms that make up the apartment painted in a jewel-like hue. These are not references to Claire’s previous work with her aunt, the Paris and Jaipur-based jeweller Marie-Hélène de Taillac, but are shades taken from Samode Palace, just outside of Jaipur. “Samode is Pacho’s favourite house in India, so a lot of my references came from there.” Executed in just two months, Claire is nonchalant about the work she put into what is her first interiors project. “The City Palace has its own in-house teams of upholsterers, carpenters and painters. It isn’t hard when you have all these resources at your disposal,” she says modestly. All the furniture was sourced from Palace storerooms and restored on site. The only pieces she bought were the classic crystal lamps, and the only piece she had made was the French-style circular conversation sofa in the dressing room—a nod to her own heritage. The pièce de résistance of the Gudliya Suite is the unassuming door in the glamorous bathroom, which opens to steps that descend to a vaulted private pool. “Previously, the room had a small bathroom and so we knocked through to find extra space, and came across this amazing hammam-style room,” says Claire of what sounds like a possibly important archaeological discovery. As a grand final touch, a long and wide corridor, previously part of the adjacent Palace museum, was taken as a private entrance. It’s the one clear separation from the actual royal residence it is part of, so that the family don’t have to bump into guests. Invited to Jaipur not just for a party but to be the second guest to stay in the suite, I am delighted by both the cheery design and the home-from-home experience. The overall aesthetic is distinctly Jaipur, and the overall feel is not of a hotel or a palace, but of a very well appointed house of a friend. But not so familiar that I don’t find myself videoing a walkthrough of the suite to send to friends, something I think is deeply naff and have never done before. Over the weekend I spend there, I swim before breakfast, which is served on the suite’s private outdoor patio. The Royal cornflakes arrive on a silver tray, delivered by the same charming staff who serve the family upstairs. I am happy to report that there is no Tupperware in sight.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHEMOULD PRESCOTT ROAD.

SOFT PL


LAY

A “soft sculptural bedroom installation” by Dhruvi Acharya goes on show at Nature Morte in New Delhi this month. In her own words, the artist unpacks the visceral human experience of love, loss and life

L

iving with death is an odd experience. Awareness of the physical non-existence of a loved one colours almost every experience. One can accept and adjust, but the void remains. And it is funny how the human mind adapts to living with this lacuna. Sometimes the mind understands, and sometimes it plays tricks: the past, present and future merge in different ways; dreams, nightmares and reality become interchangeable. My work dwells on this alternate reality and makes visible the negotiations that take place in one’s mind in order to live. The soft sculptural bedroom installation ‘what was, still is, but isn’t…’ is a contemplation on loss, love, longing and memories. This is a room you can walk into, with walls covered with hundreds of drawings from my drawing books from the last 20 years and the floor covered with soft mattresses. The ‘floating’ furniture is hand-stitched from cotton fabric or kora kapda, made at three quarters of human scale. The bed has a bedcover with drawings of memories, with one-half covered in small cones symbolizing thorns. The bookshelf has 16 books, each one with a title encapsulating each of the 16 years my late husband and I were married, as well as a fabric box that replaces the stolen silver box that once held precious ashes. The paintings in my solo show ‘Permeated Absence’ mull over the awareness of the physical absence of a loved one, symbolized by drawings of memories, by thought bubbles left vacant or paint marks representing emotions. The paintings also address the gnawing awareness of one’s own mortality, and the ‘joys’ of navigating this life and world in a middle-aged female body, with the rising awareness of the ageing body and failing health. The paintings also bring to attention the objectification of women, and expectations placed on how they must look. When the works are viewed, I hope the specifics of the stories and the meaning of each image become unimportant, and all that is felt and remembered is the universality of the human experience. Permeated Absence, solo show by Dhruvi Acharya is at Nature Morte, New Delhi, from 11 January to 8 February 2020.


Tarini Jindal Handa with interior architect Tanya Singh seated on a Tacchini ‘Julep’ sofa, designed by Jonas Wagell. Behind them, a melange of books, artefacts and curios collected by the homeowner’s family is arranged on the ‘Romboidale’ bookshelf by Pietro Russo. Made with emerald green marble, the ‘Three Cylinder’ table by Casegoods sits atop a custom-designed cc-tapis rug. Facing page: In the living room, a custom-designed table by Tanya Singh and Moroso ‘Pipe’ armchairs by designer Sebastian Herkner are arranged on top of two stunning custom rugs by cc-tapis.; in the background is a golden artwork by Aldo Chaparro, made with stainless steel.

PHOTO: ASHISH SAHI.

MAXIMUM


M SUNSET Interior architect Tanya Singh turns Tarini Jindal Handaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seafacing apartment into a playground for the light of the setting sun Writer RitupRiya Basu . PhotograPher isha shah

169


The Pink Cloud, an installation by Jacopo Foggini, tumbles from the ceiling in the dining space. Through the sliding glass doors by Rimadesio, a view of the living room shows two beige and yellow armchairs by Moroso, and a pair of Baxter ‘Dalma’ armchairs by Draga & Aurel. The ‘IC’ ceiling lights were designed by Michael Anastassiades for FLOS. In the far end of the room, Pietro Russo’s ‘Voliera Ottone’ bookshelf turns into a bar.


PHOTO: BHARATH RAMAMRUTHAM.

The dining room features a Tonelli dining table on a custom-made cc-tapis rug. A series of iron, concrete and brass artworks by Rathin Barman are mounted on the wall. Below: The bed in the master bedroom was custom-designed by Tanya Singh. The closet features ‘Mediterranean Marks’, a wallpaper from Wall & Decò, by Talva Design. The lamp on the bedside table is by Bover.

171


Left: The outer wall of the steam room is hand-panelled with strips of seasoned oakwood. The circular sink and mirrors were all customdesigned by Tanya Singh; the freestanding bathtub is from Bagnodesign London. Right: The master bathroom continues the curvilinear trend seen through the apartment with Marmara marble flooring, traditionally used in hammams.


A

s the sun kisses the horizon, the last rays of the day glide into Tarini Jindal Handa’s sea-facing south Mumbai apartment, tinting the space in an ethereal light. A sweeping veranda, which runs across the length of the house, lets the sunshine pour into the 5,000-square-foot space, and opens it up to a panoramic view of the sea and the sky. When interior architect Tanya Singh first stepped into the apartment a year ago, she immediately knew that the light of the golden hour—which bounces through the area, moving from the dining space, to the living room and the library—would become crucial to the design process. “The first time I visited the apartment, I ended up spending an hour or two walking around the place. Just when the sun set, this incredible rosy light invaded the space, casting everything it touched in a pink haloed glow,” says Singh. “And yet, this beautiful light had nowhere to go; it was contained by the walls of the two rooms on either side of the living space, shrouding the rest of the apartment, which was a shame. I knew, then, that the first step of my design process would be to open the space up, so it could engage with the intense aura of the sunset.” Singh dismantled the false ceiling, instantly increasing the height by a foot, and broke down the walls of the two rooms on either side of the living area, replacing them with sliding glass doors by Rimadesio. Now no matter where you stand in the apartment, the striking blue sea is unmissable. “Eliminating the walls expanded the space at once, letting the light fluidly move through the area,” says Singh. To capture the magic of the oblique rays of the afternoon, she asked Milan-based designer Jacopo Foggini to tap into his forte, and translate light into matter. With a cascading tangle of 250 polycarbonate modules—handmade in water, at 280 degrees Celsius—Foggini crafted The Pink Cloud, an installation that tumbles from the ceiling in the dining space. As the voluminous sculpture catches the changing light through the day, it turns different shades of pink, becoming a pulsating, almost living object. “Since this isn’t my primary home, I had the liberty to have a little fun with this place,” says Handa. “This isn’t meant to be a serious apartment, so I wanted it to be a bit of an experiment, brushed with different colours and textures. My only brief to Tanya—apart from the functionality of the space—was to make it feel experimental. We didn’t jot down a set of rules or illustrate expectations; we just trusted the process and went with the flow. I think that freewheeling approach reflects in what we’ve arrived at.” This playful energy can be seen in most every detail. The two custommade cc-tapis rugs spread over the living space eschew the prescriptive rectangle, instead morphing into an abstract melange of geometric shapes. On a closer look, geometry—especially the circle—is revealed as a recurring theme. “The [circle] returns

throughout the apartment, in perimeters and in details,” says Singh. “Having completely revised the layout, I asked myself: how do I create the sensation of ‘feeling at home’? To translate the notions of warmth and security, I used the shape of a circle, which collects within itself but does not close, does not isolate.” The circles, peppered across the apartment, are not always obvious; they hide, and linger, until they suddenly erupt into view. And yet, the circle is ubiquitous: in the library, it pops up in the sculptural lamp by Michael Anastassiades for Flos; hides in plain sight in the backrest of the living room’s ‘Pipe’ armchairs by Moroso; and reappears in the delicate crown moulding across the apartment. It is both realized and implied; the Marmara marble flooring in the master bathroom traces an unmissable arc, while the black and white dome on the cc-tapis rug finds its other half only when the custom-designed semicircle table by Singh is placed next to it, adjusted to the perfect angle. The art that takes pride of place in the apartment is as fresh and unpredictable as the design that surrounds it. “To build on the mood of the space, I wanted to pick out works by exciting emerging artists, most of whom are dear friends,” says Handa, pointing to Dia Mehhta Bhupal’s Airplane, which hangs opposite the library; not too far away, a Longpi sculpture by Ashiesh Shah sits atop a console customdesigned by Singh, inlaid with remnants of an Indian rug. A textural piece by Aaditi Joshi, made using recycled plastic bags and acrylic colours, flanks the entrance. “I selected a few concrete, iron and brass artworks by Rathin Barman for the dining space, and tucked a towering Annie Morris totem in a corner of the library,” reveals Handa. A glinting, golden Aldo Chaparro piece in the living room drives home one fact: in this home, the art is not meant to steal the show, but organically meld into the setting. “I didn’t want to pack every wall with an art piece just because we have to; the use of negative space is very intentional,” says Singh. “The shell of the house should be strong and beautiful enough to hold its own. It should also be pliable, ready to transform and keep in step with its owners and their changing needs.” This silent ebb and flow of life—and the creative manoeuvring it calls for—is perhaps why every object is infused with the potential to turn into something else entirely. The Edra ‘Standard’ sofa can be tweaked into different arrangements, as can a set of tables custom-designed by Singh. In the library, the pendant light by Michael Anastassiades is a modular system, waiting to transform into glowing geometric compositions. In this evolving canvas—that shifts and morphs along with the lives that it contains within the walls—the only constant is the streaking light that filters through the veranda. Here, the rose-tinted light is the conductor; the rest, mere musicians, dancing to its tune.


LAA LA A

The late Charles Jencksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; s lifelong interest in cosmology, the science of the planets, is realized here in his design for this New Delhi house and garden, which seeks to symbolically bring down to earth, the sun and the moon and the stars Writer NoNie NiesewaNd . PhotograPher ashish sahi . StyliSt samir wadekar


A LAND

Designer Shalini Misra, on the grounds of her farmhouse, which was landscaped by Charles Jencks.


The design of the amphitheatre is inspired by the Misra Yantra, one of the astronomical instruments at the Jantar Mantar observatory in Jaipur. Shalini loves amphitheatres and considers them sculptures in their own right, as well as useful spaces for solitary or group activities. Facing page: The custom-designed granite fountain representing the Shiva lingam was designed and landscaped by Integral Design.


Charlesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscape design is all about juxtaposing shapes and materials to represent his multiverse, and his speculation about the cosmos. The metal railing, bricks, grass mounds and water bodies all align into a beautifully orchestrated form.


The path between these two green mounds leads to the house, creating an element of surprise. The trees add a sense of height, and the pathways undulating up and through the mounds are fun to walk on.


The drop-off point at the entrance of the house. The Shiva lingam fountain creates a sense of sound and movement.


Metal lotuses stand in the waterbody with a black floor that reflects the trees surrounding it. The gentle slopes of the grassy mounds form beautiful patterns.


This is the meandering path around the periphery of the site. Shalini designed seven “moon gates” to symbolize the seven chakras of spiritual energy that—according to yogic tradition—exist within the human body. The meandering path is perfect for walking (or jogging), and gradually leads from the meditative garden, to the vegetable garden, towards the sunset wall and on to the fruit orchards and so on. The idea is to slow down and think about the chakras that each gate represents. Facing page: The outdoor dining area was placed in the south to catch the winter sun. The neon light that reads ‘Let’s go get lost’ was designed by Shalini’s own firm (Shalini Misra Limited, or SML, in short). It amplifies the theme of the house, which is to slow down.


The dining room comfortably seats 16 to 18 people, though elements of the bespoke table—also designed by SML—can be taken out to seat a smaller group. The William Daniell lithograph-turned-wallpaper was a gift from designer Tarun Tahiliani. Facing page: Fondly referred to as “the library”, this room holds the family’s collection of books. Placed on an old kilim from the family’s collection, the vintage carved wooden table was picked up on a trip to Ladakh. It is surrounded by a U-shaped sofa. Brass strips form the pattern on the ceiling.


The chandeliers were custom-designed for the space by Paul Matter. The wooden staircase, the bespoke terrazzo floor and the ceiling all follow the curves of the house. Facing page: This bedroom was designed by Shaliniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elder daughter, Reeva, using her own photography as a wallpaper to frame the ceiling. The Ottoman candle stands and accessories that adorn the vintage marble fireplace are from Reevaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own collection. The Bengal four-poster bed and the Yamakak rug are both vintage.


All the furniture in the master bedroom was designed by SML, including the four-poster bed in cane and wood. The wooden wall panels were made by Akeel, a local carpenter. Facing page: The play of geometric shapes continues in the dressing room. Intersecting circles, stripes and mirrors create a pattern on the blue wardrobes, which were made by a local carpenter. The terrazzo flooring also reflects the patterns with brass strips, as does the vintage art deco dressing table.


Shalini, in the family room that sits at the end of the curved corridor. It is a casual, playful space that fully opens out into the garden, with a covered patio between the inside and the outside spaces. The sofa is inspired by Vladimir Kagan, who is the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-time favourite designer. The configuration seats multiple people in different ways. The coffee table is a bespoke design in marble and metal, by DeMuro Das. The carpet is from the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection.


T

he House of Light in New Delhi is a monument to the most original architect and landscape artist of the 21st century, Charles Jencks (1939 -2019). After seeing his own Garden of Cosmic Speculation in Scotland, Shalini Misra asked Charles with his daughter Lily, partners in Jencks Squared, to collaborate on the design of her family house on four acres of farmland. Shalini first visited the farm in 2013 where she discovered “a 92-year-old widow living there in a tiny cottage. She was bedridden, chain-smoking, having a gin and tonic and I thought ‘What a woman!’ I liked her spirit. There were no boundaries.” An internationally acclaimed architect and interior designer herself, Shalini determined to keep that spirit, breaking boundaries in her search for perfection. The House of Light sprang from Charles’s sketch pad as a swirling figure of eight. Unlike normal houses based on the square or rectangle, this house breaks all boundaries in its spiralling, circular form. At its core, a courtyard represents the strong centre of gravity that pulls the international couple and their three children back to India, their spiritual, and actual, home. An infinity pool closes that figure of eight. The landscape imagined by Charles and installed on site by Integral Design, tracks that cosmic swirl in twists and folds. Seven moon gates rise along a meditative path (known to younger members of the family as the jogging path) based on the Hindu philosophy of vyatireka. Five huge, spiralling turfed mounds represent the life force, or chakra, with an amphitheatre scooped out of the earth for performing arts as part of the Misras’ Vahani scholarship programme. Standing stones like lightning bolts, a golden brick wall designed to capture the last rays of the sun, rills of water that reflect the sky, a fountain to Shiva, are features. The point where the earth meets the sky as the turfed pathway rises to the top floor of the house, Charles called the morphing moment. “Symbolic architecture takes time to build and must be consciously pursued,” Charles wrote in his book on the subject. “It takes a good client and a good architect.” Few clients presented with a cosmic swirl of a master plan would have had the vision—and the stamina—to realize their dream house but Shalini and Rajeev Misra, the latter, CEO of the Vision Fund and Softbank, did. “They’re great patrons of the arts,” observes Sonali Rastogi from Morphogenesis Architects, appointed on-site architects by the Misras. “Not since the Mughals has so much craft work been commissioned from all over India,” Rajeev says as, indoors and out, Shalini revives age-old Indian craftsmanship with her contemporary designs. Now the thikri mirrored tiles that adorned centuries-old Indian palaces cover a contemporary cabinet at the entrance, and line a skylight to effectively bring the sky down into the prayer room. Hand-ground Indian stone terrazzo floors and wooden doors patterned with inlaid brass concentric circles and hexagons create a bold background. Bronze doors incised like paper cuts with slits through which leather peeks, coffered ceilings, chandeliers aflutter with glass leaves, a mural of a 17th-century William Daniell lithograph— all are one-off designs. Soft furnishings, too, have the luxury of bespoke design. “A

velvet jacket can make you feel seductive, glamorous—just like a plush velvet sofa adds instant panache to a room,” Shalini’s website insists, alongside photographs of glamorous interiors for her celebrity clients. Landing in her own home, pieces upholstered in velvet anchor the swooshing curves, and windows and beds are dressed with exquisite Indian silks, cottons and muslins. Every space was debated for almost a year before construction began. On average, Shalini, Lily and Sonali spoke once a month on Skype, a most unusual design process. Mathematicians would recognize the result as a hyperbolic paraboloid aerodynamic structure but the complexities of making it were challenging. “There’s an engineering marvel going on in there,” says Sonali. “Only two columns supporting such mass and volume are visible on the outside. The rest are hidden within walls.” Even the mounds that appear to rise simply from the ground have steel beams hidden within to support them during heavy monsoon rains and seismic activity. Orientation diagrams and computer simulations tracked the sun to position entrances. Brick jali walls that either block sunlight or filter it were configured to bring light and shade and wind movement right into the very centre of the house. Every brick, and every single window, was modelled on a computer. Glass walls that wrap around the courtyard at the heart of the house are really square panes, strategically placed within brick quoins to make them appear circular. Even the undulating roof cantilevered out from the building is designed to provide shade at the entrance throughout the day. Charles, alas, died in 2019 before seeing his House of Light. He would have made the most entertaining guide. Back in the 1980s, visitors to his family home in Los Angeles were encouraged to tour it with copies of the 17th-century poet John Milton’s L’Allegro and Il Penseroso to interpret epigrams like the ‘Loathed Melancholy of Cerberus’ stencilled on rustic telegraph poles over the garage. And within the disused open cast coal mine in Crawick, Scotland he turned a dump into a cosmic landscape, charting intergalactic activity with boulders and earthworks. I first became aware of Charles’s interest in otherworldly things some 30 years ago when I introduced his Nile furniture collection to House & Garden readers. Nine golden lacquered blobs representing the nine planets climbed up the legs of his ‘Sun’ table. More throne-like than a chair, the ‘Sun’ seat had a sunburst-flared chairback. He called his shelving unit adorned with scarabs ‘The Egyptian Telephone Kiosk’. Some might call it kitsch. But then, as pun-loving Charles observed, “If you can’t take the kitsch, get out of the kitchen.” Today you will find this collection in his London house, built in 1840, which he gutted to introduce Cosmic Rooms so dazzling they would make the Sun King blink. The house will open as a museum to postmodernism. As an architectural critic, he coined the postmodernist movement in a book so weighty, the joke was that if you put four legs on it and glazed the cover, it would make a chic coffee table. In the spirit of the House of Light, Shalini says, “Whatever we design, it will always be the continuous liveliness of the family and friends who come to the house that completes the space, filling the design with life, love and laughter for generations to come.”


BOMBAY

Overlooking the Oval Maidan and the Bombay High Court in the distance, the fifth floor apartment is an art deco dream, with original window grills and pairs of minimal Ionic columns that are part of the original structure.

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AY DECO With views of the Oval Maidan, the Bombay High Court and Rajabai Clock Tower in the distance, Sunshine, an original 1920sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; art deco building, sits on the cusp of time and architectural style. Its fifth-floor interiors designed by Annkur Khosla Design Studio are a treat for art deco as well as classic Bombay lovers Writer Komal Sharma PhotograPher Ira GoSalIa/PhotoGraPhIx


In the den, B&B Italia pouffes sit on the Roche Bobois sofa and next to is a vintage deer horn-legged table belonging to the homeowner’s grandmother. Architect Annkur Khosla’s cutwork-inspired carpeting ‘Void’ spreads out in the foreground and a vintage rare leather and wooden case by Beyond Designs sits on the wall. Facing page: The entrance foyer with a seasoned old burma teak door and Khosla’s custom designed, art decoinspired brass door handle in the distance.

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Above: To mirror the chevron pattern around the house, the artwork in the living room, by Chandrakanth, was custom crafted and sized to the vision of the architect, Annkur Khosla. The patterned living room flooring is from STP, Fcml, and the carpet â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Voidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, designed by Khosla is inspired from the technique of cutwork. The furniture is from Diviana and Ravish Vohra Home, lamps from Oma and antique pieces are sourced from flea markets. Below: A sculptural light from Global Views hangs over the dining and an ancient puppetry piece is sourced from Philips Antiques.

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Above: The study with a view of the High Court, Rajabai Clock Tower and Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya. The doors are designed as screens with classic deco patterns and all windows are original 1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, strengthed with additional old burma teak wood. All handles are especially fabricated in brass with a step detail inspired from the art deco language. Below: In the bedroom, an Italian upholstered back bed from Lema sits next to an Arco lamp with a vintage bedside table with brass filigree.


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has been restored to its original glory. Art deco as a movement was known for creating its own hardware, and Khosla certainly took delight in that. The brass door handles and knobs, keyholes and details in the carpentry around the house were mini projects for the designer. A tall elegant brass handle on a door towards the end of the apartment is certainly a sculpture in itself. “Designing those was quite a high point for me,” she laughs. However, the high point of this space is the continuing, consistent visual language that the designer has extended. From the flooring and the custom furniture to the carpet-less carpeting and the way art is mounted—specially commissioned to fit not a flat surface, but a waved wall—is all part of Khosla’s experiments with deco. She radically cropped out the carpet and simply left a border running along the patterned floors, “essentially using a carpet to bind the entire space together.” Art deco was a movement of innovation and breakthroughs from old norms, and Khosla has clearly slipped her own avant-garde ideas into the scheme. “If you notice the window frames, we padded them up, to strengthen them, of course, but also to add that staggered wood aesthetic that is more typical of art deco rather than flat wood,” she adds. She also did away with curtains completely. “In the den, I took an artwork and put it on a sliding panel, which if you open, you see the skyline outside, and if you shut, you cut all glare and noise of the outside. The wooden screens in classic geometric patterns work as partitions to transform private rooms into one open, flowing, public space, their varying wood finishes adding a subtle texture and depth. Khosla’s interventions have a sense of humour. They also have a rhythm and flow in which she clearly believes—in design and in life. The nicest nook, however, feels like the enclosed balcony, which doubles up as a study, to just read, watch TV, think or gaze out at the spectacular view. In the distance, one can see the High Court and Rajabai Clock Tower; it’s quintessential Bombay. And Khosla is completely sensitive to retaining this romance of the city in the body of this apartment. “The homeowner has worked in the stock market all his life. He’s somewhat of a pioneer. Their lives exist in this proximity of the Bombay Stock Exchange, Cricket Club of India, and the Oval. As much as Sunshine is a prime heritage site and my excitement to work on an authentic art deco apartment was sky-high, I always worked with the intent that it’s their home,” she adds. And homes need nooks and special places to put your feet up. Luckily for this couple, it’s on a vintage 1920s art deco window grill.

DRAWING OF SUNSHINE APARTMENTS FROM DECO ON THE OVAL: A PORTFOLIO OF FACADES AND DETAILS CREATED BY SIR JJ COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, PUBLISHED BY UDRI AND SIR JJ COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE.

A

nnkur Khosla brings a crisp, fresh energy to our breakfast meeting on an early December morning as she tells AD how the Sunshine apartments project serendipitously came to her. A few years ago, she had been holidaying with her husband in Paris “in an art deco hotel with the most pristine architecture and stained glass windows in this Haussmann building. That’s when I got a call from the homeowner, asking if I’d consider doing the interior architecture of her fifth-floor apartment in Sunshine,” says Khosla, adding, “It was kind of mystical”—a word this practising Buddhist uses liberally. Sunshine apartments is itself at quite a cusp. It overlooks the magnificent Oval Maidan with all of civilization playing cricket in its grounds. The Mantralaya is on its left, standing across is the neo-Gothic High Court building, and the Victorian Gothic Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya museum on the other side. The views from this fifth-floor apartment are a luxury in their own league, leaping across time and architectural styles. Built in the 1920s, Sunshine represents the art deco wave of Bombay, when progressive merchants and entrepreneurs of the time began exploring the flamboyant architectural style and brought it back to their home city. Khosla’s deep dive into deco made perfect timing. When she began working on Sunshine, the revived interest in art deco in Bombay was visibly picking up, thanks in part to Art Deco Mumbai, a non-profit society set up in 2016. In 2018, after a protracted effort, UNESCO had declared the art deco buildings on Marine Drive and those around the Oval Maidan, a World Heritage Site. “Sunshine was an untouched heritage project, built sometime in the 1920s. It came with its own set of challenges,” she says. “We had to be extremely careful while strengthening the structure. It had to be done incrementally and certainly not like an invasion.” Yet this wasn’t a pure restoration project. It was someone’s home, a husband and wife’s, and it had to be functional and practical and beautiful and simply a home. “I feel passionately about having the homeowners appreciate the movement as well; that you’re sitting in a building that belongs to an era, but it’s also extremely livable and relevant to the present moment and their lives.” Khosla has been ingenious with space and flow. The entrance foyer opens with a minimal floor pattern and a subtly fluted oak backdrop, which tucks away a closet space. Walking ahead from the foyer, one comes upon a mirrored partition that opens into the dining space, panelled with a similar ribbed effect. The open balcony is held up by twin columns with Ionic capitals, and the art deco grill


ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

` 200 DECEMBER 2019 THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

INDIA


THE BATHROOM REPORT RUB-A-DUB-DUB DESIGN

Detail of the shagreen matt gold washbasin from Armani/Rocaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest Baia collection.


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WITH LOVE, FROM SPAIN The Roca Gallery in Barcelona is more than a showroom of faucets and showers. It speaks of a 100-year-old brand’s adaptive, progressive outlook towards lifestyle and design Writer Komal Sharma

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROCA.

I

n the historic city of Antoni Gaudí, the Roca Gallery is an absolute contrast. It’s abstract, minus any ornamentation, and super-minimal. But it belongs perfectly to its time and place. It speaks to everything the Spanish bath brand stands for. A glass cube, the facade is a light box during the day with curious visual effects and appears like a sheet of still water in the night, with its 4,200 LEDs emitting a neon blue glow. But it’s really the interior space—how it’s used and what it inspires—that sets it apart from just another product showroom. Such discernment is evident from the company’s vibrant history as well. Roca’s origins date back to 1917, when the Roca brothers founded Compañia Roca Radiadores in Barcelona. They began with cast-iron radiators for domestic heating; 10 years later, began making cast-iron baths; in another 10 years or so, ceramics surfaced; and by the middle of the century, faucets appeared. It’s the kind of persistent company that survived the Spanish economic crisis. Today, it is present in more than 170 countries, with a product portfolio too long to fit in this story. The Roca galleries are designed as points of conversation and confluence. While the Barcelona gallery was founded in 2009—and developed in collaboration with the Office of Architecture in Barcelona by Borja, Lucia and Carlos Ferrater—there are galleries in London, Shanghai, Beijing, Madrid, Lisbon, and another opening in São Paulo. In the Barcelona gallery, the ground-floor space is an expansive, open area with visual imagery on its peripheral walls, “re-enacting bath and living rituals by a family”. Carlos Velazquez, the corporate marketing director of Roca, who took the time to show AD around, articulated the heart of Roca. “People are really our universe. To understand the children, men and women, to anticipate what they need and to make it real, grounded and feasible, that’s what this company is about.” An interactive touch screen allows us to grasp the story of the historic brand, its technological developments, its water conservation programme and other design details. And the best is saved for last. One level below—at the time of our visit—the gallery was set up with a playful Ettore Sottsass-designed dining area, no less than any museum. This bath showroom is quite a white cube, rather neon blue, gallery.


WATER WORLDS The latest in bathroom trends from the world’s greatest designers, and how to get the look STYLIST MITALEE MEHTA

Atop the Greenwich Hotel, the TriBeCa Penthouse by Axel Vervoordt with architect Tatsuro Miki—and inputs from the hotel’s owners, Robert De Niro and Ira Drukier—is a world apart from the bustling Manhattan it is set in. “The master bath is made with old stones from New York,” says Vervoordt. The bath itself is crafted from a converted trough with patina created by time and use. In front is a 19th-century French montagnard pine stool.

PHOTO: LAZIZ HAMANI.

AXEL VERVOORDT


‘BASALTO VENA CHIARA’ PORCELAIN SLABS, STONELAM LAMINAM

‘PENT’ (GLOSSY BLACK) WASHBASIN, STERNHAGEN

‘ADVANTIX’ (737450 ) SHOWER CHANNEL, VIEGA

‘RAINFINITY’ HAND-SHOWER HANSGROHE ‘PLAZA OXIDE DECOR’ AND ‘MOSAIC SLATE DECOR’ CERAMIC TILES, KAJARIA

‘DEVONIAN BLACK’ AND ‘GRIGIO MONET SKY’ GLAZED VITRIFIED TILES, NITCO

‘FOREFRONT’ (5373IN-HG1) BASIN, KOHLER

‘DUTCH PLUS’ VANITY AND BASIN, KEROVIT BY KAJARIA

‘ETNA’ MIXER, ROCA

‘MYEDITION’ (SATIN BLACK) FAUCET, AXOR

‘F-LE FORME’ WALL-MOUNTED WATER CLOSET, QUEO

‘ZA SERIES’ FAUCET, TOTO

‘NIGHTLIFE’ WALL-MOUNTED WATER CLOSET FROM THE ARTITUDE COLLECTION, PARRYWARE


JACQUES GARCIA

Villa Elena, Jacques Garcia’s palatial Sicily home has a storied past—a 17th-century monastery built on a 12th century Norman villa, which replaced a 10th century Moorish palace, built on a 5th-century Roman house, itself built on a 3rd-century Greek villa. Fittingly, the decorator, known for his glamorous hotel interiors, has accoutred the house in objects that reflect this provenance—scalloped silk canopies, and furniture made for 19th-century royals. A neoclassical marble tub anchors this bathroom.

PHOTO: OBERTO GILI.

‘ORIGIN’ FAUCET, VITRA

‘REGINA’ FREE-STANDING BATHTUB, DEVON & DEVON

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‘NUDE’ MIXER BY ZUCCHETTI KOS, INTERSEKT

‘ICE BLOCK’ MARBLE BASIN, ARNAYA


‘PASSIONE’ MARBLE FROM THE CELEBRITY COLLECTION, THE QUARRY GALLERY

‘BOL’ CERAMIC FAUCET WITH MARRAKESH PATTERN, KOHLER

MARBLE BASIN, ARNAYA

‘BOURGEOIS II’ FLOOR MIXER BY MAISON VALENTINA, C BHOGILAL WEST-END

‘ADRIANA’ PORCELAIN BASIN, LONDON BASIN COMPANY

‘CHAMPAGNE’ ONYX FROM THE CELEBRITY COLLECTION, MARBLE CENTRE

‘JASEN’ TILES, CRAFT BETON

‘BLUE POMFRET’ ONYX FROM THE EXCLUSIVES RANGE, HMG STONES

‘BIANCO VERSAILLES’ STONE, CLASSIC MARBLE COMPANY

GLAZED VITRIFIED TILES FROM THE DURALISM COLLECTION, SOMANY CERAMICS

‘UNO’ TAP BY AXOR, FREESTANDING SINK FROM THE TOMMY METROPOLE COLLECTION, INTERSEKT


‘CORUS’ BASIN, CERA

‘SWIRL’ TILE BY TOPSTONA, C BHOGILAL WEST END ‘H2OKINETIC’ PENDANT RAIN-CAN SHOWER HEAD WITH LED LIGHTS, DELTA FAUCETS

‘HALO’ (DUSTY PINK) BASIN, CONCRETE NATION

‘PINK ONYX’ FROM THE OPERA COLLECTION, A-CLASS MARBLE

‘ARC’ BASIN MIXER, JAQUAR

‘RIO’ BASIN BY DADO, HÄFELE

‘RAINDANCE S’ OVERHEAD SHOWER, HANSGROHE ‘INTERSECT’ TILE FROM THE LUSSO COLLECTION, TOPSTONA

TILE FROM THE MARMO COLLECTION , PIETRA 1556

‘F-AUTOMODE’ ELECTRONIC WATER CLOSET, QUEO

‘DUTCHMASTER BLUSH FLORAL CARILLON’ (K-30333-DM1-0) SINK, KOHLER

‘MYSTICAL HAVEN’ WALL-MOUNTED EUROPEAN WATER CLOSET, ALCHYMI


GOLD AND BERRY TILES FROM THE PENT COLLECTION, STERNHAGEN

‘ANTHEUS’ FREE-STANDING BATHTUB, VILLEROY & BOCH

‘METROPOL CLASSIC’ FREE-STANDING BATHTUB FILLER, HANSGROHE

‘ANTHEUS’ OVAL MIRROR AND SHELF IN AMERICAN WALNUT, VILLEROY & BOCH

PHOTO: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN.

HANNAH CECIL GURNEY

Colours and patterns abound in the London home of Hannah Cecil Gurney—as is expected from a scion of de Gournay, maker of some of the world’s best wallpaper. In the maximalist master bath, terrazzo flooring is paired with a de Gournay wallcovering on sterling-silver gilded paper. The tub is Ilbagnoalessi, with a Catchpole & Rye tub filler. Gurney chose a pink flamingo paper for the space, adding an ombré yellow effect to the top.


CHARLES ZANA

PHOTO: AMBROISE TÉZENAS.

Julie de Libran, creative director of Sonia Rykiel, decorated her home—in a Paris building with a courtyard—with the help of French architect Charles Zana. Having lived for a while in Southern California, de Libran wanted her home to reflect the flora that she had come to love. Spots of green dot the apartment, which is decorated with a mix of pieces from de Libran's collection and Zana's designs. A pendant from Roman and Williams Guild hangs above a planter and a stone sink in the entrance hall, where de Libran often arranges flowers. The tiles are vintage Gio Ponti designs.

‘ELECTRA’ MOSAIC WALL PANEL, SICIS

‘BROADWAY COMPACT' SPA, ROCA

‘PLOUF BLUEBERRY’ BATHTUB FROM THE MAHDAVI COLLECTION, BISAZZA, FCML BATHROOMS

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‘CALMOR’ CERAMIC TILE FROM THE GLOSSTRA XL SERIES, SOMANY CERAMICS

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

‘VENTO’ (INKONRA1901) VINYL WALLPAPER BY INKIOSTROBIANCO, INTERSEKT


‘TIAARA’ BASIN MIXER, ARTIZE ‘LUV’ BATHROOM FURNITURE FROM THE NORDIC ELEGANCE DESIGN SERIES, DURAVIT

3D FAUCET, GROHE

‘D.1’ FAUCET, DURAVIT ‘COSMIC MOUNTED ‘COSMIC’ WALL WALL-MOUNTED EUROPEAN WATER CLOSET (S1044142), CERA

‘COMPOSED’ (K-73159T-7-RGD) FAUCET, KOHLER

‘FLOTATION’ BATHTUB, TOTO

‘TAO’ MARBLE SINK BY KREOO, C BHOGILAL WEST-END

‘H2OKINETIC’ RAIN SHOWERHEAD (RP707171-PN), DELTA FAUCETS

‘NAMISEN’ TILE FROM BHARAT FLOORINGS & TILES

‘AMAZONITE’ TILE FROM THE EXOTICA COLLECTION, A-CLASS MARBLE

Assisted by Samir Wadekar. For details, see Stockists.


NEWSLETTER From the hottest products to the coolest launches, here’s the low-down on the latest in the market this season

CR AFTED TO PERFEC TION

Iconic Indian carpet manufacturer Hands collaborated with UAE’s Senses Centre for Special Needs, in celebration of 2019 being declared as the Year of Tolerance in the country. Senses is a non-profit organization and the first care facility for people with severe physical and learning difficulties in the Middle East. The children at Senses created artworks that were incorporated into the design of a special carpet inspired by the Ghaf tree, which is the UAE’s national tree. The artworks were used by the Hands team to design the carpet. At least 25 different hands were involved in various parts of the process of creating this hand-tufted carpet (pictured), including design, dyeing, weaving, backing and finishing. It is also characterized by its use of 31 colours making 54 combinations. The tree, its leaves and the black leaves are all made with fine pure silk and the background with fine New Zealand wool. (handscarpets.com)


T H E P OW E R O F PA S T E L S The winter season is all about pastel hues. ‘Oak Winter’ wooden floors by Mikasa make for a perfect escape into a classy yet elegant setting, which blends warmth and elegance. The flooring pairs well with pastel shades and gives a seamless flow to your spaces. With a range of shades and tones available, you go all out and create the perfect look to add a magical vibe to your home. (greenlamindustries.com)

1 0 0 YEAR S OF BAUHAUS

Inspired by the Bauhaus movement, Cocoon Fine Rugs has launched a new collection to celebrate the movement’s centenary. Unveiled in October, these objets d’art have been hand-knotted from the finest raw materials, and bring an indulgent feel with an element of modern design to your home. The signature line of rugs has been made in handcarded wool with natural, hand-spun silk accents, which come in a soft and muted colour scheme. (cocooncarpets.com) ENGINEERING DESIGN When it comes to taste and quality, today’s customers are more discerning than ever. That is why Sternhagen, Germany’s premium sanitaryware brand, makes unique products that are thought-provoking and a perfect blend of high-quality design and flawless engineering. Shin (pictured), their latest luxury bathroom collection, was launched with the underlying desire to raise the bar of excellence in design. The Shin suite takes its cues from the sea—its soothing designs channel the undulations of waves, making it perfect for calming bathroom spaces. (sternhagen.com)


O N T H E S U R FA C E

Somany Ceramics have always been innovators in the tile space. In keeping with this tradition, the brand has launched VC Shield tilesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a revolutionary technology that makes tiles highly abrasion-resistant while shielding them against weathering, stains and scratches. Balancing true functionality with brilliant aesthetics, the durable tiles are available in plethora of finishes and colourways. (somanyceramics.com)

D E S T I N AT I O N D E S I G N

Known for luxury interiors for almost two decades, 1pointsix18 recently made its maiden flight to Bengaluru. In the midst of the cacophony of the city, their idea was to create a reinvigorating home in a villa, where the rich colours of the space would rejuvenate your soul. In this double storey drawing room every element spells luxury and blends in with the other like in a large painting. The in-house produced furniture and furnishings are effortlessly stylish. The vibrant space has been designed to have a fine balance of form and function. (1pointsix18.in)


NORDIC ELEGA NCE

Defined by precise, clear and fine forms and edges, the unusual designs of the Luv series by Duravit combines Nordic purism with timeless elegance. Designed with Danish designer Cecilie Manzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s refined sense for nuanced forms, the series is minimalist, elegant and softly flowing. Moreover the colour palette of matt lacquers and glazes in soft shades exclusively developed for the luxury bathroom brand emphasizes its fresh character. (duravit.in)


LIVING IN ST YLE

PHOTOS: SARANG GUPTA.

If a few days away from the bustle of Mumbai is exactly what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for, an exciting new property in Alibag might just fit the bill. A 10-minute drive from the Mandwa Jetty in Alibag leads you to Oasis, a brand new project designed to make a bespoke leisure home. Surrounded by emerald green paddy fields and hills, it promises to be a sanctuary of peace, a quiet haven where you can unwind, entertain and truly appreciate the little gifts of life. Envisaged as a condominium property, replete with all the delights of a five star resort, Oasis provides the perfect opportunity to kick back and relax, albeit in a gated community. Inspired by Balinese architecture, Oasisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscaping focuses on open spaces and waterbodies.

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Every sprawling apartment comes with an equally spacious open deck, perfect to soak in the afternoon sunshine. The swimming pool at the heart of the property, as well as The Clubhouse, with a spa, gym, sauna and a snooker table, ensure that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re never short of ways to relax. While you make your way to Oasis, The Courtyard at the Mandwa Jetty offers a private refreshment stop and a concierge lounge. A complimentary pick-up service ensures a hassle-free ride to the property, while you catch up on your plans for the weekend. Living life resort-style has never been so affordable. As the second phase of the property nears completion, Oasis is ripe for the picking. (oasisatalibaug.com)

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stockists

BHARAT FLOORINGS & TILES: MUMBAI 022-40574423 (BHARATFLOORINGS.COM) BLUE LOFT: INDIA 09321019798 (BLUELOFT.COM) BOCONCEPT: MUMBAI 022-49731531; NEW DELHI 011-41663554; HYDERABAD 09121355570 (BOCONCEPT.COM)

1STDIBS.COM: (1STDIBS.COM) 500BC: (500BC.DESIGN)

C BHOGILAL WEST-END: MUMBAI 022-61523100 (CBWESTEND.COM) CARPENTERS WORKSHOP GALLERY: LONDON 0044-2030515939 (CARPEN TERSWORKSHOPGALLERY.COM) CASA PARADOX: INDIA 09810349493 (CASAPARADOX.COM) CERA: (CERA-INDIA.COM) CLASSIC MARBLE COMPANY: MUMBAI 022-41404140 (CLASSICMARBLE.COM) CONCRETE NATION: AUSTRALIA 0061-75-5934075 (CONCRETENATION.COM.AU) CRAFT BÉTON: INDIA 07042221219 (CRAFTBETON.COM)

A-CLASS MARBLE: NEW DELHI 09958791101 (ACLASSMARBLE.CO.IN) ALCHYMI: INDIA 1800-200-7577 (ALCHYMIBATHROOMS.COM) ARNAYA: INDIA 09586899999 (ARNAYA.IN) ARTIZE: INDIA 1800-121-6808 (ARTIZE.COM) ATELIER DS: INDIA 09414017834 (ATELIERDHRUVSAXENA.COM) AUDEMARS PIGUET: KAPOOR WATCH, NEW DELHI 011-46767777 AXOR: PUNE 020-66259500 (AXOR-DESIGN.COM) BAXTER: ITALY 0039-03-135999 (BAXTER.IT) BHAANE: INDIA 08800940700 (BHAANE.COM)

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DELCOURT COLLECTION: PARIS 0033-01-42713484 (CHRISTOPHEDELCOURT.COM)

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

DELTA FAUCETS: INDIA 0918130518936 (DELTAFAUCET.CO.IN) DEVON&DEVON: ITALY 0039-3357242951 (DEVON-DEVON.COM) DURAVIT: (DURAVIT.IN) FABINDIA: (FABINDIA.COM) FCML BATHROOMS: MUMBAI 022-49261200; NEW DELHI 011-26800482 (FCMLINDIA.COM) FIRMAMENTO MILANO: MILAN 0039-02-928503 (FIRMAMENTOMILANO.COM) GERVASONI: MILAN 0039-02-780414 (GERVASONI1882.IT) GROHE: INDIA 1800-102-4475 (GROHE.CO.IN) HÄFELE: INDIA 1800-266-6667 (HAFELEINDIA.COM) HANDS: MUMBAI 022-26320609; NEW DELHI 011-26806475 (HANDSCARPETS.COM) HANSGROHE: PUNE 020-66259500 (HANSGROHE.IN) HINDWARE: INDIA 1800-200-7577 (HINDWAREHOMES.COM) HMG STONES: INDIA 06366450619 (HMGSTONES.COM)

PHOTO: ASHISH SAHI.

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INTERSEKT: NEW DELHI 01147129937 (THEINTERSEKT.COM) IQRUP+RITZ: INDIA 09599110672 (IQRUPANDRITZ.COM) JAQUAR: INDIA 1800-121-6808 (JAQUAR.COM) KAJARIA: INDIA 1800-011-2992 (KAJARIACERAMICS.COM) KEROVIT BY KAJARIA: INDIA 1800-011-0059 (KEROVIT.COM) KOHLER: INDIA 1800-103-2244 (KOHLER.CO.IN) LONDON BASIN COMPANY: LONDON 0044-20-87491267 (LONDONBASINCOMPANY.COM) MARBLE CENTRE: INDIA 09880144544 (MARBLECENTRE.IN) MUSELAB: INDIA 09820146139 (MUSELAB.IN) NILA HOUSE: (NILAJAIPUR.COM) NITCO: INDIA 1800-266-4826 (NITCOTILES.IN) PARRYWARE: INDIA 1800-274-6060; MUMBAI 09914915975; NEW DELHI 09384065847 (PARRYWARE.IN)

PIETRA1556: (PIETRA1556.COM) PLÜSCH LIVING: MUMBAI 022-24467750; NEW DELHI 011-41553333; HYDERABAD 040-23550346; BENGALURU 080-25504444 (PLUSCHLIVING.COM) POLTRONA FRAU GROUP: MUMBAI 022-22614848 (POLTRONAFRAU.COM) QAALEEN: NEW DELHI 011-69000130 QUATTRO ITALIA: (QUATTROITALIA.IN) QUEO: GURUGRAM 0124-4779493 (QUEOBATHROOMS.COM) RITU KUMAR HOME: (RITUKUMAR.COM) ROCA: INDIA 1800-274-6060; MUMBAI 09914915975; NEW DELHI 09384065847 (ROCA.IN) ROOSHAD SHROFF: MUMBAI 02222037745 (ROOSHADSHROFF.COM) SÉ: LONDON 0044-20-76274282 (SE-COLLECTIONS.COM) SEETU KOHLI HOME: INDIA 09999966702 (SEETUKOHLIHOME.COM) SICIS: NEW DELHI 011-46114811 (SICIS.COM); SEE INTERSEKT

SOMANY CERAMICS: INDIA 1800103-0004 (SOMANYCERAMICS.COM) SOURCES UNLIMITED: MUMBAI 02262101700; NEW DELHI 08510098000 (SOURCESUNLIMITED.CO.IN) STERNHAGEN: INDIA 07045994497 (STERNHAGEN.COM) STONELAM LAMINAM: INDIA 09818188651 (STONEXINDIA.NET) THE ANTIQUE STORY: INDIA 09606371111 (THEANTIQUESTORY.COM) THE QUARRY GALLERY: INDIA 0993054444 (QUARRY.ASIA) TOPSTONA: INDIA 09829795787 (TOPSTONA.COM); SEE C BHOGILAL WEST-END TOTO: (IN.TOTO.COM) VIEGA: INDIA 1800-572-9613 (VIEGA.COM) VILLEROY & BOCH: MUMBAI 02249050403 (VILLEROY-BOCH.ASIA) VISIONNAIRE: MUMBAI 02266622921 (VISIONNAIRE-HOME.COM) VITRA: INDIA 1800-123-1134 (VITRA-INDIA.COM) WONDERLAND OF BONSAI: MUMBAI 022–23679762 (WONDERWORLDOFPAREKH.COM)


Dia Mirza at the Gemfields Booth Anjali Lama and Sabyasachi Mukherjee

Conde Nast India’s Alex Kuruvilla and Natasha Poonawalla with Winnie Harlow

lin Kalki Koech th oo B va Li e in th

POWER PLAYERS

The third edition of Vogue Women of the Year awards accoladed a new crop of women leaders across fashion, food, film, sports, social impact and beauty. Here’s the lowdown on the evening that was.

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WHAT: The Vogue Women of the Year awards in association with Serum Institute of India WHERE: Grand Hyatt, Mumbai The ingredients required to make a night to remember: star power, standing ovations and speeches that stay with you long after it’s all over. Vogue’s Women of the Year awards 2019, in association with Serum Institute of India, had all the makings of a memorable night. An Olympic national champion, movers and shakers of the beauty industry, the global Indians we love, and a few good men—it’s safe to say the event, in its third edition, came back bigger and better than before.

The Absolut wall depicting an inclusive world

HUDA K ATTAN N

WOMEN of the YEAR 2019 (and the men we love)

WINNER’S CIRCLE 15 sketches later the winner’s trophy designed by Anjali Mody using The Quarry Gallery marble was ready

Dutee Chand

Dulquer Salmaan


Kunal Nayyar and Neha Kapur Nayyar Winnie Harlow

Janhvi Kapoor and Conde Nast India’s Arjun Mehra

Katrina Kaif

Conde Nast India’s Alex Kuruvilla with Lilly Singh

Anushka Sharma

Mona and Huda Kattan

e out The staglarmsoucar brm ought to you

Jim Sarbh

A heavy dose of ustries by the leaders across ind

Ranveer Singh

Vogue’s Priya Tanna kicks off the evening

HOST WITH THE M Our ho OST evening st for the , Ka pulled o ran Johar ff a p of heels air

Radhika Apte

Karan Johar Natasha Poonawalla

Natasha Poonawalla

Pooja Mor

Ranveer Singh


Samir Srivastav

Nehal and Monica Shah

Sangita Jindal receiving her award from mother Urmila Kanoria and Kalki Koechlin

Shane and Falguni Peacock

Neeta Lulla

Liva’s Dilip Gaur and Michael Halpern present the award to Ruchika Sachdeva

i Pulkith Mod i od & Teena M

ion F is formeFandaawsh ay, and the

Designers, at ho es, all came out people behind the scen s in support for the winner Maneka Thadani and Pareina Thapar

Milind Soman, AD Singh, Jaspreet Chandhok and JJ Valaya

Manish Malhotra

Anjali Mody Sabyasachi Mukherjee and Gemfields’ Sophie Ebbetts presenting the award to Anushka Sharma

Anupama Chopra

i Sharma, Liva’s Rish ey, hn Srishti Saw pal o G v ee aj R

The Quarry Gallery’s Rupesh Shinde presents the award to Ananya Panday with her father Chunky Pandey

Bibhu Moh and Gaura apatra v Gupta

Vogue’s Priyanka Khanna with United Colors of Benetton winner JeanCharles de Castelbajac with Anjali Lama

Vogue’s xxxx Dilshad Arora

Kusha Kapila


Raja Kumari, Ranveer Singh and Lilly Singh singing on stage

Istituto Marangoni’s Tarun Pandey

Taapsee Pannu

Neera Nundy

Kabir Khan Sonali Bendre Behl

Vogue’s A nai and Natas ta Shroff Adajania ha Poonaw alla

oments Winnins togokm their bow with The winner heartwarming speeches

United Colors of Benetton’s Jasleen Kaur

Avni Biyani

Matthew Spacey

Garima Arora

Rahul Bose

Anchit Nayar

Forest Essentials’ Karishma Manga Bedi

Nikhil Mehra and Dia Mirza Manushi Chhillar

Falguni Nayar

Sunny Leone

Heena Sidhu Pernod Ricard’s Aditya Sharma


T H E M O O D : R A S E E L GU J R A L A N SA L With a wildly creative expression, surrealist style and colourful palette, the New Delhibased designer has made her mark over the last 30 years through three companies— RGA architecture studio, Casa Paradox Luxe and Raseel at Casa Pop “Liquid red lips is my go-to and a classic shade. The Stunna lip paint by Fenty Beauty stays on from the studio to cocktails!”

“A lot of memories on this board are attached to the late Henry Wilson, an intensely close friend and Indophile. He designed these gift sets for Thames & Hudson. I watched him madly trace many of these intricate patterns.”

“I grew up around Lutyens’s Delhi, and the iconic Hyderabad House with its Indo-Saracenic architecture holds a special place in my heart. It’s been designed in the shape of a butterfly and is my favourite obsession.”

“The iconic ‘Petite Malle’ handbag is inspired by the history of Louis Vuitton trunks. I love this little clutch, because it’s like carrying furniture.”

“In 2003, I went to Bali for the first time and fell in love with its distinct representation of Hindu culture. This ostrich eggs was hand-painted with scenes from the Ramayana.”

“My eternal goddess—my mother Kiran Gujral is pictured here in 1960. The photograph is housed in a photo frame I made in 1989!”

“My beloved silver chinoiserie cigarette case that I bought in Sunder Nagar market 35 years ago, even though I didn’t smoke. Now that I do, it works fabulously for my cigarettes, lighter and lipstick!”

“My parents gifted this painting to me on my last birthday. My father Satish Gujral’s youthful and crazy creative spirit, and the fact that he could paint this at 85 inspires me. Game is how I title this work in my head, drawing inspiration from his series on sport about 10 years ago.”

“When I started to design professionally in 1986, the first two furniture designers that fascinated me were Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Carlo Bugatti, because of their extreme design sensibilities.”

“Peer and pry! I delve deeper into my obsession with magnifying glasses—from burning paper as a child to rummaging through my grandfather’s possessions.”

224|

“The botanical and naturalist drawings from Animalium by Jenny Broom and Katie Scott are constant additions to my library of inspiration.”

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2020

“These beautiful clutches are from a Dutch company specializing in motherof-pearl inlays.”

“Dragonflies and saturated colours are featured on this Casa Pop handkerchief.”

AS TOLD TO SAMIR WADEKAR, PHOTO: SARANG GUPTA.

“The fierce and the fragile, both these aspects of my creative self are also seen in the pieces that I collect—a bracelet designed by my sister, Alpana Gujral; a chameleon shaped letter opener from my office table; and a strange chalcedony ring from Istanbul.”


ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

DESIGN SHOW 2O19 HIGHLIGHTS FROM MUMBAIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LUXURY ART & DESIGN FAIR


N W IN NOW N GLASS

F FOR THOSE WHO W KNOW N W

www.bluepine.in www


pg 180 DECEMBER 2019

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INTRODUC TION AD DESIGN SHOW

A glimpse into the three-day event with the who’s who from the worlds of art, architecture and design—as well as scenes from exclusive parties hosted at the AD x Chivas Harbour Bar. BRILLIA NT, BEAU TIFUL MINDS

Insights from the speakers who took the stage at the Asian Paints Power Talks. FINISHING TOUCHES

Design brands SÃR, Moorthy’s and Mishcat Co bring out their best for the AD Design Show. ASIAN PAINTS

India’s leading paint brand, partnering with the AD Design Show, launched the Nilaya Naturals collection of eco-friendly, organic paints. POWER TO THE K ARIGAR

With support from JSW, AD celebrated the diversity and richness of crafts in India by showcasing five artisan teams. JSW

The second JSW Prize for Contemporary Craftsmanship was awarded to Heirloom Naga. LE CABINET DE CURIOSITÉS

A modern interpretation of the 16th century tradition of Le Cabinet of Curiositiés, by Jean-François Lesage and Neils Schoenfelder. IN ALL HIS SPLENDOUR

Design aficionado Sharan Parekh and his brand Splendour powered the stunning concept of Le Cabinet of Curiositiés.

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

DESIGN SHOW 2O19

VASTR AK ALA

A look at the embroidery atelier and the team that put together Le Cabinet de Curiosités.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM MUMBAI’S LUXURY ART & DESIGN FAIR

AD CAFE

O Pedro, Bombay Canteen, Miss T, The Table, Mag St Bread Co and Souk by Taj present a delicious spread for the visitors. THA NK YOU

A shout out to The Works and 70 EMG for their flawless production. DESIGN SATELLITE

Artist and designer, Lekha Washington’s otherworldly installation, This Too Shall Pass: Moondancer graced the AD Design Show

ON THE COVER

A corner of the Tracing Room in the Jean-François Lesagedesigned Le Cabinet de Curiosités at the AD Design Show 2019. Photographer: Talib Chitalwala.


contents

120 122 124 128 130 134 136 138 142 146 150 152 154 158 162 168

Anca Since 1985 Arnaya Gauri Khan Designs Gulmohar Lane Loco Deisgn Manglam Arts Natuzzi Editions At Kerf Plüsch Poltrona Frau Ravish Vohra Home Sarita Handa Scarlet Splendour Seetu Kohli Home Simone Timothy Oulton Studio Willow Viiew

LIGHTING & ACCESSORIES

These brands shone a spotlight on contemporary lighting and accessories. 172 Cocoon Fine Rugs 174 Emery Studio 176 Jaipur Rugs 178 Kavita Singh Interiors 180 Klove 184 Sabyasachi For Thomas Goode 186 Shazé 188 The Carpet Cellar 190 Vis A Vis

pg 142 A NTIQUES

The show featured accoutrements from some of the country’s best decor brands. 90 Geethanjali Artifacts 92 Phillips Antiques 94 Taherally’s ART

Galleries from around the country showcased exquisite works of art. 98 Akara Art 100 Apparao Galleries 102 Chemould Prescott Road 104 Experimenter 106 Nature Morte 108 Pichvai Tradition & Beyond 110 Studio Art 112 Vadehra Art Gallery FUR NITURE

The AD Design Show featured some of the best furniture brands from around the country–and the world. 116 Alsorg 6|

DESIGN SHOW 2019

PARTNER S

AD’s collaborators in creating the second edition of this expansive event. 194 Alex Davis 196 Angie Homes .Co – By Angie Kripalani Design 197 Bent Chair 198 Arttd’inox 200 Borderline Studio 202 Classic Marble Company 208 Craft Béton 210 Digital Dreams 212 Foam Home (India) Pvt. Ltd. 214 Harbour Bar 215 Hatsu x Koy 216 Ikkis 218 India Circus By Krsnaa Mehta | A Godrej Venture 220 Istituto Marangoni – Enhancing Talent Since 1935 222 MCM Unfired Clay Cladding 224 Script – A Godrej Venture 228 Valcucine 230 Vvyom 232 Woodfeather 233 Thomas Abraham For Idea Design House

238

LEKHA WASHINGTON

The conceptual artist behind the spectacular installation that caught everyone’s eye at the AD Design Show 2019.


FINE TEXTILES . UPHOLSTERY . RUGS . BESPOKE FURNITURE

Kastur Nivas, Off. Hughes Road, Mumbai- 400007, info@splendour.co.in, +9177383 57563

. . .


EDITOR GREG FOSTER MANAGING EDITOR Komal Sharma ART DIRECTOR Ashish Sahi DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Almas Jani COPY DIRECTOR Tyrel Rodricks SENIOR STYLIST Samir Wadekar JUNIOR STYLIST Mitalee Mehta FEATURES WRITER Ritupriya Basu PHOTO ASSISTANT Sarang Gupta EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Shalini Kanojia WATCH EDITOR Rishna Shah MANAGER SYNDICATION Michelle Pereira SYNDICATION COORDINATORS Giselle D’Mello DIGITAL EDITOR Aditi Sharma Maheshwari ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR Kriti Saraswat-Satpathy DIGITAL WRITER Avni Raut PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Sunil Nayak SENIOR MANAGER - COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION Sudeep Pawar PRODUCTION MANAGER Mangesh Pawar PRODUCTION CONTROLLERS Abhishek Mithbaokar, Geetesh Patil CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Sunil Sethi Nonie Niesewand Divia Patel Neha Prasada Namita A Shrivastav Divya Mishra Gauri Kelkar Gayatri Rangachari Shah Arati Menon CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ricardo Labougle Neville Sukhia Tom Parker AD DESIGN SHOW 2019 COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR - EXHIBITIONS Sabina Lall (New Delhi) SENIOR MANAGER - EXHIBITIONS Mukta Malhotra (New Delhi) MANAGER - EXHIBITIONS Kaetki Bhatia (New Delhi) SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER Priyank Vora PROJECT MANAGER Sabah Jugari ART DIRECTOR Bijal Sheth Morbia CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Huma Shaikh CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kinjal Vora, Gauri Kelkar

CHIEF BUSINESS OFFICER ARJUN MEHRA PUBLISHER Armaity Amaria ASSOCIATE ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kapil Tolani, Loveleen Kahlon (New Delhi) SENIOR ADVERTISING MANAGER Aditi Sharma (New Delhi) ACCOUNT MANAGER - ADVERTISING SALES Varun A Sama ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR Yesha Patel ITALY SALES REPRESENTATIVE Angelo Carredu US ADVERTISING MANAGER Alessandro Cremona ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - DIGITAL SALES Abhay Srivastava (New Delhi) SENIOR MANAGER - DIGITAL SALES Joita Basu MANAGER - DIGITAL SALES Shilpi Mishra MARKETING DIRECTOR Madhura Phadnis SENIOR MARKETING MANAGER Jaymin Dalal HEAD - ADMINISTRATION Boniface Dsouza PR DIRECTOR Swati Katakam Samant SENIOR PR EXECUTIVE Waheeda Abdul Jabbar Machiwala HEAD - EVENTS Fritz Fernandes SENIOR MANAGER - EVENTS Khushnaz Daruwala MANAGER - EVENTS Vania Scott PROJECT & MARKETING MANAGER Olinda Rodrigues CREATIVE DIRECTOR - PROMOTIONS & CREATIVE SOLUTIONS Dipti Soonderji Mongia ASSOCIATE PROMOTIONS EDITOR Sneha Mahadevan SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Varun Patil, Atul Hirijagner, Payal Rosalind Malik PROMOTIONS WRITER Tina Jimmy Dastur MANAGER - CIRCULATION OPERATIONS Jeeson Kollannur CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Amrit Bardhan FINANCIAL CONTROLLER Rakesh Shetty SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Dattaprasanna Bhagwat ACCOUNTANTS Nitin Chavan, Anthony Paulose COMPANY SECRETARY & ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - LEGAL Mosami Kesarkar ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - VIDEO COMMERCIALS Kastubh Belur SENIOR MANAGER - PROCUREMENT Rahul Mulekar ASSISTANT MANAGER - PROCUREMENT Anubhuti Sharma ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - COMMERCIAL PLANNING Alisha Goriawala ASSISTANT MANAGERS - HUMAN RESOURCES Ria Ganguly, Neha Pednekar DIRECTOR - DIGITAL SALES AND BRANDED CONTENT Shreyas Rao DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR Kiran Suryanarayana HEAD - AD OPERATIONS Sachin Pujari SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER - DIGITAL Dipak Raghuwansi DIGITAL GRAPHIC DESIGNER Deep Shikha GRAPHIC DESIGNER - NATIVE Ayushi Teotia MANAGER - TECH PROJECT Vishal Ingale MANAGERS - AD OPERATIONS Vinayak Mehra, Reshma Nilankar SENIOR EXECUTIVE - AD OPERATIONS Akanksha Malik DIGITAL DIRECTOR Saurabh Garg SENIOR MANAGER - DIGITAL MARKETING & SUBSCRIPTIONS V Satyavagheewasan MANAGERS - DIGITAL MARKETING Priyanka Shivdasani, Akanksha Naik MANAGER - DATA & GROWTH Tanvi Randhar MANAGER - AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Kanupriya Kedia SENIOR EXECUTIVE - EMAIL MARKETING Tanya Chhateja EXECUTIVE DIGITAL COPYWRITER Pranjali Jakatdar DIRECTOR - DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS Salil Inamdar CLIENT DIRECTOR - DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS Aman Bahl ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - CLIENT SERVICING & PROJECT MANAGEMENT Neha Dhanani MANAGING EDITOR - NATIVE STORIES Shivani Krishan INFLUENCER MANAGER Insiya Bagasrawala SENIOR MANAGER - BRAND SOLUTIONS Abigail Rodrigues MANAGER - BRAND SOLUTIONS Sakhi Deshpande COPY EDITOR - BRAND SOLUTIONS Tanuj Kumar (New Delhi) CREATIVE PRODUCER Mandira Sharma DIRECTOR - VIDEO Anita Horam SENIOR CREATIVE PRODUCER - VIDEO Preshita Saha ASSISTANT CREATIVE PRODUCER Aditya Sinha EA TO MANAGING DIRECTOR Karen Contractor Avari

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Introduction Having set a bar for ourselves already, the second edition of the AD Design Show opened with much anticipation and excitement in Mumbai in October this year. For the 6,000+ people in attendance, there had to be an element of surprise, of pleasure and fun—three days spent spectacularly well with the best of art and design from India and around the world. Where last year’s fair was anchored by a reimagining of the late Laura Hamilton’s apartment, this year’s edition went a step further with Jean-François Lesage’s Le Cabinet de Curiosités, AD’s most ambitious project to date. Across three rooms created by Chennai-based architect Neils Schoenfelder of Mancini Enterprises, our modern-day reimagining of this 16th-century tradition had an arresting assemblage of objets and antiques from the legendary embroiderer’s personal collection as well as a selection of contemporary Indian and international furniture and decor. It was the perfect balance of tactility, intensity, lights, shapes and forms coming together to create a design aficionado’s fondest fever dream. In addition to Le Cabinet de Curiosités and the impressive roster of art and design brands that took over the Dome@NSCI in Worli, Mumbai, the line-up of speakers at the Asian Paints Power Talks featured icons like Humberto Campana, Ilse Crawford, Sabyasachi Mukherjee, Viren Bhagat, Bijoy Jain and Shanth Fernando, among others. Their witty insights into the process and future of design had the crowds queueing up for more. Continuing AD’s focus on craftsmanship this year as well, the JSW-sponsored Power To The Karigar pavilion showed a slice of India’s craft traditions. With a focus on five craft forms, the live exhibit featured artisans working with Longpi and Kutch pottery, Gyaser silk, Naga textiles, and embroidery, curated from the length and breadth of the country. Everyone who visited the Dome@NSCI just had to take that immediate left turn to walk through the Craftsmanship Pavilion and witness India’s living heritage. In case you missed it, this special issue captures the dazzle of those three days of art and design—and parties! This is a big shout-out to our partners, exhibitors, and everyone who attended, and a celebration of an absolutely fabulous weekend.

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DESIGN SHOW 2019


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DESIGN SHOW It was three days of the best design, the finest art and a series of fabulous parties as the who’s who of design and lifestyle arrived at the second edition of the AD Design Show at Mumbai’s Dome@NSCI

LUXURY PARTNER

HOSPITALITY PARTNER

MARBLE PARTNER


AMIT SYNGLE

AD EDITOR GREG FOSTER, JEAN-FRANÇOIS LESAGE, MADHURA AND VIREN BHAGAT, MALAVIKA SHIVAKUMAR, BEATRICE AND ANDRÉ CÔRREA DO LAGO, CONDÉ NAST’S ALEX KURUVILLA HUMBERTO CAMPANA

PINAKIN PATEL, HERVÉ VAN DER STRAETEN

ASHIESH SHAH

REKHA, KAVITA SINGH

KUMAR MANGALAM AND NEERJA BIRLA

TALJINDER SINGH

SANGITA JINDAL

TARINI JINDAL

SUBODH SHAH, AMIT SHAH

JESMINA ZELIANG, MAXIMILIANO MODESTI


SHANTH FERNANDO

GAURI KHAN

PULKITH MODI

NATASHA POONAWALLA, MANISH MALHOTRA

ILSE CRAWFORD

GIUSEPPE DI NUCCIO, CONDÉ NAST’S ARJUN MEHRA

JEAN-FRANÇOIS LESAGE, SABYASACHI MUKHERJEE

SRIKANTH SK, CONDÉ NAST’S ARMAITY AMARIA

ALEX KURUVILLA, GAUTAM SINGHANIA

BIJOY JAIN

NOZER WADIA

ABHA NARAIN LAMBAH


LEKHA WASHINGTON, ALEX DAVIS

UMA DUBASH

BOSE KRISHNAMACHARI SHIVAN BHATIYA AND NARRESH KUKREJA

VAISHALI KAMDAR

CONDÉ NAST TRAVELLER’S DIVIA THANI

ARVIND DUBASH

URMILA AND SHREYA KANORIA

SOHA ALI KHAN

SUSSANNE KHAN, SIMONE ARORA

PHEROZA GODREJ

ARJUN MALIK


PETER AND ERIKA BORN

SHEFALI BALWANI, HERVÉ VAN DER STRAETEN, DIVYA THAKUR, AD’S KOMAL SHARMA, GREG FOSTER, MANGESH LUNGARE, ROBERT VERRIJT

IRAM SULTAN

SHARAN PAREKH

BYRAM WADIA

STEFANIA COSTANZA, CONSUL GENERAL OF ITALY

GAUTAMI REDDY, JAGDIP JAGPAL

MICHAELA MCCLELLAND, CORMAC LYNCH

GAYATRI OBEROI

ARJUN MEHRA, PETER NAGY

SHALINI AND SAMRAT ZAVERI

KIRAN SHETTY


CONDÉ NAST’S MADHURA PHADNIS, VOGUE’S DILSHAD ARORA

APOORVA SHROFF, EKTA PURI, RAJIV PAREKH MOZEZ SINGH, RENU CHAINANI GARWARE

CECILE AND PETER D’ASCOLI

SUNITA CHORARIA

RAJIV SAINI

SHOBHAA DÉ

JESMINA ZELIANG

VINITA CHAITANYA KUNAL KAPOOR

LOULOU VAN DAMME


ZUBIN ZAINUDDIN AND KRUPA ZUBIN

NAMITA AND ALEX KURUVILLA

ELSIE NANJI

ZUBIN MASTER

JAYA LAMBA, NISHA JAMVWAL, GQ’S ALMONA BHATIA

GQ’S CHE KURRIEN

SUNITA AND KOHELIKA KOHLI

VOGUE’S PRIYA TANNA, GREG FOSTER

SAMEEP PADORA

DOMINIC DUBE

MALIKA VERMA

JJ VALAYA

SANDEEP KHOSLA

SMITA CRISHNA-GODREJ


THE ASIAN PAINTS POWER TALKS ROOM

HEMMANT JHA AND LANA BERKOVICH

SHIREEN GANDHY

SCHEREZADE SHROFF AND VAIBHAV TALWAR

MAYANK MANSINGH KAUL

APARNA KAUSHIK

THE AD X CHIVAS HARBOUR BAR

FARHAN AKHTAR MUNIRA CHUDASAMA SHIBANI DANDEKAR


TY BHOJWANI

THE BOOTHS AT THE AD DESIGN SHOW

RAVI VAZIRANI

LEILA ERFAN

SUJAL SHROFF

MANSI PODDAR, KANIKA PARAB

SUKANYA AND ATMAN SHAH

BACHI KARKARIA

RATAN BATLIBOI

THE CMC BOOTH


AHSAN ANSARI, VIVEK GUPTA

MALA RAMADORAI

KRUPA SRINIVAS

SAM MANECKSHAW, SULEIMAN BHANJI

CONDÉ NAST’S MUKTA MALHOTRA, KAETKI BHATIA

MINAL VAZIRANI

ROOSHAD SHROFF

AN EVENT AT THE AD DESIGN SHOW

CECILIA MORELLI PARIKH

ARADHANA AND GAUTAM CHAND


KAIF FAQUIH

KAYZAD SHROFF, SAMTA NADEEM, IRAM SULTAN, MARÍA ISABEL JIMÉNEZ LEÓN, KUNAL KHANDELWAL, PURAN KUMAR, KISHOR SHETTY, AMIT GUPTA

AD’S SAMIR WADEKAR VIKAS KHANNA

RALPH AND SONIA HAYS, CONSUL GENERAL OF NEW ZEALAND

CONDÉ NAST’S SABINA LALL

VEERA KAPADIA

MARTIN

POONAM BHAGAT

AAMIR AND HAMEEDA SHARMA

AD’S KAPIL TOLANI


MALAVIKA SHIVAKUMAR

AMIT SYNGLE, ARMAITY AMARIA, PRITESH SALIAN, SRIKANTH SK, MANALI ADHIKARI, SUMEET BHOJANI

ARUNJIT SODHI

NIKHIL MEHRA

THE AD CAFE

LAILA LAMBA BRINDA SOMAYA, NANDINI SAMPAT

MATTEO CIBIC

SHARAN APPARAO

DABBOO RATNANI

AMIT PAI


THE NILAYA NATURALS COLOUR DISPLAY

POOJA SINGHAL

SEEMA PURI

ZARIR MULLAN NEHAL AND MONICA SHAH

PRASHANT RAO

HAMENDRA, SUKRITI AND RATI SHARMA

SEETU KOHLI

ASHISH BAJORIA

MADHAV RAMAN

THE INDIA CIRCUS BOOTH


SUDHIR VERMA, JITENDER SINGH, KAPIL BHARTI, SAJAL LAMBA

THE ISTITUTO MARANGONI BOOTH

ASHNA SINGH

SUNDEEP KUMAR

RAHUL PURI

MANDEEP SINGH

DIVYA BAJAJ, HITESHI WADHWA

NATASHA JAIN

ESSA AND ALI JAMNAGARWALA

PRATEEK JAIN GAUTAM SETH RADHIKA AND JAI RAWAT

VIKNESWARAN TA


NIKITA BHATE

PRIYANKA TAPARIA

THE PHILLIPS ANTIQUES BOOTH

MANAN TRIVEDI

ADâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S VARUN SAMA

AMIT VADEHRA, SIMON LAWS, VINAY MELWANI

ANGIE KRIPALANI

VIRAL SHETH

RAVISH VOHRA

SAMTA NADEEM, AMIT GUPTA

AYUSH CHOUDHARY

PARMINDER PAL SINGH

SABINA BHANPURWALA


PRATEEK RAJA

PRIYANKA RAJA

KRUTI BADANI, ANAND GUNJUR, NIVEDITHA REDDY, KARTIK BADANI, PUNEET AGGARWAL, PRAVEEN PARAK, SACHIN CHOPRA, GAUTAM VORA, AATISH GUPTA

MANDEEP SINGH

YOGESH CHAUDHARY MALVIKA PODDAR, JOHNNY SANDELSON

GUNJAN GUPTA

PARUL AND ROSHINI VADEHRA

ANICA KOCHHAR

HARDIK AJMERA

PINAKIN AJMERA

AKSHAY SHARMA

THOMAS ABRAHAM, SUMAN RAO

PUNEET SHAH


KASHISH RAHEJA

THE AD DESIGN SHOW TEAM

SAURABH AILAWADI NISHANT CHANDRA KUNAAL KYHAAN SEOLEKAR

ALL PHOTOS: CAMERA CREW PRODUCTIONS.

YASH BHANAGE

SAUMIL SUCHAK

LIFE VEST UNDER OUR SEAT BY SIDDHARTH SOMAIYA

THE SCRIPT BOOTH

SAMEER SETH

SHUCHITA SANCHETI

GAURI DEVIDAYAL


BRILLIANT, BEAUTIFUL MINDS

The Asian Paints Power Talks brought electric energy to the AD Design Show with iconic names from as far as Brazil and the UK, as well as elusive designers of our country who rarely speak about their work. From Humberto Campana’s anecdotal creative journey to Shanth Fernando’s fascinating notes on Sri Lankan art and design, from the charming chemistry of Viren Bhagat and Bijoy Jain on stage to Matteo Cibic’s spirited presentation— these sessions inspired as much as they entertained. In this portfolio of candid portraits shot by Sarang Gupta, AD captures the character and conversation from the tastemakers on stage.


“It’s funny. I once took my ‘Bubble Wrap’ chair for an exhibition, and packed it in bubble wrap. When I arrived, I saw that the chair was completely destroyed—only the metal grip and bolts were left of it. I asked them, ‘What did you do to my chair?’ And they said, ‘We were looking for it in the packing.’”

~ Humberto Campana


â&#x20AC;&#x153;We always put a lot of time into the research of any particular project, to build a foundation through research and by confronting some of the uncomfortable questions and bringing them up to the surface sooner rather than later. But then we talk to people a lot. Nothing beats eye-to-eye contact. I find that stage of design really fascinating.â&#x20AC;?

~ Ilse Crawford


â&#x20AC;&#x153;The compelling urge to discover beauty is what I left the established business for. I had to find out what beauty meant to me. In those days, there was no reference point in the city. Fashion, as we see it now, evolved only later. Even modern art was being sold in just a few galleries. It was an amazing period of discovery.â&#x20AC;?

~ Pinakin Patel


“I belong to Calcutta. So a lot of the city gets reflected in everything that I do. There are certain brand markers; for example, the royal Bengal tiger and historical buildings that recur. To be a designer of relevance, you have to take ideas from what you see around you in your everyday life. I’ve grown up with these markers all my life and they are a part of my brand.”

~ Sabyasachi Mukherjee


â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of what we look at as historical architecture in India is actually the idea of architecture as a structure, a mere bone for actually occupying and containing textile, which is constantly changing with context, with views, with celebrations, with rites of passage.â&#x20AC;?

~ Mayank Mansingh Kaul


“In Brazil, modernism came with two very special characteristics, which is different from how it played out in Europe. In Brazil, it came at the same time for low-income projects as well as high-end. Both sets of clients adopted it. Also, those who brought modernism to Brazil also believed in a spirit of conservation. So there is a lot of reference to old furniture and architectural elements.”

~ André Corrêa do Lago


“I collect art. I promote art in Sri Lanka. Everything in my home tells a story. Everything. And it’s me.”

~ Shanth Fernando


“An alternative way to consider a flaw or imperfection is to see it as affection. That’s what resonates in a piece, and that’s what the work really is about.”

~ Bijoy Jain


“I’ve always been fascinated by the play of shadow and light. In jewellery, you generally don’t have that element. But because of my fascination for it, I always wanted to bring it into my work. Besides having stone and metal, having light and shadow takes it beyond jewellery. It takes it to a different level. And that was my endeavour.”

~ Viren Bhagat


“There is a need for fairs to reinvent. And it has to begin with what we’ve seen in this fair right now—with the karigar section and the Cabinet of Curiosities.”

~ Ashiesh Shah

“Inspiration is a much larger journey. Design fairs are about the one-offs, the people you meet, the little shops that you stumble upon or the man that you meet on a street and strike up a conversation with, and he tells you about an obscure little gem that you would’ve never known about otherwise.”

~ Iram Sultan


â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was six, I never expected to be an artist. By the age of 10, I was attending a Catholic college, and I aspired to be a pope. Later, I wanted to be like Michael Jordan, so I started playing basketball. Finally, my parents sent me to my uncle, a famous Italian designer. That was when I understood that it was better to be a designer than a pope.â&#x20AC;?

~ Matteo Cibic

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