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WOMEN'S SURF MAGAZINE SPRING . 2014

ALANA BLANCHARD

SURFER & MODEL

HEALTH

FASHION

TRAVEL AVEDON


W

ave magazine, established in 2014, is the world’s leading action sports/ entertainment mounthly magazine, targetted towards women’s surfing. We take pride in our unique style and aestetic as well as our relationships to the reader and their views. Wave features leading print, online and event properties reaching more than 40 million sport enthusiasts every month through women’s surf events and competitions, health and fitness, sports wear to street wear and even beauty, all targetted towards women. Wave magazine is available for download on your Kindle Fire, Nook Tablet, Google Play, iPad, and Zinio. Get the inside scoop by liking us on Facebook at Facebook.com/WaveMagazine and following us on Twitter @WaveMagazine.


TABLE OF

CONTENTS

5 14 31

8 22

7 10

5. Letter From the Editor 7. DIVE IN: Travel 8. DIVE IN: Food 10. DIVE IN: Fashion 14. Alana Blanchard 22. Richard Avedon 31. Last Stop SPRING 2014

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MAGAZ I NE SPRING

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m a e t EDITOR IN CHIEF Vi c t or i a Fo l i n o C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R Vi c tor i a Fol i no S TA F F W R I T E R Randy Dunbar ART DIRECTOR Vi c t or i a Fo l i n o F E AT U R E S D I R E C T O R Randy Dunbar SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR Benson PHOTO EDITOR Vi c t or i a Fo l i n o PHOTOGRAPHER Benson PHOTOGRAPHER Hailey Kim RESEARCH CHIEF Vi c t or i a Fo l i n o PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Randy Dunbar PUBLISHER FIDM ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Andy Black ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Amy Whinehouse D I G I TA L D I R E C T O R Miley Cyrus FA S H I O N D I R E C T O R Elvis Presley C O R P O R AT E PA R T N E R S H I P S Hillary Clinton MARKETING SOLUTIONS Rook Folino CONSUMER MARKETING Dino Joseph

R E T E H T T E LFROM OR T I D E

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BUSINESS MANAGER Roco Hound

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UU TO

W PU elc o N HA m SA WA A e II' N L H D SB

TRAVEL FOOD FASHION

TOP

3ISLANDS 1.

HAWAII

K a u a' i

→ Spectacular Sunsets → World Class Surfing Waves → Garden Isles → Abundance of Wild Life

2. M a ui

→ Shows: Elvis Impersonator, Magic → Pipiwai Trail → Haleakala Crater → 2nd Largest Island

3. O ' a hu

→ Bowfin Submarine Museum → Diamond Head → Byodo-In Temple → Makapuu Light House

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Crabs are crustaceans that are most commonly available from summer through the winter. Almost all parts of the crab are edible, from the claws to the legs to the body. As with all food, fresh is best when preparing crab. They should have a fresh, mild, sea-breeze odor. Crabs should be purchased live and as close to the time of cooking as possible. They should actively move their claws; however, if the crabs have been refrigerated, they will not be very active. Do not purchase any crabs that do not show these signs of life. Lobster is a crustacean that is considered more of a luxury food item. It is typically only available in the spring and summer. Lobsters are cooked by weight. Even though they turn bright red almost immediately, this is not an indication of doneness. When boiling, the cooking time begins once the water has returned to a boil.

FOOD NETWORK’S

FAVORITE

CRAB

MACA RONI

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his mac and cheese is a fantastic one-dish meal -- it’s so rich and creamy and cheesy, all you’ll need is a simple green salad to serve alongside, and your menu is set. Lobster goes great in this recipe, but if that seems too luxurious, use any combination of seafood that makes you happy.

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BE ST

SURF

WEAR

3

2

1

7

4

SURF 6

1. RIP CURL WETSUIT $120 2. BOARD ANKLE LEASH $22.95 3. BILLABONG BRACELET $4.95 4. SEX WAX SURFBOARD WAX 9.95/EA 5. HURLEY SURF SHORTS $39.95 6. BILLABONG STICKERS $2.49/EA 7. BUSTER WOMENS SURFBOARD $395

5

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2

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1

STREET 8

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1. BILLABONG PONCHO $59.95 2. BILLABONG NECKLACE $4.95 3. GOLDENROD TANK 19.95 4. BILLABONG BACKPACK $65 5. BILLABONG SWIMSUIT $39.95 6. PACSUN SHORTS $49.50 7. BILLABONG BRACELET $4.95 7. BILLABONG SNADALS $14.95 SPRING 2014

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ALANA

blanchard

Riding

waves

the Alana Blanchard is a busy woman— Internet celebrity, Sports Illustrated and Maxim swimsuit model, watery sex icon, and, oh yeah, Women’s World Tour surfer. She’s on the go so much that meeting up for this lunch in Southern California—one hour, that’s it—was something that took a few months of planning. When she finally had an open spot to make it into town. Alana Blanchard is the 10th-ranked female surfer in the world, and she is easily one of the most famous surfers on the planet, malor or female. If that seems preposterous, its not. But of course she’s also charming about it. Fifteen minutes later, Alana is here, 5’7″, light tan, long sandy-blonde hair, down and straight, black jeans and a black top— an outfit that looks so effortless.

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Alana Blanchard is the 10th-ranked female surfer in the world, and she is easily one of the most famous surfers on the planet, male or female. If that seems preposterous, it’s not. Consider that fame is simply a metric of how many people recognize you, and then consider Alana’s 675,000-and-climbing Instagram followers, 200,000 more than Kelly Slater. As we sit in this restaurant in the sun, and as I look out at the yachts, I know and Alana Blanchard knows that she is famous because she is attractive, and more specifically, she is famous because she looks good in a bikini. And I know and she knows that she is also famous because she seems aware of this fact, is unapologetic about it, and actively promotes it, regularly posting pictures of herself in a bikini online. And, lastly, I know and she knows that it would be incredibly fucking stupid to stop right there and choose to dismiss Alana Blanchard as simply a nice ass with a surfer attached to it, to ignore her considerable surfing accomplishments, even if plenty of people do. “This is what’s comfortable,” she says, confidently. “Think about it like this—this is my job. If I went to a regular job, if I was a secretary or something, I’d want to look good. I’d dress up for that part. I like looking cute. So I want to look cute in the water. Because I’m a girl. Female athletes have bad reps of being butchy and all that. I just thought, I’m going to be a girl and see if I can do this. It’s probably half the reason I’m here. Not necessarily because I’m wearing little bathing suits, but because I actually wanted to be a girl. I wanted to be feminine.” “Think about the top performers in the world. Look at Beyonce,” she explains. “She’s wearing these tiny little outfits, and everyone wants to see her sing because she’s looking amazing. Why can’t we? We want to look cute, too. Rihanna is wearing tiny little

things. Not that we’re Rihanna and Beyonce, but they look hot, so why can’t we? Just because we’re athletes?” And we’re back to the exploding of feminists’ heads. Except…is she wrong? At all? If equality is about choice, then isn’t Alana free to…oh, fuck it. I don’t know. Regardless, Alana says there was no calculated contemplation that informed her decision to surf contests in small bikinis. It was just happenstance, and perhaps a little bit of naivety. “Looking back, I just didn’t care,” she says. “There’s a picture of me online in a straight thong at my first ’QS contest, thinking it’s totally normal. I just thought that’s what everyone wore, because coming from Kauai, that’s what everyone wore. Little bathing suits. Then at some point, I was like, ‘Oh, shit, I guess not all the girls wear these.’” That realization didn’t stop her. “I didn’t care. I mean I still get hated on to this day, but I just don’t care. I think it looks cuter, and they stay on way better, too.” I can’t speak to what form of women’s swimwear stays on the best, but clearly the Internet—and Blanchard’s legions of Instagram followers—have decided that her bikinis do, in fact, look “cute.” And Blanchard isn’t shy about the fact that much of her popularity is owed to those bikinis. Which explains why it’s tough to remember that Alana Blanchard can surf, that she’s more than just the girl who was played by Jack Nicholson’s daughter in the Bethany Hamilton biopic Soul Surfer. But Alana Blanchard can surf. Perhaps she hasn’t won any World Tour contests, and perhaps she’s not a favorite to ever win the World Title, but a lot of girls haven’t done either of those things. Alana Blanchard is the 10th-ranked female surfer in the world, and being the 10th best anything in the world, regardless of what you do or what you look like, is unfathomable for most of us.

"LOOKING

BACK, I JUST

DIDN’T CARE"

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“I had a good heat on the gold coast," she says of a contest earlier in the year, "and the commentators were like, 'i didn't even know she could surf.' I was like, 'thanks, guys.'" “I am on the Tour,” she says, assertively, “and somehow people question that. I think people are just haters. When they see people doing well,
some people, if there’s something wrong, they’ll pick at that.” In Blanchard’s case, it’s not that there’s anything wrong so much as it is that she’s easy to dismiss as a pretty face whose way was paved by being attractive. But of course being attractive doesn’t get you to the highest level as a professional athlete. And Blanchard’s surf pedigree runs deep—her father and uncle were vagabond surfers who finally ended up on Kauai in the ’70s, and Alana has been surfing since she was four. “I had a good heat on the Gold Coast,” she says of a contest earlier in the year, “and the commentators were like, ‘I didn’t even know she could surf.’ I was like, ‘Thanks, guys.’ It’s cool that people finally know I can surf, but after that heat, everyone was saying, ‘Whoa, I didn’t even know you could surf.’” Blanchard doesn’t necessarily blame sexism or a focus on her bikinis over her surfing for this misconception. It’s a misconception, she says, wrought by the fact that nobody watches women’s surfing. “Obviously I wouldn’t be on the Tour if I wasn’t that good. But nobody sees our contests. We just had a contest in New Zealand, and no one heard about it. Not even my close friends.” With the ASP under new management, a management that has plans to make promoting women’s surfing a priority,

it’s hard to imagine that they wouldn’t take advantage of Blanchard and all of her marketability, which is a polite way to say that it’s hard to imagine that they won’t promote women’s competitive surfing by selling its sex appeal. Its tons of girls, frolicking in bikinis on beaches around the world, surfing, having a good time. That’s an easy sell. For her part, Blanchard has no problem being marketed as a sex symbol, so long as it doesn’t take away from her surfing. “I don’t mind it. I always look up to girls like Beyonce, or Anna Kournikova,” she says. “Girls who do something well but also look good. I think every girl loves to feel sexy and, sure, there’s some creeps out there, but I’m putting myself out there. I guess I’m just working with what I have. I never knew that people would be so focused on that, but if they are, then that’s their choice. I just want my surfing to show, too.” “If you were going to write a profile about yourself, what would 
you write?” “I don’t know,” she said. “That’s a tricky one. It must be hard for you to write these things because everyone has a different opinion about everyone. I’m sure everyone perceives me in a different way. People are funny in that way, but I’m happy and that’s all that matters. So, you just can’t listen to those…funny people.” And there she goes: A young woman who’s happy, who’s aware that she’s talented and attractive, and who’s not afraid to capitalize on either of those things, and who knows that those “funny people” don’t matter.

“I HAD A GOOD HEAT ON THE GOLD COAST,” SHE SAYS OF A CONTEST EARLIER IN THE YEAR, “AND THE COMMENTATORS WERE LIKE, ‘I DIDN’T EVEN KNOW SHE COULD SURF.’ I WAS LIKE, ‘THANKS, GUYS.’”

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As I listen to Alana say this, I imagine a thousand feminists’ heads exploding in unison. Then I walk myself, as quickly as possible, through what I would presume to be their argument— that Blanchard’s fame has come primarily from the fact that she has sexualized herself, and that the sexualization of women in this way robs them and, to an extent, all women, of their humanity and their individuality and their natural female power. Maybe I got it right and maybe I didn’t, but before I can think it all the way through, I start to think about the historical precedent in surfing, and the fact that it was only two decades ago that Lisa Andersen and her generation made headlines by wearing boardshorts, a move that was taken as a statement regarding gender equality. Then I think about the fact that, although she says she did not do so consciously, Alana Blanchard and her bikinis have made headlines for exactly the opposite reason—not because she wanted to be able to dress like the guys, but because she wanted to be able to dress like the girls. Those girls. The sex-icon girls. “Think about the top performers in the world. Look at Beyonce,” she explains. “She’s wearing these tiny little outfits, and everyone wants to see her sing because she’s looking amazing. Why can’t we? We want to look cute, too. Rihanna is wearing tiny little things. Not that we’re Rihanna and Beyonce, but they look hot, so why can’t we? Just because we’re athletes?” And we’re back to the exploding of feminists’ heads. Except…is she wrong? At all? If equality is about choice, then isn’t Alana free to…oh, fuck it. I don’t know. Regardless, Alana says there was no calculated contemplation that informed her decision to surf contests in small bikinis. It was just happenstance, and perhaps a little bit of naivety.

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RIC

AVEDO

A PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST Fahey Klein presents a major retrospective of the photographers work. By Kely Smith

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CHARD

ON

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W

hat do Jean Genet, Jimmy Durante, Brigitte Bardot, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jacques Cousteau, Andy Warhol, and Lena Horne have in common? They were a few of the many personalities caught on film by photographer Richard Avedon. For more than fifty years, Richard Avedon’s portraits have filled the pages of the country’s finest magazines. His stark imagery and brilliant insight into his subjects’ characters has made him one of the premier American portrait photographers.

“All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.” Richard Avedon

Born in New York in 1923, Richard Avedon dropped out of high school and joined the Merchant Marine’s photographic section. Upon his return in 1944, he found a job as a photographer in a department store. Within two years he had been “found” by an art director at Harper’s Bazaar and was producing work for them as well as Vogue, Look, and a number of other magazines. During the early years, Avedon made his living primarily through work in advertising. His real passion, however, was the portrait and its ability to express the essence of its subject. As Avedon’s notoriety grew, so did the opportunities to meet and photograph celebrities from a broad range of disciplines. Avedon’s ability to present personal views of public figures, who were otherwise distant and inaccessible, was immediately recognized by the public and the celebrities themselves. Many sought out Avedon for their most public images. His artistic style brought a sense of sophistication and authority to the portraits. More than anything, it is Avedon’s ability to set his subjects at ease that helps him create true, intimate, and lasting photographs. Throughout his career Avedon has maintained a unique style all his own. Famous for their minimalism, Avedon portraits are often well lit and in front of white backdrops. When printed, the images regularly contain the dark outline of the film in which the image was framed. Within the minimalism of his empty studio, Avedon’s subjects move freely, and it is this movement which brings a sense of spontaneity to the images. Often containing only a portion of the person being photographed, the images seem intimate in their imperfection. While many photographers are interested in either catching a moment in time or preparing a formal image, Avedon has found a way to do both.

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Lloyd Wright, and Mae West. Around this same time he began a series of images of patients in mental hospitals. Replacing the controlled environment of the studio with that of the hospital he was able to recreate the genius of his other portraits with noncelebrities. The brutal reality of the lives of the insane was a bold contrast to his other work. Years later he would again drift from his celebrity portraits with a series of studio images of drifters, carnival workers, and working class Americans. Throughout the 1960s Avedon continued to work for Harper’s Bazaar and in 1974 he collaborated with James Baldwin on the book Nothing Personal. Having met in New York in 1943, Baldwin and Avedon were friends and collaborators for more than thirty years. For all of the 1970s and 1980s Avedon continued working for Vogue magazine, where he would take some of the most famous portraits of the decades. In 1992 he became the first staff photographer for The New Yorker, and two years later the Whitney Museum brought together fifty years of his work in the retrospective, “Richard Avedon: Evidence”. He was voted one of the ten greatest photographers in the world by Popular Photography magazine, and in 1989 received an honorary doctorate from the Royal College of Art in London. Today, his pictures continue to bring us a closer, more intimate view of the great and the famous. Avedon died on October 1st, 2004.

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THE LAST BITE.

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Folino_Wave Magazine  

Spring 2014 Publication Design Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising FIDM Victoria Folino Graphic Design