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NORTH DOWNTOWN & MARTHA JEFFERSON PLAC 4010 INC: Inclusive Charlottesville | Victoria Glasgow, Katie Hines, Jessica Lin, Martin Millspaugh, Rachel Moon <Double-click here to enter title>

EMANCIPATION PARK

MISSION STATEMENT

Through our interventions, we aim to make Downtown Charlottesville a place for all, including both those who live there WE a 3-phase process. First, we address the currently exclusive spaces in and those who do not. We will do this through ST M N Sa complete re-design of Emancipation (formerly Lee) Park. This downtown: the parks. Specifically, we are callingAIfor TRE ET and will be a place for all Charlottesville residents to gather new, inclusive park will have a form that better fits its function together. Next, we will focus on improving downtown’s connections to the larger Charlottesville context by improving key intersections. By making these intersections more pedestrian-friendly and creating inclusive public spaces at the edges, those who do not necessarily live downtown will be more inclined to come into the area. Finally, our final phase will concentrate on enhancing multi-modal transportation in the area. Currently, most people who go Downtown get there by driving. However, we can make Downtown more of a place for everyone by renovating the streets to encourage active transportation and adjusting bus routes to encourage public transit. These improvements will all lead to creating an inclusive Downtown Charlottesville.

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Phase I: Create Inclusive Public Spaces Downtown EMANCIPATION PARK EXISTING CONDITIONS 1917

1919

Paul McIntire purchases the block within Jefferson, Market, First, and Second Streets, demolishes twostory home and gardens therein, and constructs park space;

1921

McIntire purchases second property and gives it to the city under agreement that the land would always serve as a park, and that no monument but Jackson’s would occupy the property

Also, McIntire commissions a statue of Robert E. Lee and donates the land to the city of Charlottesville

Emancipation Park has become a site of violence and tension in the City of Charlottesville. Currently, it stands in a state of transition.

1924

Jackson statue unveiled by greatgreat-granddaughter of Jackson in ceremony coinciding with large Confederate reunion and parade

Statue depicting Robert E. Lee Statue and his horse, Traveller, installed in Lee Park and unveiled from under confederate flag by Lee’s great-granddaughter in ceremony

In light of recent events, Emancipation Park should be a primary focus in creating inclusive public spaces Downtown. Through our RFP, Emancipation Park can effectively reflect Charlottesville’s true values and community vision in moving forward. ASSET: trees

ASSET: grassy areas

BARRIER: Confederate statue

BARRIER: topography

ASSET: trees ASSET: grassy areas

BARRIER: Confederate statue

BARRIER: topography

ASSET: benches

ASSET: benches BARRIER: stairs

BARRIER: stairs

Design Proposals

BROAD APPEAL + WELCOME - providing frequent food trucks on sidewalks & corners of the park - informing community members of reasons to be at the park - addressing the challenging topography, making the park more accessible

PRECEDENT: TORONTO, ON LUMINATO: PROMOTING SOCIAL COHESION, JUNCTION BOX (2009) - interactive wall on glass bus shelter that showcases upcoming events, restaurants, and music that people can download and share through devices

SIDEWALK

GREENSPACE

WALKWAY

STATUE AREA

WALKWAY

SIDEWALK

SIDEWALK

GREENSPACE

WALKWAY

STATUE AREA

WALKWAY

SIDEWALK

INCLUSION + BELONGING - removing the statue, acknowledging the past & informing of history - emphasizing community values and desire to progress forward

PRECEDENT: ROXBURY, MA NUBIAN ROOTS: UNITY THROUGH DIVERSITY MURAL (1993) & UPHAMS PEACE MURAL: PEACE, HARMONY, AND SOLIDARITY ACROSS DIFFERENCE MURAL (2006) - community murals that display history, compassion, collaboration, and solidarity - communicates community collective goals and what the neighborhood stands for - can be changing art

CALVIN LEE (2009)

OWNERSHIP OF SPACE + SOCIAL INTERACTION

PRECEDENT: CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA IX ART PARK, BEFORE I DIE WALL - community members freely interact with the space and can leave a personal mark

- social furniture - movable furniture - interactive element with park

DOUGLAS OLSON & DOROTHY KOLOMEISKY (2014)

DUDLEY STREET NEIGHBORHOOD INITIATIVE YOUTH COMMITTEE (1993)

DUDLEY STREET & BIRD STREET YOUTH (2006)


MAPLEWOOD CEMETARY

9T

HS

TR EE

T

HIGH STREET

Phase II: Improve Intersections & Public Spaces at Edges 9TH STREET & HIGH STREET - EXISTING

ROUTE 250 & HIGH STREET - EXISTING

Wide turning radii encourage traffic to take fast turns. This endangers crossing pedestrians.

Large intersections lead to crashes when cars cannot easily see where there lane is on the other side.

Sharp changes in topography causes cars to speed up and slow down suddenly. The steep elevation also creates blindspots. An undeveloped lot is underutilized except when used for parking. When people park there, they can only reach their destination by jaywalking.

Design Proposals UNDERUSED LOT COVERTED TO PUBLIC SPACE Smaller turn radii and well-marked sidewalks decrease car turning speed and increases pedestrian safety.

REPURPOSED BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES

ASPHALT REPLACED WITH GREENERY

Well-defined lanes and turning guidelines eliminates intersection confusion and creates a safer area.

Creating a park turns the unused lot into an environmental, aesthetic, and recreational space.

A viewing platform with four separate legs allows safe pedestrian crossing for all accessibilities and beccomes a landmark for Charlottesville.

SEATING

WAYFINDING & ENTRYWAY IMPROVEMENTS

IMPROVED PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS

WI-FI

FOOD TRUCKS


RO

UT

E2

50

PANTOPS 0

0.25 0.5

1 Miles

Phase III: Enhance Multi-Modal Transportation PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

EXISTING PEDESTRIAN INFRASTRUCTURE ALONG HIGH STREET CORRIDOR

Service provided Monday-Saturday, 6:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. $0.75 for a single ride $2.50 for a day pass Services the High Street and Downtown areas east of Rt. 250 15 stops covering 11 locations 8’ Greenspace

29’ Roadway

4.5’ Sidewalk

Stop frequency: once every hour

Design Proposals

6’ Sidewalk

5’ Bike Lane

22.5’ Roadway

6’ Sidewalk

Reduce Lane Widths

Add pedestrianscale lighting

Add and widen sidewalks

Improve crosswalks

Remove sidewalk obstacles

Decrease bus fare cost

Add climbing bike lane

Increase bus stop frequency

High Street Intersections & Bus Route 10

Proposed path Points of crosswalk and sign intervention Route 10 Bus stops

Green Corridor Retrofit - Downtown Neighborhoods  
Green Corridor Retrofit - Downtown Neighborhoods  
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