ECIS2017 Book of Abstracts

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BOOK OF ABSTRACTS Information Systems for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World 5-10 June, 2017



MESSAGE FROM THE CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS

Isabel Ramos

Helmut Krcmar

Virpi Tuunainen

ECIS 2017 will take place in Guimarães, Portugal at the Centro Cultural Vila Flor and is hosted by the Department of Information Systems of the University of Minho. The aim of the ECIS 2017 is to discuss the fundamental issues related to the role information systems research and education can play in creating a smart, sustainable and inclusive world. The world is facing very complex and long-term challenges that require sophisticated and integrated responses in a context of globalization, strong interdependency, pressure on resources, ageing. Simultaneously, the creation and sharing of information and knowledge is growing at a fast pace. The increasing pace of technological innovation and qualification of human resources brings with it the hope that the economic and social changes necessary to the well being of the world population may occur in an effective way. The Information Systems and Technologies have the potential to enhance the collective intelligence necessary to support a smart, sustainable and inclusive world. They can: (i) improve the use of scarce resources; (ii) engage citizens in the participative and self-organized processes required to improve regions’ resilience and well-being; (iii) enable innovative ways to do business; (iv) support the effective use of huge amounts of information in private and public decision making; (v) extend the human capabilities (physical and cognitive) among many other applications with a strong potential to contribute to effectively address the global challenges ahead. We invite all of you to participate in the AIS [affiliated] prestigious conference ECIS 2017 that will take place in the historical city of Guimarães. Isabel Ramos, Helmut Krcmar and Virpi Tuunainen Conference Co-Chairs ECIS2017


COMMITTEES Conference Chairs Isabel Ramos, University of Minho, Portugal Helmut Krcmar, TUM Technical University of Munich, Germany Virpi Tuunainen, Aalto University, Finland

Program Chairs Jan Pries-Heje, Roskilde University, Denmark João Álvaro Carvalho, University of Minho, Portugal Jörg Becker, University of Münster, Germany

Research Paper Chairs António Lucas-Soares, Universidade do Porto, Portugal Carl Adams, University of Portsmouth, UK Wendy Currie, Audencia Nantes, School of Management, France

Research-in-Progress Chairs Bjørn Erik Munkvold, University of Agder, Norway Henrique O’Neill, ISCTE, Portugal Robert Winter, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland

Doctoral Consortium Chairs Kevin Desouza, Arizona State University, USA Niall Hayes, Lancaster University, UK

Workshop and Tutorials Chairs Antoine Harfouche, Université Paris Dauphine, France Brian Fitzgerald, University of Limerick, Ireland Paulo Rupino, Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal

Junior Faculty Consortium Angelika Kokkinaki, University of Nicosia, Cyprus Rui Quaresma, Universidade de Évora, Portugal Karl(heinz) Kautz, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, Australia Neri dos Santos, Universidade Católica do Estado do Paraná, Brazil

Panel Chairs Edson Luiz Riccio, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil Jan Damsgaard, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark Jan Devos, Universiteit Gent, Belgium

CIO Symposium Chairs Dov Te’eni, Tel Aviv University, Israel José Tribolet, Instituto Superior Técnico, Portugal Luís Amaral, University of Minho, Portugal


Submission Team Ana Cardoso, University of Minho, Portugal Irving Reascos, University of Minho, Portugal Nuno Santos, University of Minho, Portugal Victor Barros, University of Minho, Portugal

Local Organization Chairs Aleš Popovič, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia Alexandre Miguel Pinto, Fac. Ciências da Univ. Lisboa Anabela Mesquita, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal Arminda Lopes, Instituto Politécnico de Castelo Branco, Portugal Delfina Sá-Soares, University of Minho, Portugal Isabel Seruca, Portucalense, Portugal Maria João Ferreira, Universidade Portucalense, Portugal Olga Delgado Ortega, Universidade Lusófona, Portugal Paulo Silva, University of Évora, Portugal Rui Dinis de Sousa, University of Minho, Portugal Tiago Oliveira, NOVA IMS, Portugal



PROGRAM



WORKSHOPS

June 6th 09:00-10:30

Room B1.13 Developing Activity Theory in Information Studies

University of Minho Room B1.14 Mastering the Process of Grounded Theory Research in Information Systems: Doing and Publishing

10:30-11:00 11:00-12:30

Developing Activity Theory in Information Studies

Room B1.17

Socio-Technical Perspectives on Information Systems Security

Design Science Research: a Hands-on Tutorial

Similarity Detection in Digital Trace Data

Design Science Research: a Hands-on Tutorial

Similarity Detection in Digital Trace Data

Design Science Research: a Hands-on Tutorial

Opening Smart Cities: Challenges to Engage Citizens through Information Systems

Design Science Research: a Hands-on Tutorial

Opening Smart Cities: Challenges to Engage Citizens through Information Systems

Socio-Technical Perspectives on Information Systems Security Lunch

Developing Activity Theory in Information Studies

Mastering the Process of Grounded Theory Research in Information Systems: Doing and Publishing

16:00-16:30 16:30-18:00

Room B1.16

Coffee-Break Mastering the Process of Grounded Theory Research in Information Systems: Doing and Publishing

12:30-13:00 13:00-14:00 14:00-16:00

Room B1.15

Socio-Technical Perspectives on Information Systems Security Coffee-Break

Developing Activity Theory in Information Studies

Mastering the Process of Grounded Theory Research in Information Systems: Doing and Publishing

Socio-Technical Perspectives on Information Systems Security


WORKSHOPS June 7th

University of Minho

Room B1.13

Room B1.14

09:00-10:30

International Workshop for PractitionerResearchers

Service Science: New Perspectives and Directions for IS

International Workshop for PractitionerResearchers

Service Science: New Perspectives and Directions for IS

10:30-11:00

11:00-12:30

12:30-13:00 13:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

Room B1.16 PLS Path Modelling Using ADANCO 2.0: Designing User Introduction, Assistance System Extensions, and Advances Coffee-Break PLS Path Modelling Using ADANCO 2.0: Designing User Introduction, Assistance System Extensions, and Advances

Room B1.17

DSI Auditorium

Towards How to Be an Effective Interdisciplinary Dialog Reviewer: a Workshop in Service Design for PhD Students and Contexts Junior Faculty

Towards How to Be an Effective Interdisciplinary Dialog Reviewer: a Workshop in Service Design for PhD Students and Contexts Junior Faculty

Lunch

Electronic Resources for the Aging Society

Service Science: New Perspectives and Directions for IS

16:00-16:30

16:30-18:00

Room B1.15

Electronic Resources for the Aging Society

Service Science: New Perspectives and Directions for IS

Knowledge Engineering for BioMedical and Health Intelligent Information System Coffee-Break Knowledge Engineering for BioMedical and Health Intelligent Information System

PLS Path Modelling Using ADANCO 2.0: Introduction, Extensions, and Advances

Towards Interdisciplinary Dialog in Service Design Contexts

PLS Path Modelling Using ADANCO 2.0: Introduction, Extensions, and Advances

Towards Interdisciplinary Dialog in Service Design Contexts


Main Conference

June 8th

GA

CCVF PA

S1

S2

08:00-08:30

Reception and Registration

08:30-09:30

Opening Session – GA

09:30-10:30 10:30-11:00

Keynote 1 – GA – Katrin Metcalf Coffee-Break

11:00-11:30 11:30-12:00 12:00-12:30 12:30-13:00

Maritime IS for a Smart, Empowering Informatics Sustainable and Refugees with Inclusive World Technology: Best IT Governance and Practices and Business-IT Industry Research Agenda Alignment PANEL PANEL

13:00-13:30 13:30-14:00 14:00-14:30

A Sociotechnical Approach for 21st Century Problems

16:00-16:30

IS Teaching and Learning General IS Topics Smart Information Systems for Inclusive Education

Service Innovation, Engineering and Management

General IS Topics

Social Media in Business and Society

Business Models in a Digitized World

Digital Government in the Public Sector

Business Process Management

Coffee-Break

16:30-17:00 17:30-18:00

Financial Technology (FinTech) and the Digitization of Financial Services

S4

Lunch

Unleashing innovation in 14:30-15:00 information systems 15:00-15:30 research together PANEL 15:30-16:00

17:00-17:30

Materiality of IT and Ubiquitous Computing

S3

General IS Topics

Digital Health Initiatives

IT Governance and Business-IT Alignment

Digital Ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities

RiP Presentation Session 1


Main Conference

June 09th

GA

CCVF PA

09:00-10:00 10:00-10:30 10:30-11:00

Business Process Management

Big Data Analytics and Business Transformation

General IS Topics

Big Data Analytics and Business Transformation

11:00-11:30 11:30-12:00 12:00-12:30 12:30-13:00 13:00-13:30 13:30-14:00 14:00-14:30 14:30-15:00 15:00-15:30 15:30-16:00

S1

S2

Keynote 2 – GA – Rui Paiva Participatory Aspects and Digital Government Inclusion in Social in the Public Sector Media Coffee-Break IS Adoption and Diffusion

Openness and IT

S3

S4

Digital Health Initiatives

Internet of Things in Organizational Life

IT Governance and Business-IT Alignment

IS for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World

RiP Presentation Session 2

Lunch Making an Impact in A Sociotechnical a Publish-or-Perish Approach for 21st World Century Problems PANEL

16:00-16:30

Social Media in Business Models in a Business and Society Digitized World

IS Adoption and Diffusion

Coffee-Break

16:30-17:00

Business Analytics 17:00-17:30 and Data Science for Business 17:30-18:00 Performance

Service Innovation, Engineering and Management

Knowledge Management

Social and Ethical Implications of ICT Use

IS Adoption and Diffusion

IS Research Methods and Philosophy

Healthcare Information Systems for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World

RiP Presentation Session 3


Main Conference

June 10th

09:00-09:30 09:30-10:00 10:00-10:30 10:30-11:00

CCVF

GA

PA

S1

Politics and AIS: Where do we draw the line PANEL

Openness and IT IS Research Methods and Philosophy

11:00-11:30 11:30-12:00 12:00-12:30 12:30-13:00 13:00-13:30 13:30-14:00

Digitization and Innovation in the Public Sector

S2 Digital Ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities Economics and Value of IS

S3 Use of ICT in Crisis Communications Entrepreneurship and IS

S4

Accounting Information Systems

Coffee-Break Social and Ethical Implications of ICT Use

Business Analytics and Data Science for Business Performance

Digitization and Innovation in the Public Sector

Economics and Value of IS

Healthcare Information Systems for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World

Lunch (Closing Session & Port Wine/Green Wine tasting)

Knowledge Management

RiP Presentation Session 4



June 6th University of Minho, Campus of AzurĂŠm

09:00 - 18:00 WORKSHOPS SESSIONS [Full Day] Developing Activity Theory in Information Studies Room: B1.13 Organizers: Stan Karanasios, RMIT University, Australia David Allen, University of Leeds, United Kingdom Jyoti Mishra, University of Bradford, USA Alistair Norman, University of Leeds, United Kingdom Boyka Simeonova, Loughborough University, United Kingdom

Mastering the Process of Grounded Theory Research in Information Systems: Doing and Publishing Room: B1.14 Organizers: Walter D. Fernandez, UNSW Business School, Australia Natalia Levina, New York University Stern School of Business Suprateek Sarker, University of Virginia, USA Robert W. Gregory, IESE Business School, Spain

Socio-technical perspectives on Information Systems Security Room: B1.15 Organizers: Moufida Sadok, University of Tunis, Tunisia Lynn Futcher, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa Penny Ross, University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom

Design Science Research: A Hands-on Tutorial Room: B1.16 Organizers: Jan Pries-Heje, Roskilde Universitet, Denmark Richard Baskerville, Georgia State University, USA John Venable, Curtin Business School (CBS), Australia

09:00 - 12:30 WORKSHOPS SESSIONS [Half-Day] Similarity Detection in Digital Trace Data Room: B1.17 Organizers: Mahmood Shafeie Zargar, Vrije Universiteit, Netherlands Harris Kyriakou, IESE Business School, Spain Yegin Genc, Pace University, USA


June 6th University of Minho, Campus of Azurém

14:00 - 16:00 WORKSHOPS SESSIONS [Half-Day] Opening Smart Cities: Challenges to engage citizens through information systems Room: B1.17 Organizers: Mijail Naranjo, NOVAIMS, Portugal Guiying Du, WWW, Germany Khoi Manh Ngo, Universitat Jaume I, Spain Albert Acedo Sánchez, NOVAIMS, Portugal Mehrnaz Ataei, University of Muenster, Germany Ana Maria Bustamante Duarte, University of Münster, Germany Manuel Portela, Universitat Jaume I, Spain


June 7th University of Minho, Campus of Azurém

09:00 - 18:00 WORKSHOPS SESSIONS [Full Day] Service Science: New Perspectives and Directions for IS Room: B1.14 Organizers: Daniel Beverungen, Paderborn University, Germany Christoph Breidbach, University of Melbourne, Australia

PLS Path Modelling Using ADANCO 2.0: Introduction, Extensions, and Advances Room: B1.16 Organizers: Jose Benitez, Rennes School of Business, France Jörg Henseler, University of Twente, Netherlands

Towards Interdisciplinary Dialog in Service Design Contexts Room: B1.17 Organizers: Licínio Roque, Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal Eduardo Miranda, Carnegie Mellon University, USA Nuno Nunes, University of Lisbon, Portugal

09:00 - 12:30 WORKSHOPS SESSIONS [Half-Day] International Workshop for Practitioner-Researchers Room: B1.13 Organizers: Tadhg Nagle, Cork University Business School, Ireland David Sammon, University College Cork, Ireland Paidi O’Reilly, University College Cork, Ireland Jeremy Hayes, University College Cork, Ireland Cathal Doyle, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Designing User Assistance System Room: B1.15 Organizers: Stefan Morana, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany Jella Pfeiffer, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany


June 7th University of Minho, Campus of Azurém

How to be an effective reviewer: A workshop for PhD students and junior faculty Room: DSI Auditorium Organizers: Edgar Whitley, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom

14:00 - 16:00 WORKSHOPS SESSIONS [Half-Day] Electronic Resources for the Aging Society Room: B1.13 Organizers: Wendy Currie, Brunel University, United Kingdom Doug Vogel, Harbin Institute of Technology, China Heiko Gewald, Neu-Ulm University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Knowledge Engineering for Bio-Medical and Health Intelligent Information System Room: B1.15 Organizers: Abdel-Badeeh M. Salem, Ain Shams University, Egypt

19:00 - 23:00 WELCOME RECEPTION POUSADA MOSTEIRO GUIMARÃES – SMALL LUXURY HOTELS Venue: Hotel St. Marinha Phone: +351 253511249 Web Page: https://www.pousadas.pt/br/hotel/pousada-guimaraes Largo Domingos Leite de Castro, Lugar da Costa, 4810-011, Guimarães GPS: Lat: N 41 26.593; Long: W 8 16.591


June 8th

08:00 - 08:30 RECEPTION AND REGISTRATION 08:30 - 09:30 OPENING SESSION Room: GA Isabel Ramos, Co-Chair of ECIS2017 Jason Thatcher, President of AIS António M. Cunha, Dean of University of Minho Adelina Pinto, Councillor of Education, Human Resources, Library and Archives

09:30 - 10:30 PLENARY I IS THERE A LIMIT TO DIGITALIZATION? OR SHOULD THERE BE? Room: GA Katrin Nyman-Metcalf, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia

10:30 - 11:00 Coffee-Break 11:00 - 13:00 PANEL I EMPOWERING REFUGEES WITH TECHNOLOGY: BEST PRACTICES AND RESEARCH AGENDA Room: GA Hanna Krasnova, University of Potsdam Safa’a AbuJarour, University of Potsdam Antonio Díaz Andrade, Auckland University of Technology Sebastian Olbrich, European Business School Chee-Wee Tan, Copenhagen Business School Cathy Urquhart, Manchester Metropolitan University Manuel Wiesche, Technische Universität München

12:00 - 13:00 INDUSTRY PANEL Room: PA Raul Azevedo, VP Product Development, WeDo Technologies Miguel Figueiredo, Territory Manager, CISCO – Cybersecurity João Tedim, Director of Cloud and Enterprise Solutions, MICROSOFT Carla Albuquerque, Delivery Manager/Program Manager, WIPRO - Wipro HOLMESTM


June 8th

11:00 - 13:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T01. General IS Topics 11:00 - 13:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Carl Adams HOW CAN SCRUM BE SUCCESSFUL? COMPETENCES OF THE SCRUM PRODUCT OWNER Sandra Oomen, Benny M. E. de Waal, Ademar Albertin, Pascal Ravesteijn ......................................................... 46 EXPLORATION OF HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEM USERS’ LIFEWORLD: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY INFORMED BY HEIDEGGER’S PHENOMENOLOGY Yu Zhang, Caddie Gao, Frada Burstein ................................................................................................................. 46

T19. IS Teaching and Learning 11:00 - 12:30 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Kalinka Kaloyanova DEMANDED AND IMPARTED BIG DATA COMPETENCES: TOWARDS AN INTEGRATIVE ANALYSIS Matthias Murawski, Markus Bick ......................................................................................................................... 86 PERSONALISING THE IS CLASSROOM – INSIGHTS ON COURSE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION Philipp Melzer, Mareike Schoop .......................................................................................................................... 87 DEVELOPING INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL WITHIN AGILE IT TEAMS: A LITERATURE REVIEW Anna Wiedemann, Andy Weeger ......................................................................................................................... 87

T17. IS for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World 11:00 - 12:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Helena Karsten COMPARING GOAL SETTING APPROACHES TO BOOST COMPUTER-RELATED PRO-ENVIRONMENTAL BEHAVIORS Sandy Staples, Jane Webster, Shunan (Catherine) Lv .......................................................................................... 82 PROFIT, PLANET AND PEOPLE IN SUPPLY CHAIN: GRAND CHALLENGES AND FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Firouzeh Taghikhah, Jay Daniel, Grant Mooney ................................................................................................... 82

T22. Maritime Informatics 11:00 - 11:30 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Ioanna Constantiou DIGITIZATION IN MARITIME INDUSTRY: COPING WITh A VESSEL’S ENGINE FAILURE Ioanna Constantiou, Arisa Shollo, Kristian Kreiner, Morten Thanning-Vendelø .................................................. 95

T23. Materiality of IT and Ubiquitous Computing 11:00 - 11:30 | Room: S2 Session Chairs: Jean-François De Moya and Jessie Pallud QUANTIFIED SELF: A LITERATURE REVIEW BASED ON THE FUNNEL PARADIGM Jean-François De Moya, Jessie Pallud .................................................................................................................. 95


June 8th

T13. Financial Technology (FinTech) and the Digitization of Financial Services 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: J. Christopher Westland ENTREPRENEURIAL ORIENTATION AND DIGITALIZATION IN THE FINANCIAL SERVICE INDUSTRY: A CONTINGENCY APPROACH Sascha Kraus, Thomas Niemand, Andreas Kallmünzer, Coen Rigtering, Stevan Matijas ..................................... 77 BREAKING DOWN THE BLOCKCHAIN HYPE – TOWARDS A BLOCKCHAIN MARKET ENGINEERING APPROACH Benedikt Notheisen, Florian Hawlitschek, Christof Weinhardt ............................................................................ 77 OVERCOMING BLOCKAGES TO COLLECTIVE INNOVATION IN DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURES: THE CASE OF MOBILE PAYMENT Boriana Rukanova, Mark de Reuver, Stefan Henningsson, Fatemeh Nikayin, Yao-Hua Tan ................................ 78

T20. IT Governance and Business-IT Alignment 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Steven De Haes BALANCING ALIGNMENT, ADAPTIVITY, AND EFFECTIVENESS: DESIGN PRINCIPLES FOR SUSTAINABLE IT PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT David Hoffmann, Thomas Müller, Frederik Ahlemann ......................................................................................... 88 HOW TO IMPLEMENT AGILE IT SETUPS: A TAXONOMY OF DESIGN OPTIONS Jan Jöhnk, Maximilian Roeglinger, Markus Thimmel, Nils Urbach ....................................................................... 88 THE VIEW FROM THE TOP – HOW SENIOR EXECUTIVES EXERCISE CONTROL OVER INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECTS TO ENHANCE PERFORMANCE Martin Wiener, W. Alec Cram, Ulrich Remus ....................................................................................................... 89

T27. Smart Information Systems for Inclusive Education 12:30 - 13:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Anabela Mesquita MULTIPLE VOICES IN THE MAKER MOVEMENT – A NEXUS ANALYTIC LITERATURE REVIEW ON CHILDREN, EDUCATION AND MAKING Netta Iivari, Marianne Kinnula, Tonja Molin-Juustila, Leena Kuure ................................................................... 103

13:00 - 14:00 Lunch 14:00 - 16:00 PANEL II UNLEASHING INNOVATION IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH TOGETHER Room: GA Robert Davison, City University of Hong Kong Gerhard Schwabe, University of Zurich Amany Elbanna, Royal Holloway University of London Antonio Díaz Andrade, Auckland University of Technology Manuel Wiesche, Technische Universität München


June 8th

14:00 - 16:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T01. General IS Topics 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Carl Adams DECODING THE MOTIVATIONAL BLACK BOX – THE CASE OF RANKING, SELF-EFFICACY, AND SUBLIMINAL PRIMING Carolin Ebermann, Benjamin Brauer, Alfred Benedikt Brendel, Lutz M. Kolbe .................................................... 47 MASTERING DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: THE PATH OF A FINANCIAL SERVICES PROVIDER TOWARDS A DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION STRATEGY Simon Chanias ...................................................................................................................................................... 47 DIGITAL MATURITY IN TRADITIONAL INDUSTRIES – AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS Gerrit Remane, Andre Hanelt, Florian Wiesböck, Lutz M. Kolbe ......................................................................... 48 TOWARDS ADAPTIVE GAMIFICATION: A SYNTHESIS OF CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS Martin Boeckle, Jasminko Novak, Markus Bick .................................................................................................... 48

T02. A Sociotechnical Approach for 21st Century Problems 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Peter Bednar 'IT’S PEOPLE HEAVY': A SOCIOTECHNICAL VIEW OF HOSPITAL DISCHARGE Valentina Lichtner, Tony Cornford, Ela Klecun ..................................................................................................... 52 IS MAKING THE NEW KNOWING? TANGIBLE AND INTANGIBLE KNOWLEDGE ARTIFACTS IN DIDIY Angela Locoro, Aurelio Ravarini, Federico Cabitza, Luca Mari ............................................................................. 52 TRANSFORMATION OF COMPETENCE – THE EFFECTS OF DIGITALIZATION ON COMMUNICATORS' WORK Charlotte Arghavan Shahlaei, Masood Rangraz, Dick Stenmark .......................................................................... 53

T26. Service Innovation, Engineering and Management 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Jens Poeppelbuss ANSWERING KEY QUESTIONS FOR SERVICE SCIENCE Steven Alter .......................................................................................................................................................... 99 INVOLVEMENT PRACTICES IN PERSUASIVE SERVICE ENCOUNTERS: THE CASE OF HOME SECURITY ADVICE Mateusz Dolata, Gerhard Schwabe ...................................................................................................................... 99 TOWARD A MULTI-STRATEGY CONCESSION MODEL FOR HUMAN-COMPUTER PRICE NEGOTIATION Mukun Cao , Qing Hu, Melody Kiang .................................................................................................................. 100 CUSTOMER ACCEPTANCE OF PRO-ACTIVE SERVICES – A SCENARIO-BASED EMPIRICAL STUDY Michael Leyer, Mary Tate, Florian Bär, Marek Kowalkiewicz, Michael Rosemann ............................................ 100


June 8th

T29. Social Media in Business and Society 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Mathias Trier “WHAT DOES THE CUSTOMER WANT TO TELL US?” AN AUTOMATED CLASSIFICATION APPROACH FOR SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS AT SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES Josef Schwaiger, Markus Lang, Florian Johannsen, Susanne Leist ..................................................................... 106 THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT ON CUSTOMER PROFITABILITY – INSIGHTS FROM A DIRECT BANKING INSTITUTION’S ONLINE CUSTOMER NETWORK Annette Felgenhauer, Julia Klier, Mathias Klier, Georg Lindner ......................................................................... 106 SILENCE IS GOLDEN – WHEN FIRMS SHOULD REACT TO NEGATIVE WORD OF MOUTH Alper Beşer, Richard Lackes, Markus Siepermann ............................................................................................. 107 IMPACTS OF SOCIAL NETWORK SITES ON PSYCHOLOGICAL AND BEHAVIOURAL OUTCOMES IN THE WORKPLACE: SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW Nugi Nkwe, Jason Cohen .................................................................................................................................... 107

T31. Business Models in a Digitized World 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Jonas Hedman FROM ONE TO MANY BUSINESS MODELS: UNCOVERING CHARACTERISTICS OF BUSINESS MODEL PORTFOLIOS Johannes Schwarz, Nicola Terrenghi, Christine Legner ...................................................................................... 111 TYPOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED LEDGER BASED BUSINESS MODELS Nadine Rückeshäuser ......................................................................................................................................... 111 MERGING PLATFORM ECOSYSTEMS IN TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITIONS: A GOVERNANCE PERSPECTIVE Jamie Dowie, Stefan Henningsson, Thomas Kude, Karl Michael Popp ............................................................... 112 REPAINTING THE BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS FOR PEER-TO-PEER SHARING AND COLLABORATIVE CONSUMPTION Florian Plenter, Erwin Fielt, Moritz von Hoffen, Friedrich Chasin, Michael Rosemann ..................................... 112

16:00 - 16:30 Coffee-Break 16:30 - 18:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T01. General IS Topics 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: GA Session Chair: Oliver Müller POLITICAL IDEOLOGY AS A PREDICTOR OF ONLINE MEDIA PIRACY Lorenz Graf-Vlachy, Tarun Goyal, Yannick Ouardi, Andreas König ....................................................................... 49 ANTECEDENTS OF EMPLOYEES’ INFORMATION SECURITY AWARENESS – REVIEW, SYNTHESIS, AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH Felix Haeussinger, Johann Kranz .......................................................................................................................... 49 ABOUT USER PREFERENCES AND WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR A SECURE AND PRIVACY PROTECTIVE UBIQUITOUS PERSONAL ASSISTANT Andreea Cristina Mihale-Wilson, Jan Zibuschka, Oliver Hinz ............................................................................... 50


June 8th

T06. Business Process Management 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Maximilian Röglinger ASSESSING SUITABILITY OF ADAPTIVE CASE MANAGEMENT Jeroen Pillaerds, Rik Eshuis .................................................................................................................................. 61 ON THE EFFECT OF MIXING TEXT AND DIAGRAMS ON BUSINESS PROCESS MODEL USE Toomas Saarsen, Marlon Dumas .......................................................................................................................... 62 USING SECONDARY NOTATION TO IMPROVE THE COGNITIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF BPMN-MODELS Jeannette Stark, Werner Esswein ......................................................................................................................... 62

T07. Digital Ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Eusebio Scornavacca SEAMLESS UPDATES – HOW SECURITY AND FEATURE UPDATE DELIVERY STRATEGIES AFFECT CONTINUANCE INTENTIONS WITh DIGITAL APPLICATIONS Tillmann Grupp, David Schneider ......................................................................................................................... 63 LEARNING ABOUT AMBIGUOUS TECHNOLOGIES: CONCEPTUALIZATION AND RESEARCH AGENDA Jean-Charles Pillet, Claudio Vitari, Federico Pigni ................................................................................................ 64 EFFECTS OF FIRM RESPONSES TO ANTI-FIRM EPISODES ON SOCIAL MEDIA David Langley, Jan-Willem Tel .............................................................................................................................. 64

T08. Digital Government in the Public Sector 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Luis Amaral and Isabel Ferreira MOBILE JOB SEARCH APPLICATIONS – NEW PATHWAY TO INCREASE YOUTHS’ JOB APPLICATION EFFORTS? Annette Felgenhauer, Solveigh Hieronimus, Julia Klier, Mathias Klier, Lea Thiel ................................................ 66 BUILD YOUR CITY! – ENGAGING CITIZENS IN CROWDFUNDING PROJECTS Michael Marcin Kunz, Oliver Englisch, Ulrich Bretschneider ................................................................................ 66 E-PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT: FORMULATING A CITIZENS-CONTENT ENGAGEMENT MODEL Nnanyelugo Aham-Anyanwu, Honglei Li .............................................................................................................. 67

T09. Digital Health Initiatives 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Reeva Lederman PRODUCING COMMUNAL HEALTH THROUGH SELF-CARE: THE EMERGENCE OF DIGITAL PATIENT ACTIVISM Dimitra Petrakaki .................................................................................................................................................. 68 IDENTIFYING PERSONALIZATION IN A CARE PATHWAY: A SINGLE-CASE STUDY OF A FINNISH HEALTHCARE SERVICE PROVIDER Olli Korhonen, Minna Isomursu ........................................................................................................................... 69 PROCESS INNOVATION MEETS DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURE IN A HIGH-TECh HOSPITAL Bendik Bygstad, Ole Hanseth, Anette Siebenherz, Egil Øvrelid ............................................................................ 69


June 8th

T20. IT Governance and Business-IT Alignment 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Wim Van Grembergen A STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT MODEL FOR IT FLEXIBILITY AND DYNAMIC CAPABILITIES: TOWARD AN ASSESSMENT TOOL Rogier Van de Wetering, Patrick Mikalef, Adamantia Pateli ................................................................................ 89 THE DATA VALUE MAP: A FRAMWORK FOR DEVELOPING SHARED UNDERSTANDING ON DATA INITIATIVES Tadhg Nagle, David Sammon ............................................................................................................................... 90 WE’VE GOT THE POWER – THE RELEVANCE OF IT LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL IT CAPABILITIES IN THE FULLY DIGITIZED BUSINESS ERA Nico Wunderlich, Roman Beck ............................................................................................................................. 90

13:00 - 18:00 RIP PRESENTATION SESSION 1 CCVF Session Chair: Victor F. A. Barros NEW VENTURE AMBIDEXTERITY IN EMERGING MARKETS: THE CASE OF CROWDFUNDING IN INDIA Gaurav Gupta, Prof Indranil Bose ....................................................................................................................... 119 INFLUENCE OF NATIONAL CULTURE ON EMPLOYEES’ INTENTION TO VIOLATE INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY POLICIES: A NATIONAL CULTURE AND RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY PERSPECTIVE Tilahun Arage, Tibebe Beshah ............................................................................................................................ 119 THE IMPACT OF ADVISORY SERVICES ON CLIENTS AND VENDORS IN IT OUTSOURCING ENGAGEMENTS Robert Linden, Christoph Rosenkranz ................................................................................................................ 120 TOWARDS AN INTEGRATED EVALUATION OF HUMAN-CENTERED SERVICE SYSTEMS AND CORRESPONDING BUSINESS MODELS: A SYSTEMS THEORY PERSPECTIVE Stefan Kleinschmidt, Christoph Peters ............................................................................................................... 120 THE DEVELOPMENT OF A HOSPITAL SECURE MESSAGING AND COMMUNICATION PLATFORM: A CONCEPTUALIZATION Imran Muhammad, Paul Paddle, Chandrashan Perera, Peter Haddad, Nilmini Wickramasinghe ..................... 121 USING HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS TO FACILITATE SMART AND SUSTAINABLE KNOWLEDGE FLOW IN HEALTHCARE: THE CASE OF ALLERGY CARE IN AUSTRALIA Nilmini Wickramasinghe, Peter Haddad ............................................................................................................ 121 A THRESHOLD FOR A Q-SORTING METHODOLOGY FOR COMPUTER-ADAPTIVE SURVEYS Sahar Sabbaghan, Lesley Gardner, Cecil Chua ................................................................................................... 121 HOW ONLINE CUSTOMER REVIEWS AFFECT SALES AND RETURN BEHAVIOR – AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS IN FASHION E-COMMERCE Tobias Lohse, Jan Kemper, Malte Brettel ........................................................................................................... 122 MEDICAL RECORD SUPPORT FOR EFFECTIVE DISCHARGE PLANNING Nyree Taylor, Reeva Lederman, Rachelle Bosua ................................................................................................ 122 TOWARDS AN ANALYTICS-DRIVEN INFORMATION SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT: A CONTINGENT RESOURCE BASED PERSPECTIVE Humza Naseer, Graeme Shanks, Atif Ahmad, Sean Maynard ............................................................................ 123 TOWARDS A TAXONOMY OF DIGITAL WORK Volkmar Mrass, Mahei Manhai Li, Christoph Peters .......................................................................................... 123


June 8th

A SOCIO-TECHNICAL APPROACH TO SUSTAINABILITY IN ORGANIZATIONS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY Moufida Sadok, Christine Welch ........................................................................................................................ 124 DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY: TOWARDS A GENERIC VALUE NETWORK Tobias Riasanow, Gabriela Galic, Markus Boehm .............................................................................................. 124 DOES THE WINNER TAKE IT ALL? – TOWARDS AN UNDERSTANDING OF WHY THERE MIGHT BE NO ONE-SIZEFITS-ALL GAMIFICATION DESIGN Sofia Schöbel, Matthias Söllner, Abhay Mishra .................................................................................................. 125 SOFTWARE PROGRAMMER PRODUCTIVITY: A COMPLEMENTARY-BASED RESEARCH MODEL Natallia Pashkevich, Darek Haftor ...................................................................................................................... 125 DESIGNING HEDONIC USER EXPERIENCES: THE EFFECT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED FULFILMENT ON HEDONIC MOTIVATION Dorothee Rocznik, Klaus Goffart, Manuel Wiesche ........................................................................................... 126 SHARING BEHIND THE SCENES: UNDERSTANDING USER BYPASSING BEHAVIOR IN SHARING ECONOMY Yumeng Wang, Cheng Suang Heng .................................................................................................................... 126 TOWARDS EXPLAINING THE WILLINGNESS TO DISCLOSE PERSONAL SELF-TRACKING DATA TO SERVICE PROVIDERS Arne Buchwald, Albert Letner, Nils Urbach, Matthias von Entress-Fuersteneck ............................................... 126


June 9th

09:00 - 10:00 PLENARY II Room: GA Rui Paiva, WeDo Technologies, Portugal

10:00 - 11:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T04. Big Data Analytics and Business Transformation 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Ilias Pappas WHAT DOES YOUTUBE SAY ABOUT YOUR PRODUCT? AN ASPECT BASED APPROACH Rouven-B. Wiegard, Dennis Eilers, Dennis Gercke ............................................................................................... 56 UNDERSTANDING MUSIC TRACK POPULARITY IN A SOCIAL NETWORK Jing Ren, Robert J. Kauffman ................................................................................................................................ 57

T06. Business Process Management 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: GA Session Chair: Hans-Georg Fill MANAGING THE LONG TAIL OF BUSINESS PROCESSES Florian Imgrund, Marcus Fischer, Christian Janiesch, Axel Winkelmann ............................................................. 63 USER EVALUATION OF SYMBOLS FOR CORE BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING CONCEPTS Kathrin Figl ........................................................................................................................................................... 63

T08. Digital Government in the Public Sector 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Elsa Estevez and Isabel Ferreira WILL GOVERNMENT FORMS EVER BE CONSISTENT? DETECTING VIOLATIONS IN FORM STRUCTURES BY UTILIZING GRAPH THEORY Steffen Höhenberger, Hendrik Scholta ................................................................................................................ 67 NOT ANOTHER NEW WINE IN THE SAME OLD BOTTLES – MOTIVATORS AND INNOVATION IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT E-SERVICE DEVELOPMENT Jesper Holgersson, Ida Lindgren, Ulf Melin, Karin Axelsson ................................................................................. 68

T09. Digital Health Initiatives 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Reeva Lederman THE ROLE OF TRUST IN PERSONAL INFORMATION DISCLOSURE ON HEALTH-RELATED WEBSITES Luoxia Chen, Alex Zarifis, Julia Krönung ............................................................................................................... 70 A THIRD PERSON IN THE ROOM: A CASE STUDY OF THE SWEDISH RHEUMATOID REGISTER Christina Keller ..................................................................................................................................................... 70


June 9th

T15. Internet of Things in Organizational Life 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Elena Parmiggiani and Thomas Østerlie RFID SYSTEMS ON THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS: AN ANT STUDY OF MULTIPLICITY Marta Vos, Jocelyn Cranefield .............................................................................................................................. 81 DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURES AS PLATFORMS: THE CASE OF SMART ELECTRICITY GRIDS Mira Slavova, Panos Constantinides .................................................................................................................... 81

T25. Participatory Aspects and Inclusion in Social Media 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Anil Aggarwal and Doug Vogel CONSUMER USE OF SOCIAL LIVE STREAMING SERVICES: THE INFLUENCE OF CO-EXPERIENCE AND EFFECTANCE ON ENJOYMENT Simon Bründl, Christian Matt, Thomas Hess ........................................................................................................ 98 UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF ICTS IN PROMOTING SOCIAL INCLUSION: THE CASE OF SYRIAN REFUGEES IN GERMANY Safa’a AbuJarour, Hanna Krasnova ...................................................................................................................... 98

11:00 - 11:30 Coffee-Break 11:30 - 13:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T01. General IS Topics 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: GA Session Chair: Oliver Müller HOW TO MANAGE THE SEGMENT-OF-ONE? A FRAMEWORK TO REDUCE CUSTOMER COMPLEXITY Rebecca Bregant, Claudia Jandl, Philipp Brune, Heiko Gewald ............................................................................ 50 DEFINING ARCHETYPES OF E-COLLABORATION FOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY Manuel Holler, Falk Uebernickel, Walter Brenner ............................................................................................... 51 EXPLAINING THE INFLUENCE OF WORKAROUNDS ON EFFECTIVE USE – THE CASE OF A SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Yizhou Li, Phillip Haake, Benjamin Mueller .......................................................................................................... 51

T04. Big Data Analytics and Business Transformation 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Patrick Mikalef and Ilias Pappas SOCIO-TECHNICAL INERTIA, DYNAMIC CAPABILITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL UNCERTAINTY: SENIOR MANAGEMENT VIEWS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ORGANIZATIONAL TRANSFORMATION Frantz Rowe, Patrick Besson, Aymeric Hemon ..................................................................................................... 57


June 9th

HOW TO CULTIVATE ANALYTICS CAPABILITIES WITHIN AN ORGANIZATION? – DESIGN AND TYPES OF ANALYTICS COMPETENCY CENTERS Ronny Schüritz, Ella Brand, Gerhard Satzger, Johannes Kunze von Bischhoffshausen ........................................ 58 GENERATING CONSUMER INSIGHTS FROM BIG DATA CLICKSTREAM INFORMATION AND THE LINK WITH TRANSACTION-RELATED SHOPPING BEHAVIOR Daniel Schellong, Jan Kemper, Malte Brettel ....................................................................................................... 58

T17. IS for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Helena Karsten ECOLOGICAL & PROFITABLE CARSHARING BUSINESS: EMISSION LIMITS & HETEROGENEOUS FLEETS Kathrin Kuehne, Marc-Oliver Sonneberg, Michael Breitner ................................................................................. 83 THE ROLE OF OPEN DATA IN DRIVING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY IN NINE SMART CITIES Piyush Yadav, Souleiman Hasan, Adegboyega Ojo, Edward Curry ....................................................................... 83 IT-ENABLED IDEA CROWDSOURCING – A MEAN TO PROMOTE GENDER EQUITY IN IT RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS Elena Gorbacheva, Benjamin Barann ................................................................................................................... 84

T20. IT Governance and Business-IT Alignment 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Steven De Haes INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GOVERNANCE AND THE BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUALS IN THE PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS CONTEXT Guilherme Wiedenhöft, Edimara Mezzomo Luciano, Gabriela Viale Pereira ....................................................... 91 WHY AND HOW DO MUNICIPAL AREAS GOVERN INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL ICT COOPERATION: INDEED, “THE EMPEROR HAS NO CLOTHES” Tomi Dahlberg, Tomi Dahlberg, Ari Helin ............................................................................................................. 91 BASELINE MECHANISMS FOR IT GOVERNANCE AT UNIVERSITIES Isaias Scalabrin Bianchi, Rui Dinis Sousa, Ruben Pereira, Jos van Hillegersberg .................................................. 92

T24. Openness and IT 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Lorraine Morgan UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF SOCIAL PRESENCE IN CROWDFUNDING: EVIDENCE FROM LEADING U.S. AND GERMAN PLATFORMS Maximilian Raab, Thomas Friedrich, Sebastian Schlauderer, Sven Overhage ...................................................... 96 A FRAMEWORK FOR THE NOTION OF ‘UTILITY’ IN THE LANDSCAPE OF CROWDFUNDING Jascha-Alexander Koch ......................................................................................................................................... 96 COMPETITIVE MARKET INNOVATION CONTESTS AND SOCIAL CAPITAL: DIAMETRICALLY OPPOSED, OR INHERENTLY LINKED? Stephen Treacy, Joseph Feller, Brian O'Flaherty, Tadhg Nagle ............................................................................ 97


June 9th

T32. IS Adoption and Diffusion 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Rania El-Gazzar AN INSTITUTIONAL LENS ON CLOUD COMPUTING ADOPTION – A STUDY OF INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS AND ADOPTION STRATEGIES Rania Fahim El-Gazzar, Eli Hustad, Dag Håkon Olsen ......................................................................................... 114 PREDICTING BUYERS’ REPURCHASE INTENTIONS IN CROSS-BORDER E-COMMERCE: A VALENCE FRAMEWORK PERSPECTIVE Jian Mou, Jason Cohen, Yongxiang Dou, Bo Zhang ............................................................................................ 115 ESCAPING REALITY: EXAMINING THE ROLE OF PRESENCE AND ESCAPISM IN USER ADOPTION OF VIRTUAL REALITY GLASSES Eva Hartl, Benedikt Berger ................................................................................................................................. 115

09:00 - 13:00 RIP PRESENTATION SESSION 2 CCVF Session Chair: Cândida Silva MATERNAL IDENTITY AND MATERNAL ROLE ATTAINMENT – DETERMINANTS OF MOTHERS' PARTICIPATION IN MATERNAL VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES Johana Cabinakova, Julia Krönung ..................................................................................................................... 127 AN EXPLORATION OF FIRST-YEAR UNDERGRADUATES’ PREPAREDNESS AND EXPERIENCES IN BLENDED COURSES Yvonne Hong, Lesley Gardner ............................................................................................................................ 127 BRIDGING THE KNOWLEDGE GAP: TOWARDS A COMPREHENSIVE MHEALTH TRAINING FRAMEWORK Grace Kenny, Ciara Heavin, Yvonne O'Connor, Edmund Ndibuagu ................................................................... 128 SELLING CENTER HETEROGENEITY AND ITS INTER-PLAY WIT THE BUYING CENTER FOR INCREASING ADOPTION OF IT-SUPPORTED SERVICE INNOVATIONS Nicolas Zacharias, Ferdinand Rausch ................................................................................................................. 128 THE EMERGENCE OF SHARING AND GAINING KNOWLEDGE: TOWARDS SMARTWORK IN HEALTHCARE Helena Vallo Hult ................................................................................................................................................ 129 EFFECTING EMPLOYEE ENERGY CONSERVATION BEHAVIOUR AT THE WORKPLACE BY UTILISING GAMIFICATION Dimosthenis Kotsopoulos, Cleopatra Bardaki, Stavros Lounis, Katerina Pramatari ........................................... 129 RESOURCE MOBILIZATION IN SOCIAL MEDIA: THE ROLE OF INFLUENTIAL ACTORS Jose Ortiz, Arvind Tripathi .................................................................................................................................. 130 HOW DOES TWITTER INFLUENCE A SOCIAL MOVEMENT? Deepa Ray, Monideepa Tarafdar ....................................................................................................................... 130 MANIPULATION IN PREDICTION MARKETS – CHASING THE FRAUDSTERS Simon Kloker, Tobias Kranz ................................................................................................................................ 130 THE BENEFITS OF DCC IMPLEMENTATION FOR RETAILERS Dirk Gerritsen, Coen Rigtering, Carla Janse van Vuuren .................................................................................... 131 HELP IS ON THE WAY – PROVIDING USER SUPPORT FOR EPC MODELLING VIA A SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE MODEL Sven Jannaber, Dennis M. Riehle, Patrick Delfmann, Oliver Thomas ................................................................. 131 ACCEPTANCE FACTORS FOR USING A BIG DATA CAPABILITY AND MATURITY MODEL Jeffrey Saltz ........................................................................................................................................................ 131 DESIGNING ADAPTIVE NUDGES FOR MULTI-CHANNEL CHOICES OF DIGITAL SERVICES: A LABORATORY EXPERIMENT DESIGN Dennis Hummel, Silvia Schacht, Alexander Mädche .......................................................................................... 132


June 9th

EXPLORING HOW DIFFERENT PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGIES IMPACT DATA SCIENCE STUDENTS Jeffrey Saltz, Robert Heckman, Ivan Shamshurin ............................................................................................... 132 WEB SURVEY GAMIFICATION – INCREASING DATA QUALITY IN WEB SURVEYS BY USING GAME DESIGN ELEMENTS Silvia Schacht, Florian Keusch, Nils Bergmann, Stefan Morana ......................................................................... 133 MAKING CUES SALIENT: THE ROLE OF SECURITY AWARENESS IN SHAPING THREAT AND COPING APPRAISALS Lennart Jaeger, Andreas Eckhardt ...................................................................................................................... 133 LARGE CROWDS OR LARGE INVESTMENTS? HOW SOCIAL IDENTITY INFLUENCES THE COMMITMENT OF THE CROWD Sean Nevin, Rob Gleasure, Phillip O'Reilly, Joseph Feller, Shanping Li, Jerry Cristoforo .................................... 133 ARE YOU UP FOR THE CHALLENGE? TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A BIG DATA CAPABILITY ASSESSMENT MODEL Patrick Zschech, Kai Heinrich, Marcus Pfitzner, Andreas Hilbert ....................................................................... 134

13:00 - 14:00 Lunch 14:00 - 16:00 PANEL III MAKING AN IMPACT IN A PUBLISH-OR-PERISH WORLD Room: GA Samir Chatterjee, Claremont Graduate University Alan Dennis, Indiana University Shirley Gregor, Australian National University Magnus Mähring, Stockholm School of Economics Peter Mertens, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg

14:00 - 16:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T02. A Sociotechnical Approach for 21st Century Problems 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Peter Bednar INTEGRATIVE INFRASTRUCTURING FOR GLOBAL COLLABORATION Nick Letch, Jessica Murray ................................................................................................................................... 53 A SOCIO-TECHNICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE DESIGN OF IT ARCHITECTURE: THE LOWLANDS LENS Pierre van Amelsvoort, Marc Govers ................................................................................................................... 53 SME E-BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: AN INTERACTION BASED APPROACH Paolo Depaoli, Stefano Za .................................................................................................................................... 54 THE QUESTION OF THE CIRCULATION OF AGENCY IN TWO IN JUDICIAL INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURES Andrea Resca ........................................................................................................................................................ 54


June 9th

T32. IS Adoption and Diffusion 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Rania El-Gazzar NOT JUST ANOTHER TYPE OF RESISTANCE – TOWARDS A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF SUPPORTIVE NON-USE Manfred Geiger, Lena Waizenegger, Tamsin Treasure-Jones, Christina Sarigianni, Ronald Maier, Stefan Thalmann, Ulrich Remus .................................................................................................................................... 116 A SURVEY OF FAILURES IN THE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS Rita Marques, Gonçalo Costa, Miguel Mira da Silva, Pedro Gonçalves .............................................................. 116 EXPLAINING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USERS’ WAYS OF MITIGATING TECHNOSTRESS Markus Salo, Henri Pirkkalainen, Cecil Chua, Tiina Koskelainen ........................................................................ 116 A GENERATION COMPARISON OF MOBILE PAYMENT ACCEPTANCE FACTORS: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION Maximilian Fischer, Arna Wömmel, Riccardo Reith, Bettina Lis ......................................................................... 117

T26. Service Innovation, Engineering and Management 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Roman Beck NEVER CHANGE A RUNNING SYSTEM? HOW STATUS QUO-THINKING CAN INHIBIT SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE ADOPTION IN ORGANIZATIONS Margareta Heidt, Rabea Sonnenschein, André Loske ........................................................................................ 101 EXPLAINING THE ROLE OF SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE FOR CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS BY ESTABLISHING LOGICAL LINKS Arne Gruettner, Janek Richter, Dirk Basten ....................................................................................................... 101 MULTI USER SERVICE RE-SELECTION: REACT DYNAMICALLY TO EVENTS OCCURRING AT PROCESS EXECUTION Michael Mayer ................................................................................................................................................... 102 THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY FOR SERVICE INNOVATION IN SHARING ECONOMY ORGANIZATIONS – A SERVICEDOMINANT LOGIC PERSPECTIVE Alexander Frey, Manuel Trenz, Daniel Veit ........................................................................................................ 102

T29. Social Media in Business and Society 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Alexander Richter and Hanna Krasnova WHAT BENEFITS DO THEY BRING? A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS ON ENTERPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKS Benjamin Wehner, Thomas Falk, Susanne Leist ................................................................................................. 108 ENTERPRISE SOCIAL MEDIA: THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR START-UP COMPANIES Wietske Van Osch, Yi-Chuan Wang .................................................................................................................... 108 ANALYSING EMPLOYEES’ WILLINGNESS TO DISCLOSE INFORMATION IN ENTERPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKS: THE ROLE OF ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE Adrian Engelbrecht, Jin Gerlach, Alexander Benlian, Peter Buxmann ................................................................ 109 VALUE CO-CREATION AND TRUST IN SOCIAL COMMERCE: AN FSQCA APPROACH Ilias Pappas, Patrick Mikalef, Michail Giannakos, Paul A. Pavlou ....................................................................... 109


June 9th

T31. Business Models in a Digitized World 14:00 - 16:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Thomas John DESIGNING SERVICE-DOMINANT BUSINESS MODELS Oktay Turetken, Paul Grefen .............................................................................................................................. 112 REWARDING PROSOCIALITY ON NON-COMMERCIAL ONLINE SHARING PLATFORMS David Schneider .................................................................................................................................................. 113 OPEN INNOVATION AS BUSINESS MODEL GAME-CHANGER IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR Aakanksha Gaur, Michele Osella, Enrico Ferro, Jonas Hedman ......................................................................... 113 THE EVALUATION ASPECT OF DIGITAL BUSINESS MODEL INNOVATION: A LITERATURE REVIEW ON TOOLS AND METHODOLOGIES Jan F. Tesch, Anne-Sophie Brillinger ................................................................................................................... 114

16:00 - 16:30 Coffee-Break 16:30 - 18:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T05. Business Analytics and Data Science for Business Performance 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: GA Session Chair: Aleš Popovič THE POWER OF ONLINE CUSTOMER REVIEWS IN FASHION E-COMMERCE – AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS ACROSS CATEGORIES AND BRANDS Jan Kemper ........................................................................................................................................................... 59 ENHANCING DECISION-MAKING EFFICIENCY THROUGh M-BI USE Olgerta Tona, Sven Carlsson ................................................................................................................................. 59 CRITICAL FACTORS FOR BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE SUCCESS Rikke Gaardboe, Tanja Svarre .............................................................................................................................. 60

T14. Healthcare Information Systems for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Rui Quaresma A FRAMEWORK TO ADVANCE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD SYSTEM USE IN ROUTINE PATIENT CARE Kenny Lienhard, Oliver Job, Nicolas Bodmer, Lucas Bachmann, Christine Legner ............................................... 78 ADOPTING A SERVICE-DOMINANT LOGIC TO PREDICTION OF PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS Hawa Nyende, Urban Ask, Peter Nabende ........................................................................................................... 79 PREDICTING THE INDIVIDUAL MOOD LEVEL BASED ON DIARY DATA Vincent Bremer, Dennis Becker, Burkhardt Funk, Dirk Lehr ................................................................................ 79


June 9th

T18. IS Research Methods and Philosophy 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Richard Baskerville TOPIC MODELLING METHODOLOGY: ITS USE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND OTHER MANAGERIAL DISCIPLINES Matthias Eickhoff, Nicole Neuss ........................................................................................................................... 84 AFFORDANCES AND AGENTIAL REALISM: A RELATIONAL ONTOLOGY FOR A RELATIONAL THEORY Marko Niemimaa .................................................................................................................................................. 85 SOCIOMATERIALITY: AN OBJECT-INSPIRED PROPOSAL FOR IS SCHOLARS Paidi O'Raghallaigh, Stephen McCarthy, Frederic Adam ...................................................................................... 85

T32. IS Adoption and Diffusion 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Henri Pirkkalainen SAFEGUARDING AGAINST ROMANCE SCAMS – USING PROTECTION MOTIVATION THEORY Veronica Luu, Lesley Land, Wynne Chin ............................................................................................................. 117 SOCIAL INFLUENCE IN TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION RESEARCH: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND RESEARCH AGENDA Lorenz Graf-Vlachy, Katharina Buhtz .................................................................................................................. 118 OVERLAPPING LOGICS AND INSTITUTIONAL ALIGNMENT SPACES: MAPPING THE ORGANISATIONAL TRAJECTORY OF A IS INNOVATION Raluca Bunduchi ................................................................................................................................................. 118

T21. Knowledge Management 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Sven Dittes

UNCERTAINTIES AS BARRIERS FOR KNOWLEDGE SHARING WITh ENTERPRISE SOCIAL MEDIA Matthias Trier, Magdalene Fung, Abigail Capili Hansen ....................................................................................... 92 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT WITHOUT MANAGEMENT – SHADOW IT IN KNOWLEDGE-INTENSIVE MANUFACTURING PRACTICES Melanie Steinhueser, Lena Waizenegger, Shahper Vodanovich, Alexander Richter ........................................... 92 HOW CAN DIAGRAMMATIC CONCEPTUAL MODELING SUPPORT KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT? Dimitris Karagiannis, Robert Buchmann, Michael Walch ..................................................................................... 93

T28. Social and Ethical Implications of ICT Use 16:30 - 18:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Helena Wenninger

SOCIAL CAPITAL AND ICT INTERVENTION: A SEARCH FOR CONTEXTUAL RELATION Zafor Ahmed, Ahmed Ibrahim Alzahrani ............................................................................................................ 103 UNDERSTANDING CROWDTURFING: THE DIFFERENT ETHICAL LOGICS BEHIND THE CLANDESTINE INDUSTRY OF DECEPTION Tapani Rinta-Kahila, Wael Soliman ..................................................................................................................... 104 TO PHUB OR NOT TO PHUB: UNDERSTANDING OFF-TASK SMARTPHONE USAGE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES IN THE ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT Olga Abramova, Annika Baumann, Hanna Krasnova, Stefan Lessmann ............................................................. 104


June 9th

13:30 - 18:00 RIP PRESENTATION SESSION 3 CCVF Session Chair: Isabel Ferreira ALIGNING IS CURRICULUM WITH INDUSTRY SKILL EXPECTATIONS: A TEXT MINING APPROACH Patrick Föll, Frédéric Thiesse .............................................................................................................................. 134 THE DINU-MODEL – A PROCESS MODEL FOR THE DESIGN OF NUDGES Christian Meske, Tobias Potthoff ....................................................................................................................... 135 ADAPTING AGILE METHODS TO DEVELOP SOLUTIONS FOR THE INDUSTRIAL INTERNET OF THINGS Christoph Fuchs, Thomas Hess ........................................................................................................................... 135 RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIALS AS A METHOD OF EVALUATING MOBILE HEALTH INTERVENTIONS Samantha Dick, Yvonne O'Connor, Ciara Heavin ............................................................................................... 136 WHEN IS AGILE APPROPRIATE FOR ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT? Gary Spurrier, Heikki Topi .................................................................................................................................. 136 DEVELOPMENT OF DYNAMIC KEY FIGURES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF CRITICAL COMPONENTS IN SMART FACTORY INFORMATION NETWORKS Björn Häckel, Daniel Miehle, Stefan Pfosser, Jochen Übelhör ........................................................................... 137 TWO WAY ARCHITECTURE BETWEEN IOT SENSORS AND CLOUD COMPUTING FOR REMOTE HEALTH CARE MONITORING APPLICATIONS Jing Ma, Hoa Nguyen, Farhaan Mirza, Oliver Neuland ....................................................................................... 137 ASSESSING THE INFLUENCE OF PERSUASIVE SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINABILITY ACROSS WORK-HOME-COMMUNITY BOUNDARIES Jacqueline Corbett, Sarah Cherki El Idrissi ......................................................................................................... 138 THE YIN-AND-YANG OF COLLABORATIVE CONSUMPTION DEVELOPMENT: THE ROLE OF AMBIDEXTROUS IS CAPABILITIES AT GOGET’S CAR-SHARE Thomas Lister, Michael Cahalane, Felix Ter Chian Tan, Barney Tan, Leo Saito .................................................. 138 IDENTIFICATION OF CURRENT KEY TOPICS IN ERP POST-IMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH: A LITERATURE REVIEW CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK Sebastian Göhrig, Christian Janiesch, Daniel Neuss, Julian Kolb, Axel Winkelmann .......................................... 139 IDENTIFYING AND EMBEDDING BEHAVIORAL COMPETENCIES IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSES Vijay Kanabar, Kalinka Kaloyanova ..................................................................................................................... 139 DETECTING PANIC POTENTIAL IN SOCIAL MEDIA TWEETS Anuja Hariharan, Wei Liao, Verena Dorner, Christof Weinhardt, Georg Alpers ................................................ 139 PREDICTING THE DURATION OF SURGERIES TO IMPROVE PROCESS EFFICIENCY IN HOSPITALS Martin Riekert, Marc Premm, Achim Klein, Lyubomir Kirilov, Hannes Kenngott, Martin Apitz, Martin Wagner, Lena Ternes ........................................................................................................................................................ 140 DESIGNING FOR KNOWLEDGE-BASED FAMILIARITY, TRUST, AND ACCEPTANCE: THE CASE OF AFFECTIVE TECHNOLOGY Katharina Jahn, Oliver Heger, Henrik Kampling, Krzysztof Stanik, Björn Niehaves ............................................ 140 LEVERAGING PUSHED SELF-TRACKING IN THE HEALTH INSURANCE INDUSTRY: HOW DO INDIVIDUALS PERCEIVE SMART WEARABLES OFFERED BY INSURANCE ORGANIZATION? Stefanie Paluch, Sven Tuzovic ............................................................................................................................ 141 CHANGING LEADERSHIP BEHAVIOURS: A JOURNEY TOWARDS A DATA DRIVEN CULTURE. Jonathan McCarthy, David Sammon, Ciaran Murphy ........................................................................................ 141 I AM A CROWD WORKER – HOW INDIVIDUALS IDENTIFY WITH A NEW FORM OF DIGITAL WORK David Durward, Ivo Blohm ................................................................................................................................. 142 DIGITAL FORMATIVE LEARNING ASSESSMENT TOOL – TOWARDS HELPING STUDENTS TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THEIR LEARNING Roman Rietsche, Matthias Söllner, Sabine Seufert ............................................................................................ 142


June 9th

20:00 - 23:00 CONFERENCE DINNER Paรงo dos Duques Address: Rua Conde D. Henrique, 4810-245 Guimarรฃes Phone: +351 253 412 273 Email: pduques@culturanorte.pt

22:00 - 22:15 BEST PAPERS AND CIBORRA AWARDS


June 10th

09:00 - 11:00 PANEL IV POLITICS AND AIS: WHERE DO WE DRAW THE LINE Room: GA Jane Fedorowicz, Bentley University Safa’a AbuJarour, University of Potsdam Dov Te’Eni, Tel Aviv University Monideepa Tarafdar, Lancaster University Niels Bjorn-Andersen, Copenhagen Business School

09:00 - 11:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T03. Accounting Information Systems 9:00 - 11:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Daniela Mancini ENABLING RISK-AWARE ENTERPRISE MODELING USING SEMANTIC ANNOTATIONS AND VISUAL RULES Benedikt Pittl, Hans-Georg Fill, Gerald Honegger ................................................................................................ 55 INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL, ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING CAPABILITY, AND ERP IMPLEMENTATION FOR STRATEGIC BENEFIT Quang Nguyen, Mary Tate, Philip Calvert, Benoit Aubert .................................................................................... 55 EVALUATING AUGMENTED REALITY APPLICATIONS IN CONSTRUCTION – A COST-BENEFIT ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK BASED ON VOFI Thuy Duong Oesterreich, Frank Teuteberg .......................................................................................................... 55 CONTRACT FRAME AND PARTICIPATION: MITIGATING DISADVANTAGES OF PENALTY CONTRACTS Dennis Dominique Fehrenbacher, Vincent Bicudo de Castro .............................................................................. 56

T10. Digitization and Innovation in the Public Sector 9:00 - 11:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Ulf Melin ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE INSTITUTIONALIZATION: A TALE OF TWO CASES Dinh Duong Dang ................................................................................................................................................. 71 DISCURSIVE FORMATIONS AND SHIFTING STRATEGIES IN E-HEALTH PROGRAMMES Egil Øvrelid, Bendik Bygstad, Ole Hanseth ........................................................................................................... 71 FROM ONE-STOP-SHOP TO NO-STOP-SHOP: AN E-GOVERNMENT STAGE MODEL Hendrik Scholta, Willem Mertens, Angela Reeve, Marek Kowalkiewicz .............................................................. 71 “HAVING SKIN IN THE GAME”: A VALUE TENSION STUDY OF AN INTER-AGENCY IT PROJECT Randall Smith, Jocelyn Cranefield ........................................................................................................................ 72

T07. Digital Ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities 9:00 - 10:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Stefano Za “WE NEED TO TALK!” – PROJECT TEAMS DEALING WITH LOW CONNECTIVITY Christina Sarigianni, Lena Waizenegger, Manfred Geiger, Ulrich Remus ............................................................. 65


June 10th

LAUNCH STRATEGIES OF DIGITAL PLATFORMS: PLATFORMS WITH SWITCHING AND NON-SWITCHING USERS Nina-Birte Schirrmacher, Jan Ondrus, Thomas Kude ........................................................................................... 65

T24. Openness and IT 9:00 - 10:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Lorraine Morgan HOW ESTABLISHED COMPANIES LEVERAGE IT PLATFORMS FOR VALUE CO-CREATION – INSIGHTS FROM BANKING Maximilian Schreieck, Manuel Wiesche ............................................................................................................... 97 DESIGN OF A DECENTRALIZED PEER-TO-PEER REVIEWING AND PUBLISHING MARKET Christian Janze ...................................................................................................................................................... 98

T30. Use of ICT in Crisis Communications 9:00 - 10:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Stefan Stieglitz SENSEMAKING IN SOCIAL MEDIA CRISIS COMMUNICATION – A CASE STUDY ON THE BRUSSELS BOMBINGS IN 2016 Milad Mirbabaie, Elisa Zapatka .......................................................................................................................... 110 KATWARN, NINA, OR FEMA? MULTI-METHOD STUDY ON DISTRIBUTION, USE, AND PUBLIC VIEWS ON CRISIS APPS Christian Reuter, Marc-André Kaufhold, Inken Leopold, Hannah Knipp ............................................................ 110

T11. Economics and Value of IS 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Roman Beck and Ahmad Ghazawneh A HOMEOWNER'S GUIDE TO AIRBNB: THEORY AND EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FOR OPTIMAL PRICING CONDITIONAL ON ONLINE RATINGS Jürgen Neumann, Dominik Gutt ........................................................................................................................... 74 HOW MUCH WILL YOU PAY? UNDERSTANDING THE VALUE OF INFORMATION CUES IN THE SHARING ECONOMY Olga Abramova, Hanna Krasnova, Chee-Wee Tan ............................................................................................... 74

T12. Entrepreneurship and IS 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Brian O'Flaherty FOSTERING DIGITAL INNOVATION THROUGH INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL COLLABORATION BETWEEN INCUMBENT FIRMS AND START-UPS Nihal Islam, Peter Buxmann, David Dé-Juan Ding ................................................................................................ 76 IT INNOVATIONS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN EMERGING ECONOMIES - IS CLOUD COMPUTING A MAGIC INGREDIENT FOR EGYPTIAN ENTREPRENEURS? Rania Fahim El-Gazzar, Helle Zinner Henriksen, Fathul Wahid ............................................................................ 76


June 10th

T18. IS Research Methods and Philosophy 10:00 - 11:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Joe Nandhakumar TECHNOLOGY AND AUTHENTICITY: PATIENTHOOD IN A TECHNOLOGICAL WORLD Dimitra Petrakaki .................................................................................................................................................. 85 A CRITICAL REALIST METHOD FOR IS RESEARCH: THE CAUSAL FRAMEWORK THROUGH RETRODUCTION AND RETRODICTION John McAvoy, Tom Butler .................................................................................................................................... 86

11:00 - 11:30 Coffee-Break 11:30 - 13:00 RP PRESENTATION SESSIONS T05. Business Analytics and Data Science for Business Performance 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: PA Session Chair: Daniel Beverungen TOWARDS A TAXONOMY OF REAL-TIME BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS Mario Nadj, Christian Schieder ............................................................................................................................. 60 ANALYTICS AS A SERVICE: CLOUD COMPUTING AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS BUSINESS MODELS Dana Naous, Johannes Schwarz, Christine Legner ............................................................................................... 60 APPLYING DATA SCIENCE FOR SHOP-FLOOR PERFORMANCE PREDICTION Nikolai Stein, Christoph Flath ............................................................................................................................... 61

T10. Digitization and Innovation in the Public Sector 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S1 Session Chair: Helle Zinner Henriksen ROLE OF MIDDLE MANAGERS IN MODULAR DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: THE CASE OF SERVU Risto Paavola, Petri Hallikainen, Amany Elbanna ................................................................................................. 72 VALUE POSITIONS IN E-GOVERNMENT STRATEGIES: SOMETHING IS (NOT) CHANGING IN THE STATE OF DENMARK John Stouby Persson, Anja Kaldahl Reinwald, Espen Skorve, Peter Axel Nielsen ................................................ 73 FROM E-GOVERNMENT TO E-GOVERNANCE: SOCIAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC AUTHORITIES LEGITIMACY WORK Magnus Bergquist, Jan Ljungberg, Bertil Rolandsson, Bjรถrn Remneland Wikhamn ............................................ 73


June 10th

T11. Economics and Value of IS 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S2 Session Chair: Jose Benitez CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY, EMPLOYER REPUTATION, AND SOCIAL MEDIA CAPABILITY: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION Jose Benitez, Laura Ruiz, Javier Llorens, Ana Castillo ........................................................................................... 75 REINVENTING THE IT FUNCTION: THE ROLE OF IT AGILITY AND IT AMBIDEXTERITY IN SUPPORTING DIGITAL BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION Daniel Leonhardt, Ingmar Haffke, Johann Kranz, Alexander Benlian ................................................................... 75 THE EFFECT OF PRODUCER DESCRIPTIONS ON DEMAND OF MOBILE APPLICATIONS Michael Scholz, Lauri Frank .................................................................................................................................. 75

T14. Healthcare Information Systems for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S3 Session Chair: Henrique O'Neill TOWARDS AN INCLUSIVE WORLD: EXPLORING M-HEALTh ADOPTION ACROSS GENERATIONS Grace Kenny, Regina Connolly ............................................................................................................................. 80 PREDICTORS FOR MOTIVATION TO LEARN IN THE CONTEXT OF TECHNOLOGY-RELATED TRAINING – AN EXPLORATORY STUDY IN THE HEALTHCARE SECTOR Diana Renner ........................................................................................................................................................ 80 WORKLOAD PREDICTION MODEL OF A PRIMARY HEALTH CENTRE Manjula Devananda, Stephen Cranefield, Michael Winikoff, Hywel Lloyd .......................................................... 80

T21. Knowledge Management 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: S4 Session Chair: Matthias Murawski ‘GUANXI’ AS A SHOCK ABSORBER: LESSENING THE DETRIMENTAL EFFECT OF STRUCTURAL HOLES ON THE ACQUISITION AND INTEGRATION OF KNOWLEDGE Jiayuan Liu, Joe Nandhakumar, Markos Zachariadis ............................................................................................ 93 USABILITY EVALUATION OF COOPERATION VISUALISATION IN ENTERPRISES: FRAMEWORK DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION BASED ON EMPIRICAL RESULTS Erik Kolek, Eva Alice Christiane Bittner ................................................................................................................ 94 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMPETENCY AND ORGANIZATIONAL AGILITY: ROLES OF ABSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND INFORMATION INTENSITY Hongyi Mao, Shan Liu, Jinlong Zhang, Yajun Zhang ............................................................................................. 94

T28. Social and Ethical Implications of ICT Use 11:30 - 13:00 | Room: GA Session Chair: Ruilin Zhu INFORMATION FAILURES, TRUST VIOLATION, AND CUSTOMER FEEDBACK IN WEB-ENABLED TRANSACTIONS: THE ROLE OF CAUSAL TRANSPARENCY AS A TRUST REPAIR MECHANISM Anna-Maria Seeger, Tillmann Neben, Armin Heinzl ........................................................................................... 105 INFORMATION PRIVACY FROM A RETAIL MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVE Wanda Presthus, Linda Renate Andersen .......................................................................................................... 105


June 10th

TOWARDS AN INTEGRATIVE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK OF IT-MEDIATED INTERRUPTIONS Raphael Rissler, Mario Nadj, Marc Adam, Alexander Mädche ........................................................................... 105

09:00 - 13:00 RIP PRESENTATION SESSION 4 CCVF Session Chair: Ana Cardoso EXPLORING THE IMPACTS OF VIRTUAL REALITY ON BUSINESS MODELS: THE CASE OF THE MEDIA INDUSTRY Joschka Mütterlein, Thomas Hess ...................................................................................................................... 142 THE CONTENT AND CONTEXT OF IDENTITY IN A DIGITAL SOCIETY Michelle Carter, Deborah Compeau, Michael Kennedy, Marc Schmalz ............................................................. 143 PEER RATINGS AND ASSESSMENT QUALITY IN CROWD-BASED INNOVATION PROCESSES Thomas Wagenknecht, Timm Teubner, Christof Weinhardt ............................................................................. 143 COMBINING COLLECTIVE AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: TOWARDS A DESIGN THEORY FOR DECISION SUPPORT IN CROWDSOURCING Marcel Rhyn, Ivo Blohm ..................................................................................................................................... 144 UNDERSTANDING AUGMENTED REALITY GAME PLAYERS’ VALUE CO-DESTRUCTION PROCESS IN POKÉMON GO Juuli Lintula, Tuure Tuunanen, Markus Salo, Tuomas Kari ................................................................................. 144 AFFORDANCE THEORY IN SOCIAL MEDIA RESEARCH: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS OF THE LITERATURE Najmeh Hafezieh, Farjam Eshraghian ................................................................................................................ 145 ACHIEVING MORE BY PAYING LESS? HOW RETAILERS CAN BENEFIT BY BIDDING LESS AGGRESSIVELY IN PAID SEARCH AUCTIONS Darius Schlangenotto, Dennis Kundisch ............................................................................................................. 145 SOUNDING OUT IS? MOODS AND AFFECTIVE ENTANGLEMENTS IN EXPERIENTIAL COMPUTING Mads Bødker, Tina Jensen .................................................................................................................................. 146 PREFERENCE ELICITATION THROUGH MOUSE CURSOR MOVEMENTS – PRELIMINARY EVIDENCE Johannes Schneider, Markus Weinmann, Christoph Schneider, Jan Vom Brocke ............................................. 146 DIGITAL INNOVATION IN PUBLIC SERVICE ECOSYSTEM – ENACTING THE GENERATIVE AFFORDANCE Kim Hurtta, Christophe Elie-Dit-Cosaque ........................................................................................................... 146 USING CROWDFUNDING FOR START-UP EVALUATION: HOW TASK REPRESENTATION INFLUENCES PREDICTION ACCURACY OF THE CROWD Nikolaus Lipusch, Dominik Dellermann, Philipp Ebel ......................................................................................... 147 LEVERAGING TEXT MINING FOR THE DESIGN OF A LEGAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Jannis Hanke, Frédéric Thiesse ........................................................................................................................... 147 WHOSE MATURITY IS IT ANYWAY? THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT QUANTITATIVE METHODS ON THE DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT OF MATURITY MODELS Lester Lasrado, Ravi Vatrapu, Raghava Rao Mukkamala .................................................................................... 148 TOWARDS A LEAN APPROACH TO GAMIFYING EDUCATION Thomas John, Matthias Feldotto, Paul Hemsen, Katrin Klingsieck, Dennis Kundisch, Mike Langendorf ........... 148 INCREASING RELEVANCE IN IS RESEARCH: CONTEXTUALIZING KNOWLEDGE IN NETWORKS Kalle Lyytinen, Frantz Rowe ............................................................................................................................... 149 A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM DESIGN TO OVERCOME RESISTANCE TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE INNOVATIONS Carola Stryja, Gerhard Satzger, Verena Dorner .................................................................................................. 149 WHY ARE WE DOING THIS AGAIN? TOWARDS UNCOVERING THE OUTCOME PERSPECTIVE OF ENTERPRISE SOCIAL SOFTWARE USE Sven Dittes, Stefan Smolnik ................................................................................................................................ 149


June 10th

13:00 - 13:15 CLOSING SESSION Isabel Ramos, ECIS2017 Co-Chair Helmut Krcmar, ECIS2017 Co-Chair Virpi Tuunainen, ECIS2017 Co-Chair Ricardo Machado, Director of ALGORITMI Research Center

13:00 - 14:00 PORTO WINE/GREEN WINE TASTING Centro Cultural Vila Flor (CCVF)


ABSTRACTS



PLENARY SESSIONS IS THERE A LIMIT TO DIGITALIZATION? OR SHOULD THERE BE? Katrin Nyman-Metcalf Smart systems, internet of things, autonomous vehicles, e-health, e-government… Are we being empowered in an unprecedented manner, in a development that will continue with each step of innovation and technological advancement or is there a point at which we instead start losing control? This is the old fear of robots taking over but a reflection on whether either society or technology (or both) have a limit beyond which automation is not possible. The reasons for a such a limit can be manifold: artificial intelligence may not be able to surmount certain obstacles but the limit way also be totally un-technological, linked to symbols of power and society.

PANELS EMPOWERING REFUGEES WITH TECHNOLOGY: BEST PRACTICES AND RESEARCH AGENDA Hanna Krasnova, Safa’a AbuJarour, Antonio Díaz Andrade, Sebastian Olbrich, Chee-Wee Tan, Cathy Urquhart, Manuel Wiesche The role of technology in promoting social inclusion and integration has always been an important topic in the Information Systems community. For example, Trauth and Howcroft (2006) argued that ICTs can aid in bridging the gaps of social inclusion in the refugee context. Research interest in this area has further gained momentum recently in light of the current refugee crisis. Indeed, modern refugees rely on technology (esp. smartphones) to communicate with families and friends they have left behind, to access geo-location services, as well as to learn the language, norms and culture of the host country. For many refugees, smartphones represent the only information access point at their disposal. As refugees navigate through the complexities of bureaucratic and socio-economic structures, they encounter three major groups of stakeholders – local government and public authorities, local population, as well as businesses – who, together, constitute their new eco-system. Given that communication with different groups of stakeholders implies different goals, refugees are expected to appropriate technological affordances in different ways.

UNLEASHING INNOVATION IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS RESEARCH TOGETHER Robert Davison, Gerhard Schwabe, Amany Elbanna, Royal Holloway, Antonio Díaz Andrade


The panel aims to open up the debate for the community to engage in. Firstly, we provide a brief summary of the issues highlighting the process of peer-reviewing as our focal concern and the possibilities of introducing change. Secondly, each of the panellists will draw on their experience to address what they see as key issues that are holding the reviewing process back and provide some suggestions for change. Thirdly, we intend to engage in an open discussion with the audience about other possibilities and ideas for embracing change and innovation in research. Finally, we will provide a brief take away summary of the key outcomes of the discussion, with the objective of stimulating further discussions and debate.

RESEARCH PAPERS T01. General IS Topics HOW CAN SCRUM BE SUCCESSFUL? COMPETENCES OF THE SCRUM PRODUCT OWNER Sandra Oomen, Benny M. E. de Waal, Ademar Albertin, Pascal Ravesteijn For decades a structured development process was followed when developing software. However, the suggested predictability of such an approach has long been proofed erroneous and in its place, more flexible methods have been suggested. Such agile methods are less structured and trust in the creativity of the development team in countering unpredicted events and realizing a solution. Currently one of the most popular agile methodologies is Scrum. There are only three roles in Scrum: the development team, the Scrum master and the product owner. As the product owner is responsible for maximizing the value of the product and the work of the development team, this role is key in the success of Scrum. However, the competences needed by the product owner are unclear. Based on this the research question underlying this study is: Which competences of the Scrum product owner are related to team effectiveness and stakeholder satisfaction? In order to answer this question empirical data was collected from 141 employees in organizations in the Netherlands. To analyse the data, we have conducted correlation analyses, t-tests and regression analyses. The most important findings are that the competences ‘Relationship management’ and ‘User support’ are the main predictor for both Team effectiveness as Stakeholder satisfaction. EXPLORATION OF HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEM USERS’ LIFEWORLD: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY INFORMED BY HEIDEGGER’S PHENOMENOLOGY Yu Zhang, Caddie Gao, Frada Burstein As information technology (IT) and information systems (IS) have become increasingly important in healthcare sector, researches have shown that the healthcare context is highly complex and the users in this context have many unique characteristics as compared to those in business contexts. These findings are scattered in the existing healthcare information


systems (HIS) studies as “challenges” to and “deviations” from the classic IS acceptance theories; a holistic understanding of the HIS user’s lifeworld is yet to be achieved. Aimed at filling this gap, we conducted an empirical research in the clinical context informed by Heidegger’s phenomenology. Our purpose was to achieve a holistic understanding of the clinical users’ lifeworld and how they make sense of their encounters with HIS. Arguing against the Cartesian tradition in IS research, we developed an existential framework of IS users based on Heidegger’s concept of “Being-in-the-world” and used this framework as a conceptual instrument to inform our re-search design. By phenomenologically analysing the interview data with four doctors, we have illustrated how this existential framework can enable a holistic understanding of IS users’ life-world and their sense-making of their experiences with IS. We hope our exploratory work can inspire more empirical Heideggerian IS research endeavours.

DECODING THE MOTIVATIONAL BLACK BOX – THE CASE OF RANKING, SELF-EFFICACY, AND SUBLIMINAL PRIMING Carolin Ebermann, Benjamin Brauer, Alfred Benedikt Brendel, Lutz M. Kolbe Game-based IS features are popular means to change behavior. While existing studies indicate a successful impact of gamified IS features, others show opposite effects. However, there are no studies that have investigated the underlying motivational processes of single gamified IS fea-tures and the additional possible support of subliminally primed IS features for the desired goal attainment. To address this gap, we examine the interaction between users and the gamified feature ‘Ranking’ on concentration enhancement, while studying the moderation effects of self-efficacy and a subliminally primed IS feature in a laboratory experiment (N=407). Therefore, our paper sheds light on the theoretically and practically relevant question: how can gamification features lead to proper interaction with the user to effectively support desired goal attain-ment. The results show varying reactions of either positive or negative feedback, to the ranking, depending on individual’s self-efficacy. While test persons with low self-efficacy show better performance results receiving negative feedback, participants with high self-efficacy perceptions reveal better performance rates receiving positive feedback. Furthermore, we could not observe a significant impact of the subliminally primed feature regarding mechanisms of the consciously perceived game feature ‘Ranking’ on concentration enhancement. MASTERING DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: THE PATH OF A FINANCIAL SERVICES PROVIDER TOWARDS A DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION STRATEGY Simon Chanias To master the challenges of a digital transformation and to systematically address IT’s multifaceted transformative impacts on an organization’s inner and outer environments, top management is increasingly formulating and implementing a digital transformation strategy (DTS). To date, there have been few details of DTS formation concerning its underlying processes and activities. In this study, an interpretive case study approach is employed and


DTS formation is investigated from a process/activity perspective. By using an activity-based process model that builds on IS strategizing, an in-depth case study at a large financial services provider was conducted. The results show that this DTS was predominantly shaped by a diversity of emergent strategizing activities through a bottom-up process and prior to the introduction of a holistic approach by top management. Top management then sought to formalize emergent strategy contents by formulating and implementing a DTS that comprised a shared target picture, distinct digital transformation governance, and measures to increase the share of deliberate strategy contents. Besides providing practical implications for DTS formulation and implementation, this study contributes to the literature on digital transformation, IS strategy, and IS strategizing. DIGITAL MATURITY IN TRADITIONAL INDUSTRIES – AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS Gerrit Remane, Andre Hanelt, Florian Wiesböck, Lutz M. Kolbe The diffusion of new digital technologies renders digital transformation relevant for nearly every industry. Therefore, the maturity of firms in mastering this fundamental organizational change is increasingly discussed in practice-oriented literature. These studies, however, suffer from some shortcomings. Most importantly, digital maturity is typically described along a linear scale, thus assuming that all firms do and need to proceed through the same path. We challenge this assumption and derive a more differentiated classification scheme based on a comprehensive literature review as well as an exploratory analysis of a survey on digital transformation amongst 327 managers. Based on these findings we propose two scales for describing a firm’s digital maturity: first, the impact that digital transformation has on a specific firm; second, the readiness of the firm to master the upcoming changes. We demonstrate the usefulness of this two scale measure by empirically deriving five digital maturity clusters as well as further empirical evidence. Our framework illuminates the monolithic block of digital maturity by allowing for a more differentiated firm-specific assessment – thus, it may serve as a first foundation for future research on digital maturity. TOWARDS ADAPTIVE GAMIFICATION: A SYNTHESIS OF CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS Martin Boeckle, Jasminko Novak, Markus Bick Adaptive gamification is an emerging and fast-growing research stream, that enhances traditional gamification approaches with user-centered, personalized and adaptive incentive mechanisms, tai-lored to a specific characteristic of different users and contexts. While gamelike elements have been successfully applied to increase end-user engagement, satisfaction and task performance in different domains, the effectiveness has often been mixed, highly context specific and varied among individuals. In order to understand how adaptive gamification approaches can be developed that overcome such problems, we have conducted a systematic literature review that identifies main issues and challenges in current literature on adaptive gamification. The analysis corpus is composed of 43 identified stud-ies and includes supporting theoretical contributions from related research areas. The performed analysis provides several contributions. First, a conceptual matrix of adaptive gamification design is proposed that


identifies major dimensions of current approaches and classifies these accordingly. Second, we came up with a thematic overview where the identified literature and their related studies are assigned to the designated areas. Finally, we identify five research challenges and propose a re-search agenda that can serve as a basis for future research directions and for practitioners who want to apply adaptive gamification strategies in real-world applications. POLITICAL IDEOLOGY AS A PREDICTOR OF ONLINE MEDIA PIRACY Lorenz Graf-Vlachy, Tarun Goyal, Yannick Ouardi, Andreas König The factors which lead people to adopt or reject technologies of varying degrees of legality have not been studied extensively in information systems research. To address this gap, we combine literature in information systems and political ideology and theorize on the general influence of the personality traits openness to experience and conscientiousness on online media piracy. Furthermore, we propose differential consequences of the personality characteristic ambiguity intolerance for two different kinds of online media piracy, namely pirated online streaming and file sharing. We use clickstream data from 3,873 individuals in the U.S. to study their use of online media piracy websites. Contrary to what prior studies would suggest, we do not find that individuals with a more conservative ideology, and thus likely lower levels of openness to experience and higher levels of conscientiousness, engage in less online media piracy across the board. Instead, we find that individuals with a more conservative ideology, and hence likely lower ambiguity intolerance, exhibit lower use of a legally ambiguous technology (pirated streaming websites) whereas there is no difference in the use of a similar but legally unambiguous technology (pirated file sharing websites). We discuss how our findings impact the study of new technology adoption. ANTECEDENTS OF EMPLOYEES’ INFORMATION SECURITY AWARENESS – REVIEW, SYNTHESIS, AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH Felix Haeussinger, Johann Kranz Living in a digital age, where all kinds of information are accessible electronically at all times, or-ganizations worldwide struggle to keep their information assets secure. Interestingly, the majority of organizational information systems security (ISS) incidents are the direct or indirect result of human errors. To explore how organizations can defend themselves against harmful ISS behaviour, employees’ information security awareness (ISA) has become a top-priority in research and practice. ISA is referred to as a state of consciousness and knowledge about security issues and is a strong predictor of security compliant behaviour. However, to date knowledge about the factors that are responsible for some employees having a higher level of ISA than others is limited and widely dispersed among multidisciplinary outlets. Therefore, our study provides an extensive review of the literature on ISA’s antecedents with the aim to synthesize the literature and to reveal areas for further research. We analysed 39 publications to discern various institutional, individual, and socio-environmental ISA antecedents. Identifying and understanding these factors will be useful for stakeholders interested in


improving the effectiveness of awareness strategies, in increasing employees’ ISA and in ultimately lowering the substantial ISS threats for organizations and society. ABOUT USER PREFERENCES AND WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR A SECURE AND PRIVACY PROTECTIVE UBIQUITOUS PERSONAL ASSISTANT Andreea Cristina Mihale-Wilson, Jan Zibuschka, Oliver Hinz As more and more objects and devices get “smart” and heavily interconnected via the Internet of Things (IoT), the need for intelligent, omnipresent and individualized assistance increases rapidly. In order to develop helpful and economically viable ubiquitous intelligent assistance, companies need insights about the users’ preferences and willingness to pay for different features of Ubiquitous Intelligent Assistants (UPAs). To date, the existing body of literature does not deliver expedient information on this topic. Our study contributes to the existing research by assessing the users’ preferences and willingness to pay for a highly secure and privacy stringent UPA. Based on a Choice-Based Conjoint analysis method, we found that the participants have serious concerns about the security and privacy of their personal data. Furthermore, we discovered that participants acknowledge that for additional security and privacy a higher cost is due. However, there is a discrepancy between the user’s valuation of high security and privacy features and the actual costs incurring to realize that high level of data protection. The resulting financing gap needs to be addressed through savvy business models, which according to our findings can include advertising or product differentiation, but by no means the monetization of the participants’ personal data. HOW TO MANAGE THE SEGMENT-OF-ONE? A FRAMEWORK TO REDUCE CUSTOMER COMPLEXITY Rebecca Bregant, Claudia Jandl, Philipp Brune, Heiko Gewald The after-sales business is the most profitable area within the automotive industry. All manufacturers seek to tighten their ties with end customers in order to ensure loyalty and foster economic success. In times of dramatic change in the automotive industry (switch from combustion to electric engines, etc.), digitalization plays an evermore important role for developing sustainable business models. End customers in after-sales are as individual as their cars. In an ideal case, every customer is addressed individually, taking the individual's specific needs into account: the classic, but rather complex segment-of-one. This paper presents a multidimensional framework for customer segmentation in the automotive after-sales domain which uses a reduced number of segments. It addresses end customers on a perceived individual basis while reducing the complexity significantly compared to a full segment-of-one approach. It provides a holistic view on customers' characteristics, taking into account their specific vehicle needs for maintenance as well as several factors defining the individual's approach to services delivered by the car manufacturer. As such, a perceived segment-of-one is provided. The concept was evaluated using a qualitative study with industry experts and stakeholder representatives. Based on the findings, recommendations for the application of the framework in practice are provided.


DEFINING ARCHETYPES OF E-COLLABORATION FOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY Manuel Holler, Falk Uebernickel, Walter Brenner The automotive industry represents one of the most relevant industrial sectors of the global economy. In response to a plethora of challenges, e-collaboration for product development has become a nexus of competitive advantage in the automotive world. Since new dynamics in organizational forms on the one hand and advancements in engineering information systems on the other hand have led to increased complexity, a classification model to organize and structure the manifold manifestations seems analytically useful. Hence, the paper at hand (1) proposes, (2) describes, and (3) validates archetypes of e-collaboration for product development in the automotive industry. Anchored in (1) a structured literature review and (2) rich empirical evidence from a multiple-case study in the automotive ecosystem, we organize our research study along a well-established, two-stage research method on archetypes adopting a socio-technical systems perspective. Key findings include the archetypes (1) mechanical development-dominant, (2) software development-dominant, (3) systems engineeringoriented, and (4) non-development-focused e-collaborations for product development as basic patterns. Thereby, “importance of mechanical development” and “importance of software development” act as essential classification dimensions. Keeping the inherent limitations of the qualitative research tradition in mind, this paper offers theoretical, methodological, managerial, and cross-disciplinary contributions. EXPLAINING THE INFLUENCE OF WORKAROUNDS ON EFFECTIVE USE – THE CASE OF A SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Yizhou Li, Phillip Haake, Benjamin Mueller The stage of post-adoption of an enterprise system (ES) implementation has been in the focus of recent information systems research. However, a thorough understanding of how users effectively use an enterprise system to complete their tasks is still missing. Prior research has implied that adaptive use is of great importance to facilitate effective use of a system. We investigate adaptive use solutions, which are outside the original system. This behavior is known as workaround. We conduct an interpretive case study to investigate the impact of workarounds and explain why workarounds can lead to an advance in effective use of a standard ES. We expand the theory of effective use with an explanation why workarounds can improve transparent interaction, representation fidelity and informed ac-tion via alleviating users’ issues with the surface structure and the faithfulness in representations of an implemented standard ES.


T02. A Sociotechnical Approach for 21st Century Problems 'IT’S PEOPLE HEAVY': A SOCIOTECHNICAL VIEW OF HOSPITAL DISCHARGE Valentina Lichtner, Tony Cornford, Ela Klecun This paper is about the enduring challenge of establishing a hospital discharge process that will supply the right medicines to patients as they leave hospital to use when they return home. The paper is written in a ‘documentary genre’, chosen to show rather than tell. We want to show how sociotechnical this quotidian task is. More broadly, this gives insight on how 21st century healthcare continues to present fundamental sociotechnical challenges, how we slowly chip away at these, and reconfigure in the context of systems use and as digital technologies become more deeply embedded in contexts of care. We hope to show what sociotechnical means in everyday practice, how healthcare work is ‘people heavy’ and how it spills out of its digital confines into different artefacts, physical places and timelines. Layers of digital innovation enter into and sediment in organizations, and reshape infrastructures, posing questions about the limits of sociotechnical ideas in the face of real life. The paper is based on three ethnographic studies conducted in England (UK) over six years. IS MAKING THE NEW KNOWING? TANGIBLE AND INTANGIBLE KNOWLEDGE ARTIFACTS IN DIDIY Angela Locoro, Aurelio Ravarini, Federico Cabitza, Luca Mari Digital Do-It-Yourself (“DiDIY” for short) stands at the intersection of maker and hacker cultures, nourished in their turn by the DIY (Do-it-yourself) practices. In this paper, we briefly introduce these historical phenomena, which flow in the stream of subculture to the present days. We outline DiDIY as a complex mingling, involving social, cultural, technological, economic and psychological dimensions. A new alphabet of knowledge, the “Atoms-Bits Convergence” (ABC) is then introduced to emphasize that what is happening with the diffusion of the new technologies of digital fabrication may reshape our work and society. Finally, we survey the research literature and the Web to systematically assess more than fifty information systems for knowledge sharing in the DiDIY world. This path unveils how a central element of this phenomenon is the concept of Knowledge Artifact (KA), in that DiDIY increasingly entails the availability and familiarity with networked digital information infrastructures, and the interest or need of DiDIYers to use, share, and evolve the knowledge within their communities towards these socio-technical systems. As makers and DiDIY projects simply are not given but within a knowledge community, we argue that these KAs may have impact on shaping new KAs, improving knowledge circulation and innovating social and organizational practices.


TRANSFORMATION OF COMPETENCE – THE EFFECTS OF DIGITALIZATION ON COMMUNICATORS' WORK Charlotte Arghavan Shahlaei, Masood Rangraz, Dick Stenmark

Studying human competence in relation with digitalization is currently an under-researched area within information systems scholarship. This paper presents a response to the contemporary calls within the IS field for studying the changes brought on by the advent of digitalization. Based on in-depth interviews with professional communicators, we illustrate the effects of digitalization on the formation of work related competences. Employing a new sociotechnical system approach (Neo-STS), we analyze and illustrate the effects of digitalization in multiple ways. First, we propose that any further study of competence cannot be inadvertent to the phenomenon of digitalization. Second, we suggest a new approach for studying competence in relation with digitalization as opposed to studying “digital competence”. Third, by applying a Neo-STS perspective, we provide a substantiated explanation of the transformation of competences in the work of communicators. INTEGRATIVE INFRASTRUCTURING FOR GLOBAL COLLABORATION Nick Letch, Jessica Murray Technological growth has amplified the possibilities and necessity for collaboration across geographic borders. The sociotechnical systems which arise from and are developed to support such collaboration must transcend national boundaries, cultures and organisations. This paper is a response to the question of how we can make such sociotechnical systems flexible, sustainable and participative. To this end, we use infrastructuring (a mode of participatory design) as a theoretical framework for an action research intervention into the development of a Learning Management System (LMS) to support collaboration between Australian and Chinese universities. Based on our findings, we propose interweaving the concepts of infrastructuring and publics as an innovative, synergistic theoretical re-sponse to the challenges of implementing sociotechnical systems in a global context. A SOCIO-TECHNICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE DESIGN OF IT ARCHITECTURE: THE LOWLANDS LENS Pierre van Amelsvoort, Marc Govers The paper aims at developing a more comprehensive design theory for designing effective IT architectures based on organizational design principles. It builds on the sociotechnical systems design theory (STS-D) for the design of work, workplaces and organizations as developed in the Lowlands (The Netherlands and Belgium). Traditional sociotechnical approaches study the effects of the technical system on the social system and tries to jointly optimize both systems by end-users’ participation. The Lowlands STS-D approach focuses on creating organizational conditions for developing humane and productive organizations. Organizations are considered


as social systems. Technical systems need to support the effective functioning of work and control of work within that social system. Therefore, the division of labour is central in the Lowlands STS-D approach. It is articulated in designing the execution tasks (production structure) and control tasks (control structure). Furthermore, it claims that the design of IT architecture follows after organizational design of the production and control structure. This boils down to the design of provisioning of information needed at workplaces and between workplaces. To understand the Lowlands approach for designing IT architecture, called archipelago, we will first in-depth explain its organizational design principles and sequence, and its application for designing IT architecture, that is becoming ever more feasible with new technologies Furthermore, with this paper we attempt to bridge the different languages used by organizational and IT designers as they should jointly work on the same outcome: humane and productive organizations. SME E-BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: AN INTERACTION BASED APPROACH Paolo Depaoli, Stefano Za E-business stage/maturity models for SMEs have been criticized for their predominantly techno-centric and rather mechanistic character, not suited for this kind of firms. Based on a conceptu-al and qualitative research, the paper proposes an e-business development model to factor in the interaction sparked by the coming together of technology and organization. Given that e-business is distinguished by different levels of supplier/customer information exchanges, the model (tested in three small firms) envisages five digital and non digital interaction levels so that small business owners can better understand and evaluate the interplay of organization and technology in relation to business opportunities. THE QUESTION OF THE CIRCULATION OF AGENCY IN TWO IN JUDICIAL INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURES Andrea Resca The longitudinal study of two judicial information infrastructures offers the opportunity to investigate the factors at the basis of their development. Specifically, in the public sector, it is not sufficient to follow design principles and implementation strategies proposed by the current literature. On the contrary, these principles and strategies can represent an obstacle to the circulation of agency or the capacity to produce legal effects to the electronic transmission of digital documents and information.


T03. Accounting Information Systems ENABLING RISK-AWARE ENTERPRISE MODELING USING SEMANTIC ANNOTATIONS AND VISUAL RULES Benedikt Pittl, Hans-Georg Fill, Gerald Honegger The engagement in professional risk management is today a fact for most large organizations. In order to satisfy regulation and auditing requirements, an important step thereby is the identification and documentation of risks in an organization and the definition of measures for their mitigation. Thereby, the use of enterprise models provides the foundation for a systematic and holistic analysis of processes, organizational structures and IT systems. In the approach at hand we build upon the SeMFIS approach for semantic annotations of enterprise models with concepts from an OWL2 ontology. By providing an ontology for representing risks and mitigation measures, this additional information can be represented through annotations in arbitrary types of enterprise models without having to adapt the originally used modeling language. In addition, the approach provides a visual modeling language for representing rules according to the SWRL specification. This permits to process the semantic information provided by the annotations. The usage of the approach is illustrated through an example from the domain of risk-aware business process management. Upon the representation of risks in business processes using the semantic annotation approach, it is shown how SWRL rules can be used to automatically generate configurable risk reports. INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL, ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING CAPABILITY, AND ERP IMPLEMENTATION FOR STRATEGIC BENEFIT Quang Nguyen, Mary Tate, Philip Calvert, Benoit Aubert Despite extensive research, the degree to which organizations are successful in creating strategic ad-vantage with ERP systems, and the factors that distinguish successful and unsuccessful ERP implementations are still equivocal. Using a lens of the Resource-Based View of the firm, and following studies that suggest that IT become valuable over time when they interact with other organizational resources and capabilities, we hypothesize that the creation of the intellectual capital (IC) that can lead to strategic advantage is related to the scope of ERP implementation. We examine how ERP implementation can be used to create IC, moderated by the presence of organizational learning capability (OLC). We find clear relationships between OLC and IC, and between ERP implementation scope and IC, and ambiguous moderating effects from OLC. EVALUATING AUGMENTED REALITY APPLICATIONS IN CONSTRUCTION – A COST-BENEFIT ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK BASED ON VOFI Thuy Duong Oesterreich, Frank Teuteberg


Industry 4.0 application scenarios, based on the use of Augmented Reality (AR) in combination with wearable devices like Smart Glasses or Head-Mounted Displays (HMD), offer construction companies several opportunities to better deal with the complexity of the construction environment. Despite the given maturity of AR technology, tools or methods to estimate the costs and benefits associated with its adoption have not been provided to date. In general, high implementation costs and unclear benefits of this technology are considered as barriers to its widespread adoption. Therefore, the primary aim of this paper is to develop an assessment framework for evaluating costs and benefits of information systems (IS) investments based on an AR-based application scenario in the construction domain. By the same token, we intend to demonstrate how a traditional cost-benefit analysis (CBA) can be applied more effectively to assist in the decision-making process. The assessment framework is developed by means of a systematic literature review and evaluated by means of expert interviews as well as a simulation using the appraisal method Visualisation of Financial Implications (VoFI). Additionally, risk considerations are made by conducting a sensitivity analysis and a probability risk analysis. CONTRACT FRAME AND PARTICIPATION: MITIGATING DISADVANTAGES OF PENALTY CONTRACTS Dennis Dominique Fehrenbacher, Vincent Bicudo de Castro Contracting is an important aspect of IT governance and control. This aspect involves the manner in which goals are set, their achievements rewarded and penalized. In the context of service level agreements it has been shown that contracts that involve penalties have positive effects on individuals’ effort and negative effects on individuals’ attitude such as fairness perception. The negative effects of penalty clauses are a likely reason why they are rarely found in contracting with individuals. Our study was motivated by the question whether negative effects of penalty contracts can be mitigated. In an experiment we found that controllee participation can mitigate such negative effects. This implies that controllee participation is even more important in the face of penalty contracts in order to maintain high fairness perception levels.

T04. Big Data Analytics and Business Transformation WHAT DOES YOUTUBE SAY ABOUT YOUR PRODUCT? AN ASPECT BASED APPROACH Rouven-B. Wiegard, Dennis Eilers, Dennis Gercke Nowadays, customers have a variety of options to gather information about products, which can support their purchasing decisions. More and more customers use YouTube reviews or unboxing videos to get a first impression of different products and interact or discuss with other users in the comment section. Automatically analyzing these comments to gain a better insight


about the important product aspects remains a major challenge in the field of social media monitoring because the text data is unstructured and noisier compared to conventional review data for example from Amazon. In this study, we focus on the automated aspect extraction task to answer the question, which characteristics of products are important from the (potential) customer view. We show that YouTube comments are a valuable data source for this purpose with an aspect extraction precision comparable to conventional Amazon reviews. To improve aspect extraction in general, we propose a new aspect sorting method based on Google Trends. Incorporating the search volume of products combined with aspects into the extraction procedure improves the precision results especially for noisier text data. To illustrate the analysis results, we choose Amazon reviews and YouTube comments about three exemplary smartphones.

UNDERSTANDING MUSIC TRACK POPULARITY IN A SOCIAL NETWORK Jing Ren, Robert J. Kauffman Thousands of music tracks are uploaded to the Internet every day through websites and social networks that focus on music. While some content has been popular for decades, some tracks that have just been released have been ignored. What makes a music track popular? Can the duration of a music track’s popularity be explained and predicted? By analysing data on the performance of a music track on the ranking charts, coupled with the creation of machinegenerated music semantics constructs and a variety of other track, artist and market descriptors, this research tests a model to assess how track popularity and duration on the charts are determined. The dataset has 78,000+ track ranking observations from a streaming music service. The importance of music semantics constructs (genre, mood, instrumental, theme) for a track, and other non-musical factors, such as artist reputation and social information, are assessed. These may influence the staying power of music tracks in online social networks. The results show it is possible to explain chart popularity duration and the weekly ranking of music tracks. This research emphasizes the power of data analytics for knowledge discovery and explanation that can be achieved with a combination of machine-based and econometricsbased approaches. SOCIO-TECHNICAL INERTIA, DYNAMIC CAPABILITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL UNCERTAINTY: SENIOR MANAGEMENT VIEWS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ORGANIZATIONAL TRANSFORMATION Frantz Rowe, Patrick Besson, Aymeric Hemon While IT can be seen as leveraging dynamic capabilities, it can also be considered as a core organiza-tional capability for exploitation, and thus as a dimension of socio-technical inertia. This paper inves-tigates the latter. When the environment becomes uncertain or when organizations engage in an organ-izational transformation, inertia or the propensity of an organization to continue its run on the same path is dangerous. Based on a survey with 108 senior managers, this paper investigates the relation-ships between three dynamic capabilities and Socio-Technical (ST) inertia. Results supports the gen-eral idea that the greater the


capability to sense weak signals, to routinize experience of past transfor-mations, and to reconfigure strategic resources, the lower the ST inertia. Moreover, the effect of recon-figuring is amplified with the uncertainty of the environment. Identification and understanding of particular contingencies such as firm size and industry can shed additional light on this phenomenon.

HOW TO CULTIVATE ANALYTICS CAPABILITIES WITHIN AN ORGANIZATION? – DESIGN AND TYPES OF ANALYTICS COMPETENCY CENTERS Ronny Schüritz, Ella Brand, Gerhard Satzger, Johannes Kunze von Bischhoffshausen Today, the ability to exploit big data using advanced analytics bears considerable potential to create competitive advantages. Therefore, business leaders need to make crucial design decisions on how to cultivate these capabilities within their organization. Analytics Competency Centers (ACCs) are an important organizational solution to spread analytics capabilities by providing leadership, expertise and infrastructure. In this paper, we analyze nine analytics competency centers of major global players across several industries - based on a series of interviews with executives, consultants and data scientists. We identify strategic and structural design options, common processes, best-practices, and potential future development paths. In particular, we distinguish between two generic types of centers that differ in their strategic orientation and their choice of design options. Our work contributes to organizational design theory addressing the question on how analytics capabilities can be nurtured for competitive advantage. It should provide concrete guidance to business leaders on how to design and apply ACCs as an organizational option. GENERATING CONSUMER INSIGHTS FROM BIG DATA CLICKSTREAM INFORMATION AND THE LINK WITH TRANSACTION-RELATED SHOPPING BEHAVIOR Daniel Schellong, Jan Kemper, Malte Brettel E-Commerce firms collect enormous amounts of information in their databases. Yet, only a fraction is used to improve business processes and decision-making, while many useful sources often remain un-derexplored. Therefore, we propose a new and interdisciplinary method to identify goals of consumers and develop an online shopping typology. We use k-means clustering and non-parametric analysis of variance tests to categorize search patterns as Buying, Searching, Browsing or Bouncing. Adding to purchase decision-making theory we propose that the use of off-site clickstream data—the sequence of consumers’ advertising channel clicks to a firm’s website—can significantly enhance the understanding of shopping motivation and transaction-related behavior, even before entering the website. To run our consumer data analytics we use a unique and extensive dataset from a large European apparel company with over 80 million clicks covering 11 online advertising channels. Our results show that consumers with higher goal-direction have significantly higher purchase propensities, and against our expectations - consumers with higher levels of shopping involvement show higher return rates. Our conceptual approach and insights contribute to theory and practice alike such


that it may help to improve real-time decision-making in marketing analytics to substantially enhance the customer experience online.

T05. Business Analytics and Data Science for Business Performance THE POWER OF ONLINE CUSTOMER REVIEWS IN FASHION E-COMMERCE – AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS ACROSS CATEGORIES AND BRANDS Jan Kemper Online Customer Reviews (OCRs) have become a powerful marketing tool for e-commerce companies and an important information source for customers in online shopping. We study the influence of OCRs on sales and conversion rates of experience goods along different levels of product involvement and brand equity. We make use of a unique dataset with about 2.8 billion product detail page (PDP) views, 85.3 million sold items along 40 product categories and 09 million OCRs from a leading European online fashion company. We find that the rating valence (i.e., the average rating), has a positive influence on sales and conversion in general. Further, we identify the positive influence of OCRs on sales and conversion to be stronger for products with a high level of product involvement. Finally, this study shows that brand equity has a negative influence on the relationship between rating valence, sales, and conversion. From a managerial perspective, this study helps to use OCR as a marketing tool in the most efficient and effective way as companies should implement category and brand-specific OCR strategies. ENHANCING DECISION-MAKING EFFICIENCY THROUGH M-BI USE Olgerta Tona, Sven Carlsson Mobile business intelligence (m-BI) denotes the delivery of business information on mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones. m-BI promises to support the mobile workforce in making decisions just in time. Yet, a lack of knowledge exists on how m-BI use can actually lead to improved decision-making performance at the individual level. This void of understanding has implications for both practitioners and academics, with the former feeling insecure about the benefits of investing in yet another technology, and the latter lacking empirical studies on technologies that challenge traditional decision support system (DSS) platforms. To this end, drawing inspiration from the information system (IS) success models and information search literature, a research model is designed and tested through a surveybased study. Data are collected from 357 m-BI users employed in different organisations. The study findings support our research model. Reactive search and proactive search, both of which use modes of m-BI, significantly influence decision-making efficiency, albeit with different prediction-size effects. Furthermore, mobility and time criticality (i.e. mobile work characteristics) influence proactive search, and time criticality is a predictor of reactive search.


CRITICAL FACTORS FOR BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE SUCCESS Rikke Gaardboe, Tanja Svarre

Business intelligence (BI) is a strategically important tool for organisations. Numerous studies have attempted to investigate the factors that contribute to BI success. However, an overview of the critical success factors (CSFs) is lacking, as is an understanding of the gaps in the extant research. After examining 444 articles, we integrated the findings of 29 studies. We used the framework of information system success to identify the CSFs and to analyse how researchers identify information system success. We identified 36 variables related to BI success in the extant literature. The distinct CSFs relate to project management skills, management support, user involvement, the external environment and management processes. In the articles in which BI success was operationalised, we found several distinct factors: system quality, information quality, use, service quality, user satisfaction and net benefits. We extended the framework of information system success to include three additional factors: strategy and vision, organisational form and competency development. We contribute to the extant research by extending the framework of information system success and identifying the gaps in the extant research. We contribute to practice through an enhanced understanding of the CSFs related to BI success. TOWARDS A TAXONOMY OF REAL-TIME BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS Mario Nadj, Christian Schieder As the provisioning of timely business insights becomes increasingly relevant for organizations, real-time business intelligence (RTBI) is considered a promising vehicle to minimize the time span between elicitation, analysis, and subsequent action. However, so far, there seems no structured and systematic taxonomy in which RTBI systems can be classified and uncertainty regarding the dimensions and characteristics that constitute these systems. By analyzing extant business intelligence literature, this paper develops a taxonomy for RTBI systems to address these current impediments. Reviewing 89 studies in leading journals and conferences during the years 2000-2016, we found 29 relevant characteristics along seven dimensions for RTBI systems. Our taxonomy may serve as a foundational step to incorporate a broader theoretical perspective to integrate concepts and findings across all seven dimensions. The main contribution of the paper is in the organization and structuring of the body of knowledge in RTBI along the identified dimensions and characteristics for the advancement of the field, which is specifically relevant due to its relatively young nature. For practice, our taxonomy helps organizations to evaluate their RTBI systems or conceive the challenges of building such a system either from scratch or as an update of their existing infrastructure. ANALYTICS AS A SERVICE: CLOUD COMPUTING AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS BUSINESS MODELS Dana Naous, Johannes Schwarz, Christine Legner


Due to the growth of data volumes, volatility and variety, business analytics (BA) become an essential driver of today’s business strategies. However, BA is mainly adopted by large enterprises because it may require a complex and costly infrastructure. As many companies strive to make better use of their data and to adopt data-driven management paradigms, cloud computing has been discussed as a cost-effective approach to BA implementation challenges. To date, there has been little attention on the emerging class of analytical cloud services, “Analytics as a service” (AaaS). This article aims at demarcating AaaS as a cloud offering through an explorative research approach based on multiple case studies. Based on the analysis of 28 AaaS offerings, we derive a classification scheme for AaaS business model configurations and derive five business model archetypes. We discuss cloud computing’s implications on the business analytics ecosystem where partner networks play an important role at all levels. By clarifying the definition and characteristics of AaaS business models, our study contributes to the ‘Theory for Analyzing’ that lays the groundwork for future research. APPLYING DATA SCIENCE FOR SHOP-FLOOR PERFORMANCE PREDICTION Nikolai Stein, Christoph Flath Against the backdrop of ubiquitous computing, companies from various industries are building up ever-increasing amounts of business process data. Seeking to salvage these hidden “data treasures,” the need for analytical information systems is ever-growing to guide corporate decision-making. However, information systems research is still very much focused on static, explanatory modeling provided by business intelligence suites instead of embracing the opportunities offered by predictive analytics. Describing insights from a real-world manufacturing scenario, we seek to enhance the understanding of predictive modeling. In particular, we highlight that simply dumping data into “smart” algorithms is not a silver bullet. Rather, successful analytics projects require constant refinement and consolidation. To this end, we provide guidelines and best practices for modeling, feature engineering and interpretation leveraging tools from business information systems as well as machine learning.

T06. Business Process Management ASSESSING SUITABILITY OF ADAPTIVE CASE MANAGEMENT Jeroen Pillaerds, Rik Eshuis Business Process Management (BPM) includes methods and techniques to support the execution of business processes. In recent years, Adaptive Case Management (ACM) has been proposed as new BPM technology for supporting knowledge-intensive processes. However, there is currently no structured way of quickly deciding upon the suitability of an ACM system to a specific business process. This paper presents a framework for assessing to which extent ACM is suitable for a particular business process. It distinguishes between process


characteristics that ACM can support, characteristics that ACM can support but are not ideal, and characteristics that ACM cannot support. The framework also explains the rationale behind each assessment, and refers to alternatives in case ACM is not suitable for the process that needs to be supported. Thus, the framework provides a transparent and useful advice about which kind of BPM technology is most suitable to support a business process to the best extent. A preliminary evaluation of the framework has been carried out in collaboration with an IT consultancy company that advises its clients on BPM technology. ON THE EFFECT OF MIXING TEXT AND DIAGRAMS ON BUSINESS PROCESS MODEL USE Toomas Saarsen, Marlon Dumas A picture is worth a thousand words, but a few words can greatly enhance a picture. It is common to find textual and diagrammatic components complement each other in enterprise models in general, and business process models in particular. Previous work has considered the question of the relative understandability of diagrammatic versus textual representations of process models for different types of users. However, the effect of combining textual and diagrammatic components on the actual use of process models has to the best of our knowledge not been considered. This paper addresses the question of how the mix of diagrammatic and textual components in business process models affects their sustained use. This question is approached via a case study in a telecommunications company where models with different mixtures of text and diagrams have been collected over time. The study shows that models, in which the ordering relations between tasks are captured in diagrammatic form, while the details of each task are captured in textual form, are more likely to be used on a sustained basis. USING SECONDARY NOTATION TO IMPROVE THE COGNITIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF BPMNMODELS Jeannette Stark, Werner Esswein Almost every implementation of a modeling grammar uses secondary notation to further specify a modeling grammar. Yet, secondary notation is usually applied in an unsystematic way, might contradict what is specified in primary notation and implements research results that should rather be implemented in primary notation. With this work we aim at showing how secondary notation can be used to implement recent research results that are not yet available in primary notation without contracting what is already specified in primary notation. We demonstrate a systematic update of recent research of extended Perceptual Discriminability for BPMN secondary notation and that way, show how research results can quickly be made available for practice without contradicting primary notation. We choose Perceptual Discriminability as it can be used to focus the model user’s attention on the most important constructs and can that way, improve model comprehension. For an update of BPMN secondary notation we first specify free BPMN variables and further show how these variables can be used to focus the model user’s attention on those constructs that most foster comprehension.


MANAGING THE LONG TAIL OF BUSINESS PROCESSES Florian Imgrund, Marcus Fischer, Christian Janiesch, Axel Winkelmann

Business Process Management (BPM) initiatives are typically centrally managed and follow a top-down design based on management commitment. Although that procedure is highly effective when managing a few structured processes at a time, emerging process-oriented organizations have shown increased demand for supporting, maintaining, and optimizing all of their processes comprehensively. Due to the scarcity of organizational resources, enterprises prioritize processes based on their strategic importance, dysfunctionality, and feasibility to be redesigned. Thus, a few highly relevant processes are improved, while a considerable amount of lower prioritized processes, which would still add value to the enterprise, are deferred. Furthermore, because the amount of low-value processes exceeds the amount of centrally managed processes, central BPM initiatives leave a large untouched potential for process optimization. In this paper, we conceptualize that phenomenon as the long tail of business processes. As a theoretical foundation, we formalize the management of long-tail process distributions as an optimization problem. We further introduce a novel methodology that integrates approaches from collaborative production models and concepts of centrally managed BPM initiatives to facilitate a holistic management of business processes. USER EVALUATION OF SYMBOLS FOR CORE BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING CONCEPTS Kathrin Figl Process modeling notations are visual languages that use symbols to represent their main concepts. This study investigates the quality of such symbols from users’ perspective. The design of a symbol influences whether it is easy to spot in a model and is correctly associated with the concept it represents. In an empirical study with 188 participants, the normative ratings of process model symbols (for the basic concepts of start, end, task, AND, XOR) were gathered on the dimensions of perceptual pop-out, semantic transparency, perceptual discriminability, and aesthetics. Overall, the results are consistent with our predictions based on the theoretical analyses of the designs of the symbols. Prior familiarity with process modeling notations led to more clear-cut evaluations of routing symbols (AND, XOR) and a reduced tendency to prefer middle rating options, but it did not affect the evaluations of the other symbols. Standardization organizations and academic developers of notations can use insights from the study to enhance the usability of process modeling notations.

T07. Digital Ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities SEAMLESS UPDATES – HOW SECURITY AND FEATURE UPDATE DELIVERY STRATEGIES AFFECT CONTINUANCE INTENTIONS WITH DIGITAL APPLICATIONS Tillmann Grupp, David Schneider


Although updates have become the rule rather than the exception in modern digital ecosystems, to date they have received little attention in the IS post-adoption literature. We therefore draw on the IS continuance literature and expectation-confirmation theory to investigate, how different delivery strategies of security and feature updates impact users’ continuance intentions (CI). Based on an online-experiment with 282 participants, we find a positive effect of security updates on users’ CI only if users are notified after successful implementation. Feature updates, in contrast, elicit a positive effect on users’ CI if they are at least announced before or after successful implementation. We also find that this positive effect of ex-ante announced feature updates diminishes if users have the choice to consume the update or not. In essence, our findings contribute to IS research by extending the mostly monolithic view of information systems by showing how an alterable information system might influence users’ attitudes and behaviors during use. For practitioners, we show that it seems to be beneficial to inform users about updates, even though a silent integration has become possible with modern digital ecosystems, and that updates should be applied consistently. Directions for further research are discussed. LEARNING ABOUT AMBIGUOUS TECHNOLOGIES: CONCEPTUALIZATION AND RESEARCH AGENDA Jean-Charles Pillet, Claudio Vitari, Federico Pigni Information Technologies (IT) have gradually transformed into complex digital artefacts with blurred and constantly changing functional boundaries. While this shift offers promising venues that unfold in front of our eyes every day, it also challenges the deeply entrenched knowledge structures on which ordinary users rely to learn about unfamiliar technologies. We propose to take a step back in order to theorize the ambiguous nature of modern IT and to speculate on how users learn to use them. This paper revisits a wide array of management (BYOD, Gamification) and IS design trends (generativity, everyday computing, incompleteness) through the lens of the categorization framework. Our review of the literature on ambiguous products suggests that users exposed to ambiguous technologies may experience a categorization difficulty that disrupts the process of learning how to use them. This difficulty stems from a user’s belief that there are multiple or inconsistent interpretations of why and how to use an IT, as well as a per-ception that a given IT has some attributes in common with one or several seemingly unrelated ITs. We build on this theorization to propose a research agenda and discuss the expected prac-tical implications of this path of research. EFFECTS OF FIRM RESPONSES TO ANTI-FIRM EPISODES ON SOCIAL MEDIA David Langley, Jan-Willem Tel Due to the increasing prevalence of IT-mediated communication between firms and their stakeholders in digital ecosystems, it is particularly important to add to theory in the Information Systems area on firm reactions during online anti-firm episodes (AFEs). Specifically, the current study addresses both (a) whether firm interventions during a crisis


have an effect on the AFE, both in terms of the growth of the episode and the sentiment expressed by the social media users, and (b) how different firm interven-tion strategies affect the AFE. Drawing from the research area of conflict management from psycho-logical science, we apply the Situational Crisis Communication Theory to develop hypotheses on four relational styles which firms may apply in their IT-mediated crisis management activities. Analyzing 325 AFEs, we show that firm responses can be a double-edged sword. The firm runs the risk of at-tracting extra attention to the crisis, but is at least able to influence the sentiment of the discussion in its favor. A wholly new finding is that when a firm’s reaction avoids the specific criticism of an ongo-ing crisis, instead aiming to bolster the firm’s reputation, this is most beneficial to the firm, both for reducing AFE growth and increasing pro-firm sentiment. “WE NEED TO TALK!” – PROJECT TEAMS DEALING WITH LOW CONNECTIVITY Christina Sarigianni, Lena Waizenegger, Manfred Geiger, Ulrich Remus The continuous technological development and the consistent reliance on ICT, has raised the expectations towards ubiquitous connectivity to an extent that technical failures or social disconnects are a serious threat for project teams and their performance, especially when team members are scattered around the world. We analyse hypo-connectivity, the state in which users face too few connectivity to work efficiently, and focus on its impact in project teams. By applying a mixed method approach in the context of an international consulting company, we investigate the two-sided phenomenon of hypo-connectivity and aim to identify the consequences of hypo-connectivity on communication effectiveness and efficiency, as well as the role of connectivity norms in this relationship. Our results show that hypo-connectivity has a negative influence on communication effectiveness and efficiency, which consequently leads to decreased performance, increased frustration and conflicts. However, the establishment of connectivity norms in project teams can ease the effects of hypo-connectivity, sustain the communication flow and balance the negative impact. We conclude that people actually “need to talk” about the dos and don’ts that sustain their communication flow and develop connectivity norms that could help the team circumvent the negative effects of hypoconnectivity. LAUNCH STRATEGIES OF DIGITAL PLATFORMS: PLATFORMS WITH SWITCHING AND NONSWITCHING USERS Nina-Birte Schirrmacher, Jan Ondrus, Thomas Kude Due to two-sidedness and network effects, digital platforms face a coordination problem to attract producers and consumers upon launch. Scholars have suggested launch strategies for solving this problem with only limited empirical evidence. In this paper, we relate to the strategies of sequential and simultaneous entry of consumers and producers. We conducted a qualitative study interviewing 14 founders and CEOs of digital platforms. We used an analysis of 1st and 2nd order concepts to relate the emerging data to existing theory. We observe that the ability to switch between the producer and consumer side, (i.e., being producer in one transaction and consumer in another one), has so far remained unexplored in the platform


literature despite its importance for the implementation of launch strategies. Our findings suggest that digital platforms with switching sides implement a simultaneous entry strategy, whereas digital platforms without switching sides implement a sequential entry strategy. We conclude by providing implications for researchers, entrepreneurs, and investors and by giving directions for future research.

T08. Digital Government in the Public Sector MOBILE JOB SEARCH APPLICATIONS – NEW PATHWAY TO INCREASE YOUTHS’ JOB APPLICATION EFFORTS? Annette Felgenhauer, Solveigh Hieronimus, Julia Klier, Mathias Klier, Lea Thiel Youth unemployment is a profound problem with severe and lasting consequences for individuals, society and economies. While mobile applications have gained enormous relevance in people’s daily lives, especially those of youths, their value in the context of youth unemployment has not been investigated so far. This study aims to understand the impact of mobile job search applications on youths’ job application efforts, the main predictor of employment. We developed our research model based on DeLone and McLean’s information systems success model, demonstrating and evaluating it in a unique study with the German Federal Employment Agency. We show that the use of the Federal Employment Agency's mobile job search application has a significant positive activating effect on young job seekers’ job application efforts. Moreover, we identify and examine success factors determining mobile job search application usage and user satisfaction. Practitioners might use our insights to modernize placement services and career counselling in order to improve youth employment. BUILD YOUR CITY! – ENGAGING CITIZENS IN CROWDFUNDING PROJECTS Michael Marcin Kunz, Oliver Englisch, Ulrich Bretschneider Crowdfunding has become an increasingly popular financing instrument. Research in the field of crowdfunding mainly focusses on broadening access to finance for businesses, in particular young and innovative companies and SMEs. Our study looks beyond the potential of crowdfunding for businesses and focuses on crowdfunding as a digital government strategy. Applying insights from the literature on relationship marketing, donation behavior and crowdfunding, we develop a structural model which contains trust towards a city, commitment towards a city and the intention to fund a crowdfunding project initiated by a city as its core elements. Based on an online survey, we find that trust towards a city has a positive impact on commitment towards a city and that commitment towards a city has a positive impact on the intention to contribute to a city’s crowdfunding campaign. Certain benefits individuals perceive during a crowdfunding campaign (demonstrable, familial and societal benefits) have a positive impact on the commitment towards a city. Finally, communication has a positive impact on trust towards a city. Our study contributes to the literature on digital government, crowdfunding


and relationship marketing and has practical implications. From our results, we derive specific recommendations for cities. E-PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT: FORMULATING A CITIZENS-CONTENT ENGAGEMENT MODEL Nnanyelugo Aham-Anyanwu, Honglei Li Governments around the world are increasingly using the internet to inform, interact and communicate with their citizens, thereby fostering e-public engagement. A significant research focus has been restricted to how governments use the internet, the policies surrounding its use, and how it impacts or benefits governance and public engagement. However, there is a need for studies to investigate –from the citizens’ perspective – factors that may influence citizens’ engagement with governments’ contents on the internet. This study, therefore, investigates citizens-content engagement using a qualitative approach. Findings indicate that there are five main factors that influence such engagement: information need, attributes of the contents, the perception of the writer, trust in government, and citizens' affinity for governments’ online platforms. With these five factors, this study formulates a citizen-content engagement (C-CE) model. WILL GOVERNMENT FORMS EVER BE CONSISTENT? DETECTING VIOLATIONS IN FORM STRUCTURES BY UTILIZING GRAPH THEORY Steffen Höhenberger, Hendrik Scholta Forms play an important role in government service delivery since they are the central interface between the government and its citizens. However, due to the multiplicity of forms, their management in governments is complex. To assist governments in the initial form development and regular maintenance of forms, the contribution of this paper is a semi-automatic approach that identifies potential structural inconsistencies or other violations in a set of forms. The approach is based on graph theory to represent forms in a machine-readable format and to analyze them semi-automatically. While the phase “Form Transformation” deals with the abstraction of forms by means of model structures, the “Pattern Specification” comprises the creation of an issue to search for in a machine-readable format. Eventually, in the course of the “Form Checking”, the actual pattern search within the form is executed. We introduce the approach conceptually and demonstrate it in a real-world case by means of its implementation within a software tool and three exemplary issues in form structures. Based on this practical applicability, the approach aims at providing governments with support for reducing inconsistencies or flaws in forms to improve governments’ processes, save time and reduce effort and expenses.


NOT ANOTHER NEW WINE IN THE SAME OLD BOTTLES – MOTIVATORS AND INNOVATION IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT E-SERVICE DEVELOPMENT Jesper Holgersson, Ida Lindgren, Ulf Melin, Karin Axelsson

E-services hold the potential to innovate how the public sector operates, and to increase the transpar-ency of public services. Numerous research initiatives have illustrated the innovation power of e-services; with new technology and new solutions to existing problems. Research on this topic also em-phasizes that in order for public e-services to reach their full potential, they need to be designed in a way that users find useful and beneficiary. Interestingly, in practice, only fragments of this claimed innovation seem to take place. Today, most public eservices launched are merely electronic versions of existing services with no, or very low, degree of innovation. In this paper, we analyse empirical data from local government e-service providers. The aim is to explore the current practices in local gov-ernment e-service development with respect to how aspects related to innovative and high quality ser-vice provisioning are handled. In doing so, we analyse what basic motivators there are for local governments to offer e-services in the first place, and how such motivators influence innovation in local government e-service development. The analysis concludes that local governments are facing a chal-lenging situation in terms of a general lack of resources regarding time, competence, and skills, as well as a dispersed user segment where needs and wills often are hard to grasp. Furthermore, local gov-ernments are facing conflicting interests and agendas. At the end of the day, the heights of innovation are then hard to achieve. We call for further research on the applicability of previous research findings in other research areas in order to promote more innovative e-service provisioning.

T09. Digital Health Initiatives PRODUCING COMMUNAL HEALTH THROUGH SELF-CARE: THE EMERGENCE OF DIGITAL PATIENT ACTIVISM Dimitra Petrakaki This study shows how patients co-produce health knowledge when they use digital technology (such as health apps and online platforms) to manage their health and the implications technological self-care has for communal health. It presents results from a qualitative study that took place in the English healthcare context and involved a range of stakeholders such as policy makers, patient organisations and patient experts, and health IT developers (e.g. health apps). The paper moves away from how pa-tients use digital interfaces to ‘consume’ information towards how they are ‘activated’ on the basis of the information they have consumed or created and the implications of their activation for others. We argue that a care for the other emerges when patients self-manage their health through technological interfaces. We name this phenomenon digital patient activism and show that this is an effect of self-care (albeit a conditional one), which although associated with a neo-liberal discourse that assumes


self-responsibility merits attention and recognition given the value it creates for the community. IDENTIFYING PERSONALIZATION IN A CARE PATHWAY: A SINGLE-CASE STUDY OF A FINNISH HEALTHCARE SERVICE PROVIDER Olli Korhonen, Minna Isomursu Personalization has been extensively studied by scholars both in information systems and business. With a strong technological emphasis in mind, personalization techniques are widely applied in web context for recommending appropriate products and services for users. Typically, personalization has remained marketer-oriented, where service provider makes the decision of suitable products or services that are recommended for users. That viewpoint follows the goods-dominant (G-D) logic principles, where service providers use personalization to deliver services for the customer. In this paper, we examine personalization of entire service process, not only the technical interfaces used as service touchpoints. We focus our study on personalization in the healthcare service processes by using servicedominant (S-D) logic as our analytical lens. A case study was conducted by analyzing the depression care pathway of a Finnish healthcare service provider. As a result, we recognized different categories of service personalization, which were supported and mediated through information systems. We recognized three primary categories of personalization: coercive personalization, data display personalization, and collaborative personalization. In all these service personalization categories, information technology played a role, which could range from fully automated personalization to support provided for the physician and the healthcare user for collaborative decision making. The present results are well aligned with findings of other researchers on role of technology in personalization, and provide additional insight on role of information systems in service level personalization. PROCESS INNOVATION MEETS DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURE IN A HIGH-TECH HOSPITAL Bendik Bygstad, Ole Hanseth, Anette Siebenherz, Egil Ă˜vrelid Digitalisation is usually about process innovation with the use of IT, i.e. automating or informating organisational processes. However, redesigned processes are often misaligned with the underlying digital infrastructure. For instance, improving patient logistics with the help of IT is a key aim for current e-health initiatives, but has proven to be quite challenging in practice, and is sparsely dealt with in the literature. Our research question is, how can a process innovation initiative successfully interact with an underlying digital infrastructure? Our empirical evidence is an in-depth case study at a new high-tech hospital in Norway. Building on a proposed framework of interaction between process innovation and digital infrastructure, we identify and analyse two governance and two architectural mechanisms. Theoretically, we contribute to the digital infrastructure research by proposing a configuration for successful process innovation, in a complex e-health context. For practitioners, we show that lightweight IT can serve as a mediating technology in the configuration.


THE ROLE OF TRUST IN PERSONAL INFORMATION DISCLOSURE ON HEALTH-RELATED WEBSITES Luoxia Chen, Alex Zarifis, Julia KrÜnung E-commerce adoption has been extensive but for some specialized areas it is still in the early stages. One such area is health-related websites where the sensitive issues around the consumer’s health extenuate the similar challenges faced in other areas of e-commerce. Disclosing personal information is necessary to fully utilize such health-related websites but consumer trust is required for this. This research proposes a model of the role of trust in personal information disclosure on health-related web-sites. This model identifies 10 factors grouped in three categories. The first category is dispositional factors including faith in humanity, trusting stance and privacy concern. the second category is situational factors including reputation and perceived risk. Lastly the third category is institutional factors including the perceived effectiveness of the privacy statement, third party certification, legal and regulation and security infrastructure. Low risk, reputation, effective privacy statement and privacy seals were found to facilitate trust. While institutional factors like the legal framework and regulation have an elevated role to keep the consumer safe in this context, lack of clarity on what they are leads to a weak perception of their value. Trust in the health-related website was found to positively influence the intention to disclose information. A THIRD PERSON IN THE ROOM: A CASE STUDY OF THE SWEDISH RHEUMATOID REGISTER Christina Keller The purpose of this paper is to examine how a quality register in rheumatoid arthritis care was adopted in the Swedish medical community of rheumatologists and what helped and hindered this. A mixed methods case study was carried to collect data covering the development and adoption of the quality register. By performing 17 key informant interviews and document analysis, significant themes focusing on the context, content, process and outcomes of the innovation was sought for. The innovation process proceeded from idea generation, development phase, con-solidation phase to a phase of shared decision-making. Resistance from physicians, perceived threats to the medical consultation, organisational change climate and lack of integration with other health care IT-systems were perceived as barriers to the adoption of the quality register. Access to longitudinal patient and treatment data, change champions, transformational leader-ship, changes in the physician-patient dialogue and increased control of treatment quality and costs were identified as drivers of innovation spread. These factors can be categorised as be-longing to the construct of perceived usefulness.


T10. Digitization and Innovation in the Public Sector ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE INSTITUTIONALIZATION: A TALE OF TWO CASES Dinh Duong Dang The purpose of this research is to examine why organizations with similar objectives and environments at the beginning obtain different outcomes when implementing enterprise architecture (EA) projects and how EA institutionalization process occurs. We conduct a qualitative multiple-case study using the lens of institutional theory through the analysis of intra-organization relations. The results show that the institutional logic of stakeholders can drive EA projects in different directions during the process of EA institutionalization, and thus organizations obtain different project outcomes ultimately. We contribute by extending the knowledge on EA institutionalization from a micro-level perspective, understanding and explaining how the organizational structure was shaped and influenced by stakeholders’ relations, as well as providing insight into stakeholders’ behaviors and activities during the process of EA institutionalization so that practitioners may improve the success rate of EA projects, particularly in the public sector. DISCURSIVE FORMATIONS AND SHIFTING STRATEGIES IN E-HEALTH PROGRAMMES Egil Øvrelid, Bendik Bygstad, Ole Hanseth Research has shown that large IT programmes in e-government and e-health are challenging not only in terms of project failures and in terms of high costs, but also that the public and sectorial discourses greatly influences the trajectories and outcomes of mega-programmes. Howev-er, few IS studies have investigated this phenomenon in much depth, and the aim of this contri-bution is to shed more light on the relationship of discourse and mega-programmes. We use Foucault’s discourse concept to analyse discursive formations aiming to promote and establish solutions in e-health programs, but frame our investigation in information infrastructure theory. Our empirical evidence is a 15-year study of the growth of the national e-health infrastructure in Norway, where we analyse the interplay of the national eHealth discourse and the various programme initiatives. Our study offers two contributions. First, we demonstrate how the con-cept of discursive formation allows for an in-depth analysis of the role of discourse in large eHealth programs. Second, we show how shifts of discourse, combined with experienced prob-lems in on-going programs, may disrupt the trajectories of large information infrastructures. FROM ONE-STOP-SHOP TO NO-STOP-SHOP: AN E-GOVERNMENT STAGE MODEL Hendrik Scholta, Willem Mertens, Angela Reeve, Marek Kowalkiewicz


This paper responds to two observations regarding current government service delivery. First, despite reasonable efforts to improve the design of forms and to establish single points of contacts in the course of one-stop-shops, citizens still perceive forms as cumbersome. Second, citizens expect governments to act more proactively by initiating relevant government services themselves instead of relying on a manual trigger from the citizen. To overcome these two issues, this paper proposes the transition from a one-stop-shop to a no-stop-shop, where the citizen has to perform no action and to fill no form to receive a government service. The contribution of this paper is an e-government stage model to guide the transition from a onestop-shop to a no-stop-shop. It describes the three stages of government service delivery “OneStop-Shop”, “Limited No-Stop-Shop” and “No-Stop-Shop” according to the dimensions “Integration of Data Collection”, “Integration of Data Storage” and “Purpose of Data Use”. The stage model is exemplarily applied to a real-world case. An initial evaluation of the stage model is executed through discussions with researchers and semi-structured interviews with government employees.

“HAVING SKIN IN THE GAME”: A VALUE TENSION STUDY OF AN INTER-AGENCY IT PROJECT Randall Smith, Jocelyn Cranefield This study seeks to better understand the challenges involved in early stage development of citizen-facing Joined-Up Government and the mitigating strategies used to address these issues. In-depth interviews were carried out with 11 members of a unique, cross-agency case, the SmartStart life event project, the first of a planned suite of life event services in New Zealand’s public sector. Three key underlying value tensions were identified as contributing to agency challenges: New Public Management versus Joined-Up Government, Immediate Needs versus Long Term Benefits, and Waterfall versus Agile development approaches. Participants successfully addressed these value tensions through three concurrent mitigating strategies: active stewardship, citizen centricity, and creation of reusable artefacts. A framework is proposed, based on the concept of a base isolator, to illustrate the dynamics between the underlying value tensions and mitigating strategies, which enable effective practice of JoinedUp Government. Understanding these value tensions and their relationship to the mitigating strategies has implications for both practitioners and researchers. ROLE OF MIDDLE MANAGERS IN MODULAR DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION: THE CASE OF SERVU Risto Paavola, Petri Hallikainen, Amany Elbanna In the information systems (IS) literature, there is a gap in understanding the role of middle managers (MMs) in the digital transformation in organizations. IS research has focused on understanding top management and user roles in IT-related transformational change but the role of MMs has rarely been examined. To fill this gap, this paper reports on an open-ended exploration of the influence and contribution of the MMs in the digital transformation of a large Finnish public sector meal production company. Data were collected from a ten-year digital transformation effort in the company. The analysis suggests that MMs play an active role in


influencing both top management and end users and importantly shows that the role MMs play differs from one stage to another of the digital transformation of the organisation. The study identifies a three-stage model of modular digital transformation, where MMs acted as implementers and negotiators in the initial core digitalisation stage of digital transformation, as champions in the digital expansion stage, and as shakers and strategists in the shake down and complementary stage. The paper concludes by discussing the implications for theory and highlighting the practical consequences of our results. VALUE POSITIONS IN E-GOVERNMENT STRATEGIES: SOMETHING IS (NOT) CHANGING IN THE STATE OF DENMARK John Stouby Persson, Anja Kaldahl Reinwald, Espen Skorve, Peter Axel Nielsen Clarifying what value new information systems (IS) may help to create for government organizations and society is a central concern in the public sector. National e-government strategies present such efforts to clarify the value entailed by IS, however, what is considered valuable is influenced by value positions deeply enshrined in the traditions of public administration. We present a theory directed con-tent analysis of value positions in the national e-government strategy for Denmark published for the first time in 1994 and latest in 2016. Our comparison of the value positions in the two e-government strategies show consistency over time when looking at the ideals of professionalism, service, and efficiency. While the least dominant ideal of engagement, has declined. The 22-year timespan separating the development of these two strategies had major technological advances, but little transformational impact on Danish e-government strategies in their general value positions. We discuss how our findings contribute to previous research on values in e-government and have practical implications for working with e-government strategies. FROM E-GOVERNMENT TO E-GOVERNANCE: SOCIAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC AUTHORITIES LEGITIMACY WORK Magnus Bergquist, Jan Ljungberg, Bertil Rolandsson, Björn Remneland Wikhamn Social media increasingly condition how public authorities build legitimacy when engaging with citizens. In this paper we report on a study of the increasing use of and exposure to social media and social networking platforms in two Swedish public authorities, the Social Insurance Agency (SIA) and the police force. Although formally grounded on the same civic principles, the two authorities have significantly different approaches to social media as a way to generate internal and external legitimacy. SIA has mainly implemented an e-government approach to rationalize services to become more efficient and customer oriented, by using social media as one of several media channels. The police force, however, adopted an e-governance approach to build legitimacy through interaction and reflexive discussion between government and citizens as a way to create transparency and nuance citizens’ attitude towards the police force. Building on a two-dimensional public government/governance framework, we reflect on how the two studied authorities’ social media practices shape and are shaped by different governing practices in their legitimacy work.


T11. Economics and Value of IS A HOMEOWNER'S GUIDE TO AIRBNB: THEORY AND EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FOR OPTIMAL PRICING CONDITIONAL ON ONLINE RATINGS JĂźrgen Neumann, Dominik Gutt Optimal price setting in peer-to-peer markets featuring online ratings requires incorporating interactions between prices and ratings. Additionally, recent literature reports that online ratings in peer-to-peer markets tend to be inflated overall, undermining the reliability of online ratings as a quality signal. This study proposes a two-period model for optimal price setting that takes (potentially inflated) ratings into account. Our theoretical findings suggest that sellers in the medium-quality segment have an incentive to lower first-period prices to monetize on increased second-period ratings and that the possibility on monetizing on second-period ratings depends on the reliability of the rating system. Additionally, we find that total profits and prices increase with online ratings and additional quality signals. Empirically, conducting Differencein-Difference regressions on a comprehensive panel data set from Airbnb, we can validate that price increases lead to lower ratings, and we find empirical support for the prediction that additional quality signals increase prices. Our work comes with substantial implications for sellers in peer-to-peer markets looking for an optimal price setting strategy. Moreover, we argue that our theoretical finding on the weights between online ratings and additional quality signals translates to conventional online markets. HOW MUCH WILL YOU PAY? UNDERSTANDING THE VALUE OF INFORMATION CUES IN THE SHARING ECONOMY Olga Abramova, Hanna Krasnova, Chee-Wee Tan The advent of peer-to-peer accommodation sharing platforms, like Airbnb, has ushered in a new era in travel worldwide. However, to ensure sustainability in the long term, information asymmetry inher-ent to such platforms has to be tackled. Currently, accommodation sharing platforms offer a multitude of in-built trust-enhancing cues that may reduce information asymmetry, signal trust and aid potential guests in their decision making. Nevertheless, little is known about the effectiveness of these cues in shaping online consumption behavior. Building on the Signalling Theory, this study explores the effec-tiveness and monetary value of three groups of trust-enhancing cues commonly deployed by service providers to promote trust in the sharing economy via a discrete choice experiment methodology. Findings from our study not only contribute to extant literature on the effectiveness of trust-enhancing cues, but they also empower platform providers and hosts through novel insights on how the perfor-mance of their offerings is evaluated by consumers.


CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY, EMPLOYER REPUTATION, AND SOCIAL MEDIA CAPABILITY: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION Jose Benitez, Laura Ruiz, Javier Llorens, Ana Castillo

This study theorizes that firms engaging in socially responsible activities are more likely to be perceived as a more attractive employer, and this positive relationship may be amplified if firms have proficiency in leveraging social media platforms. This potential amplifier role may be explained through the greater social visibility enabled by social media. The proposed theory is tested using the structural equation modeling technique and the partial least squares method of estimation employing a secondary dataset on a sample composed of 100 large Spanish firms included in the Actualidad Economica's Great Place to Work 2015. The empirical analysis supports our theory. This paper contributes to Information Systems research by theorizing and empirically demonstrating that social media capability creates business value by maximizing the positive impact of firm's implementation of corporate social responsibility activities on the building of firm's employer reputation. REINVENTING THE IT FUNCTION: THE ROLE OF IT AGILITY AND IT AMBIDEXTERITY IN SUPPORTING DIGITAL BUSINESS TRANSFORMATION Daniel Leonhardt, Ingmar Haffke, Johann Kranz, Alexander Benlian The immanent opportunities and threats from digital business transformation significantly affect the role of the IT function. Line functions increasingly expect that the internal IT function provides support for digital value creation in addition to traditional IT services. This dual focus bears the potential for tensions as competing in digital business environments means to act fast and to explore, while managing traditional enterprise IT requires stability, reliability, and exploitation of existing resources. Therefore, our study empirically examines the role of two key capabilities—IT agility and IT ambidexterity—on the IT function’s digitization support. Based on a survey including 258 IT executives, we find that IT agility is a main driver of the IT function’s ability to support digitization. Furthermore, our results show that an ambidextrous focus of IT functions is best suited to find a balance between opposing demands. THE EFFECT OF PRODUCER DESCRIPTIONS ON DEMAND OF MOBILE APPLICATIONS Michael Scholz, Lauri Frank We analyze the impact of different app description characteristics on app demand on the basis of panel data for six months and 1081 distinct apps. We use several text mining techniques in order to opera-tionalize the descriptions’ textual characteristics. The extracted variables are then used in an econo-metric investigation to examine their impact on apps’ downloads. Our results provide evidence that app descriptions have an effect on demand. Apps with upfront price should be described in a neutral tone. Apps without an upfront price but with in-app


purchase option should be offered with rather short descriptions that are written in a formal and subjective style.

T12. Entrepreneurship and IS FOSTERING DIGITAL INNOVATION THROUGH INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL COLLABORATION BETWEEN INCUMBENT FIRMS AND START-UPS Nihal Islam, Peter Buxmann, David DĂŠ-Juan Ding Digital technologies offer multiple opportunities for firms, but they also involve many challenges. In-cumbent firms especially need to pursue digitalization in their businesses and create digital innovations in order to stay competitive in the market. For this purpose, an increased number of incumbent firms have been collaborating with start-ups with the aim of identifying and developing new business fields. Influencing factors in the context of collaboration between incumbent firms and start-ups aiming to foster digital innovation have barely been addressed in the research. Against this background, we have compiled a literature review on collaboration and conducted a qualitative study based on 30 interviews with experts from incumbent firms and start-ups. We investigate the increasingly important interorganizational form that is emerging from collaborative innovative processes by influencing factors identified in terms of intra-individual und interactional levels. Our main interest is in showing what factors affect incumbent firms and start-ups in pursuit of collaboration with the aim of creating and implementing digital innovation. With our results, we are contributing to the literature on collaboration as well as providing practitioners valuable guidance for fostering digital innovation by illustrating relevant factors that can be considered in future interorganizational collaborations. IT INNOVATIONS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN EMERGING ECONOMIES - IS CLOUD COMPUTING A MAGIC INGREDIENT FOR EGYPTIAN ENTREPRENEURS? Rania Fahim El-Gazzar, Helle Zinner Henriksen, Fathul Wahid Using the concept of affordances as an analytical lens, this study aims to understand the use of Cloud Computing (CC) by Egyptian entrepreneurs. The study analyses impact of CC on their businesses and its inhibiting and enabling factors. In general, Egyptian entrepreneurs have positive perceptions of CC and note its various actualized affordances: accessing information technology (IT) resources rapidly, broadening reach and transferring responsibility. The use of CC has yielded diverse effects: shortened time to market, reduced costs, a diversified audience and more useful feedback. We also identify what inhibits the use of CC, including transparency and corruption problems, limited support for online transactions, unsupportive government policies, low appreciation from the domestic market, cumbersome bureaucracy, account hacking and unreliable infrastructure. Finally, we also reveal some enabling factors, including institutional support, overseas market potential and CC uptake (i.e., growing use).


T13. Financial Technology (FinTech) and the Digitization of Financial Services ENTREPRENEURIAL ORIENTATION AND DIGITALIZATION IN THE FINANCIAL SERVICE INDUSTRY: A CONTINGENCY APPROACH Sascha Kraus, Thomas Niemand, Andreas Kallmünzer, Coen Rigtering, Stevan Matijas Financial service firms, and banks in particular, are faced with a shift from traditional, interpersonal forms of service to online services. Digital technologies are more and more becoming today’s standard and challenge traditional business models in the banking sector. Building on the concept of Entrepreneurial Orientation (EO), this study of banks in Germany, Switzerland and Liechtenstein aims at developing insights that explain how banks can use the tactics and strate-gies associated with EO to achieve superior performance in the digitalization age. Results from a survey in 102 banks show that: 1) banks that display high levels of EO report a higher level of performance, and 2) the relationship between strategic vision on digitalization and performance is moderated by EO. These results indicate that the sheer level of digitalization of a bank does not affect profitability. Instead, banks should develop a clear vision on digitalization that is characterized by innovation, being ahead of the competition, and a willingness to take risks. BREAKING DOWN THE BLOCKCHAIN HYPE – TOWARDS A BLOCKCHAIN MARKET ENGINEERING APPROACH Benedikt Notheisen, Florian Hawlitschek, Christof Weinhardt The blockchain has reached the tip of a global hype across a variety of industries. The potential of this technology, inter alia building the fundament of Bitcoin, is assumed to be immense and disruptive – particularly for the financial industry. FinTech start-ups as well as established players however are just about to explore the true potential of blockchain technology as the fundament of (financial) markets. Before this backdrop, Information Systems research is making valuable contributions to the field by integrating the technical view on blockchain with interdis-ciplinary research approaches. Our contribution to the growing body of Information Systems literature in the context of the blockchain is twofold: First, we conduct a comprehensive litera-ture review of the most relevant and recent IS research on blockchain. Second, based on the findings of our review, we build on existing research and propose a Blockchain Market Engineering Framework, which can support researchers as well as practitioners in analyzing and designing the elements of blockchain-based markets on an individual and global level. In addition, we go beyond a purely analytical perspective and provide a toolbox to support the active construction of blockchain-based ecosystems and infrastructures. In doing so we pave the way for future research that will help to break down the blockchain hype.


OVERCOMING BLOCKAGES TO COLLECTIVE INNOVATION IN DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURES: THE CASE OF MOBILE PAYMENT Boriana Rukanova, Mark de Reuver, Stefan Henningsson, Fatemeh Nikayin, Yao-Hua Tan Decentralized digital technologies increasingly enable multiple organizations to co-create digital infrastructures. However, collective innovation processes often come to a stand-still because of conflicting interests and business models. While existing research suggests various factors that block collective innovation processes, there is still little understanding of how organizations can overcome these blockages. In this paper, we identify patterns that explain how organizations overcome blockages of collective innovation processes for digital infrastructures. We follow a processual approach and develop a conceptual framework based on collective action theory. We evaluate the framework through a longitudinal case study on mobile payment infrastructure development. We find various reconfiguration processes that organizations use to overcome blockages of collective innovation. Theoretically, this paper contributes to the emerging body of research in the Information Infrastructure literature, which utilizes the collective action perspective and related models and frameworks to understand and explain underlying complexities in the digital infrastructures.

T14. Healthcare Information Systems for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World A FRAMEWORK TO ADVANCE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD SYSTEM USE IN ROUTINE PATIENT CARE Kenny Lienhard, Oliver Job, Nicolas Bodmer, Lucas Bachmann, Christine Legner The digital transformation of routine patient care is much more than doing the same but with electronic instead of paper-based health records. The current literature provides strong evidence for the gap between the promises of electronic health record (EHR) systems and our knowledge on how to design systems that fit the requirements of daily clinical practice. Following the design science research paradigm, we develop a framework that allows one to empirically assess EHR system use in routine patient care. The suggested framework describes an objective assessment of physicians’ way of executing routines to identify the user interface elements that afford and constrain physicians’ executions of routines. We demonstrate our framework’s use in a field study that reveals actionable insights into how to adapt physicians’ ways to perform a routine and to identify potential misconceptions in EHR system design. This study contributes to and complements existing research on clinical routines and EHR systems, providing a framework to unpack the ‘black box’ of EHR systems and their use in daily clinical practice.


ADOPTING A SERVICE-DOMINANT LOGIC TO PREDICTION OF PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS Hawa Nyende, Urban Ask, Peter Nabende

The United Nations listed maternal mortality as a major problem especially in developing countries. Predictive models that predict pregnancy complications have been suggested as an intervention to reduce maternal mortality but at the moment, many are not used in clinical practice. This study proposes a service-dominant perspective as an alternative use of predictive models to create value for maternal healthcare. We conducted an exploratory study in southeastern Uganda in which we held semi-structured interviews with health practitioners to understand how the maternal healthcare system in Uganda works and how pregnancy complications are predicted. Results were analyzed using components from the service innovation framework. We find that overall, ICT has not been fully exploited to improve access to quality care, improve predictions and to improve collaboration among different practitioners in Uganda. Our findings suggest that by adapting a service-dominant perspective, we can enable predictive models and other technologies to assume an active role in maternal healthcare thereby supporting health practitioners with different skills and knowledge to predict pregnancy complications and hence trigger collaborative value creation. We believe that such an intervention will reduce maternal mortality. PREDICTING THE INDIVIDUAL MOOD LEVEL BASED ON DIARY DATA Vincent Bremer, Dennis Becker, Burkhardt Funk, Dirk Lehr Understanding mood changes of individuals with depressive disorders is crucial in order to guide personalized therapeutic interventions. Based on diary data, in which clients of an online depression treatment report their activities as free text, we categorize these activities and predict the mood level of clients. We apply a bag-of-words text-mining approach for activity categorization and explore recurrent neuronal networks to support this task. Using the identified activities, we develop partial ordered logit models with varying levels of heterogeneity among clients to predict their mood. We estimate the parameters of these models by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques and compare the models regarding their predictive performance. Therefore, by combining text-mining and Bayesian estimation techniques, we apply a two-stage analysis approach in order to reveal relationships between various activity categories and the individual mood level. Our findings indicate that the mood level is influenced negatively when participants report about sickness or rumination. Social activities have a positive influence on the mood. By understanding the influences of daily activities on the individual mood level, we hope to improve the efficacy of online behavior therapy, provide support in the context of clinical decision-making, and contribute to the development of personalized interventions.


TOWARDS AN INCLUSIVE WORLD: EXPLORING M-HEALTH ADOPTION ACROSS GENERATIONS Grace Kenny, Regina Connolly

Mobile health (m-health) technologies empower individuals to manage their personal health. Whilst older citizens can benefit greatly from m-health, it remains the case that younger individuals are more likely to use these technologies. However, the factors that drive and inhibit m-health adoption across different age groups remain relatively unexplored. By understanding what drives adoption among different age groups, efforts can be made to meet their needs and increase adoption by all. This study tests whether the predictors of adoption in the technology adoption literature can be extended to the m-health context and whether age serves as a moderator. Our findings suggest that while the extant technology adoption predictors offer insights into adoption decisions, additional constructs would enable a more comprehensive understanding of m-health adoption. The moderating role of age is also supported. Younger individuals are influenced by their expectation of m-health performance, while older individuals are influenced by their perceived ability to use these technologies. M-health technologies should therefore be marketed differently for these age groups and designed to suit their differing needs. This paper highlights the need to educate older citizens to ensure they can take advantage of the benefits offered by m-health and avoid a widening digital divide. PREDICTORS FOR MOTIVATION TO LEARN IN THE CONTEXT OF TECHNOLOGY-RELATED TRAINING – AN EXPLORATORY STUDY IN THE HEALTHCARE SECTOR Diana Renner Technology-related training in the healthcare sector is crucial. Based on the high job responsibility and the variety of healthcare professionals with regards to different job roles, tasks etc., the assurance of positive learning outcomes can be a challenge. Prior research shows that motivation to learn is a predictor for positive learning outcomes. Therefore, a literature review is done to show the current state of the art. In the next step and to identify the healthcare professionals’ predictors for motivation to learn, an exploratory study is done. 18 French healthcare professionals are interviewed by using semi-structured interviews. Based on the results, several propositions are concluded which suggest that self-efficacy, personal and professional development and learner characteristics are predictors for motivation to learn as well as the environment for learning and working environment conditions. WORKLOAD PREDICTION MODEL OF A PRIMARY HEALTH CENTRE Manjula Devananda, Stephen Cranefield, Michael Winikoff, Hywel Lloyd Managing the growing demand for care due to long-term conditions (LTCs) is a big challenge for primary care providers across the globe. We argue that population-level care for LTC patients registered at a primary health centre (PHC) is possible through workload prediction


using care plans. In this paper, we try to answer two research questions: i) How can the future demand for care of the pa-tients with LTCs be predicted? and ii) How is the future demand for care affected by changes? We present a rule-based simulation model that, given the patient details, will predict the number of LTC patients who will be visiting the primary health centre for the next year. Knowing this workload would help the medical practice to meet the upcoming demand for care effectively. Our approach also allows simulation of the effects of changes to practice and resourcing to foresee how these changes may impact the practice. Following the design science research approach, our prediction results have been shared with an expert and the feedback guides us to refine our model.

T15. Internet of Things in Organizational Life RFID SYSTEMS ON THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS: AN ANT STUDY OF MULTIPLICITY Marta Vos, Jocelyn Cranefield Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems are becoming increasingly common in applications that are shared between the public and private sectors. These systems facilitate supply chain, traceability and sensor functions, not to mention the application of RFID technology in enabling the Internet of Things. Despite their increasing ubiquity, the management of public-private RFID systems is under-researched and little understood. This research addresses a gap in literature by using Actor-Network Theory (ANT) to uncover the public-private RFID network. It was found that the public-private sector relationship is initially characterised by stereotypical views which diminish as sectors work together. Further, the public sector in this context was seen to be a multiplicity with four different performances, public sector as a member of the public-private partnership; as legislator; as enforcer and as funding provider. This multiplicity is shown to lead to confusion within public-private partnerships as members of the partnership are not always clear about which performance of the public sector they are enacting, or interacting with. ANT provided a sound basis to explore such a complex networked system, its inclusion of technology within the construction of the social offers a way of understanding complexity within internet of things based applications. DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURES AS PLATFORMS: THE CASE OF SMART ELECTRICITY GRIDS Mira Slavova, Panos Constantinides Smart grids enable customers and utility providers to gain a better understanding of energy consumption and production, by adding a layer of digital data collection and analysis on existing electricity grids. As digital infrastructures they have distinct characteristics from earlier ‘pipeline’ infrastructures in that they can generate significant network effects that could lead to new opportunities for value creation across different stakeholders. Exactly because of these unique characteristics of digital infrastructures, we propose that they can be approached


as platforms. With this conceptualization, we seek to explore what are the design and value propositions of a digital infrastructure. We provide answers to this question by synthesizing existing research on platforms and digital infrastructures. We explore the case of the emerging smart grid in South Africa and develop a set of design and value propositions. We discuss the relevance of our propositions to extant research on digital infrastructures and platforms, and explore opportunities for further research.

T17. IS for a Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive World COMPARING GOAL SETTING APPROACHES TO BOOST COMPUTER-RELATED PROENVIRONMENTAL BEHAVIORS Sandy Staples, Jane Webster, Shunan (Catherine) Lv This research focuses on improving individuals’ pro-environmental behaviors related to information technology and system use. To do so, we draw on and extend goal-setting theory by comparing three goal interventions: goal-setting, goal-setting plus implementation plans, and goal-setting with both implementation plans and visualization of success. Two longitudinal studies examine individuals’ self-set goals: the first examines employees’ computer-based electricity usage in the workplace over six weeks and the second utilizes a diary approach method over four weeks to examine the effects of different goal setting conditions on students’ environmental outcomes. Both studies find that setting goals increases pro-environmental behaviors. However, rebound effects can occur when interventions are removed. Visualization of success appears to reduce this rebound effect and we suggest that future research continue to investigate methods for reducing rebound, including the roles of values and multiple goals on the efficacy of goal-setting. This paper contributes to Green IS research in several ways: conceptually (by responding to calls for more theory-based research), methodologically (by measuring objective computer-based energy usage in study 1 and by utilizing a diary method in study 2), and practically (by demonstrating the effectiveness of visualization to goal setting). PROFIT, PLANET AND PEOPLE IN SUPPLY CHAIN: GRAND CHALLENGES AND FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Firouzeh Taghikhah, Jay Daniel, Grant Mooney Recent pressure from governments and customers on supply chain organizations to consider environmental and social issues has increased dramatically. The challenge ahead for supply chain managers is how to grow business profit while protecting the planet and respecting people’s rights. The significance of this issue motivates researchers in the fields of “sustainability” and “supply chain” to further integrate these concepts. To identify affected areas, and how sustainability influences them, this research has employed a literature survey of related papers published between 2012 and 2016 within 16 A* indexed journals that are relevant to Information and Computing Science, Transportation/Freight Services and


Manufacturing Engineering. Findings show that sustainable supply chain network structure, impact factors, relationship integration and performance evaluation are the main research topics in these streams. The role of decision-making tools within each discipline, the key methodologies and techniques are discussed. Generally speaking, primary challenges in the sustainable supply chain domain devolve from use of inadequate decision-making tools and inappropriate in-formation systems. The holistic picture presented in this paper is important for helping scholars, system developers, and supply chain analysts to become more aware of current grand challenges and future research opportunities within this field. ECOLOGICAL & PROFITABLE CARSHARING BUSINESS: EMISSION LIMITS & HETEROGENEOUS FLEETS Kathrin Kuehne, Marc-Oliver Sonneberg, Michael Breitner Carsharing is a mobility concept that addresses the world’s growing interest in sustainability. It reduces CO2 emissions, traffic congestion, and noise in cities. Including electric and hybrid vehicles in the carsharing fleet supports these aspects even more. For a station-based carsharing organization (CSO), the distribution and availability of vehicles play a crucial role to satisfy the customers’ needs as well as to obtain profits. We developed a tactical optimization model to de-termine the size and composition of a heterogeneous carsharing fleet while considering different emission limits with time-depended demand profiles. Different propulsion modes and vehicle classes represent the heterogeneity of the fleet. Using the application example of the city of San Francisco, results are presented, discussed, and analyzed. Our benchmarks for two different demand scenarios reveal the strong influence of a preset maximum level of CO2 emissions on fleet composition and monthly net profit. The optimization model allows CSOs to provide a sus-tainable and profitable mobility concept; city planners are supported to evaluate influences of CO2 emission thresholds on CSOs. The model thereby represents a Green IS approach, as it contributes to supporting a society’s path towards a low emission and noise-reduced environ-ment in urban areas where carsharing is feasible. THE ROLE OF OPEN DATA IN DRIVING SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY IN NINE SMART CITIES Piyush Yadav, Souleiman Hasan, Adegboyega Ojo, Edward Curry In today’s era of globalization, sustainable mobility is considered as a key factor in the economic growth of any country. With the emergence of open data initiatives, there is tremendous potential to improve mobility. This paper presents findings of a detailed analysis of mobility open data initiatives in nine smart cities – Amsterdam, Barcelona, Chicago, Dublin, Helsinki, London, Manchester, New York and San Francisco. The paper discusses the study of various sustainable indicators in the mobility domain and its convergence with present open datasets. Specifically, it throws light on open data ecosystems in terms of their production and consumption. It gives a comprehensive view of the nature of mobility open data with respect to their formats, interactivity, and availability. The paper details the open datasets in terms of their alignment with different mobility indicators, publishing platforms, applications and API’s available. The paper discusses how these open datasets have shown signs of fostering organic


innovation and sustainable growth in smart cities with impact on mobility trends. The results of the work can be used to inform the design of data driven sustainable mobility in smart cities to maximize the utilization of available open data resources. IT-ENABLED IDEA CROWDSOURCING – A MEAN TO PROMOTE GENDER EQUITY IN IT RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS Elena Gorbacheva, Benjamin Barann The paper is aimed at enhancing understanding of how under-representation of women in IT (Information Technology) research institutions, as well as other challenges related to gender equity, can be addressed with the help of IT-enabled idea crowdsourcing. A systematic literature review was conducted to understand how the topic of gender equity promotion via collaboratively used IT artefacts has been addressed in extant research. Insights from the literature review, overview of existing related IT artefacts, and iterative discussions with scholars in the IT field have resulted in a set of requirements to the idea crowdsourcing platform aimed at the promotion of gender equity in IT research institutions. These requirements were analysed further and could be categorised into those specific for the target platform and those relevant also for other idea crowdsourcing platforms (with or without further adaptation). This study addresses a novel and important research topic and might be of value for practitioners.

T18. IS Research Methods and Philosophy TOPIC MODELLING METHODOLOGY: ITS USE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND OTHER MANAGERIAL DISCIPLINES Matthias Eickhoff, Nicole Neuss Over the last decade, quantitative text mining approaches to content analysis have gained increasing traction within information systems research, and related fields, such as business ad-ministration. Recently, topic models, which are supposed to provide their user with an overview of themes being discussed in documents, have gained popularity. However, while convenient tools for the creation of this model class exist, the evaluation of topic models poses significant challenges to their users. In this research, we investigate how questions of model validity and trustworthiness of presented analyses are addressed across disciplines. We accomplish this by providing a structured review of methodological approaches across the Financial Times 50 journal ranking. We identify 59 methodological research papers, 24 implementations of topic models, as well as 33 research papers using topic models in Information Systems (IS) research, and 29 papers using such models in other managerial disciplines. Results indicate a need for model implementations usable by a wider audience, as well as the need for more implementa-tions of model validation techniques, and the need for a discussion about the theoretical founda-tions of topic modelling based research.


AFFORDANCES AND AGENTIAL REALISM: A RELATIONAL ONTOLOGY FOR A RELATIONAL THEORY Marko Niemimaa Relational view of affordance theory has emerged as a viable theory in Information Systems (IS) research to explain variation in IS use. According to this theory, what a specific person can achieve with a technology is neither inherent in the person himself nor on the technology but emerges from their interaction. Despite that such relational view implies relational ontology, the ontological foundations have been insufficiently theorized which limits both its practical and theoretical applicability and explanatory power. In this paper, I suggest Karen Barad’s relational ontology, known as agential realism, provides coherent and solid foundations for affordances that are especially suitable to explain IS use in contemporary workplace that is characterized by distributed yet tightly interconnected technological infrastructures rather than dyadic interactions with objects. Empirical illustrations from ethnographic field work of technicians working with smart infrastructure show how affordances building on agential realism may enhance understanding of IS use. SOCIOMATERIALITY: AN OBJECT-INSPIRED PROPOSAL FOR IS SCHOLARS Paidi O'Raghallaigh, Stephen McCarthy, Frederic Adam The ideas presented in this paper have emerged from our curiosity about how technological objects might be leveraged as more than mere evidence in IS research. As constructions of a particular time and place, objects can tell us a great deal about the people, organisations and cultures that produced and used them. Objects reflect the values, beliefs and activities of those people, organisations, and cultures. But many IS scholars following a sociomaterial agenda continue to see objects as no more than background facts that play a supporting role in our research. There is little guidance in the IS literature on how objects might participate more directly and fully in our research and how we as scholars should engage with them. In this paper, we present an object-inspired perspective largely drawn from the material culture literature where we engage with objects as the units of observation. We discuss what this might contribute to IS theory-building and what opportunities it might create for new types of objectcentred and -driven theories. We describe a framework for undertaking this object-inspired research. In so doing, we are challenged to think about the ontological commitments of our approach and how this differs from dominant forms of sociomateriality. TECHNOLOGY AND AUTHENTICITY: PATIENTHOOD IN A TECHNOLOGICAL WORLD Dimitra Petrakaki This paper concerns the ways in which we can be authentic in a technological world. To respond to this question we draw on the work of Martin Heidegger and specifically on his essay ‘The Question Concerning Technology’ and on his conceptualisation of authenticity, as


outlined in ‘Being and Time’. We show that being authentic could be a response to the dangers the essence of technology poses. We contextualize our question in the context of contemporary health discourse. According to recent health policy, technology plays a pivotal role in allowing patients to make choices and manage their health. We argue that empowerment does not give much opportunity to be authentic but confuses the ability to make choice with the potential of becoming free and thus hides the ‘enframing’ effects of technology. We show how a technological understanding of patienthood has turned ‘patients’ into ‘data’ and ‘health’ into ‘information technology’, we demonstrate why technology is not neutral given its exclusionary effects and then we go on to discuss in what ways patients who are excluded from this techno-logical world could constitute the saving power that could make health more humanistic and inclusive. A CRITICAL REALIST METHOD FOR IS RESEARCH: THE CAUSAL FRAMEWORK THROUGH RETRODUCTION AND RETRODICTION John McAvoy, Tom Butler While the discussion in the IS research community has moved from describing critical realism as simply a compromise philosophy between positivists and interpretivists to its acceptance in its own right, it is still lacking in a choice of methods or processes for the IS researcher to utilise. This paper presents a proposed method that can be used by IS researchers following the critical realist paradigm. The suitability of a critical realist approach to IS research is discussed, and the importance of the combined ontological and epistemological elements described. The relevance of the search for causal mechanisms is shown and the benefits of the processes of retroduction and retrodiction in this search. A ‘causal framework’ is proposed as an artefact in the IS critical researcher’s “toolkit” and an example provided to show how it can be used. A three step process is described which uses causal frameworks the guide the analysis.

T19. IS Teaching and Learning DEMANDED AND IMPARTED BIG DATA COMPETENCES: TOWARDS AN INTEGRATIVE ANALYSIS Matthias Murawski, Markus Bick Exploiting big data seems to be an important success factor for companies in the digital age. However, recent studies show that there is a short supply of professionals who are able to deal with data appropriately. This is at least partly caused by a mismatch between university offerings and presumed industry needs. This study analyses two related questions. First, what competences are actually required for being a data professional? Second, what competences are imparted through data-related master`s programmes? These questions are answered by applying a topic model approach (first question) and deductive content analysis (second question). By using the same set of competence dimensions, the answers to these questions are


used to discuss the overall issue of how curricula are aligned with workforce demands for datarelated competences. The focus is placed on the UK market that suffers from a shortage of data professionals particularly in the financial industry. We find that companies require ‘allrounders’ who possess strong technical, analytical, and business competences, while master`s programmes rarely impart business competences. Main contributions include an empirically derived typology of data professionals, the application of a topic model for IS research, and an analysis framework that allows universities to critically assess their offerings. PERSONALISING THE IS CLASSROOM – INSIGHTS ON COURSE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION Philipp Melzer, Mareike Schoop Personalising learning is one major avenue to address the increasing heterogeneity in today’s (higher) education institutions. The present study discusses the design and implementation of a self-regulated, personalised flipped classroom course within the IS curriculum of a German uni-versity. Following a design-based research methodology, relevant kernel theories are identified to derive general requirements and components for such courses, eventually describing the pro-cess of creating and implementing an instantiation transforming an existing university course. The requirements are evaluated referring to the implemented course, showing that e-learning reduces the effort of personalising the learning process. DEVELOPING INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL WITHIN AGILE IT TEAMS: A LITERATURE REVIEW Anna Wiedemann, Andy Weeger Since the Agile Manifesto was presented in 2001, more and more organizations move from traditional, plan-driven software development to agile approaches. This movement is motivated by the fact that environments are changing quickly and new requirements need fast implementation. We conducted a structured literature review to identify the current state of knowledge about agile IT teams and how they develop ambidextrous organizational learning to respond to rapid changes. We draw on the intellectual capital theory with the aim to explore key capabilities of agile IT teams of prior research. Afterwards, we synthesize the key capabilities considering intellectual capital. We derive intellectual capital configurations that enable IT teams to develop ambidextrous organizational learning. Furthermore, we identified technological oriented capabilities of infrastructure flexibility and architecture modularity for agile IT teams. Therefore, we built the concept of technological capital and arranged these capabilities. Thus, this study contributes to research by highlighting the characteristics that enable IT teams to be agile and thus helping companies to gain competitive advantage. Furthermore, we discuss possibilities how balance in ambidextrous organizational learning could be achieved. Additionally, we provide further research opportunities in this research stream.


T20. IT Governance and Business-IT Alignment BALANCING ALIGNMENT, ADAPTIVITY, AND EFFECTIVENESS: DESIGN PRINCIPLES FOR SUSTAINABLE IT PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT David Hoffmann, Thomas Müller, Frederik Ahlemann Environmental turbulence puts significant pressure on today’s IT organizations, forcing them to proactively respond to changing strategic trajectories and thus to conduct a multiplicity of projects in order to capitalize on emerging opportunities. Although many organizations employ institutionalized IT project portfolio management (IT PPM), they often fail to achieve the desired throughput, struggle with projects that run late, and miss short-term alignment to strategic changes. Further, traditional IT PPM establishes a long-term horizon, which contradicts the organizational necessity to react at short notice. This calls for the refinement of traditional IT PPM towards an aligned yet more flexible dimensioning that is able to adapt to its environment’s dynamism. We apply a design approach guided by activity theory (AT) to investigate a revelatory case, to explore an important phenomenon from a novel perspective. We then conduct a focus group, and perform an applicability check to evaluate and refine our suggestions. Finally, we propose three design goals and 12 design principles to address the issues that so often arise. Our research contributes to the nascent body of knowledge by providing a new analytical view on IT PPM and by suggesting recommendations for a significant problem in practice. HOW TO IMPLEMENT AGILE IT SETUPS: A TAXONOMY OF DESIGN OPTIONS Jan Jöhnk, Maximilian Roeglinger, Markus Thimmel, Nils Urbach The digital transformation requires organizations to rethink how they interact with customers, define value propositions, leverage data, and organize internal operations. Evolving into an indispensable part of value creation, IT organizations are required to not only plan, build, and run IT services in the safe and steady mode, but also to enable organizations seizing digital opportunities in an agile and adaptive mode. Despite mature knowledge on IT organizations, ambidextrous IT, and agile methods, there is high uncertainty on how to implement bimodal IT organizations. To address this gap, we propose a taxonomy of design options for the agile mode. Our taxonomy includes seven dimensions (i.e., scope, institutionalization, accountability, governance, location, staffing, and technical integration) that address relevant questions regarding the design of agile IT setups. While creating our taxonomy, we built on extant literature and involved experts from various organizations (e.g., Chief Information Officers, Digital Transformation Officers, and Managing Directors of IT departments). These experts did not only validate our taxonomy regarding real-world fidelity and understandability, but also applied it to classify the agile IT setups of their organizations. Thus, our study contributes to descriptive knowledge and delivers practically relevant insights into existing agile IT setups.


THE VIEW FROM THE TOP – HOW SENIOR EXECUTIVES EXERCISE CONTROL OVER INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECTS TO ENHANCE PERFORMANCE Martin Wiener, W. Alec Cram, Ulrich Remus Exercising control over information systems (IS) projects is a challenging task. This seems to be par-ticularly true for senior executives who commonly represent key project owners and who are ultimately held accountable for project performance despite their scarce time and often limited project-related knowledge. While prior studies have almost exclusively focused on the role of line and project managers in controlling IS projects, this study aims to contribute new theoretical insights by focusing on the role of senior executives. Specifically, our study explores how different control styles and modes used by senior IT executives relate to the performance of IS projects. Based on a survey with 92 participants, we find that executives’ use of an enabling control style is positively related to IS project per-formance. In contrast, the use of an authoritative control style is found to be negatively related to performance, but still seems to play a critical role in successfully enacting formal controls. Moreover, the study results show that only senior IT executives’ use of input control significantly and positively affects IS project performance, indicating that prior results on the effectiveness of different control modes do not easily translate to the specific context of our study. A STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT MODEL FOR IT FLEXIBILITY AND DYNAMIC CAPABILITIES: TOWARD AN ASSESSMENT TOOL Rogier Van de Wetering, Patrick Mikalef, Adamantia Pateli The Dynamic Capabilities View (DCV) has emerged as an influential theoretical and management framework in modern IS research. However, despite the view's significant contributions, its strength and core focus are essentially in its use for historical firm performance explanation. Furthermore, valuable contributions have been made by several researchers in order to extend the DCV to fit the constantly changing IT environments and other imperative drivers for competitive performance. Nevertheless, to our knowledge, no DCV extension has been developed which allows firms to assess their current state of maturity and to derive imperative steps for further performance enhancement. To fill this gap, this article develops a strategic alignment model for IT flexibility and dynamic capabilities and empirically validates proposed hypotheses using correlation and regression analyses on a sample of 322 international firms. Findings suggest that there is a positive relationship between a firm’s degree of alignment of IT flexibility and dynamic capability dimensions – defined as the degree of balance between all dimensions – and competitive firm performance. Alignment can, therefore, be seen as an important condition that significantly influences a firm’s competitive advantage in constantly changing environments. The proposed framework helps firms assess and improve their IT flexibility and dynamic capabilities. Results are discussed, while theoretical and practical implications are highlighted, concluding with suggestions for future research.


THE DATA VALUE MAP: A FRAMWORK FOR DEVELOPING SHARED UNDERSTANDING ON DATA INITIATIVES Tadhg Nagle, David Sammon

While organisations regularly claim that data is one of their most important assets, they regularly fail to articulate or fully leverage its value. This leads to impacts such as missed opportunities, a reactive nature to data issues, and poorly defined/failed data projects. Framing this problem as a lack of shared understanding and misalignment between data stakeholders, this paper documents the development of the Data Value Map, an artefact designed to remedy this disconnect. Following a Practitioner Design Science Research approach, the Data Value Map is currently in its fourth iteration and has been rigorously evaluated with: (i) 96 practitioners in the field, (ii) a 12-month case-study, (iii) feedback from six workshops, and (iv) a survey on the effectiveness of the framework. Developed over the course of 4 years the Data Value Map has demonstrated its ability to facilitate a shared understanding on data initiatives and is linked to the success of data projects with an estimated value over €40 million. While, the Data Value Map is itself a contribution to the body of knowledge, further contributions were made in the form of: insights on how to overcome barriers in developing a shared understanding, namely: a lack of an organisational mental model, (ii) lack of a shared language, and (iii) an over-emphasis on technology. WE’VE GOT THE POWER – THE RELEVANCE OF IT LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL IT CAPABILITIES IN THE FULLY DIGITIZED BUSINESS ERA Nico Wunderlich, Roman Beck Modern information technologies allow for an ever increasing digitization of business processes in various industries around the globe. This requires an organization-wide digital mind-set and IT capabilities to react agile in turbulent business environments. Which enabling role CIOs have to develop IT capabilities as necessary predecessor to develop organizationwide strategic IT alignment is still unclear. How strategic IT alignment as means to react to rapid market changes can be achieved as consequence of organization-wide capabilities has not been answered yet. In this research, we capture individual and organizational factors characterizing the CIO posi-tion and combine them with two preliminary stages of IT competencies, IT infrastructure and IT capabilities, in a single nomological net to identify their influence on strategic IT alignment. Evaluating the results by means of a broad sample collected within a survey among 141 IT-decision makers in the U.S., our partial least squares analysis supports most of our hypotheses, notably verifying the influence of CIOs on organizational structures and strategic IT alignment, therefore fully mediated by IT capabilities. Building on Mintzberg, we propose strengthening the CIO leadership position furthermore throughout the entire organization to cope with the chal-lenges arising from the ongoing digitization of business processes.


INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GOVERNANCE AND THE BEHAVIOR OF INDIVIDUALS IN THE PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS CONTEXT Guilherme Wiedenhöft, Edimara Mezzomo Luciano, Gabriela Viale Pereira

IT Governance (ITG) institutionalization might reduce the negative impact of political issues on IT results especially through the behavioral pillar. This research used the Organizational Citi-zenship Behavior (OCB) concept to understand this phenomenon. OCB describes a person's voluntary commitment to an organization that is not part of his/her contractual tasks. The goal of this study is confirming that ITG institutionalization effects civil servants’ behavior. The set of hypotheses of the theoretical-empirical model are based on the presumption that ITG institu-tionalization exerts a positive effect on each variable of OCB. A descriptive-confirmative ex post facto research was operationalized through a survey research with 173 civil servants in the Ex-ecutive and Judiciary Branch of a Brazilian state. A questionnaire was developed and validated through Factor exploratory Analysis. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used for data analysis. All hypotheses were confirmed, showing the effect of ITG institutionaliza-tion on the behavior of individuals. The theoretical contribution is the development of an ITG institutionalization construct and the demonstration of a positive and significant relationship between this and the OCB construct. The practical contribution highlights the possibility of IT managers performing their IT tasks through behavior change of individuals encouraged by the ITG institutionalization. WHY AND HOW DO MUNICIPAL AREAS GOVERN INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL ICT COOPERATION: INDEED, “THE EMPEROR HAS NO CLOTHES” Tomi Dahlberg, Tomi Dahlberg, Ari Helin Information and communication technologies (ICT) are significant for the development and production of municipalities’ services and activities. Yet, municipalities typically operate their ICT independently with only limited resources. Limited resources are a key incentive for intermunicipal ICT cooperation. We investigated, how inter-municipal ICT cooperation was executed and governed in 20 Finnish municipal regions including 144 actual municipalities. As the theoretical background, we reviewed Transaction Cost Economics and the Resource Based View theories, and the literature on IT governance practices. These theories and literature were used to identify theory-proposed ICT cooperation benefits and governance practices. We then compared theory-proposed benefits and practices empirically to those perceived in the actual regions. Finally, we used Granovetter’s social network theory to understand the empirical findings on ICT cooperation benefits and IT governance practices. Our findings reveal distinct differences in perceived ICT cooperation benefits, in ICT cooperation, and in the governance of IT between Finnish municipal areas, and the lack of social ties helps to understand detected differences. Our findings also indicate that the emperor will not enjoy new clothes – ICT cooperation benefits – unless ICT cooperation is systematically organized and governed. The extension of the theory base in IT governance research is our main contribution.


BASELINE MECHANISMS FOR IT GOVERNANCE AT UNIVERSITIES Isaias Scalabrin Bianchi, Rui Dinis Sousa, Ruben Pereira, Jos van Hillegersberg

The pervasive use of technology has created a critical dependency on Information Technology (IT) that requires IT Governance (ITG). ITG calls for the definition and implementation of formal mechanisms at the highest level in the organization taking into account structures, processes and relational mechanisms for the creation of business value from IT investments. However, determining the right ITG mechanisms remains a complex endeavour. Previous studies have identified ITG mechanisms in use in the financial and health care industries. While universities also increasingly depend on IT for their success, ITG implementation in universities has not received much attention. As universities have many unique characteristics, it is highly unlikely that ITG experiences from the financial and health care industries can be directly applied to universities. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to identify an ITG mechanisms’ baseline for universities. Six case studies comprising of in-depth interviews three international universities in Brazil, Portugal and the Netherlands, led to the proposal of a minimum ITG baseline for universities that is comparared with the financial and health care industries. This article concludes by presenting key contributions, limitations and future work.

T21. Knowledge Management UNCERTAINTIES AS BARRIERS FOR KNOWLEDGE SHARING WITH ENTERPRISE SOCIAL MEDIA Matthias Trier, Magdalene Fung, Abigail Capili Hansen Transferring knowledge has become a key challenge for global organizations and social media offers new opportunities to digitalize and support this process. However, the successful implementation of a social media based knowledge transfer environment is marked by several uncertainties that can become a barrier for the participants’ adoption. There is only limited existing research studying the types of uncertainties that employees perceive and their impact on knowledge transfer via social media. To address this gap, this article presents a qualitative interview-based study of the adoption of the Enterprise Social Media tool Yammer for knowledge sharing in a large global organization. We identify and categorize nine uncertainties that were perceived as barriers by the respondents. The study revealed that the uncertainty types play an important role in affecting employees’ participation and willingness to share. We further derive necessary critical managerial interventions that ensure a successful ESM implementation for knowledge sharing. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT WITHOUT MANAGEMENT – SHADOW IT IN KNOWLEDGEINTENSIVE MANUFACTURING PRACTICES Melanie Steinhueser, Lena Waizenegger, Shahper Vodanovich, Alexander Richter


The voluntary use of private device by employees without formal approval of the IT department, commonly termed Shadow IT, is an increasingly widespread phenomenon. In this paper, we study the role of private smartphones (and related applications like WhatsApp) in knowledge-intensive practices in the manufacturing domain. With an in-depth case study based on data gained from observations and interviews, we are able to empirically illustrate why workers use their private smartphones (contrary to company guidelines) and how they find significant gains of productivity by using the ‘forbidden’ applications. Our study contributes to knowledge management research by showing how private IT use can change existing knowledge management practices. At the same time, we are able to give rich insights into the rise of Shadow IT in a manufacturing context which takes place in a self-organised way without knowledge of the management. This enables us to take a step towards a knowledge management strategy perspective on Shadow IT. HOW CAN DIAGRAMMATIC CONCEPTUAL MODELING SUPPORT KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT? Dimitris Karagiannis, Robert Buchmann, Michael Walch Traditionally, venues that are publishing Knowledge Management research have been separating concerns between two viewpoints that rarely converge into holistic approaches: one is the tradition of Artificial Intelligence research, where "Knowledge Management" is often employed as an umbrella term in relation to a variety of semantic technologies, knowledge representation and knowledge discovery techniques; the other viewpoint is a specialisation of "intangible asset management", dealing with the business value and the pragmatics of organisational knowledge. Knowledge Management Systems are a catalyst for bridging such complementary perspectives and Design Science artefacts must be employed to facilitate alignments between these viewpoints, specifically between human-oriented and machineoriented knowledge representations. Motivated by this desideratum and driven by projectbased experience, the paper at hand advocates a key role of Diagrammatic Conceptual Modelling methods in enriching the seminal SECI Knowledge Conversion spiral, to the aim of opening it towards Knowledge Management Systems that could not have been envisioned at the time of Nonaka's original SECI proposal, but can now benefit from state-of-the-art semantics-driven practices. By hybridising the SECI model with a machine-oriented Knowledge Distilling cycle, an extended SECI spiral variant is proposed and analysed in the paper, as a reflection on project-based deployments and experience. ‘GUANXI’ AS A SHOCK ABSORBER: LESSENING THE DETRIMENTAL EFFECT OF STRUCTURAL HOLES ON THE ACQUISITION AND INTEGRATION OF KNOWLEDGE Jiayuan Liu, Joe Nandhakumar, Markos Zachariadis China’s digital ventures are becoming increasingly popular on the global landscape, attracting signif- icant attention on their digital innovation ecosystem; meanwhile, the reduction of communication cost and the convergence of digital technology are distributing the control over


innovation activities and amplifying the knowledge heterogeneity, inducing a serious challenge. Facing this problem, collaborative knowledge activities could provide a solution, but in China, there is very limited under- standing of this due to the existence of “guanxi”influential relationships in Chinese culture. To address the gap, we adopt a mixed-methods research approach to explore how guanxi and structural holes affect knowledge acquisition and knowledge integration among Chinese digital ventures at dif- ferent stages in doubly distributed innovation networks. Our findings indicate that guanxi fosters the acquisition and integration of knowledge by creating a buffer zone, around which knowledge re- sources flow in the form of favor exchange, ‘renqing’ (favor) accumulation, and ‘mianzi’ (face) preservation. Hence we make three contributions: 1) recognizing guanxi as a shock absorber to lessen the detrimental impacts induced by excessive structural holes situated in innovation networks; 2) iden- tifying the significance of integrators in Chinese culture; 3) uncovering when and what type of guanxi is utilized the most for China’s digital ventures.

USABILITY EVALUATION OF COOPERATION VISUALISATION IN ENTERPRISES: FRAMEWORK DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION BASED ON EMPIRICAL RESULTS Erik Kolek, Eva Alice Christiane Bittner Cooperation visualisation is used for planning, coordinating, and controlling enterprise cooperation within cross-organisational knowledge management. Visualisation is created using different modelling languages like BPMN 2.0. In this research paper we focus on the usability evaluation of cooperation visualisation in enterprises. We developed a usability evaluation framework and derived a model of hypotheses from it. This model is also linked to usability theory and verified with empirical results. Quantitative data from 432 managers with experience in using visualisation for enterprise cooperation has been collected and the causal model has been tested using the structure equation modelling method partial least squares. The empirical study reveals a critical path for usability evaluation of cooperation visualisation in enterprises. For theory, the impact of organisation properties and usage attributes on the usability of cooperation visualisation in enterprises is demonstrated. For practice, especially the user properties, further usage conditions, usage requirements, and usage variants are supporting the critical usability evaluation path and aid to improve management decisions, model interpretation and usability of cooperation visualisation in enterprises. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMPETENCY AND ORGANIZATIONAL AGILITY: ROLES OF ABSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND INFORMATION INTENSITY Hongyi Mao, Shan Liu, Jinlong Zhang, Yajun Zhang Organizational agility has become increasingly essential for contemporary organizations to survive and compete in this information age. Although scholars have discussed the possible effects of information technology (IT) competency on organizational agility, existing knowledge on IT–agility relationship is limited. An integration analysis of internal capability and external environment is lacking. This study investigates the mediating role of absorptive capacity and the moderating role of information intensity in IT‒agility relationship to fill the


research gap. Empirical evidence from the data of 165 organizations in China shows that the effects of absorptive capacity are multifaceted and nuanced. In particular, absorptive capability partially mediates the effects of IT knowledge and IT operations on market capitalizing agility and fully mediates their effects on operational adjustment agility. No mediations are found in IT objects. The results also show that information intensity strengthens the effects of IT operations and objects on absorptive capacity. We then discuss theoretical and practical implications.

T22. Maritime Informatics DIGITIZATION IN MARITIME INDUSTRY: COPING WITH A VESSEL’S ENGINE FAILURE Ioanna Constantiou, Arisa Shollo, Kristian Kreiner, Morten Thanning-Vendelø Digitization in the maritime industry is expected to transform businesses. The recently introduced mo-bile technologies in inter-organizational processes is an example of digitization in an industry which moves very slowly towards digital transformation. We focus on the influence of mobile technologies on control practices in inter-organizational processes related to coping with an engine failure. We collect-ed qualitative data from in depth interviews with representatives of the involved parties. We identify organizational and behavioural challenges hindering information sharing during problem solving of an engine failure, as well as how mobile technologies are currently used. We conclude by reflecting on how introduction of mobile technologies influences control in the inter-organizational processes by addressing some of the identified organizational and behavioural challenges. Mobile technologies increase information sharing and thus the efficiency of inter-organizational processes when coping with an engine failure.

T23. Materiality of IT and Ubiquitous Computing QUANTIFIED SELF: A LITERATURE REVIEW BASED ON THE FUNNEL PARADIGM Jean-François De Moya, Jessie Pallud Over the last decade, increasing scholarly interest has been demonstrated by the exponential growth of published studies on the topic of Quantified-Self (QS). After 10 years of existence, it seems important to review the knowledge accumulated on QS in order to identify potential gaps and avenues for future research, especially in the IS field. We rely on a systematic literature re-view in the field of Information Systems with the approach recommended by Okoli and Scha-bram (2010). In addition, we use the paradigm funnel (Berthon et al., 2003) to structure our analysis. We find that the literature on QS covers three main domains. The technological do-main has studied data mining, visualization and user behaviour. The medical domain has fo-cused on the benefits of QS especially for health management and the social


domain is more critical about the implications of QS in people’s life. Also, our analysis of the literature reveals a concentration of empirical and critical articles and few theoretical and methodological pa-pers. Future research should fill in these gaps.

T24. Openness and IT UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF SOCIAL PRESENCE IN CROWDFUNDING: EVIDENCE FROM LEADING U.S. AND GERMAN PLATFORMS Maximilian Raab, Thomas Friedrich, Sebastian Schlauderer, Sven Overhage As a novel opportunity to acquire capital from the masses, crowdfunding has attracted great attention in academia and practice. So far, little is known about the factors that promote the success of crowdfunding projects, however. In this paper, we examine in how far the social presence perceived on a project’s website influences the success of the respective crowdfunding project. Based on a data-driven analysis of 2.000 project websites from the largest crowdfunding platforms in the U.S. and Germany, we show that the perceived social presence has a significant influence on the success of crowdfunding projects. The obtained results indicate that using socially rich pictures and a socially rich description in the project presentation positively affects the success of a crowdfunding project. A socially rich profile page of the founder(s) in contrast appears to have a rather limited effect. The success of crowdfunding projects seems to be dependent on the participation behavior of the founder, however. Our results indicate that having backed other projects positively influences the success of one’s own initiative. The number of answered comments might have a negative effect on the success of the initiative, though. A FRAMEWORK FOR THE NOTION OF ‘UTILITY’ IN THE LANDSCAPE OF CROWDFUNDING Jascha-Alexander Koch Crowdfunding, peer-to-peer lending, and crowdinvesting are part of the philosophy of 'openness' in information systems and constitute valuable opportunities for raising funds for business ideas and any type of project. Research has confirmed that online crowdfunding generates high value for project initiators that look for financial resources. Funders, for their part, benefit from funding compensations which they receive in exchange for their financial support. And, finally, diverse other groups of individuals are directly or indirectly influenced by the project results. As a consequence, research articles often touch aspects of utility regarding the individuals concerned. In fact, the notion of utility is of special importance in the context of crowdfunding because it constitutes the basis for explaining participants' actions and decisions. However, crowdfunding research does not use a consistent concept of 'utility', discusses aspects of utility only superficially, and ignores the various influences on utility generation processes in the landscape of crowdfunding. For this reason, we propose a consistent conceptualization of utility in the area of crowdfunding that regards the different


sources of utility. We discuss the influences on funders' decision making and demonstrate that aspects of imperfect openness affect utility generating processes in crowdfunding in many ways. COMPETITIVE MARKET INNOVATION CONTESTS AND SOCIAL CAPITAL: DIAMETRICALLY OPPOSED, OR INHERENTLY LINKED? Stephen Treacy, Joseph Feller, Brian O'Flaherty, Tadhg Nagle Competitive market innovation contest platforms are increasingly used by businesses to identify new products or services to offer their customer base; yet, the degree to which social capital has been explored within these online communities remains scarce. While there is ample support for the presence of social capital within other forms of virtual communities to facilitate knowledge sharing, competitive markets represent a unique setting given the inherently competitive nature of their contest solvers. This has led to a distinct lack of prior research exploring this area, especially as previous studies have chosen to focus instead on social capital vis-à -vis solver motivation rather than a standalone theory. We investigate six competitive markets from the perspective of their experts to explore how the three dimensions of social capital have a role within this setting: (1) the structural dimension (involving social ties), (2) the relational dimension (involving trust, reciprocity, and self-identity), and (3) the cognitive dimension (involving shared language and shared vision). Through this study, we present a theoretical model of both the emergent themes and the net impacts of social capital within competitive markets, and discuss its implications for both IS research and practice. HOW ESTABLISHED COMPANIES LEVERAGE IT PLATFORMS FOR VALUE CO-CREATION – INSIGHTS FROM BANKING Maximilian Schreieck, Manuel Wiesche Inspired by the success of digital-native companies such as Google or Salesforce, established companies such as car manufacturers, equipment manufacturers, or banks strive for value cocreation via open IT platforms. However, literature on value co-creation does not cater to the specific situation of established companies. Addressing this gap, we seek to improve our understanding of how established companies can co-create value through openness and collaboration with IT platforms. Based on an exploratory field study of a European bank that is introducing an IT platform, we show that openness and collaboration enable value cocreation while creating areas of conflict and potential benefit. For example, openness creates internal resistance and exposes technology while facilitating internal transparency and standardization. Collaboration entails conflicts with existing partners that are affected by the value co-creation strategy, but existing partners are also assets in incentivizing collaboration with third-party developers. Contributing to literature on value co-creation and openness of IT, we confirm that established companies can benefit from IT platforms but need to address specific areas of conflict and potential benefits related to balancing openness and control and governing collaboration. Our discussion provides first insights for established companies that consider implementing an IT platform strategy.


DESIGN OF A DECENTRALIZED PEER-TO-PEER REVIEWING AND PUBLISHING MARKET Christian Janze This normative paper conceptualizes an alternative for the current scientific peer reviewing and publication system. Based on design science research methodology, we propose a distributed peer-to-peer network and transactional data base system (APOLLO) and a cryptocurrency (APL). We conceptualize a market for peer-to-peer reviewing and publishing of research contributions and associated assets that is based on economic market mechanisms and does not require centralized authorities or intermediaries. We discuss how the resulting decentralized and pseudonymous market for research assets could help to mitigate unresolved conflicts of interests and biases prevalent in the current system.

T25. Participatory Aspects and Inclusion in Social Media CONSUMER USE OF SOCIAL LIVE STREAMING SERVICES: THE INFLUENCE OF COEXPERIENCE AND EFFECTANCE ON ENJOYMENT Simon Bründl, Christian Matt, Thomas Hess Social live streaming services (SLSS) have emerged as a new type of hedonic social media. SLSS allow users to watch and broadcast video streams in real-time, fostering sociability through synchronous communication via chat channels. While the extant literature has mostly examined producers’ use of SLSS, the consumer perspective has been underexplored. Prior research has identified perceived enjoyment as consumers’ primary motivation to use hedonic social media. However, it remains unclear how the specific affordances of SLSS affect consumers’ enjoyment. Due to their synchronous nature, SLSS enable consumers to coexperience live streams together and to perceive so-called “effectance” by shaping the content of live streams through their actions. Consequently, research is required on how both coexperience and effectance influence consumers’ enjoyment of SLSS. We empirically address this research gap by applying partial least squares equation modeling on web survey data of 127 consumers of SLSS. Our results show that consumers’ perceived co-experience has a strong positive effect on the enjoyment of their active behavior (chatting) and their passive behavior (watching). Perceived effectance, however, only shows a positive impact on the enjoyment of active behavior, while playing no role for the enjoyment of passive behavior. UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF ICTS IN PROMOTING SOCIAL INCLUSION: THE CASE OF SYRIAN REFUGEES IN GERMANY Safa’a AbuJarour, Hanna Krasnova


With a number of refugees around the world reaching disastrous proportions, there is a growing pressure to understand which measures are effective in promoting social inclusion of refugees in their new homes. Considering an exemplary IT-savviness of the current refugee wave, there is a growing hope in the power of Social Media and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in supporting integration processes. Contributing to this discourse, in this study we build on the qualitative analysis of fifteen interviews with Syrian refugees in Germany. Based on the capability approach, our findings reveal dependencies between properties of ICTs and their use, ICT-enabled capabilities relevant for refugees, and the corresponding contribution of ICTs to the processes of social inclusion. On the theoretical level, our findings extend current understanding of the ICT effects on the processes of social inclusion in the refugee context. From the practical standpoint, our findings provide actionable recommendations for policy-makers in their efforts to achieve integration.

T26. Service Innovation, Engineering and Management ANSWERING KEY QUESTIONS FOR SERVICE SCIENCE Steven Alter A three month consultation process following the Cambridge Service Science, Management, and Engineering Symposium in July 2007 produced a white paper called “Succeeding through service innovation: A service perspective for education, research, business and government”(IfM and IBM, 2008). The white paper’s content served as an important inspiration for subsequent service science research. Among other contributions, it identified five “key questions” for service science related to architectures of service systems, building blocks, life cycles, optimization, and outcomes of service systems.This paper addresses the white paper’s challenge by providing a conceptual rationale and then an-swering each of the key questions. It starts by discussing the series of ideas that form a basis for an-swering the questions. Its final section looks at each question in turn and explains how the previously discussed ideas, taken in combination, answer each question in a way that is coherent and consistent with the other answers. In essence, this paper is an existence proof illustrating that there is at least one coherent and consistent set of answers for these key questions. Ideally, the existence of one set of an-swers will encourage the creation of answers from other viewpoints, ultimately supporting future de-velopments in service science. INVOLVEMENT PRACTICES IN PERSUASIVE SERVICE ENCOUNTERS: THE CASE OF HOME SECURITY ADVICE Mateusz Dolata, Gerhard Schwabe Advisors providing non-commercial service encounters are neither trained nor explicitly incentivized to persuade the advisee. However, a whole range of encounters may benefit from enhanced persuasiveness to prevent the advisee from taking counterproductive decisions.


Persuasion literature from the field of social psychology points to the persuadee’s involvement as a central factor of persuasive effect. Nevertheless, little is known on how persuader addresses persuadee’s involvement and how those efforts can be supported by means of modern technology, especially in the non-commercial service encounters. Based on a detailed analysis of experimental service encounters and supported by the in situ studies of real advisory sessions, this study identifies a set of involvement practices, i.e., conversational practices that advisors engage in when trying to improve the advisee’s involvement and illustrates how these practices can be afforded with modern multimedia technology. Thereby, the manuscript proposes to bridge the notions of involvement from the conversation studies and from the persuasion literature. By pointing to the influence of IT on persuasive behaviour in service encounters, it brings together the concept of persuasive technology and service support as a subfield of IS. The manuscript offers novel perspective for framing the conversations and the practices in service encounters. TOWARD A MULTI-STRATEGY CONCESSION MODEL FOR HUMAN-COMPUTER PRICE NEGOTIATION Mukun Cao , Qing Hu, Melody Kiang Human-computer negotiation plays an increasingly important role in today’s highly dynamic online environment, especially in B2C e-commerce transactions. However, the lack of research on effective automated negotiation systems to respond to human buyers’ strategic and/or tactic offers has limited the potential of automated human-computer negotiation systems in realworld situations. Hence, the development of an intelligent software agent that is capable of dynamical-ly adjusting its negotiation strategy in response to the human buyers’ offers can greatly improve the negotiation experience of the human buyer and the outcome for the merchant seller. In this study, we propose a software agent that combines five price negotiation strategies: time-dependent, behavior-dependent, dynamic time-dependent, punishment, and anti-detection. In order to validate this novel multi-strategy model, we implement a prototype of the system and compare it with two classic single strategies (i.e., competitive and collaborative) in human-computer price negotiation experiments with 121 participants. The results show that the pro-posed software agent not only outperforms its human counterpart, but also significantly in-creases the settlement ratio and the joint utility of the negotiations, two commonly used criteria for measuring performance of automated negotiation agents. CUSTOMER ACCEPTANCE OF PRO-ACTIVE SERVICES – A SCENARIO-BASED EMPIRICAL STUDY Michael Leyer, Mary Tate, Florian Bär, Marek Kowalkiewicz, Michael Rosemann Advances in Information Technology (IT) have changed the nature of services, letting it become increasingly digitized. Pro-active services represent a new kind of digital service delivery model promising added value for the receiver of the service who can consume a service without being concerned about its initiation. However, research has provided neither adequate conceptualizations for these novel digital services nor insights into customers’


attitudes and readiness to accept them. To our knowledge, the present study is first in filling this research gap. We provide three metaphors, simplification, enhancement and outsourcing, for different classes of pro-active services. Moreover, we develop a causal model for explaining customer acceptance of pro-active services that is evaluated quantitatively adopting a scenariobased approach for an enhancement service. As an example we choose the readiness of students to accept a pro-active digital service from their education provider. Our findings reveal outcome evaluation as the strongest predictor of attitude. Additionally, attitude is determined by control beliefs and trust. Attitude towards pro-active service affects the customer’s willingness to accept the pro-active service. The presented findings help service organizations in designing pro-actives services that are presumably accepted by customers. NEVER CHANGE A RUNNING SYSTEM? HOW STATUS QUO-THINKING CAN INHIBIT SOFTWARE AS A SERVICE ADOPTION IN ORGANIZATIONS Margareta Heidt, Rabea Sonnenschein, André Loske Despite the “buzz” about Software as a Service (SaaS), decision makers still often refrain from replacing their existing in-house technologies with innovative IT services. Industry reports indicate that the skeptical attitude of decision makers stems primarily from a high degree of uncertainty that exists, for example, due to insufficient experience with the new technology, a lack of best practice approaches, and missing lighthouse projects. Whereas previous research is predominantly focused on the advantages of SaaS, behavioral economics conclusively demonstrate that reference points like the evaluation of the incumbent technology or a familiar product are oftentimes prevalent when decisions are made under uncertainty. In this context, Status Quo-Thinking may inhibit decisions in favor of potentially advantageous IT service innovations. Drawing on Prospect Theory and Status Quo Bias research, we derive and empirically test a research model that explicates the influence of the incumbent technology on the evaluation of SaaS. Based on a large-scale empirical study, we demonstrate that the decision makers’ attitude toward SaaS is highly dependent on their current systems and their level of SaaS. A lack of SaaS experience will increase the impact of the Status Quo, thus inhibiting a potential advantageous adoption of the new technology. EXPLAINING THE ROLE OF SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE FOR CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS BY ESTABLISHING LOGICAL LINKS Arne Gruettner, Janek Richter, Dirk Basten In the context of the so-called fourth industrial revolution, cyber-physical systems (CPS) build the technological foundation for the increasing digitalisation of our world. Because guidelines to overcome challenges of building such systems (e.g. security concerns, missing know-how, and lack of standards) are scarce, researchers and practitioners alike have begun to analyse the role of the mature paradigm of service-oriented architecture (SOA) in implementing CPS. However, the relationship between SOA and CPS is not entirely understood. To close this gap, we analyse SOA’s role for CPS based on a concept-driven literature review. The analysis of 12 publications that address the interrelation between SOA and CPS yielded four groups of


CPS benefits that can be achieved by leveraging SOA. Combining these benefits with architectural layers and SOA’s design principles, we identify logical links that explain the role of SOA for CPS. Future research might concentrate on dominant patterns to scrutinise how a specific benefit can be achieved by leveraging SOA. Designers of CPS can leverage the identified patterns to understand the importance of specific characteristics of SOA to address the unique requirements of their CPS. MULTI USER SERVICE RE-SELECTION: REACT DYNAMICALLY TO EVENTS OCCURRING AT PROCESS EXECUTION Michael Mayer Considering service-based processes, the problem of determining the service candidates that fit best to a user’s target weights and requirements regarding certain non-functional properties is known as QoS-aware service selection problem. Referring to multi-user processes, this requires taking into account several users with their individual goals. In this regard, users could also have preferences in the sense of user-defined requests referring to other users, so-called Inter-User-Requests (IUR). Such IUR result in dependencies among different users’ service compositions that have to be taken into account when selecting services. However, due to the dynamic environment in which services are used certain events – like the failure of a service – may occur during process execution that require service re-selection at runtime. In this work, we provide such a service re-selection approach in terms of an optimization model that considers multiple users and dependencies resulting from IUR. Moreover, for the temporal coordination of the users – necessary for time-dependent IUR – we further propose a continuous time concept and integrate that in our model. Supported by our evaluation, we feel confident that this approach can serve as a first step for a comprehensive multi-user service reselection approach where dependencies among users exist. THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY FOR SERVICE INNOVATION IN SHARING ECONOMY ORGANIZATIONS – A SERVICE-DOMINANT LOGIC PERSPECTIVE Alexander Frey, Manuel Trenz, Daniel Veit The role and influence of information technology related to business and value creation of a firm are discussed controversially. The question how technology can drive service innovations is especially crucial in highly competitive and quickly developing areas such as digital platforms – and at the same time not well understood. This study investigates the role of information technology for service innovation in sharing economy organizations. These organizations are digital platforms that conflate physical and digital service elements. Using a service-dominant logic perspective, we conduct an interpretive multiple-case study to gain a deeper understanding for types of service innovation in this area and the different roles that IT can play in these initiatives. Our findings reveal different areas for service innovation and thereby help identifying previously unexplored interdependencies between the service ecosystem and value co-creation. We furthermore find that organizations’ choices on the role of IT are dependent on the level of heterogeneity and standardization of the mediated


transactions. We derive four archetypes for the role of IT in service innovation that serve to explain how and why IT is exploited sharing economy organizations. The findings are translated into practical guidelines for managers of digital platforms.

T27. Smart Information Systems for Inclusive Education MULTIPLE VOICES IN THE MAKER MOVEMENT – A NEXUS ANALYTIC LITERATURE REVIEW ON CHILDREN, EDUCATION AND MAKING Netta Iivari, Marianne Kinnula, Tonja Molin-Juustila, Leena Kuure Inviting children to take part in maker movement has been advocated, especially in the context of education. Despite the numerous publications related to making, a more theoretical treatment and common vocabulary of the topic are still lacking. This paper utilizes as its theoretical lens the re-search framework of nexus analysis, suited for an in-depth study of complex social phenomena, to make sense of existing research on children and making. The study illustrates the value of the nexus-analytic concepts of ‘discourses in place’, ‘interaction order’ and ‘historical body’, the three aspects of social action, in scrutinizing the extant research as well as indicates how to utilize these concepts in educational making projects with children: when establishing relationships with children, involving children as makers, and analyzing the results. Implications for IS research, practice and education are discussed.

T28. Social and Ethical Implications of ICT Use SOCIAL CAPITAL AND ICT INTERVENTION: A SEARCH FOR CONTEXTUAL RELATION Zafor Ahmed, Ahmed Ibrahim Alzahrani Social Capital is a relatively new and popular term in social science. It is being increasingly applied by researchers to tackle a broad range of issues. Regardless of the wide applicability, the meaning of social capital is still hotly disputed, and its utility in scientific discourse is highly contested. Research findings contrary to social capitals theoretical prediction are key contributors for such dispute. Through a systematic review of social capital and ICT-centric literature, combined with a grounded theory approach, this study aims to identify a contextual link or enablers of social capital in an ICT intervention. Current research identified three broader contexts acting as enablers for different dimensions of social capital during an ICT intervention which include: (1) functionalist context, (2) interactionist context, and (3) conflict context. Theoretically grounded links among context, social capital and ICT have also been discussed to show the significance of context.


UNDERSTANDING CROWDTURFING: THE DIFFERENT ETHICAL LOGICS BEHIND THE CLANDESTINE INDUSTRY OF DECEPTION Tapani Rinta-Kahila, Wael Soliman

Crowdturfing, the dark side and usually unnoticed face of crowdsourcing, represents a form of cyber-deception in which workers are paid to express a false digital impression. While such behavior may not be punishable under the jurisdiction of formal law, its consequences are destructive to the cohesion and trustworthiness of online information. The conceptual work at hand examines the current literature on the topic, and lays the foundation for a theoretical framework that explains crowdturfing behavior. We discuss crowdturfing through three ethical normative approaches: traditional philosophical ethics, business ethics, and codified rules. We apply these lenses to an illustrative example of an online platform orchestrating the trade of paid book reviews on Amazon. The study contributes to theory by explaining the ethical logic behind crowdturfing from the perspectives of the key actors involved in the business. We argue that while crowdturfing cannot stand a critical examination through the deontological, stakeholder, or social contract perspectives, leaning on the teleological logic, the stockholder theory, or certain levels of codified rules can enable the actors involved in the business to operate with clean conscience. An increased understanding of the behavior can help both victim platforms and the Internet community at large to combat this hidden industry. TO PHUB OR NOT TO PHUB: UNDERSTANDING OFF-TASK SMARTPHONE USAGE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES IN THE ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT Olga Abramova, Annika Baumann, Hanna Krasnova, Stefan Lessmann This study was inspired in part by calls for research to explore the ubiquitous phenomenon of phub-bing in the academic environment. The goal of our study is to explore the phenomenon of phubbing and its consequences among students. Combining observations, questionnaires, quasi-experimental research design and focus groups interviews, our findings suggest that students phub a substantial amount of lecture time and often underestimate the effect this behavior has on their learning process. The quasi-experimental study shows that the number of times a student looks at a smartphone during the lecture is negatively related to the visual attention, while the total duration of smartphone use worsens the auditory attention. Follow-up analysis of the focus group interviews uncovers the causes of the phenomenon and possible preventive measures. The study thus contributes to a growing body of IS research on undesirable consequences of ICT use and provides implications for IS practitioners, simultaneously calling for a better solution of the problem commonly witnessed by the universities: the improvement of the educational process and student performance in the digital society.


INFORMATION FAILURES, TRUST VIOLATION, AND CUSTOMER FEEDBACK IN WEBENABLED TRANSACTIONS: THE ROLE OF CAUSAL TRANSPARENCY AS A TRUST REPAIR MECHANISM Anna-Maria Seeger, Tillmann Neben, Armin Heinzl

Information asymmetry and fear of opportunism turn e-commerce information failures into a threat for e-vendors’ trustworthiness. Consumers that perceive an e-vendor as dishonest and unreliable, in turn, form intentions to notify others through spreading of negative electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM). While information systems (IS) researchers agree on the relevance of trust for e-commerce interactions, little effort has been taken to understand how IS design should respond to information failures to defend e-vendors’ trustworthiness. The purpose of the present paper is to contribute to trust violation and repair research in web-enabled buyerseller interactions. By building upon trust research and related theories an explanatory model for the relationship between information failures, trustworthiness and negative eWOM is derived. A special focus is given to the distinct role of each subdimension of trustworthiness (integrity, benevolence, competence). Finally, design interventions that defend e-vendors’ trustworthiness are derived. Results of an experiment support the research model. INFORMATION PRIVACY FROM A RETAIL MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVE Wanda Presthus, Linda Renate Andersen Information privacy concerns a person’s right to access and control personal data. Advances in technologies like smart phones, beacons, and video surveillance influence a customer’s privacy in both physical spheres and online shopping. We wanted to investigate: What kind of information do retailers accumulate from in-store versus online shopping, and how does this affect their customers’ information privacy? We interviewed managers at large retailers that have both physical and online stores. As anticipated, we found that case companies accumulate more data from online than in-store shopping, however the retailers are in the process of integrating data from both sources. We make the following contributions: (i) an updated mapping of Norwegian retailers’ exploitation of technology and customer data, and (ii) the following argument: Mason’s PAPA framework from 1986 still addresses the main issues regarding companies’ data collection from both online and physical stores. However, we need to focus on how companies handle the information. Pertaining to this, we offer two guidelines for retail managers. This study should be of interest to researchers within privacy, Business Intelligence, Big Data, and Data Science. It is also relevant for retail managers and customers both inside and outside Norwegian borders. TOWARDS AN INTEGRATIVE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK OF IT-MEDIATED INTERRUPTIONS Raphael Rissler, Mario Nadj, Marc Adam, Alexander Mädche


Whilst contemporary information technology (IT) fosters ongoing connectivity and offers organisational advantages, it can also create unintended outcomes due to task disruption. However, despite a strong interest of scholars and practitioners in IT-mediated interruptions, they are scarcely addressed in information systems (IS) research, and our understanding about their nature and effects is limited. Further, there is a lack of a structured and systematic form in which IT-mediated interruptions can be classified and there is uncertainty regarding their boundary conditions and consequences. This article presents the results of a systematic literature review (SLR) on IT-mediated interruptions across varies disciplines. Reviewing identified 55 studies in leading journals and conferences, this article further synthesizes the various and fragmented findings on IT-mediated interruptions into an integrative theoretical framework along their boundary conditions, causes, manifestations, and consequences. Theoretically, our framework may serve as a foundational step to incorporate a broader theoretical perspective to integrate concepts and findings across literature. Practically, our integrative theoretical framework can be used as a reference guide for designing IT-mediated interruptions to achieve optimal user experience.

T29. Social Media in Business and Society “WHAT DOES THE CUSTOMER WANT TO TELL US?” AN AUTOMATED CLASSIFICATION APPROACH FOR SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS AT SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES Josef Schwaiger, Markus Lang, Florian Johannsen, Susanne Leist Social media posts created by customers capture a lot of business relevant information for decision-makers, e.g., current consumer expectations on products and services. For that purpose, the social media posts need to be analyzed thoroughly. In this respect, a topic-related classification facilitates managerial decision-making because business relevant topics, social media users discuss about, immediately become obvious and the need for action can be derived. For instance, it may get obvious that the majority of a company’s negative customer posts refers to a particular product or a specific campaign. However, such a classification of social media posts is particularly challenging for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This is because human resources for a manual examination of posts are missing and an automatic analysis is error-prone due to particularities of customer posts such as the occurrence of regional dialect or branch-specific expressions. We thus develop a tool, which enables the automatized topic-related classification of social media posts and matches the particular requirements of SMEs in southern Germany. Our solution is evaluated by using a data set stemming from three collaborating companies. THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT ON CUSTOMER PROFITABILITY – INSIGHTS FROM A DIRECT BANKING INSTITUTION’S ONLINE CUSTOMER NETWORK Annette Felgenhauer, Julia Klier, Mathias Klier, Georg Lindner


The digital transformation leads to an enormous change in the customer-firm relationship. Recently launched firm-sponsored online customer networks enable customers to actively interact with the company and other customers in form of social engagement activities like asking and answering questions or receiving feedback. Despite the increasing importance of online customer networks, existing literature still lacks an in-depth understanding of the impact of social engagement on customer profitability based on real-world data regarding both customers’ social engagement activities and customers’ profitability. Our paper therefore aims at providing insights about the relationship between different forms of customers’ social engagement and customers’ profitability based on an extensive dataset of a German direct banking institution’s online customer network. We found, for example, that – in contrast to posting answers – raising questions in the online customer network is associated with significantly higher profitability of the respective customers. Our study leads to interesting results exceeding existing research and helping practitioners to manage online customer networks more effectively and to focus on and foster particularly promising forms of customers’ social engagement.

SILENCE IS GOLDEN – WHEN FIRMS SHOULD REACT TO NEGATIVE WORD OF MOUTH Alper Beşer, Richard Lackes, Markus Siepermann With the advent of online social networks such as Facebook or Twitter, negative messages about a product or an enterprise can spread faster, reach a greater degree of dissemination, and will be able to influence the attitude and behaviour of customers. Quickly, a serious amount of economic damage can arise caused by such negative word of mouth. This paper examines various strategies on how firms can adequately cope with and react to negative word of mouth in online environments. For this, a diffusion model is presented that incorporates not only the content of a message and aging but also the phenomenon of triggering older messages. To evaluate the activities and reactions both technical and economic indicators are used. The results show that it is advantageous for firms to invest more time in designing a good counter message than to react as quickly as possible or to use more seeds. In addition, reacting with a big number of seeds can even cause more damage than just doing nothing. In some situations, it is therefore beneficial for firms not to take any measure. IMPACTS OF SOCIAL NETWORK SITES ON PSYCHOLOGICAL AND BEHAVIOURAL OUTCOMES IN THE WORKPLACE: SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW Nugi Nkwe, Jason Cohen This paper reports on a systematic review of the evidence into the impacts of social network site usage on individual workplace outcomes. Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. SNS use in the workplace has been found to be positively associated with job satisfaction, job performance, innovative behaviour, employee engagement, and knowledge sharing, with knowledge sharing the most supported workplace outcome. The evidence does not support SNS use as being associated with negative behaviour like absenteeism and turnover intentions. Evidence of effects on behavioural outcomes such as presenteeism, organisational citizenship


behaviour, and psychological outcomes such as employee involvement were limited. Results have implications for SNS usage policies in the workplace. Avenues for future work are provided. WHAT BENEFITS DO THEY BRING? A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS ON ENTERPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKS Benjamin Wehner, Thomas Falk, Susanne Leist Over the last years, Enterprise Social Networks (ESN) have gained increasing attention both in academia and practice, resulting in a large number of publications dealing with ESN. Among them is a large number of case studies describing the benefits of ESN in each individual case. Based on the different research objects they focus, various benefits are described. However, an overview of the benefits achieved by using ESN is missing and will, thus, be elaborated in this article (research question 1). Further, we cluster the identified benefits to more generic categories and finally classify them to the capabilities of traditional IT as presented by Davenport and Short (1990) to determine if new capabilities of IT arise using ESN (research question 2). To address our research questions, we perform a qualitative content analysis on 37 ESN case studies. As a result, we identify 99 individual benefits, classify them to the capabilities of traditional IT, and define a new IT capability named Social Capital. Our results can, e.g., be used to align and expand current ESN success measurement approaches. ENTERPRISE SOCIAL MEDIA: THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR START-UP COMPANIES Wietske Van Osch, Yi-Chuan Wang Enterprise Social Media (ESM) represents a burgeoning area of research; yet, the majority of studies on ESM have focused on the adoption and use of these systems in large enterprises, with limited knowledge about the use of ESM systems in small enterprises, particularly startups. The challenges faced by start-up businesses are sufficiently different from those faced by large companies, therefore limiting the generalizability of findings about ESM adoption and use in large companies to the start-up context. In this paper, we use a qualitative case study approach to explore the benefits and challenges associated with the implementation and use of Slack in a Taiwanese mobile application start-up company. Moving beyond offering mere rich descriptions of the organizational impacts associated with ESM implementation for start-up companies, we also use the findings of this study to propose a set of technological modifications that may make ESM systems more suitable for the types of workplace interactions required in small enterprise settings. Thus beyond implications for research and practice, this paper concludes with a set of design implications that could guide ESM developers in building systems for the start-up market.


ANALYSING EMPLOYEES’ WILLINGNESS TO DISCLOSE INFORMATION IN ENTERPRISE SOCIAL NETWORKS: THE ROLE OF ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE Adrian Engelbrecht, Jin Gerlach, Alexander Benlian, Peter Buxmann

Due to the rise of social media, many companies have started to implement enterprise social networks (ESNs). Compared to existing systems supporting communication and collaboration in organisations, ESNs can foster employees’ productivity and innovativeness by making previously invisible communication among employees visible. However, this visibility can prevent employees from disclosing information within ESNs. As the success of ESNs depends on users’ contributions, it is crucial to understand which factors influence employees’ behaviour in this regard. In this research, we investigate the role of organisational culture in fostering employees’ trusting and mitigating their risk beliefs, two factors we transfer from research on Online Social Networks (OSNs) and hypothesize to be highly relevant for information disclosure in ESNs. Based on data obtained from 282 employees, we find support for our hypotheses and illustrate that group and development culture significantly affect employees’ trusting and risk beliefs, and their willingness to disclose information. Our results imply that organisations should carefully assess employees’ trusting and risk beliefs as well as their culture to account for possible obstacles preventing employees’ information disclosure. VALUE CO-CREATION AND TRUST IN SOCIAL COMMERCE: AN FSQCA APPROACH Ilias Pappas, Patrick Mikalef, Michail Giannakos, Paul A. Pavlou This study aims to explain how value co-creation, between customers and companies, and key aspects of trust combine to influence customers’ purchase intentions in social commerce. Value co-creation is decomposed into two attributes, behavioral alignment, and empowerment and control, while trust is measured through the aspects of trusting beliefs, institutional trust, and disposition to trust. In order to examine the interplay of these factors and their combined effect on purchase intentions in social commerce, a conceptual model is developed and examined on a data sample of 379 users with experience in social commerce, through fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The findings indicate five configurations that lead to high intentions to purchase in social commerce, and three configurations that inhibit purchase intentions. The outcomes of the analysis show that value co-creation may be more important than trust in achieving high purchase intentions, while avoiding low/medium purchase intentions. This study contributes to the social commerce literature by demonstrating how value co-creation and trust interrelate and how their interplay influences purchase intentions.

T30. Use of ICT in Crisis Communications SENSEMAKING IN SOCIAL MEDIA CRISIS COMMUNICATION – A CASE STUDY ON THE BRUSSELS BOMBINGS IN 2016


Milad Mirbabaie, Elisa Zapatka

Uncertainty in crises often leads to knowledge gaps, which can be bridged through people’s communication, resulting in sensemaking. Because research dealing with the identification of roles to examine how they guide sensemaking is almost non-existent, this paper seeks to clarify this problem. In the context of crisis communication related to the Brussels bombings in 2016, first social network analyses are conducted to identify influential users and their role. Second, content and sensemaking analyses are performed to determine what kind of content diffuses through them to contribute to sensemaking. The results indicate that frequently retweeted users (information starters) as well as those with the most followers (amplifiers) guide the gap bridging through tweeting and retweeting new information. Furthermore, users who have the potential to bridge different communities (transmitters) shared many opinions, leading to sensemaking differently. These first research insights provide practitioners in role-based, target-oriented communication with coding schemes for further crisis communication research. KATWARN, NINA, OR FEMA? MULTI-METHOD STUDY ON DISTRIBUTION, USE, AND PUBLIC VIEWS ON CRISIS APPS Christian Reuter, Marc-André Kaufhold, Inken Leopold, Hannah Knipp Crises, such as thunderstorms and an increasing number of (recognised) terroristic attacks in 2015, 2016, and 2017, do not only lead to extensive monetary damage, but also threaten human lives and influence citizens’ perceptions of safety and security. In such situations, the population demands information about the damage and safe behaviour. Although some apps are available to provide this information, the number of users seems relatively low. Focussing on Germany, this study aims to research (1) the distribution of crisis apps in the population, (2) the kinds of crisis apps currently used, as well as (3) needed core functionalities of warning apps. This multi-method study analyses crisis apps by investigating their utilisation quantitatively in a snowball-based survey in Europe (n=1,034) and in a representative survey in Germany (n=1,369). Based on this, the German warning apps Katwarn and NINA and the US-American app FEMA are evaluated qualitatively (n=22). The results revealed requirements which informed the implementation of a warning app prototype. The prototype combines the identified advantages of the apps evaluated in the study, containing warnings and all-clear, recommendations for action, functions to contact friends and helpers. The contributions of this work are findings on the distribution of crisis apps in Europe and Germany (both 16%), the kinds of crisis apps used (mostly weather and warning apps), and empirically based requirements for warning apps which can be integrated in further developments of existing apps and a prototype for such an app.


T31. Business Models in a Digitized World FROM ONE TO MANY BUSINESS MODELS: UNCOVERING CHARACTERISTICS OF BUSINESS MODEL PORTFOLIOS Johannes Schwarz, Nicola Terrenghi, Christine Legner As business model (BM) innovation has become one of management’s top priorities, anecdotal evidence suggests that firms do not have one single BM but run multiple BMs in parallel. From an academic perspective, only few attempts have been made until today, to broaden the scope of research from one to many BMs within firm boundaries. To close this gap, we systematically review the emerging literature on “multiple” BMs, based on a theoretical framework that links the BM concept with general mechanisms of corporate portfolio management. Our results show that firms develop BM portfolios as a direct result of challenges in today’s technology-driven environment, such as disruptive industry BMs and the need to commercialize technologies with innovative BMs. More specifically, our findings challenge the general assumption that firms should (or can) be described based on a single BM. Segmentation, con-figuration and coordination of multiple BMs can complement a customer-centric perspective in the BM development and management process, not only for large organizations. We provide initial characteristics of these mechanisms and outline areas for future research. TYPOLOGY OF DISTRIBUTED LEDGER BASED BUSINESS MODELS Nadine Rückeshäuser The potential of distributed ledger technology and its application in various industries is a controversially debated topic. Advocates of the technology emphasize the economic benefits of decentralization and transparency, leading to cost reductions as well as the alleviation of several of today`s economic and technological problems. In contrast, critics assert that the potential of distributed ledgers might be overhyped, possibly leading to the next tech bubble. This paper contributes to the discussion by developing a typology of business models that are based on distributed ledger technology. In particular, this paper is a first step towards a more differentiated discussion on the potential of distributed ledges, by taking the underlying business models into consideration. Despite a characterization of the types, a discussion about special features of distributed ledger based business models is provided in the context of contemporary business model literature and the associated role of IT. It is proposed that future research must evaluate each business model isolated to achieve a comprehensive assessment of the potential of distributed ledgers. This paper can be interpreted as starting point for more fruitful discussions and the repeal of the partially diametrical opposed opinions towards the potentials of the technology.


MERGING PLATFORM ECOSYSTEMS IN TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITIONS: A GOVERNANCE PERSPECTIVE Jamie Dowie, Stefan Henningsson, Thomas Kude, Karl Michael Popp

This paper investigates the issue of merging third-party ecosystems in corporate acquisitions to access innovative technologies and related capabilities. Extant explanations for how technology acquisitions create value are limited to the analysis of the internal capabilities and structures of the merging companies. Given the increasing importance of platforms and value co-creation with third-party providers for companies making technology acquisitions, we complement exist-ing literature by reframing the analysis of technology acquisitions to include the merger of the broader partner ecosystems. Specifically, we draw on theories of ecosystem governance to ana-lyze how ecosystem tensions unfolded during the ecosystem merger and how the acquirer gov-erned these tensions in SAP SE’s acquisition of the e-commerce provider Hybris AG. Our find-ings suggest that the governance of ecosystem tensions is an important aspect of managing technology acquisitions. We identify the pre-acquisition relation between the acquired compa-ny’s ecosystem partners and the acquirer as an important context factor for explaining how a partner company is exposed to the ecosystem tensions during the merger. REPAINTING THE BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS FOR PEER-TO-PEER SHARING AND COLLABORATIVE CONSUMPTION Florian Plenter, Erwin Fielt, Moritz von Hoffen, Friedrich Chasin, Michael Rosemann Sharing Economy businesses have become very popular recently but there is little guidance available on how to develop the respective business models. We faced this problem during a consortium research project for developing a service for electric vehicle charging that adopts the paradigm of Peer-to-Peer Sharing and Collaborative Consumption (P2P SCC) – a specific branch of the Sharing Economy. We use Action Design Research (ADR) to develop an adapted version of the Business Model Canvas that is specifically tailored to the needs of P2P SCC business model development. The adapted canvas is then applied to develop a business model for the proposed service. The learnings from the development process are formalized into a set of generally applicable guidelines for the development of P2P SCC business models. The resulting guidelines and the adapted canvas provide guidance for both researchers and practitioners who want to either develop new or analyze existing P2P SCC business models. DESIGNING SERVICE-DOMINANT BUSINESS MODELS Oktay Turetken, Paul Grefen The emergence of service-dominant logic has influenced business in many domains. It emphasizes the interaction of the producer, consumer, and other value-network partners as they co-create value through collaborative processes. These processes can be seen as service-forservice exchanges of these actors, which contrasts with the output orientation of the goods-


dominant-logic that emphasizes how actors exchange output units. This paradigm transition has significant implications on doing business: the business requirements to services will change faster, and the complexity of value-networks required to meet these requirements will increase further. This requires new approaches to business engineering that are grounded in the premises of service-dominant logic. This paper introduces the service-dominant business model radar (SDBM/R) as an integral component of the business engineering framework that we have developed for engineering network-based, service-dominant business. Existing approaches to business model design follow an organization-centric view rooted in goodsdominant-logic, which does not allow adequately modeling the character of service-dominant business. The SDBM/R was developed with close collaboration with industry experts and empirically validated through a series of hands-on workshops with industry professionals from several domains. Thereby, this paper contributes a novel business design approach that has proper academic background and relevant practical embedding. REWARDING PROSOCIALITY ON NON-COMMERCIAL ONLINE SHARING PLATFORMS David Schneider Digitization and new trends in consumption behaviour have brought forward new business models within the Sharing Economy (SE). While commercial online sharing platforms such as Uber and Airbnb have already received some attention by researchers, non-commercial online platforms have remained largely unexplored. At the same time, prosocial motives are playing an increasingly central role in participation in the SE, calling for a better understanding of prosocial factors influencing user behaviour. This paper aims to close this gap by assessing the effect of prosociality, via donation behaviour in previous and current transactions, on the likelihood to make a transaction on non-commercial online sharing platforms. We conduct a controlled online experiment and find a significant increase in transaction likelihood in the presence of prosociality. Users who donated in previous transactions are twice as likely to make a transaction and three times more likely if they donate in current transactions. However, if simultaneous-ly present they crowd each other out, suggesting a potential penalization of excessive prosociality. This paper contributes to the scarce Information Systems (IS) literature on non-commercial online sharing platforms by introducing prosociality as central design feature, and provides valuable insights into designing incentive schemes to foster traffic on online sharing platforms. OPEN INNOVATION AS BUSINESS MODEL GAME-CHANGER IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR Aakanksha Gaur, Michele Osella, Enrico Ferro, Jonas Hedman Organizations are increasingly looking to tap into external knowledge sources through open innovation initiatives. Most public sector agencies are in the early stages of adoption of open innovation and are in the process of defining relevant issues. Once such issue concerns how open innovation strategies influence public sector business models. This study seeks to understand this interdependency. Building upon an action research study on crowdsourcing related to policies around telemedicine conducted in the Piedmont region of Italy, this paper


highlights how public sector business models could be better aligned with open innovation strategies (in our case crowdsourcing). Our results indicate that in adopting a crowd-based open innovation strategy, the content, structure and governance dimensions of public sector business model need to be aligned accordingly. The content of the business model is altered to offer citizens a user-oriented value proposition stemming from a participatory process. The structure of the business model changes to include citizens as co-creators of public value and as key partners of the public sector. Finally, as part of governance dimensions, the study highlights the role of non-monetary rewards to employees such as training and support staff. THE EVALUATION ASPECT OF DIGITAL BUSINESS MODEL INNOVATION: A LITERATURE REVIEW ON TOOLS AND METHODOLOGIES Jan F. Tesch, Anne-Sophie Brillinger Despite the increasing importance of business model innovation (BMI), a lack of understanding on the evaluation aspect still exists within research. Thereby, the development of tools and methodologies for BMI lacks sufficient consideration in both theory and practice. This paper contributes by systematically reviewing present literature with an explicit focus on the applicability in digital BMI projects. The authors elaborate a categorization of tools and methodologies concerning two major logics of evaluation: Analytical/effectual and quantitative/qualitative. This sheds light upon the dominant mode of evaluation within different stages of digital BMI processes.

T32. IS Adoption and Diffusion AN INSTITUTIONAL LENS ON CLOUD COMPUTING ADOPTION – A STUDY OF INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS AND ADOPTION STRATEGIES Rania Fahim El-Gazzar, Eli Hustad, Dag Hükon Olsen This paper reports from an empirical study that focuses on cloud computing (CC) adoption in various contexts. The findings build upon 25 interviews conducted in both Norwegian and Egyptian organizations. We utilized a neo-institutional lens as a guide to understand the internal and external factors, and their various influences on shaping CC adoption strategies. We identified five external institutional factors; governments and regulatory bodies, cloud service providers, media, socio-political changes, and culture. Furthermore, three internal institutional factors have been identified; internal stakeholders, organization characteristics, and IT infrastructure. We identified three different adoption strategies in this respect; efficiency-motivated adoption, legitimacy-motivated adoption and non-adoption. This research gives an insight into which institutional factors that influence the adoption and non-adoption of CC services.


PREDICTING BUYERS’ REPURCHASE INTENTIONS IN CROSS-BORDER E-COMMERCE: A VALENCE FRAMEWORK PERSPECTIVE Jian Mou, Jason Cohen, Yongxiang Dou, Bo Zhang

Cross-border e-commerce has become an important channel for promoting international trade. Yet, the factors influencing buyer behavior in cross-border e-commerce have received relatively less research attention than in domestic e-commerce settings. In this paper we draw on the valence framework to develop and test a research model of buyer repeat purchase intentions in cross-border e-commerce. We hypothesized the effects of positive valences (value, monetary saving, convenience and product offerings) along with negative valences (product and transaction-based uncertainties) on buyers’ repeat purchase intentions. Data was collected from users of a popular cross-border e-commerce provider in China. Results (n=169) revealed that positive valences exert the strongest effects on repeat purchase intention, but negatively valences are also significant. These include product-based uncertainties arising, inter-alia, from information asymmetries, as well as transaction-based uncertainties including confiscation risks. Our model explained 69% of the variance in repeat purchase intentions in a cross-border e-commerce plat-form. Results enhance our understanding of cross-border ecommerce and have important implications for online providers competing in international markets. ESCAPING REALITY: EXAMINING THE ROLE OF PRESENCE AND ESCAPISM IN USER ADOPTION OF VIRTUAL REALITY GLASSES Eva Hartl, Benedikt Berger The development of virtual reality (VR) glasses such as the Oculus Rift has made VR technologies available to the mass market. The rapid diffusion of VR glasses holds the potential to disrupt the way media is consumed. Yet little is known about their acceptance by consumers. This study seeks to explore the user acceptance of VR glasses, considering the specifics of hedonic information systems in consumer settings. Focusing on user personality, namely the users’ desire to escape reality, we developed a framework based on the extended unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2) and tested it in a laboratory study with 155 participants. The structural equation model results show that VR glasses’ ability to induce presence, a sense of being in another environment, is a key characteristic of the technology that influences the adoption. We found the users’ escapism tendency to be a distinctive user personality trait for determining the adoption of VR glasses. Our study provides insights into the adoption of technology in early diffusion stages and the role of technology characteristics and personality traits in adoption decisions. Finally, our findings have important implications for practitioners in the VR industry.


NOT JUST ANOTHER TYPE OF RESISTANCE – TOWARDS A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF SUPPORTIVE NON-USE Manfred Geiger, Lena Waizenegger, Tamsin Treasure-Jones, Christina Sarigianni, Ronald Maier, Stefan Thalmann, Ulrich Remus

Research on information system (IS) adoption and resistance has accumulated substantial theoretical and managerial knowledge. Surprisingly, the paradox that end users support and at the same time resist use of an IS has received relatively little attention. The investigation of this puzzle, however, is important to complement our understanding of resistant behaviours and consequently to strengthen the explanatory power of extant theoretical constructs on IS resistance. We investigate an IS project within the healthcare sector in the UK in which endusers, who were heavily involved during the design, implementation and roll out, expressed their support for the system, while simultaneously showing resistance. To examine this behaviour in detail, we applied Q methodology. As a result, we identified three different groups: (1) The convinced connector, waiting for collaborators. (2) The savvy explorer, sceptical about the tools’ benefits. (3) The ambivalent follower, overwhelmed by complexity. While the behaviour is similar across all three groups, the reasons for not using the system differ significantly. Based on these groups, as our main contribution, we explain the paradox of supportive non-use. We further add a fine grained understanding of supportive non-use to the existing types of IS resistance.

A SURVEY OF FAILURES IN THE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS Rita Marques, Gonçalo Costa, Miguel Mira da Silva, Pedro Gonçalves Software development is one of the most important worldwide industries and continues to grow. To deal with this challenge, organizations are adopting ever more tools and methodologies. However, software development projects are still failing in meeting time, budget and functional requirements. This study provides insights on the failures faced by software development organizations regarding their processes, the reasons leading to these failures, and initiatives taken to cope with them. A research methodology was used to gather and compare results from a literature review and semi-structured interviews. We learnt that there are more failures in Management activities, although they were not often reported, while failures in Requirements Engineering and Software Testing are less in number but more frequently reported. Lack of communication, lack of time for improvements and ap-propriate testing, and poor requirements and functionalities specification were the mostly reported failures. Furthermore, we learnt that organizations are not implementing any initiative to address these failures, although they suggested solutions. EXPLAINING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USERS’ WAYS OF MITIGATING TECHNOSTRESS Markus Salo, Henri Pirkkalainen, Cecil Chua, Tiina Koskelainen


Technostress refers to the inability of an individual to deal with information technology (IT) in a healthy manner. Researchers, practitioners, and medical professionals have emphasized the omnipresence of technostress and its severe outcomes, including poor well-being and burnout. Despite the importance of the phenomenon, prior research has paid limited attention to how technostress can be mitigated. The few existing studies examine organizational mitigation mechanisms, but we could not find any studies that focus on individual IT users’ own ways of mitigating technostress outside of work. To address the research gap, we conducted a qualitative study to uncover users’ ways of mitigating technostress caused by personal/leisure IT. As a theoretical contribution, we offer a new perspective on technostress by applying an approach of stress interventions and refining it to the technostress context. This enabled us to uncover three fundamentally different mitigation types that IT users can utilize. As such, our findings go beyond the organizational mechanisms that prior studies have focused on. As a practical contribution, our resulting model presents ways for individual IT users to decrease technostress. A GENERATION COMPARISON OF MOBILE PAYMENT ACCEPTANCE FACTORS: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION Maximilian Fischer, Arna Wömmel, Riccardo Reith, Bettina Lis Many unsuccessful initiatives for establishing technological solutions of mobile payment (mpayment) services in stationary trade have been detected in the past few years. Therefore, following research deals with possible explanations for insufficient diffusion. A lack of research was analyzed by investigating the moderating effect of being a Digital Native (DN) or Digital Immigrant (DI) regarding technological factors influencing the attitude towards using m-payment systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of consumers’ needs and personal characteristics in the adoption of m-payment technology. The theoretical basis is built on a modified TAM and Prensky’s (2001) cultural generation concept. Hence, the technical field of m-payment is connected to a theory of identity. The study results displayed a greater degree of technological affinity concerning all factors examined in the group of DNs. By using a moderated regression analysis, we verified the negative influence of perceived security and risk having a significantly stronger effect on the attitude of DIs. Additionally, further results confirm the enormous importance of security in innovative payment processes. The results reinforce the importance of a target group-specific communication of an easy and secure payment-transaction to DIs. Furthermore, divergence of former research could be explained through the results of our cultural approach. SAFEGUARDING AGAINST ROMANCE SCAMS – USING PROTECTION MOTIVATION THEORY Veronica Luu, Lesley Land, Wynne Chin Online dating offers new opportunities for individuals to seek a romantic partner; however, the platform has also been exploited by criminals seeking to perpetrate scams, classified as online dating (romance) fraud. These are arguably one of the most distressing frauds, as victims suffer


both financially and emotionally. Thus, this emergent issue has fielded increasing attention from diverse disciplines, though research still remains limited – in particular, investigation of romance fraud from a risk mitigation and information systems (IS) approach has been neglected. This study begins to address these shortfalls by utilising Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) as a framework for understanding the factors and processes underlying intention to use protective tools safeguarding against online dating (OD) scams. The results of Partial Least Squares analysis showed the perceptions and importance of PMT factors differs among protection mechanisms, highlighting the need to better understand and thus enhance the mechanisms based on empirical evidence. Additionally, an online dater’s assessment of the protective mechanism (and protective response) generally has a greater influence on adopting protective behaviour, than the evaluation of the scam itself. SOCIAL INFLUENCE IN TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION RESEARCH: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND RESEARCH AGENDA Lorenz Graf-Vlachy, Katharina Buhtz Social influence has been shown to profoundly affect human behavior in general and technology adoption (TA) in particular. Over time, multiple definitions and measures of social influence have been introduced to the field of TA research, contributing to an increasingly fragmented landscape of constructs that challenges the conceptual integrity of the field. In this vein, this paper sets out to review how social influence has been conceptualized with regard to TA. In so doing, this paper hopes to inform researchers’ understanding of the construct, provide an overview of its myriad conceptualizations, constructively challenge extant approaches, and provide impulses for future research. A systematic review of the relevant literature uncovers that extant interpretations of social influence are 1) predominantly compliance-based and as such risk overlooking identification- and internalization-based effects, and 2) primarily targeted at the individual level, thereby neglecting the impact of socially rich environments. Building upon these insights, this paper develops an integrated perspective on social influence in TA research that encourages scholars to pursue a multi-theoretical understanding of social influence at the interface of users, social referents, and technology. OVERLAPPING LOGICS AND INSTITUTIONAL ALIGNMENT SPACES: MAPPING THE ORGANISATIONAL TRAJECTORY OF A IS INNOVATION Raluca Bunduchi Institutional IS research focuses on explaining IS adoption depending on its alignment with a set of coherent institutional pressures. In contrast, institutional logics research emphasises the insti-tutional complex and contested nature of most organisational contexts where multiple and often divergent institutional logics interact to shape organisational action. Adopting an institutional logic perspective and relying on an in-depth case study of the development and implementation of a student led visualisation tool to display course information in a large European university, this study examines the trajectory of the IS innovation across an institutional complex organisational landscape. The success of the innovation is explained by


its ability to change over time and spaces, both in content and process, as the innovation actors sense alignment spaces where multiple logics overlap, and negotiate between these different logics by inscribing the IS innovation with specific practices reflecting the demands imposed by these changing alignments, and materially reflected in features of the IS innovation. The concept of alignment spaces provides a powerful tool for IS researchers to aid the examination of IS implementation in institutionally plural context, and consider not only time but also the landscape as important in understanding the progression of IS innovation over time.

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS PAPERS NEW VENTURE AMBIDEXTERITY IN EMERGING MARKETS: THE CASE OF CROWDFUNDING IN INDIA Gaurav Gupta, Prof Indranil Bose Extant literature on ambidexterity has focused primarily on established firms in existing markets. New ventures operate in a resource-constrained environment. Further, if the market is new, then identifying a suitable market strategy involves the adoption of an expensive ambidextrous stance. Using a longitudinal case study-based approach of Wishberry, a creative crowdfunding platform in India, we explore this context and propose a model for implementation of this strategy for such firms in embryonic markets. The market characteristics do change simultaneously with the product’s maturation. With this study, we attempt to identify the various ambidextrous strategies available to firms across different stages of a new product’s growth. Further, we explore the role of market maturity with the emergent ambidexterity strategy of new technology ventures. The results of this ongoing research will allow new ventures to identify an appropriate trajectory for implementation of an appropriate ambidextrous stance. INFLUENCE OF NATIONAL CULTURE ON EMPLOYEES’ INTENTION TO VIOLATE INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY POLICIES: A NATIONAL CULTURE AND RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY PERSPECTIVE Tilahun Arage, Tibebe Beshah The security of information systems has become one of the top agendas of business executives in economically developed nations. While the information systems security (ISS) world focuses on threats of external origin, most ISS breaches are caused by insiders. Both the amount of money allocated for ISS related activities and the number of ISS breaches are shown to increase in parallel. A majority of the investments and researches around ISS are limited to bring technically oriented solutions only. It is now realized that the technical approach alone couldn’t bring the required level of ISS, and this led ISS researchers to embark on sociotechnical approaches. In this respect, one of the critical social factors that has been given little emphasis is culture. Thus, this research investigates the impact of national culture on


employees’ ISS behavior. More specifically, it answers the question “what is the moderating impact of national culture on the influence of ISS countermeasures and other important variables on employees’ intention to violate ISS policies?” We develop and test an empirical ISS compliance model, which is composed of security related rational choice theory and national culture constructs in the Ethiopian and USA context. Survey will be used to collect data. THE IMPACT OF ADVISORY SERVICES ON CLIENTS AND VENDORS IN IT OUTSOURCING ENGAGEMENTS Robert Linden, Christoph Rosenkranz Information technology outsourcing (ITO) continues to be an important market and research topic in 2016. The client-vendor relationship has been identified as one of the key driver to foster successful outsourcing engagements. But another stakeholder besides client and vendor that presumably highly influences this relationship is neglected in ITO research so far: the advisor. This research-in-progress paper propose to investigate how and why advisory services impact the relationship of clients and vendors and the project success in ITO engagements. To answer our research question, we build on principal-agent theory and social exchange theory as our theoretical lenses to explain the impact of advisory services on the client-vendor relationship. We develop our preliminary research model with three hypotheses and introduce our research design using a case study-based, mixed-method approach. Our planned outcome is a model explaining the role of advisors for improving ITO success. We conclude with an outlook about our next steps and the study’s planned contributions. TOWARDS AN INTEGRATED EVALUATION OF HUMAN-CENTERED SERVICE SYSTEMS AND CORRESPONDING BUSINESS MODELS: A SYSTEMS THEORY PERSPECTIVE Stefan Kleinschmidt, Christoph Peters The design of services and their corresponding business models (BMs) aims at a value creation for customers and service providers. Thus, the outcome is interrelated. However, both – the design service systems and BMs – are evaluated separately because they do not have a common theoretical foundation. Therefore, this design science research aims at the development of an evaluation scheme for the design of services and BMs. Building on a general systems theory, we conceptualize human-centered service systems (HCSSs) and their corresponding BMs as a coherent system. This conceptualization gives the possibility to provide concrete analytical levels that allow an integrated evaluation of this system. We apply this evaluation scheme in a care service context and show that the integrated evaluation allows a more concrete assessment of the combined design of HCSS and the corresponding BMs. With this evaluation scheme, we offer an operationalization of a summative evaluation for the design of HCSSs and BMs as an artifact. Also, this provides a new perspective on theory-rooted knowledge for designing and evaluating service systems. For practitioners, the evaluation results allow the coordination of the value proposition in the service systems and BMs.


THE DEVELOPMENT OF A HOSPITAL SECURE MESSAGING AND COMMUNICATION PLATFORM: A CONCEPTUALIZATION Imran Muhammad, Paul Paddle, Chandrashan Perera, Peter Haddad, Nilmini Wickramasinghe Pagers and phone conversations have been the stalwarts of hospital communication. With good reason, they are simple, reliable and relatively inexpensive. However, with the increasing complexity of patient care, the need for greater speed and the general inexorable progress of health technology, hospital communication systems appear to be increasingly inefficient, nonsecure, and inadequate. It is unsurprising then, that methods other than pagers and phone calls are often utilised; be it residents communicating with other residents, nurses seeking consultant feedback, or patients seeking advice from their clinicians. Thus, this study seeks to develop a conceptual framework for the theoretical underpinning for a larger study and to answer the key research question: How can ICT (information communication technology) solutions ameliorate the current challenges regarding communication inefficiencies within healthcare? To answer this question, this study has served to develop a theoretical research framework by integrating two sociotechnical theories namely Actor-network theory and Activity Theory to investigate the possibility of designing a bespoke ICT solution for a specific context at one of the largest private hospital in Australia. USING HEALTHCARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS TO FACILITATE SMART AND SUSTAINABLE KNOWLEDGE FLOW IN HEALTHCARE: THE CASE OF ALLERGY CARE IN AUSTRALIA Nilmini Wickramasinghe, Peter Haddad Allergy including asthma incidents are steadily increasing, and thus becoming a major health concern in developed countries. In Australia, the model used to manage patients suffering from allergy has two main problems; it is fragmented in nature, and difficult to access specialist care. In addition, there is a lack of awareness from the public about allergy management. To address these factors an ICT solution that facilitates knowledge flow between both allergy care providers and patients is proffered. The system is a web portal coupled with a mobile App, which together utilize a shared database of medical records for allergy patients. The system is used to examine the role of ICT to facilitate superior knowledge flow and transfer. This system uses the principles of Knowledge Management, and is guided by a Design Science Research Methodology. The implications of this study are far reaching to communities, healthcare systems, and national economies. A THRESHOLD FOR A Q-SORTING METHODOLOGY FOR COMPUTER-ADAPTIVE SURVEYS Sahar Sabbaghan, Lesley Gardner, Cecil Chua


Computer-Adaptive Surveys (CAS) are multi-dimensional instruments where questions asked of respondents depend on the previous questions asked. Due to the complexity of CAS, little work has been done on developing methods for validating their content and construct validity. We have created a new q-sorting technique where the hierarchies that independent raters develop are transformed into a quantitative form, and that quantitative form is tested to determine the inter-rater reliability of the individual branches in the hierarchy. The hierarchies are then successively transformed to test if they branch in the same way. The objective of this paper is to identify suitable measures and a “good enough” threshold for demonstrating the similarity of two CAS trees. To find suitable measures, we perform a set of bootstrap simulations to measure how various statistics change as a hypothetical CAS deviates from a “true” version. We find that the 3 measures of association, Goodman and Kruskal’s Lambda, Cohen’s Kappa, and Goodman and Kruskal’s Gamma together provide information useful for assessing construct validity in CAS. In future work we are interested in both finding a “good enough” threshold(s) for assessing the overall similarity between tree hierarchies and diagnosing causes of disagreements between the tree hierarchies. HOW ONLINE CUSTOMER REVIEWS AFFECT SALES AND RETURN BEHAVIOR – AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS IN FASHION E-COMMERCE Tobias Lohse, Jan Kemper, Malte Brettel The goal of this study is to get a better understanding of the relationship between online customer reviews (OCRs), product returns and sales after returns in online fashion. Furthermore, we generate deeper insights about the moderating role of mobile shopping usage, product involvement and brand equity in this context. We answer our research questions by empirically analyzing a unique data set from a European fashion e-commerce company. This study links a wide range of transaction data (2.5 billion page clicks, 46 thousand different products, 700 brands, 40 product categories, 72 million sold and 33 million returned items) with a large set of OCRs (0.9 million). Our results show that positive OCRs can lead to lower return rates, higher sales after returns, and better conversion rates. Considering higher search costs on mobile devices, we reveal a weaker impact of OCRs in the mobile than in the desktop sales channel. Furthermore, in line with involvement theory, we see a significant impact of product involvement in this context such as the influence of positive OCRs is stronger for highinvolvement products than vice versa. Moreover, we find support for statements from brand signaling literature, that OCRs matter more for weak than for strong brands. MEDICAL RECORD SUPPORT FOR EFFECTIVE DISCHARGE PLANNING Nyree Taylor, Reeva Lederman, Rachelle Bosua Little is known about the Information Technology artefacts which help inform decision-making to sup-port people returning home following a hospital stay. Content, delivery, timing and information about personal circumstances form integral components of person-centred discharge planning. From an Information Systems (IS) perspective, understanding barriers to information flow, artefacts in use and the context in which they are presented to health care


professionals is the first step to explore how currently used IS support or fail to support the discharge process. This research-in-progress uses Roy’s Adaption Model and Adaptive Structuration Theory to explore to what extent patient information documented in the medical record supports and enables person-centred discharge planning. We aim specifically to understand how the medical record shapes discharge planning through clinician-to-clinician and clinician-to-patient information sharing to support a patient’s recovery journey when home. Findings suggest that the medical record is insufficient to support and enable personcentred discharge planning. We suggest how these limitations can be overcome to improve person-centred discharge planning to assist and facilitate patients’ transition home. TOWARDS AN ANALYTICS-DRIVEN INFORMATION SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT: A CONTINGENT RESOURCE BASED PERSPECTIVE Humza Naseer, Graeme Shanks, Atif Ahmad, Sean Maynard Information security risk management (ISRM) is a continuous process that integrates identification and analysis of risks to which an organisation is exposed, assessment of likelihood of potential threats and their impact on the business, and deciding what actions need to be taken to eliminate or reduce risk to an acceptable level. Our review of the literature highlights two trends in organizational practice of ISRM: (1) security risks are not analysed and monitored continuously and historically (2) security risks are assessed based on speculation rather than evidence. Business analytics (BA) provides organizations with a unique opportunity to develop specialised capabilities (security analytics) and thereby enable the practice of analytics-driven evidence-based decision making in ISRM. In this study, we utilize a contingent resource based view to develop a research model that explains how security analytics capabilities and ISRM capabilities indirectly influence enterprise security performance through mediating role of analytics-driven ISRM capabilities. Risk assessment complexity moderates the process by which security analytics capabilities and ISRM capabilities influence the enterprise security performance. The model is defined based on an extensive analysis of BA and ISRM literature. The model provides a foundation for future empirical work including multiple case studies and a survey. TOWARDS A TAXONOMY OF DIGITAL WORK Volkmar Mrass, Mahei Manhai Li, Christoph Peters Despite the increasing importance of digitization for economy and society, there is few structuring of the very heterogenous kinds of digital work. Representatives from business, politics and science need a basis for the development of strategies to encounter the challenges that result from this digitization. We aim at delivering a contribution to that basis by systematically investigating what different types of digital work exist and by developing a taxonomy. As a first important step towards this goal, we investigate in this paper what digital work tools exist since such tools are a major constituent element of digital work. Using a hybrid approach including both a deductive conceptual-to-empirical and an inductive empirical-toconceptual procedure, we create an artifact that gives business leaders an overview of existing


digital work tools as a basis for strategic decisions and at the same time provides researchers with stimuli for future investigations in the dynamic domain of digital work. A SOCIO-TECHNICAL APPROACH TO SUSTAINABILITY IN ORGANIZATIONS: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY Moufida Sadok, Christine Welch Research has shown that sustainability is a critical issue for organizations. There are many dimensions to this concept, notably economic, social and environmental sustainability. When considering development of Information Systems, it is necessary to take these factors into account. However, although developers wish to deliver a package of sustainable benefits, the values that these benefits represent to different stakeholder groups will vary. Approaches will be needed that can provide support to resolve divergent and conflicting requirements within a transformation process, and help to surface contextual understandings of sustainable performance. Poorly-designed systems lead to work activity that is less than optimal, and thus fails to achieve a level of excellence in performance that is a significant prerequisite for competitiveness and economic sustainability. This paper introduces an investigation into understanding of a socio-technical systems framework that could function as a trigger for sustainability development where a suitable agenda already exists within an organization. Preliminary results, and their limitations, are discussed and a tentative agenda for further research is presented. DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY: TOWARDS A GENERIC VALUE NETWORK Tobias Riasanow, Gabriela Galic, Markus Boehm The emergence of digital innovations is accelerating and intervening existing business models by delivering opportunities for new services. Drawing on the automotive industry, leading trends like self-driving cars, connectivity and car sharing are creating new business models. These are simultaneously giving rise for innovative market entrants, which begin to transform the automotive industry. However, literature does not provide a generic value network of the automotive industry, including new market players. The paper aims to visualize the current automotive ecosystem, by evolving a generic value network using the e3-value method. We define different roles, which are operating in the automotive industry by analyzing 650 companies reported in the Crunchbase database and present the value streams within the ecosystem. To validate the proposed generic value network we conducted five preliminary interviews with experts from the automotive industry. Our results show the central role of mobility service platforms, emerging disruptive technology providers and the dissemination of industries, e.g., as OEMS collaborate with mobile payment providers. Scholars in this field can apply the developed generic value network for further research, while car manufacturers may apply the model to position themselves in their market and to identify possible disruptive actors or potential business opportunities.


DOES THE WINNER TAKE IT ALL? – TOWARDS AN UNDERSTANDING OF WHY THERE MIGHT BE NO ONE-SIZE-FITS-ALL GAMIFICATION DESIGN Sofia Schöbel, Matthias Söllner, Abhay Mishra Despite the popularity of gamification, and the positive effects of games in daily life, many gamification projects fail. A possible explanation for this observation is that most projects follow a one-size-fits-all approach without considering what the intended users really want. Closely re-lated to this, most approaches focus on the integration of competitive game structures even though several mechanisms are available. This applies especially for the learning context of the study. Consequently, we aim to investigate the effectiveness of multiple gamification configura-tions based on different underlying motivational structures of users. To achieve our goal, we combine social comparison and social interdependence theory. This integration of theories helps to identify reward structures. They serve to analyze differences in user needs concerning their motivation to learn. We develop hypotheses that expose four different reward structures: autonomous, competitive, cooperative, and co-competitive. Our research-in-progress paper closes with an outline of an upcoming experiment. Once our research is completed, we expect to be able to better understand how differences in the users’ motivational structures influence their motivation in the context of learning, and how gamification configurations can be adapted based on a user’s underlying motivational structures. SOFTWARE PROGRAMMER PRODUCTIVITY: A COMPLEMENTARY-BASED RESEARCH MODEL Natallia Pashkevich, Darek Haftor The identification of the factors that condition a software programmer’s productivity remains a key challenge for both scholars and practitioners. While a number of studies have focused on the impact of one or a few particular factors, the way these factors jointly condition programmer productivity is still unknown. This paper presents a conceptual model aimed at a comprehensive understanding of the factors that complement each other to govern the productivity of a software programmer. The model is based on complementarity theory and its systems approach and addresses an individual worker’s productivity, which accounts for cognitive, technological, and organizational characteristics. The analyzed factors are organized into a system of complementarities, offering two propositions that specify the conditions of a programmer’s productivity. The model’s key contribution lies in its unique configuration of two systems of complementarities, which have the potential to add to the literature on the productivity of software programmers. The proposed model can be employed as a guidance for the design of empirical investigations of the conditions of individual software programmers’ productivity as well as information worker productivity in general.


DESIGNING HEDONIC USER EXPERIENCES: THE EFFECT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL NEED FULFILMENT ON HEDONIC MOTIVATION Dorothee Rocznik, Klaus Goffart, Manuel Wiesche

Within the last two decades the investigation of emotional and experiential influences in technology acceptance gained increasing attention. Especially in the context of the Internet of Things (IoT) researchers discovered the potential of designing hedonic experiences for customers. Recent studies integrated hedonic motivation as a core construct of the Unified Theory of Adoption and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) and confirmed the importance of its role. Nevertheless, we still lack research on the psychological processes underlying the hedonic motivation. Previous research on user experience hints at psychological need fulfilment to be the construct that explains the role of the hedonic motivation within UTAUT2. In the preliminary stages of the investigation, we establish a relationship between psychological need fulfilment and hedonic motivation in a field study. The aim of this study is to make a theoretical contribution by identifying the psychological needs that underlie the hedonic motivation within the framework of UTAUT2 in the context of IoT devices at home. Moreover, the expected outcomes are meant to serve as guidelines for the development of enjoyable products. SHARING BEHIND THE SCENES: UNDERSTANDING USER BYPASSING BEHAVIOR IN SHARING ECONOMY Yumeng Wang, Cheng Suang Heng Sharing economy platforms facilitate people’s sharing of underutilized resources by adding value to their users, such as reducing transaction costs and building trust. However, it is discovered by practitioners that users may actually bypass, or “disintermediate”, the platforms to strike direct deals on their own. This phenomenon motivates this research-in-progress to understand sharing economy user bypassing behaviour. Specifically, we investigate their motivations of bypassing and behavioral strategies of overcoming trust barriers. Drawing insights from disintermediation literature, we conduct a single case study on Airbnb, a renowned accommodation sharing platform. Our preliminary findings show that Airbnb hosts have non-economic motivation to bypass the platform, and they are able to overcome trust barriers through leveraging the unbundling of intermediary functions. Upon completion of the research, the study is expected to make three theoretical contributions: uncovering the loopholes in sharing economy business models, augmenting predominant economic view of disintermediation, and proposing a “spillover effect” of embedded relationship on economic action. TOWARDS EXPLAINING THE WILLINGNESS TO DISCLOSE PERSONAL SELF-TRACKING DATA TO SERVICE PROVIDERS Arne Buchwald, Albert Letner, Nils Urbach, Matthias von Entress-Fuersteneck


Users of digital self-tracking devices increasingly benefit from multiple services related to their self-tracking data. Simultaneously, service providers are dependent from these data to offer such services. Thereby, the willingness of users to provide such personal data heavily depends on benefits and risks associated with the disclosure. In this regard, the aim of our research is to investigate the factors influencing the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to service providers. So far, IS research has largely focused on private information disclosure in social media and little in the health and behavior context. To advance research in this area, we develop a conceptual model based on the privacy calculus by building on established information disclosure and privacy theories. With our research, we aim at contributing to both a better theoretical understanding in the fields of privacy and information disclosure and giving practical implications for service provider. MATERNAL IDENTITY AND MATERNAL ROLE ATTAINMENT – DETERMINANTS OF MOTHERS' PARTICIPATION IN MATERNAL VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES Johana Cabinakova, Julia Krönung The importance of local communities for mothers has been well documented in the social literature. However local communities have changed significantly in the last decades due to a number of cultural factors, including women’s increased participation in paid workforce and increasing geographical distance between family members. As easily accessible, location independent substitutes of local communities, maternal virtual communities (VC) have evoked an increased interest in the recent years. A considerable amount of literature has been published on the factors affecting members’ participation behaviour in various types of VCs. However only limited research has focused on their specific form targeting mothers and future mothers as main audience. Subsequently, there is only limited understanding of what motivates especially mothers to actively participate in maternal social networks. Hence to fill this research gap, the primary goal of our planed research is to provide some understanding of the crucial factors that determine mothers’ participation behaviours in maternal VC environments. Integrating the Technology Acceptance Model and the Updated VC Model extended by two new social factors Maternal Identity and Maternal Role Attainment we propose a research that might contribute to the newly evolving research stream on maternal motivation to participate in VCs. AN EXPLORATION OF FIRST-YEAR UNDERGRADUATES’ PREPAREDNESS AND EXPERIENCES IN BLENDED COURSES Yvonne Hong, Lesley Gardner Despite their advantages, blended approaches have been met with mixed results by learners. There is a general view that learners who are known as Digital Natives or Millennials, are technologically savvy. Research, however, suggests rather that they possess poor levels of digital literacy and have demonstrated some degree of avoidance towards e-learning tools (Boyd, 2014; Chigeza and Halbert, 2014; O’Connell and Dyment, 2014). This study thus intends to explore learners' preparedness in adapting to blended courses. We hypothesize that


learners’ depth of engagements in blended activities is influenced by learners’ characteristics. We further hypothesize the influence of learning facilitators and the learning environment in moderating learners’ engagement. We aim to contribute in a theoretical and empirical manner by testing the proposed framework based on past literature. Expected practical contributions include enriching teaching practices to better cater to students’ needs, and improving on blended techniques, allowing learners to learn in a more effective manner. BRIDGING THE KNOWLEDGE GAP: TOWARDS A COMPREHENSIVE MHEALTH TRAINING FRAMEWORK Grace Kenny, Ciara Heavin, Yvonne O'Connor, Edmund Ndibuagu Mobile health (mHealth) solutions can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare services delivered by Primary Healthcare (PHC) workers in rural communities in developing countries. However, a host of barriers can hinder the success of new mHealth implementations including low technology literacy levels and failure to communicate the benefits of the solution for all stakeholders. This paper argues that effective training of end users and all stakeholders can remove the barriers which stem from these issues, thereby improving the likelihood of successful implementation and enabling the eventual improvement of healthcare delivery. During a visit to Nigeria, the perceptions of key stakeholders regarding IMPACT, a new mHealth solution, were explored to ascertain the training needs of all stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem. The paper leverages data from this visit and presents IMPACTeD, a comprehensive mHealth training framework which aims to develop a collective understanding of the solution among all stakeholders, while also improving the technical ability and confidence of PHC workers. The framework will be implemented and evaluated during a second visit to Nigeria. This paper con-tributes to the scant literature in developing countries by providing a framework which can guide the implementation of further mHealth solutions in developing nations. SELLING CENTER HETEROGENEITY AND ITS INTER-PLAY WITH THE BUYING CENTER FOR INCREASING ADOPTION OF IT-SUPPORTED SERVICE INNOVATIONS Nicolas Zacharias, Ferdinand Rausch IT-supported service innovations attract considerable interest as drivers of competitive advantage in a business-to-business (B2B) context. Sales managers are in need of insights regarding how to set up their selling centers (SC) with regard to SC’s heterogeneity of expertise and values to raise the success of new services. However, literature in the area of SC heterogeneity in relationship with service innovations is scarce. Noting the increasing practical relevance, this study investigates how the different forms of SC heterogeneity influence the customers’ intention to adopt a service innovation, considering the moderating effects of degree of service digitalization as well as buying center (BC) heterogeneity of expertise and values. Drawing on organizational buying behavior theory, we hypothesize a positive effect of SC heterogeneity of expertise on the intention to adopt, while SC heterogeneity of values is expected to weaken the intention to adopt. In addition, we propose varying moderating effects for the two different forms of BC heterogeneity as well as the degree of service digitalization.


We will test the proposed hypotheses on the basis of a dyadic data collection. The expected findings will help sales managers to design their SCs in order to increase adoption rates of new services. THE EMERGENCE OF SHARING AND GAINING KNOWLEDGE: TOWARDS SMARTWORK IN HEALTHCARE Helena Vallo Hult The subject of this research-in-progress paper is on digitalization of healthcare in relation to work and learning. The aim is to explore the introduction of social technologies for collaboration and knowledge sharing at work. The empirical data is from a pilot study in the Swedish healthcare sector, involving emergency resident physicians, medical library team, and hospital management. The preliminary findings are discussed within the context of sociotechnical perspectives. Preliminary findings shed lights on some of the tensions and conflicting perspectives related to the digital workplace, and how to balance between them seems to be the challenge (personal vs. professional; medical vs. administrative; flexibility vs. institutionalization). This study also indicates that there are promising potential for collegial collaboration, knowledge sharing, and learning, and argue that better integration in daily practice and new ways of working may contribute to meet demand for health-related IT competence for healthcare staff and the benefit of patients as well. EFFECTING EMPLOYEE ENERGY CONSERVATION BEHAVIOUR AT THE WORKPLACE BY UTILISING GAMIFICATION Dimosthenis Kotsopoulos, Cleopatra Bardaki, Stavros Lounis, Katerina Pramatari Energy consumption is one of the widely recognised important factors that should be addressed, in reducing CO2 emissions towards addressing climate change. However, albeit the documented effect of public buildings, in specific, on energy consumption, only a limited body of research focuses on one of the most important factors that could limit it: employees’ energy consumption behaviour. Aiming to contribute to this path of research, we have identified gamification as an instrument that, when appropriately utilised, could lead to employees’ energy behaviour change. Additionally, we present a behavioural research model for employee energy conservation at work, in alignment with VBN theory of environmentalism, and a questionnaire instrument to validate it combined with practical experimentation. We consider two important categories of parameters that are connected to energy consumption behaviour in the workplace: Employees’ personal profile, which also influences the design and effectiveness of gamified apps, as well as level of environmental awareness. Concurrently, we also present preliminary findings from the analysis of the data collected after deploying the forementioned questionnaire instrument.


RESOURCE MOBILIZATION IN SOCIAL MEDIA: THE ROLE OF INFLUENTIAL ACTORS Jose Ortiz, Arvind Tripathi

This research in progress studies the role of social media as a resource for contemporary social movements in their endeavors to bring about social change. Current studies on this topic have largely regarded social media as an alternative channel for communicating situational information during protests against repressive regimes or perceptions of fraudulent democracy. Drawing on theories of resource mobilization and social networks, we present a framework for studying how the presence of influential and popular actors in social networks, can influence the acquisition process and the number of new followers by a social movement organization. We collected Twitter data for a major social movement organization in the global justice movement and found evidence suggesting that the existence of popular figures, impacts to some extent, the audience acquired by the social movement organization. We also conclude that the geographic location of these popular figures acts as a moderator for this effect. Our study lays the groundwork for answering questions regarding the sociotechnical dynamics that influence the propagation of ideologies in online environments promoted by groups and organizations concerned with societal issues. HOW DOES TWITTER INFLUENCE A SOCIAL MOVEMENT? Deepa Ray, Monideepa Tarafdar Impact of social media on social movements is highly debated and not clearly understood. For better clarity, social media’s influence should be examined by situating it in the context of use. To do so, a research study was undertaken to look at the role of Twitter in a social movement that emerged in India, post a violent gang-rape. Data was gathered to understand Twitter activity as well as offline activity that occurred post the incident. The research study consisted of multiple phases. The first phase of this research was exploratory in nature and aimed to examine how Twitter interacted with the structure of the social movement. For this, we analyzed important Twitter activity that occurred one week post the critical incident. This paper reports results of the initial, exploratory analysis. It found that Twitter was used as an important information diffusion mechanism. Analysis also revealed that Twitter impacted important structural components of the social movement. It influenced mobilization, identity framing and opportunity structures of the social movement. This helped in a better understanding of the process via which Twitter influenced the social movement. MANIPULATION IN PREDICTION MARKETS – CHASING THE FRAUDSTERS Simon Kloker, Tobias Kranz Prediction markets are a common instrument in forecasting and corporate knowledge management. Based on the “wisdom of the crowd” its forecasts regularly outperform polls as well as statistical models. In addition, it offers a convenient way to collect dispersed information in organizations and incite employees to reveal private information as well as to


stay informed. Although such markets are well established, there still remain open questions regarding their operation and maintenance. Especially the issue of manipulation and fraud, which are reported in many cases, is only rarely addressed; if so, only very theoretical or with complex algorithms, hard to implement for practitioners. Yet, a rigid framework, uncovering weaknesses of prediction markets and offering applicable prevention and detection strategies is missing. We propose the Fraud Cube, a concise framework unveiling fraudster’s thought process and thus potential attack vectors. Additionally, we present an easy to implement detection algorithm based on state of the art detection heuristics. Finally, we show not less than comparable detection rates to established detection algorithms whilst providing superior applicability. THE BENEFITS OF DCC IMPLEMENTATION FOR RETAILERS Dirk Gerritsen, Coen Rigtering, Carla Janse van Vuuren Retailers recently adopted dynamic currency conversion (DCC) techniques in which they offer their international clients the possibility to pay in their local currency. As retailers generally share in conversion revenues, it is relevant to gain insights in customers’ attitudes towards different forms of presenting the conversion option. It is found that the likelihood of using DCC decreases with conversion margins, but increases once DCC is presented as a default option. The findings provide guidance to retailers when to deploy DCC efficiently. HELP IS ON THE WAY – PROVIDING USER SUPPORT FOR EPC MODELLING VIA A SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE MODEL Sven Jannaber, Dennis M. Riehle, Patrick Delfmann, Oliver Thomas Process models and consequently business process modelling languages get more and more complex. This is especially true for the event-driven process chain (EPC), since the absence of a clearly defined standard renders EPC modelling difficult. On top, modelling itself is no trivial task. To address this issue, several frameworks and guidelines have emerged to support process modelling. However, most of them remain at a generic level. Currently, there is no user support with respect to the actual modelling process that is specific to the EPC language. To address these needs, the paper applies a design-oriented research approach and proposes a systematic procedure model specifically tailored towards EPC modelling as current outcome of this research in progress. We argue that the procedure model facilitates the modelling process and thus has the potential to increase model quality. ACCEPTANCE FACTORS FOR USING A BIG DATA CAPABILITY AND MATURITY MODEL Jeffrey Saltz Big data is an emerging field that combines expertise across a range of domains, including software development, data management and statistics. However, it has been shown that big


data projects suffer because they often operate at a low level of process maturity. To help address this gap, the Diffusion of Innovation Theory is used as a theoretical lens to identify factors that might drive an organization to try and improve their process maturity. Specifically, thirteen acceptance factors for teams to use (or not use) a Big Data CMM are identified. These results suggest that a positive perception exists with respect to relative advantage, compatibility and observability factors, and a negative perception exists with respect to perceived complexity. While more work is required to refine the list of factors, this insight can help guide the improvement of big data team processes. DESIGNING ADAPTIVE NUDGES FOR MULTI-CHANNEL CHOICES OF DIGITAL SERVICES: A LABORATORY EXPERIMENT DESIGN Dennis Hummel, Silvia Schacht, Alexander Mädche Channel-switching, cross-channel free-riding, and research shopping is causing problems for companies offering multiple channels. Either customers could choose a channel that is more expensive for the company or they inform themselves in one channel but switch to a competitor for the final purchase. We aim to influence channel choice by using the recently proposed IS concept of digital nudging. In particular, we leverage the nudges of social norms and perceived risk in the online channel. In addition to this concept, we propose that the individual context of the user, like gender or personality, has to be incorporated as a moderator by designing customer specific (i.e. adaptive) nudges. To test these hypotheses, we outline an experiment design for a lab experiment and show how multi-channel choices can be influenced with design interventions in the form of nudges. As previous studies have only tested static nudges, we contribute to existing research by enhancing the nudge theory to adaptively consider user characteristics. Moreover, we apply the nudge theory to the new context of multi-channel choices. Finally, we provide guidance for practitioners on designing their own online channels. EXPLORING HOW DIFFERENT PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGIES IMPACT DATA SCIENCE STUDENTS Jeffrey Saltz, Robert Heckman, Ivan Shamshurin This paper reports on a controlled experiment comparing different approaches on how to guide students through a semester long data science project. Four different methodologies, ranging from a traditional “just assign some intermediate milestones” to other more agile methodologies, are compared. The results of the experiment shows that the project methodology used in the classroom made a significant difference in student outcomes. Surprisingly, an Agile Kanban approach was found to be much more effective than an Agile Scrum methodology, which was not one of the leading approaches.


WEB SURVEY GAMIFICATION – INCREASING DATA QUALITY IN WEB SURVEYS BY USING GAME DESIGN ELEMENTS Silvia Schacht, Florian Keusch, Nils Bergmann, Stefan Morana

Researchers and survey designers face the challenge of low data quality as web surveys are often not compelling. Thus, participants’ engagement declines while completing a survey resulting in participants tend to apply satisficing behavior (e.g., speeding, straight-lining) in order to complete the questionnaire or even break-off the completion of the questionnaire. Due to satisficing behavior, researchers are faced with the challenge of low data quality. Addressing this challenge, survey gamification promises to make web survey participation enjoyable, which might also engage participants to complete questionnaires by providing high-quality data. However, the research on the effects of gamifying web surveys (in particular on behavioral outcomes) is still inconclusive. Addressing this short-coming, we propose to examine the effects of two common game design elements – badges and a meaningful story – in an experimental study. Based on the theoretical background of gamification and the theory of cognitive absorption, we derive hypotheses and outline in detail our experimental design in this research-in-progress paper. Our proposed research study will contribute to research and practice by addressing an important challenge when conducting online surveys: the motivation to process surveys accurately. MAKING CUES SALIENT: THE ROLE OF SECURITY AWARENESS IN SHAPING THREAT AND COPING APPRAISALS Lennart Jaeger, Andreas Eckhardt The number of phishing e-mails sent to users’ inboxes at organizations increases every year, putting users under constant threat of data or identity theft. In finding ways to motivate users to protect them-selves and their organization from such threats, IS security researchers using protection motivation theory (PMT) have made notable contributions to the relationship between appraisal processes and adaptive responses. In this study, we argue that security awareness is the missing link that can explain what makes cues salient. To observe this link, we have recently conducted a multi-method experimental design including eye tracking, facial analysis, and survey components to shed light on the relationship between users’ awareness and appraisal processes. Our study also contributes to prior literature by observing the effect of fear appeal manipulations on this relationship and the role of fear in user protection motivation. Additionally, we are able to uncover actual security-related behaviors. LARGE CROWDS OR LARGE INVESTMENTS? HOW SOCIAL IDENTITY INFLUENCES THE COMMITMENT OF THE CROWD Sean Nevin, Rob Gleasure, Phillip O'Reilly, Joseph Feller, Shanping Li, Jerry Cristoforo


Equity crowdfunding is increasing in popularity as an alternative to traditional financing for start-ups and growth companies to raise money for their business. This study discusses how equity crowdfunding is different from traditional financing, such as angel investors and venture capitalists. We argue this difference is brought further into focus when large numbers of crowd members invest small amounts, as opposed to fewer individuals making large investments. Building on existing research on Social Identity Theory, we look at why some crowdfunding campaigns are more likely to attract these contrasting types of investment (numerous small investments or fewer large investments). A model is presenting linking different characteristics of campaigns to total investment and average investment. This proposed model will be tested using public data gathered from Crowdcube, a leading UK-based equity crowdfunding platform. This study has significant implications for fundraisers who may wish to target different types of crowds according to the nature of their business, i.e. smaller numbers of passionate investors to provide informed input or larger numbers of casual investors to help create awareness and spread positive word of mouth. ARE YOU UP FOR THE CHALLENGE? TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A BIG DATA CAPABILITY ASSESSMENT MODEL Patrick Zschech, Kai Heinrich, Marcus Pfitzner, Andreas Hilbert Utilizing Big Data scenarios that are generated from increasing digitization and data availability is a core topic in IS research. There are prospective advantages in generating business value from those scenarios through improved decision support and new business models. In order to harvest those potential advantages Big Data capabilities are required, including not only technological aspects of data management and analysis but also strategic and organisational aspects. To assess these capabilities, one can use capability assessment models. Employing a qualitative meta-analysis on existing capability assessment models, it can be revealed that the existing approaches greatly differ in their fundamental structure due to heterogeneous model elements. The heterogeneous elements are therefore synthesized and transformed into consistent assessment dimensions to fulfil the requirements of exhaustive and mutually exclusive aspects of a capability assessment model. As part of a broader research project to develop a consistent and harmonized Big Data Capability Assessment Model (BDCAM) a new design for a capability matrix is proposed including not only capability dimensions but also Big Data life cycle tasks in order to measure specific weaknesses along the process of data-driven value creation. ALIGNING IS CURRICULUM WITH INDUSTRY SKILL EXPECTATIONS: A TEXT MINING APPROACH Patrick Föll, Frédéric Thiesse Digitalization offers both great opportunities as well as new challenges and uncertainties. In particular, students in their role as future employees will have to cope with the new digital envi-ronments, which makes lifelong learning and up-to-date skills even more important than they already are. Key players in this long-term development are the universities as providers


of the necessary skills and knowledge. By now, it is clear that digitalization will have a broad impact on the future conditions of universities. But are they already prepared for it? Against this back-drop, we present an approach to combine universities’ offerings with the required industry job skills to identify potential curricular gaps at course level that arise through ongoing digitaliza-tion and, as a consequence, changing skill requests for employees. We identify an appropriate set of methods for our project including text mining methods, an expert survey and an interview phase for evaluation. We illustrate our approach using a large data set of German IS curricular module descriptions and offers for IS job starters. THE DINU-MODEL – A PROCESS MODEL FOR THE DESIGN OF NUDGES Christian Meske, Tobias Potthoff The sociotechnical paradigm legitimates our discipline and serves as core identity of IS. In this study, we want to focus on IS-induced human behavior by introducing a process model for nudging in IS. In behavioral economics, the concept of nudging has been proposed, which makes use of human cognitive processes and can direct people to an intended behavior. In computer science, the concept of persuasion has evolved with similar goals. Both concepts, nudging and persuasion, can contribute to IS research and may help to explain and steer user behavior in information systems. We aim for an integration of both concepts into one digital nudging process model, making it usable and accessible. We analyzed literature on nudging and persuasion and derived different steps, requirements, and nudging elements. The developed process model aims at enabling researchers and practitioners to design nudges in e.g. software systems but may also contribute to other areas like IT governance. Though the evaluation part of our study has not yet been completed, we present the current state of the process model enabling more research in this area. ADAPTING AGILE METHODS TO DEVELOP SOLUTIONS FOR THE INDUSTRIAL INTERNET OF THINGS Christoph Fuchs, Thomas Hess The Internet of Things (IoT) is evolving from a technological buzz-phrase into a substantiated organizational and private reality with interconnected devices over the Internet. However, with literature focusing on the technological aspects of IoT, research on the development process of IoT solutions remains scarce. This is particularly captivating, since agile methods provide a natural fit for the requirements associated with the development of IoT solutions, ranging from continuous and flexible improvement of products to integrating developers’ interdisciplinary expertise. We bring together these two areas of interest by conducting a study on the adaptation of agile methods in organizations that develop and distribute industrial IoT solutions. In this paper, we derive a theoretical model based on adaptive structuration theory and develop our empirical research design. Our multiple-case study research approach across relevant companies and industries is currently in process of data collection and analysis. Nonetheless, our preliminary findings reveal interesting insights into the specific adaptation of the agile development method of Scrum in the industrial IoT context. In terms of our finalized study, we


provide a sound theoretical basis for future research and offer relevant practical guidance for organizations that are implementing agile methods to develop their industrial IoT solutions. RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIALS AS A METHOD OF EVALUATING MOBILE HEALTH INTERVENTIONS Samantha Dick, Yvonne O'Connor, Ciara Heavin With the momentum around the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), more recently the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), there is a steady increase in the number of mobile health (mHealth) pilots, feasibility studies and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) used to evaluate the potential for mHealth in developing countries. Recent research indicates the need for more robust ways of evaluating and measuring mHealth in order to truly understand the tangible benefits, and to better plan for, wide scale mHealth roll-out and implementation. In a number of large funded mHealth projects in Africa, RCTs have been selected as a means of assessing mHealth. However, there remains a dearth of research to support the selection of RCTs as a means of evaluating mHealth. The objective of this research is to investigate RCTs as a method of evaluating mobile health interventions in developing countries. Using a qualitative analysis approach, this study aims to explore the challenges associated with pursuing an RCT for the evaluation of mHealth in Malawi, Africa. Following this, as part of the wider study a checklist of factors will be proposed as a means of determining the suitability (OR LACK THEREOF) OF RCTS AS A MEANS OF MHEALTH EVALUATION. WHEN IS AGILE APPROPRIATE FOR ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT? Gary Spurrier, Heikki Topi Using agile methods for enterprise software development (ESD) remains contentious. Advocates of agile and plan-driven methods (i.e., waterfall) argue their respective cases with near evangelical zeal, and recent evidence indicates that waterfall (or some variant) remains a widely used approach. This controversy persists despite strong arguments by Boehm and Turner (2004) recommending a balanced software development approach combining aspects of agile and plan-driven methods, aligned to projects based on each project’s fit with agile vs. plan-driven “home ground” characteristics. In this research, we hypothesize that Boehm and Turner were fundamentally correct and that neither of the “pure” models will lead to the highest level of project success in all circumstances. This paper describes a research project to study the impact of alignment with a flexible but simple agile vs. hybrid vs. plan-driven approach on ESD outcomes. The discussion includes: 1) Articulating the identifying characteristics of ESD, 2) distilling the essence of plan-driven vs. agile methods along two key dimensions, 3) explicating a hybrid method of software development using those dimensions, and 4) extending Boehm and Turner’s “home grounds” model to better determine the optimal ESD approach. The discussion includes our planned research questions, data collection and analysis, and hypotheses.


DEVELOPMENT OF DYNAMIC KEY FIGURES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF CRITICAL COMPONENTS IN SMART FACTORY INFORMATION NETWORKS Björn Häckel, Daniel Miehle, Stefan Pfosser, Jochen Übelhör

Informational risks in smart factories arise from the growing interconnection of its components, the increasing importance of real-time accessibility and exchange of information, and highly dynamic and complex information networks. Thereby, physical production more and more depends on functioning information networks due to increasing informational dependencies. Accordingly, the operational capability of smart factories and their ability to create economic value heavily depend on its information network. Thus, information networks of smart factories have to be evaluated regarding informational risks as a first prerequisite for subsequent steps regarding the management of a smart factory. In this paper, we focus on the identification of critical components in information networks based on key figures that quantitatively depict the availability of the information network. To enable analyses regarding dynamic effects, the developed key figures cover dynamic propagation and recovery effects. To demonstrate their applicability, we investigate two possible threat scenarios in an exemplary information network. Further, we integrated the insights of two expert interviews of two global companies in the automation and packaging industry. The results indicate that the developed key figures offer a promising approach to better analyse and understand informational risks in smart factory information networks. TWO WAY ARCHITECTURE BETWEEN IOT SENSORS AND CLOUD COMPUTING FOR REMOTE HEALTH CARE MONITORING APPLICATIONS Jing Ma, Hoa Nguyen, Farhaan Mirza, Oliver Neuland This research presents an intelligent two way IoT (Internet of Things) architecture that uses IoT sensors and cloud-technology for data collection, monitoring and alerting strategies. This approach can enhance development of support systems which are useful for patients and aging individuals who want to remain in an independent living environment. Such an architecture can be used for early detection of anomalies and reduce medical costs. In this paper we present a technical architecture called SMMC - Sensors, Micro Controller, Machine to Machine Protocols and Cloud. The technical architecture proposed will firstly collect data from IoT sensors at the point of care. Secondly, the data collected by sensors is usually an analogue signal, this is processed by the micro controller. Thereafter the data is sent to the cloud, where clinical decision support algorithms can be applied to check for any clinically alarming anomalies in the data. Finally using machine to machine protocols can be used to activate sensors for feedback or alerts. We present this architecture along with a smart bed scenario, and describe further research in progress.


ASSESSING THE INFLUENCE OF PERSUASIVE SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINABILITY ACROSS WORK-HOME-COMMUNITY BOUNDARIES Jacqueline Corbett, Sarah Cherki El Idrissi

Little doubt remains that human activities have contributed to climate change and environmental degradation over the past century. Humans must now alter their behaviours if the devastating consequences of climate change are to be avoided. To this end, persuasive systems for sustainability present a novel opportunity for encouraging environmentally responsible behaviours. This paper is part of ongoing research seeking to assess the influence of a persuasive system for sustainability deployed in one domain, such as a utility-sponsored energy conservation application, on individual behaviours within that domain, and also in other domains, such as at work or in the community. Here, we report on the development of measures to evaluate our constructs of interest, namely environmentally responsible behaviours at work, home and in the community, rebound effects, work-home-community boundary strengths, complexity of change and system characteristics of perceived persuasiveness and integration support. Through a process that included item creation, card sorting and exploratory factor analysis based on a survey of 168 participants, we have been successful in developing certain measures. Although still in progress, this work contributes to the Green IS literature by developing new measures and drawing attention to mechanisms for enhancing organizational and inter-organizational sustainability initiatives. THE YIN-AND-YANG OF COLLABORATIVE CONSUMPTION DEVELOPMENT: THE ROLE OF AMBIDEXTROUS IS CAPABILITIES AT GOGET’S CAR-SHARE Thomas Lister, Michael Cahalane, Felix Ter Chian Tan, Barney Tan, Leo Saito In this paper, we present a model of how ambidextrous IS capabilities enact the development and management of collaborative consumption platforms. Collaborative consumption in an increasingly digital economy is emergent, and fosters hyper-connections among human actors, organizations, and processes in the negotiating and sharing of goods and services. Despite this, extant literature does not provide actionable process models, nor does it meaningfully engage the role of IS in understanding how collaborative consumption platforms create value. We present a study of GoGet, a car-sharing platform, service and community that has experienced significant growth over the past decade. Based on preliminary findings and drawing on IS capabilities as theoretical lens, we reveal a four-stage process model− minimizing, attaining, extending and optimizing−central to achieving a balance between growth and control objectives in a collaborative consumption ecosystem. Our ongoing study which seeks to reveal a roadmap to how IS capabilities facilitate this new mode of consumption has implications for both theory and practice.


IDENTIFICATION OF CURRENT KEY TOPICS IN ERP POST-IMPLEMENTATION RESEARCH: A LITERATURE REVIEW CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK Sebastian Gรถhrig, Christian Janiesch, Daniel Neuss, Julian Kolb, Axel Winkelmann

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems enable business operations through IT in basically any mid- to large-size company. In the past, research on ERP systems has focused heavily on their adoption and implementation. However, since implemented and running ERP systems are already omnipresent in most industrialized countries, research has to shift its focus to the postimplementation phase. Consequently, in this paper we prepare the basis for a literature review on ERP post-implementation research. We have synthesized and extended classification schemes from prior ERP- and organizational learning literature by distinguishing the level of exploitation and exploration from a technical, an organizational, and a business perspective. Using this framework as a tool, we will be able to systematize relevant literature and we can identify category-specific and inter-categorical exploitation and exploration activities, which will reveal cross-cutting research issues in ERP post-implementation. IDENTIFYING AND EMBEDDING BEHAVIORAL COMPETENCIES IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSES Vijay Kanabar, Kalinka Kaloyanova This paper describes our efforts in auditing coverage of critical all-inclusive behavioral competencies in Information Systems (IS) and Computer Science (CS) curricula. The paper introduces a framework to teach critical behavioral competencies such as communications, conflict management and leadership in teams in IS and CS programs. Such programs provide limited opportunity to students to develop these skills of great importance in the workforce. Our research reveals that usually such abilities are spread out across several courses and it is difficult to get a broad picture of which competencies are being delivered and where. We have researched a spreadsheet model that makes it possible to assess if topics such as leadership, teams or communications are underdeveloped. If any specific competency is missing, the model recommends a list of topics and exercises for integration into a course. DETECTING PANIC POTENTIAL IN SOCIAL MEDIA TWEETS Anuja Hariharan, Wei Liao, Verena Dorner, Christof Weinhardt, Georg Alpers A high degree of real-time interconnectedness can aid information transmission, particularly in disaster situations. However, it can have substantial negative consequences when information is emotionally laden and transmits these emotions, particularly the emotion of panic, to the individual across social media in an already grave situation. Prior research has shown that information laden with emotion spreads through social network faster than otherwise. Hence, we highlight the need to understand and curtail potentially panic-causing information, without compromising on good quality information from being available for


effective crisis communication and management. With this research, we present the necessity of detecting the panic potential of social media messages, and aim to address two research questions: What are the features, and metrics necessary, to compute and evaluate the panic potential of a social media message (respectively)? Our planned analysis takes the case of the Munich shooting incident, 2016, based on user tweets immediately after the incident. Different features and evaluation metrics are proposed and discussed. The work aims to detect panic potential of a messages in social media networks during disasters. PREDICTING THE DURATION OF SURGERIES TO IMPROVE PROCESS EFFICIENCY IN HOSPITALS Martin Riekert, Marc Premm, Achim Klein, Lyubomir Kirilov, Hannes Kenngott, Martin Apitz, Martin Wagner, Lena Ternes Predicting the duration of surgeries is an important task because of the many dependencies between surgery processes and the hospital processes within other departments. Thus, accurate predictions allow for better coordinating patient processes throughout the hospital. Prior datadriven research provides evidence for accurate predictions of surgery durations enhancing the efficiency of surgery schedules. However, the current prediction models require large sets of features, which make their adoption more intricate. Moreover, prediction models focus on the surgery department and neglect potential effects on other departments. We use a unique dataset of about 17,000 surgeries to study how particular features and machine learning algorithms affect the prediction accuracy of major surgery steps. The prediction models that we study require few features and are easy to apply. The empirical findings can be useful for the design of surgery scheduling systems. DESIGNING FOR KNOWLEDGE-BASED FAMILIARITY, TRUST, AND ACCEPTANCE: THE CASE OF AFFECTIVE TECHNOLOGY Katharina Jahn, Oliver Heger, Henrik Kampling, Krzysztof Stanik, Bjรถrn Niehaves With the ability to recognize human emotions, so-called affective technology has the potential to provide highly adaptive service to its user in many different areas such as learning, health care, or manufacturing. However, there are specific barriers for the acceptance of affective technology because most people are unfamiliar with the affective components of such technologies and, hence, do not trust them. Assuming that increasing the knowledge-based familiarity with an affective technology is essential for accepting it, so far, only little is known about appropriate design concepts to increase the familiarity and, as a consequence, the acceptance of affective technology. To close this gap, we follow a Design Science approach laying out an explanatory design theory for knowledge-based familiarity and acceptance of affective technology. We argue that familiarity with a technology is built by gaining knowledge about the emotional state the system has recognized and the subsequent behavior of the system and such knowledge will be gained by providing suitable feedback. We develop different designs for feedback systems of an affective technology and propose corresponding design


hypotheses. This research-in-progress concludes with the planned experimental approach varying feedback content and feedback explanation. LEVERAGING PUSHED SELF-TRACKING IN THE HEALTH INSURANCE INDUSTRY: HOW DO INDIVIDUALS PERCEIVE SMART WEARABLES OFFERED BY INSURANCE ORGANIZATION? Stefanie Paluch, Sven Tuzovic Mobile sensor devices such as smart wearables and activity trackers open up new opportunities to be used in the health care sector. Moreover, since the positive effects of wearable technologies on individ-uals have been examined, and with fitness trackers becoming significance in preventing chronical con-ditions which are typically caused by the lack of regular physical activity and causing problems in weight gain and obesity, diabetes and/or osteoporosis has led the statutory health insurance companies in different countries to introduce fitness trackers as part of their reward systems. The objective of this study is to empirically examine individual’s overall perception and experience with mobile fitness tracker, drivers as well as adoption barriers, with a particular focus on individual attitude and response when these trackers are implemented in novel services offered by professional health insurance companies. Based on 32 qualitative interviews with users, non-users and experts from insurance companies, our study will contribute toward a better understanding of individuals’ smart wearable perception and adoption in the context of health insurance companies. CHANGING LEADERSHIP BEHAVIOURS: A JOURNEY TOWARDS A DATA DRIVEN CULTURE. Jonathan McCarthy, David Sammon, Ciaran Murphy Student retention is important to all Higher Education Institutions. This has driven considerable re-search and focus, much of which concluded that each institution must define those factors by which it can identify student retention risk. These factors include student attendance, engagement, participation, academic performance, socio-economic background, etc. Once these factors are identified the institu-tion then works to put some sort of proactive intervention programme in place to prevent the student moving from a retention risk to a retention statistic. Much of the research supports the move towards data driven decision making for each institution: use data to identify the retention risk early, make some sort of intervention with the student with a view to mitigating the risk. Unsurprisingly, the research has predominantly focused on the behaviour of the student and providing data to institutional leaders who then drive interventions aimed at altering the at risk student’s behaviour. However, very little research has considered how this data is impacting on the leaders themselves. This move towards a data driven culture has a significant dependency on leaders making data driven decisions and thus their behaviour is also an important factor. This paper looks at the impact a move towards a data driven culture can have on leadership behaviour.


I AM A CROWD WORKER – HOW INDIVIDUALS IDENTIFY WITH A NEW FORM OF DIGITAL WORK David Durward, Ivo Blohm

Crowd work has emerged as a new form of digital gainful employment that changes the nature of work. However, an increasing number of people perform certain tasks in the crowd and start to identify with this work. In this paper, we outline our research in progress which is concerned with the effects of work characteristics in crowd work that have impact on the individual’s identification. Thus, we developed our research model and conducted an online survey amongst 434 crowd workers to ex-amine their perception of work and illustrate the antecedences of identification. Our expected contribution will increase the understanding of crowd work and extend prior research on self-determination theory (SDT) and work design. For practice, we provide important insights for platform providers to (re-) design work on platform in order to increase identification among their crowd. In addition, our findings can serve as common basis for future discussions on decent crowd work.

DIGITAL FORMATIVE LEARNING ASSESSMENT TOOL – TOWARDS HELPING STUDENTS TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THEIR LEARNING Roman Rietsche, Matthias Söllner, Sabine Seufert Over the last years, the number of students has constantly risen while the number of lecturers remained steady. To the consequence are large-scale classes with often hundreds of students. Large-scale classes have didactical challenges such as providing effective feedback for the students’ learning success. This is in particular problematic, since feedback belongs to the most influential factors for the student learning success. In order to overcome the challenges of providing feedback in large-scale classes, we suggest using an IT-based solution we label digital formative learning assessment tool (DFLAT). In this research-in-progress paper, we will show the development of this tool by using the method of action design research (ADR). More precisely, we will concentrate on the first part from the requirements gathering to the alphaversion. In order to collect the requirements, we conducted expert interviews with lecturers and students and also derived requirements from scientific literature. Based on the requirements, we will define the key design elements of the first version of DFLAT. The next steps in our research are then the intervention and evaluation of our alpha-version in a large-scale lecture. With our completed research, we aim to contribute to literature by developing a theory of design and action for providing individualized feedback for students in large-scale classes. EXPLORING THE IMPACTS OF VIRTUAL REALITY ON BUSINESS MODELS: THE CASE OF THE MEDIA INDUSTRY Joschka Mütterlein, Thomas Hess


Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging technology with a large potential to disrupt businesses. However, impacts of VR on companies have remained largely unexplored. We seek to fill this research gap with the business model concept as a well-structured foundation. Using the example of the media industry as one of the industries most affected by VR, our qualitative study classifies different types of VR applications and contents to assess their impacts on a business model’s components. We distinguish between the internal use of VR applications in companies (e.g., for conferencing and collaborating) and the production and distribution of VR content for external use (e.g., videos and games). The findings show that the impact of VR on companies that produce and distribute VR contents for external purposes is large and even increases when more technologies are needed to create content and when the content is more interactive. Compared to this, VR’s impact on companies that merely use the technology for internal purposes is small. Our analysis also shows that the business model concept is well suited to analyze technology adoption at the firm level. Thus, we suggest its future use to methodically advance this research stream. THE CONTENT AND CONTEXT OF IDENTITY IN A DIGITAL SOCIETY Michelle Carter, Deborah Compeau, Michael Kennedy, Marc Schmalz Our team has undertaken a study designed to explore the context and content of IT identity in a digital society. The work involves conducting semi-structured, reflective interviews and analysis based on grounded theory, extending prior research on IT identity by investigating the meanings and expectations for behaviour that individuals ascribe to themselves in relation to IT and how these relate to various aspects of their current self-concepts. Our initial findings indicate that our participants have complex relationships with a range of IT. These technologies become embedded in their daily lives, providing evidence in support of IT’s role as a medium, determinant, and consequent of identity. Further, we see the emergence of weak and strong IT identities and the emergence of a weak anti-IT identity. By iterating on our processes and reflecting on our results, we have been able to tune our methods and inform future recruitment goals. Moving forward, we expect that expanding the diversity in our group of participants will reveal greater insights into the ways that participation in a digital society influences the formation and expression of one’s role, group, personal, and IT (or anti-IT) identities. PEER RATINGS AND ASSESSMENT QUALITY IN CROWD-BASED INNOVATION PROCESSES Thomas Wagenknecht, Timm Teubner, Christof Weinhardt Social networks – whether public or in enterprises – regularly ask users to rate their peers’ content using different voting techniques. When employed in innovation challenges, these rating procedures are part of an open, interactive, and continuous engagement among customers, employees, or citizens. In this regard, assessment accuracy (i.e., correctly identifying good and bad ideas) in crowdsourced evaluation processes may be influenced by the display of peer ratings. While it could sometimes be useful for users to follow their peers, it is not entirely clear under which circumstances this actually holds true. Thus, in this research-in-progress article, we propose a study design to systematically investigate the effect of peer ratings on assessment


accuracy in crowdsourced idea evaluation processes. Based on the elaboration likelihood model and social psychology, we develop a research model that incorporates the mediating factors extraversion, locus of control, as well as peer rating quality (i.e., the ratings’ correlation with the evaluated content’s actual quality). We suggest that the availability of peer ratings decreases assessment accuracy and that rating quality, extraversion, as well as an internal locus of con-trol mitigate this effect. COMBINING COLLECTIVE AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: TOWARDS A DESIGN THEORY FOR DECISION SUPPORT IN CROWDSOURCING Marcel Rhyn, Ivo Blohm Crowdsourcing represents a powerful approach that seeks to harness the collective knowledge or creativity of a large and independent network of people for organizations. While the approach drastically facilitates the sourcing and aggregating of information, it represents a latent challenge for organizations to process and evaluate the vast amount of crowdsourced contributions – especially when they are submitted in an unstructured, textual format. In this study, we present an on-going design science research project that is concerned with the construction of a design theory for semi-automated information processing and decision support in crowdsourcing. The proposed concept leverages the power of crowdsourcing in combination with text mining and machine learning algorithms to make the evaluation of textual contributions more efficient and effective for decision-makers. Our work aims to provide the theoretical foundation for designing such systems in crowdsourcing. It is intended to contribute to decision support and business analytics research by outlining the capabilities of text mining and machine learning techniques in contexts that face large amounts of usergenerated content. For practitioners, we provide a set of generalized design principles and design features for the implementation of these algorithms on crowdsourcing platforms. UNDERSTANDING AUGMENTED REALITY GAME PLAYERS’ VALUE CO-DESTRUCTION PROCESS IN POKÉMON GO Juuli Lintula, Tuure Tuunanen, Markus Salo, Tuomas Kari We conceptualize the mobile game Pokémon Go as a service provider aiming to offer customers value propositions over an augmented reality (AR) platform, where players engage in co-creating value, such as fun, social unity and health. However, playing Pokémon Go can also ensue to value co-destruction through critical service interactions involving e.g. increased mobile costs, trespassing, accidents or assaults. Such could ensue to negative value outcomes, such as frustration, humiliation or unsafety. In order to prevent critical service interactions, it is significant to gain an understanding of value co-destruction, which currently remains an unclear concept with a call for empirical studies. We address this gap by adopting a qualitative research approach and examining 55 critical Pokémon Go user incidents, and ca. 30 laddering interviews. The data is coded into process components categorized in three interrelated dimensions and three temporal points. As a result, a value co-destruction process framework for AR mobile games will be proposed. We contribute to the literature by empirically extending


the extant value co-destruction conceptualization, and pioneering a study of value codestructive user behaviour in the AR mobile games domain. Our findings will help researchers and managers understand value co-destructive user behaviour and rectify critical interaction components.

AFFORDANCE THEORY IN SOCIAL MEDIA RESEARCH: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS OF THE LITERATURE Najmeh Hafezieh, Farjam Eshraghian Social media technologies continue transforming various dimensions of social and organisational life through possibilities they present for goal-oriented actions of diverse users/ user groups. The notion of affordances that explains these possibilities has witnessed popularity among IS scholars to study these technologies. However, since the concept itself has been under ongoing development, its use in studying social media technologies has been focused on identi-fying technical affordances, perception and actualisations of these affordances, or the social and organisational implications of such affordances. In this research-in-progress paper, we present our attempt to systematically review and synthesise the literature to examine the effects of social media affordances. In addition, we aim to systematically review the existing literature to explore how the concept of affordance has been employed in social media research, to un-cover the effects of social media affordances and present a comprehensive framework of these affordances effects and identify areas for future research. ACHIEVING MORE BY PAYING LESS? HOW RETAILERS CAN BENEFIT BY BIDDING LESS AGGRESSIVELY IN PAID SEARCH AUCTIONS Darius Schlangenotto, Dennis Kundisch Current research on paid search highlights its ability to enhance online as well as offline conversions. Yet, research investigating the impact of placing paid search ads on less prominent positions on subsequent consumer behavior is limited to the online environment. This paper presents a controlled field experiment which investigates whether the targeting of a less prominent ad position can be beneficial for bricks-and-mortar retailers who sell their products via local stores. Preliminary Results indicate that paid search advertising budgets could be allocated more efficiently by targeting less prominent ad positions, thus allowing a bricks-andmortar retailer with a limited marketing budget to increase the reach of their marketing campaign, attract more consumers to its website and achieve an overall increase in conversions. These findings illustrate that search theory continues to apply in the realm of paid search and that different consumer types are likely to click on differently positioned ads. Advertisers could leverage this behavior to reach preferred types of customers by targeting specific ad positions. Bricks-and-mortar retailers could consider targeting less prominent ad positions when seeking to re-duce advertising costs while simultaneously extending their reach to customers and achieve an increase in conversions.


SOUNDING OUT IS? MOODS AND AFFECTIVE ENTANGLEMENTS IN EXPERIENTIAL COMPUTING Mads Bødker, Tina Jensen

How do we experience living in a world in which soundscapes from digital technologies are increasingly pervading our everyday lives? In this paper, we pay attention to moods, ambiances, and other ephemeral aspects that give shape to how working with digital technology feels. Too often glossed over in search of more concrete narratives of ‘effect’ or ‘impact’ of digital technology, we argue that the socio-materiality of practice can be complemented by a notion of affective entanglement; i.e., the embodied materiality of feeling. Highlighting in particular how soundscapes and noise from ubiquitous computers performs and matters in the emergent composition of embodied being and subjectivity, we urge IS researchers to pay attention to everyday phenomena that involve digital technologies. Towards this aim, we present three autoethnographic vignettes that help unpack situations in which sounds shape or perform certain kinds of subjectivities and felt, embodied dispositions. Based on these everyday narratives, we analyse the different ways in which soundscapes from digital technology shape the body’s ability to act, feel, think, and experience. We conclude this research in progress paper by suggesting some opportunities for advancing a material, sensory, and ‘experiential turn’ in the IS discipline. PREFERENCE ELICITATION THROUGH MOUSE CURSOR MOVEMENTS – PRELIMINARY EVIDENCE Johannes Schneider, Markus Weinmann, Christoph Schneider, Jan Vom Brocke Identifying customers’ preferences is a challenging task with significant practical implications for online shopping. Current methods often put considerable burden on the customers through such methods as questioning, so the process could benefit from a more accurate and less intrusive estimation of how customers weight product attributes, particularly in the initial purchasing phase. Our goal is to derive attribute weights automatically by recording and analyzing cursor movements. We conducted an experiment to confirm the suitability of the proposed design, and found a highly significant correlation between the time people spend investigating a product attribute and their self-reported importance rating. Our proposed Web page design might also reduce the risk of information overload. DIGITAL INNOVATION IN PUBLIC SERVICE ECOSYSTEM – ENACTING THE GENERATIVE AFFORDANCE Kim Hurtta, Christophe Elie-Dit-Cosaque The Information systems (IS) literature explains how specific digital characteristics enable structural generativity, i.e. “a system’s capacity to produce unanticipated change through contributions from broad and varied audiences” (Zittrain, 2008: p.70). This resonates well with


innovation literature, which emphasizes the combinatorial aspect of innovation and the value of open and distributed innovation. However, the connection between generative affordance and desired outcomes in the form digital innovation is largely unexplored. In response to this research gap, this study takes a human agency perspective for analysing how actors perceive and act upon the generative affordance, how the actions are constrained, and how the actions and constraints relate to the concepts of generativity and digital innovation. In order to examine those issues, a qualitative embedded case study in the context of Finnish public administration is being completed. Preliminary findings indicate that generative digital innovation depends on individuals, who need to have ability and motivation to explore and implement new approaches, and sufficient coordination and support at the ecosystem level, but is constrained by current governance practices. USING CROWDFUNDING FOR START-UP EVALUATION: HOW TASK REPRESENTATION INFLUENCES PREDICTION ACCURACY OF THE CROWD Nikolaus Lipusch, Dominik Dellermann, Philipp Ebel The paper at hand examines if the crowd can offer valuable support in evaluating start-ups. In doing so, we plan to conduct an experiment 1.) to test if the crowd is capable to support experts in evaluating start-ups 2.) to examine how differences in task-representation (i.e. rating scales vs. a crowdfunding mechanism) influences cognitive processing of the crowd and 3.) to examine how types of cognitive processing (i.e. system 1 thinking vs. system 2 thinking) relate to prediction accuracy of the crowd. To this end, we plan to introduce crowdfunding as a new evaluation mechanism to support the crowd in coming up with more accurate predictions of start-up value. Our theoretical contribution is twofold. First, we aim to show if the crowd can be used to support Venture capitalists in evaluating start-ups, in the sense that their evaluations agree with expert evaluations. Second, we plan to contribute to a better understanding about how the de-sign of evaluation mechanisms influences peoples cognitive processing and the crowds ability to predict start-up value. LEVERAGING TEXT MINING FOR THE DESIGN OF A LEGAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Jannis Hanke, Frédéric Thiesse In today’s globalized world, companies are faced with numerous and continuously changing legal requirements. To ensure that these companies are compliant with legal regulations, law and consulting firms use open legal data published by governments worldwide. With this data pool growing rapidly, the complexity of legal research is strongly increasing. Despite this fact, only few research papers consider the application of information systems in the legal domain. Against this backdrop, we propose a knowledge management (KM) system that aims at supporting legal research processes. To this end, we leverage the potentials of text mining techniques to extract valuable information from legal documents. This information is stored in a graph database, which enables us to capture the relationships between these documents and users of the system. These relationships and the information from the documents are then fed


into a recommendation system which aims at facilitating knowledge transfer within companies. The prototypical implementation of the proposed KM system is based on 20,000 legal documents and is currently evaluated in cooperation with a Big 4 accounting company. WHOSE MATURITY IS IT ANYWAY? THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT QUANTITATIVE METHODS ON THE DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT OF MATURITY MODELS Lester Lasrado, Ravi Vatrapu, Raghava Rao Mukkamala This paper presents results from an ongoing empirical study that seeks to understand the influence of different quantitative methods on the design and assessment of maturity models. Although there have been many academic publications on maturity models, there exists a significant lack of understanding of the potential impact of (a) choice of the quantitative approach, and (b) scale of measurement on the design and assessment of the maturity model. To address these two methodological issues, we analysed a social media maturity data set and computed maturity scores using different quantitative methods prescribed in literature. Specifically, we employed five methods (Additive, Variance, Cluster, Minimum Constraint, and RASCH) and compared the sensitivity of measurement scale and maturity stages. Based on our results, we propose a set of methodological recommendations for maturity model designers. TOWARDS A LEAN APPROACH TO GAMIFYING EDUCATION Thomas John, Matthias Feldotto, Paul Hemsen, Katrin Klingsieck, Dennis Kundisch, Mike Langendorf Many university students struggle with motivational problems, and gamification has the potential to address these problems. However, using gamification currently is rather tedious and time-consuming for instructors because current approaches to gamification require instructors to engage in the time-consuming preparation of course contents (e.g., for quizzes or mini-games). In reply to this issue, we propose a “lean” approach to gamification, which relies on gamifying learning activities rather than learning contents. The learning activities that are gamified in the lean approach can typically be drawn from existing course syllabi (e.g., attend certain lectures, hand in assignments, read book chapters and articles). Hence, compared to existing approaches, lean gamification substantially lowers the time requirements posed on instructors for gamifying a given course. Drawing on research on limited attention and the present bias, we provide the theoretical foundation for the lean gamification approach. In addition, we present a mobile application that implements lean gamification and outline a mixed-methods study that is currently under way for evaluating whether lean gamification does indeed have the potential to increase students’ motivation. We thereby hope to allow more students and instructors to benefit from the advantages of gamification.


INCREASING RELEVANCE IN IS RESEARCH: CONTEXTUALIZING KNOWLEDGE IN NETWORKS Kalle Lyytinen, Frantz Rowe Relevance is useful and actionable knowledge in situ. It is a result and condition of ‘knowledge ex-changes’ between practitioner and scientific communities taking place in heterogeneous knowledge networks. Whereas IS research has traditionally emphasized a selection perspective in disputes around relevance preferring scholarly community’s viewpoint over the other, this paper articulates a network-ing perspective which analyzes enablers, competencies and barriers for useful knowledge flow across communities. After introducing main types of knowledge that flow in the knowledge system we apply the concept of absorptive capacity to analyze the outcomes and processes of knowledge exchanges and map how each type of knowledge is sought and absorbed by one community from another by leverag-ing specific knowledge networks including the focal one. Given little empirical research about a) how IT managers and other high level IT professionals (consultants, etc) source and exchange different forms of knowledge in their practice, and b) the properties of this knowledge such as its volatility, accuracy, validity demands, forms of sourcing, genre or presentation, we outline a field study on sali-ent knowing and knowledge practices among high achievement IT individuals with significant careers. Preliminary findings are reported. A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM DESIGN TO OVERCOME RESISTANCE TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE INNOVATIONS Carola Stryja, Gerhard Satzger, Verena Dorner The concept of sustainability has been acknowledged as one of the central and most important issues of our time. However, technological innovations which provide a more sustainable way of living, for instance electric cars, are not always welcomed with open arms by consumers but often resisted at the beginning. As such, human resistance behavior can be explained as an interplay of different personality traits that favour the status quo. In this study, a decision support system design is introduced which bases on the concept of digital nudging that addresses innovation resistance on an individual’s cognitive level by de-biasing innovation trial decision-making. An experimental pre-study is conducted to test the influence of different DSS modifications on the selection of electric cars in an online rental car booking scenario. First results show that DSS which set sustainable innovations as default option have a significantly positive effect on their trial probability while priming consumers towards electric car trial has no significant effect. WHY ARE WE DOING THIS AGAIN? TOWARDS UNCOVERING THE OUTCOME PERSPECTIVE OF ENTERPRISE SOCIAL SOFTWARE USE Sven Dittes, Stefan Smolnik


Growing numbers of companies are implementing enterprise social software (ESS) in its various forms. The adoption and use of those information systems (IS), such as wikis, weblogs, social networking sites, or platforms that combine and integrate various of those IS, is said to have various kinds of impact on organizations. Such impacts include increased productivity or improved innovation levels. In our study, we aim to provide a more holistic overview of the various outcomes of ESS use. In doing this, we conduct a literature review to collect a list of ESS use outcomes, and apply coding techniques to categorize and order these outcomes. Our study contributes to both theory and practice: Our understanding of the outcome perspective of ESS use is advanced, thus answering various calls for research, and management of the value creation process becomes more transparent and more feasible due to the introduction of ESS.


INDEX AUTHORS A

B

Aakanksha Gaur, 113 Abhay Mishra, 125 Abigail Capili Hansen, 92 Achim Klein, 140 Adamantia Pateli, 89 Adegboyega Ojo, 83 Ademar Albertin, 46 Adrian Engelbrecht, 109 Ahmed Ibrahim Alzahrani, 103 Albert Letner, 126 Alex Zarifis, 70 Alexander Benlian, 75, 109 Alexander Frey, 102 Alexander Mädche, 105, 132 Alexander Richter, 92 Alfred Benedikt Brendel, 47 Alper Beşer, 107 Amany Elbanna, 45, 72 Ana Castillo, 75 Andre Hanelt, 48 André Loske, 101 Andrea Resca, 54 Andreas Eckhardt, 133 Andreas Hilbert, 134 Andreas Kallmünzer, 77 Andreas König, 49 Andreea Cristina Mihale-Wilson, 50 Andy Weeger, 87 Anette Siebenherz, 69 Angela Locoro, 52 Angela Reeve, 71 Anja Kaldahl Reinwald, 73 Anna Wiedemann, 87 Anna-Maria Seeger, 105 Anne-Sophie Brillinger, 114 Annette Felgenhauer, 66, 106 Annika Baumann, 104 Antonio Díaz Andrade, 45 Anuja Hariharan, 139 Ari Helin, 91 Arisa Shollo, 95 Armin Heinzl, 105 Arna Wömmel, 117 Arne Buchwald, 126 Arne Gruettner, 101 Arvind Tripathi, 130 Atif Ahmad, 123 Aurelio Ravarini, 52 Axel Winkelmann, 63, 139 Aymeric Hemon, 57

Barney Tan, 138 Bendik Bygstad, 69, 71 Benedikt Berger, 115 Benedikt Notheisen, 77 Benedikt Pittl, 55 Benjamin Barann, 84 Benjamin Brauer, 47 Benjamin Mueller, 51 Benjamin Wehner, 108 Benny M. E. de Waal, 46 Benoit Aubert, 55 Bertil Rolandsson, 73 Bettina Lis, 117 Björn Häckel, 137 Björn Niehaves, 140 Björn Remneland Wikhamn, 73 Bo Zhang, 115 Boriana Rukanova, 78 Brian O'Flaherty, 97 Burkhardt Funk, 79

C Caddie Gao, 46 Carla Janse van Vuuren, 131 Carola Stryja, 149 Carolin Ebermann, 47 Cathy Urquhart, 45 Cecil Chua, 116, 121 Chandrashan Perera, 121 Charlotte Arghavan Shahlaei, 53 Chee-Wee Tan, 45, 74 Cheng Suang Heng, 126 Christian Janiesch, 63, 139 Christian Janze, 98 Christian Matt, 98 Christian Meske, 135 Christian Reuter, 110 Christian Schieder, 60 Christina Keller, 70 Christina Sarigianni, 65, 116 Christine Legner, 60, 78, 111 Christine Welch, 124 Christof Weinhardt, 77, 139, 143 Christoph Flath, 61 Christoph Fuchs, 135 Christoph Peters, 120, 123 Christoph Rosenkranz, 120 Christoph Schneider, 146 Christophe Elie-Dit-Cosaque, 146 Ciara Heavin, 128, 136


Ciaran Murphy, 141 Claudia Jandl, 50 Claudio Vitari, 64 Cleopatra Bardaki, 129 Coen Rigtering, 77, 131

Espen Skorve, 73 Eva Alice Christiane Bittner, 94 Eva Hartl, 115

D

Falk Uebernickel, 51 Farhaan Mirza, 137 Farjam Eshraghian, 145 Fatemeh Nikayin, 78 Fathul Wahid, 76 Federico Cabitza, 52 Federico Pigni, 24, 64 Felix Haeussinger, 49 Felix Ter Chian Tan, 138 Ferdinand Rausch, 128 Firouzeh Taghikhah, 82 Florian Bär, 100 Florian Hawlitschek, 77 Florian Imgrund, 63 Florian Johannsen, 106 Florian Keusch, 133 Florian Plenter, 112 Florian Wiesböck, 48 Frada Burstein, 46 Frank Teuteberg, 55 Frantz Rowe, 57, 149 Frederic Adam, 85 Frédéric Thiesse, 134, 147 Frederik Ahlemann, 88 Friedrich Chasin, 112

Dag Håkon Olsen, 114 Dana Naous, 60 Daniel Leonhardt, 75 Daniel Miehle, 137 Daniel Neuss, 139 Daniel Schellong, 58 Daniel Veit, 102 Darek Haftor, 125 Darius Schlangenotto, 145 David Dé-Juan Ding, 76 David Durward, 142 David Hoffmann, 88 David Langley, 64 David Sammon, 90, 141 David Schneider, 63, 113 Deborah Compeau, 143 Deepa Ray, 130 Dennis Becker, 79 Dennis Dominique Fehrenbacher, 56 Dennis Eilers, 56 Dennis Gercke, 56 Dennis Hummel, 132 Dennis Kundisch, 145, 148 Dennis M. Riehle, 131 Diana Renner, 80 Dick Stenmark, 53 Dimitra Petrakaki, 68, 85 Dimitris Karagiannis, 93 Dimosthenis Kotsopoulos, 129 Dinh Duong Dang, 71 Dirk Basten, 101 Dirk Gerritsen, 131 Dirk Lehr, 79 Dominik Dellermann, 147 Dominik Gutt, 74 Dorothee Rocznik, 126

E Edimara Mezzomo Luciano, 91 Edmund Ndibuagu, 128 Edward Curry, 83 Egil Øvrelid, 69, 71 Ela Klecun, 52 Elena Gorbacheva, 84 Eli Hustad, 114 Elisa Zapatka, 110 Ella Brand, 58 Enrico Ferro, 113 Erik Kolek, 94 Erwin Fielt, 112

F

G Gabriela Galic, 124 Gabriela Viale Pereira, 91 Gary Spurrier, 136 Gaurav Gupta, 119 Georg Alpers, 139 Georg Lindner, 106 Gerald Honegger, 55 Gerhard Satzger, 58, 149 Gerhard Schwabe, 45, 99 Gerrit Remane, 48 Gonçalo Costa, 116 Grace Kenny, 80, 128 Graeme Shanks, 123 Grant Mooney, 82 Guilherme Wiedenhöft, 91

H Hanna Krasnova, 45, 74, 98, 104 Hannah Knipp, 110 Hannes Kenngott, 140 Hans-Georg Fill, 55 Hawa Nyende, 79 Heikki Topi, 136 Heiko Gewald, 50


Helena Vallo Hult, 129 Helle Zinner Henriksen, 76 Hendrik Scholta, 67, 71 Henri Pirkkalainen, 116 Henrik Kampling, 140 Hoa Nguyen, 137 Honglei Li, 67 Hongyi Mao, 94 Humza Naseer, 123 Hywel Lloyd, 80

Ida Lindgren, 68 Ilias Pappas, 109 Imran Muhammad, 121 Ingmar Haffke, 75 Inken Leopold, 110 Ioanna Constantiou, 95 Isaias Scalabrin Bianchi, 92 Ivan Shamshurin, 132 Ivo Blohm, 142, 144

Jochen Übelhör, 137 Joe Nandhakumar, 93 Johana Cabinakova, 127 Johann Kranz, 49, 75 Johannes Kunze von Bischhoffshausen, 58 Johannes Schneider, 146 Johannes Schwarz, 60, 111 John McAvoy, 86 John Stouby Persson, 73 Jonas Hedman, 113 Jonathan McCarthy, 141 Jos van Hillegersberg, 92 Joschka Mütterlein, 142 Jose Benitez, 75 Jose Ortiz, 130 Josef Schwaiger, 106 Joseph Feller, 97, 133 Julia Klier, 66, 106 Julia Krönung, 70, 127 Julian Kolb, 139 Jürgen Neumann, 74 Juuli Lintula, 144

J

K

Jacqueline Corbett, 138 Jamie Dowie, 112 Jan F. Tesch, 114 Jan Jöhnk, 88 Jan Kemper, 58, 59, 122 Jan Ljungberg, 73 Jan Ondrus, 65 Jan Vom Brocke, 146 Jan Zibuschka, 50 Jane Webster, 82 Janek Richter, 101 Jannis Hanke, 147 Jan-Willem Tel, 64 Jascha-Alexander Koch, 96 Jasminko Novak, 48 Jason Cohen, 107, 115 Javier Llorens, 75 Jay Daniel, 82 Jean-Charles Pillet, 64 Jean-François De Moya, 95 Jeannette Stark, 62 Jeffrey Saltz, 131, 132 Jeroen Pillaerds, 61 Jerry Cristoforo, 133 Jesper Holgersson, 68 Jessica Murray, 53 Jessie Pallud, 95 Jian Mou, 115 Jiayuan Liu, 93 Jin Gerlach, 109 Jing Ma, 137 Jing Ren, 57 Jinlong Zhang, 94 Jocelyn Cranefield, 72, 81

Kai Heinrich, 134 Kalinka Kaloyanova, 139 Kalle Lyytinen, 149 Karin Axelsson, 68 Karl Michael Popp, 112 Katerina Pramatari, 129 Katharina Buhtz, 118 Katharina Jahn, 140 Kathrin Figl, 63 Kathrin Kuehne, 83 Katrin Klingsieck, 148 Katrin Nyman-Metcalf, 45 Kenny Lienhard, 78 Kim Hurtta, 146 Klaus Goffart, 126 Kristian Kreiner, 95 Krzysztof Stanik, 140

I

L Laura Ruiz, 75 Lauri Frank, 75 Lea Thiel, 66 Leena Kuure, 103 Lena Ternes, 140 Lena Waizenegger, 65, 92, 116 Lennart Jaeger, 133 Leo Saito, 138 Lesley Gardner, 121, 127 Lesley Land, 117 Lester Lasrado, 148 Linda Renate Andersen, 105 Lorenz Graf-Vlachy, 49, 118 Luca Mari, 52


Lucas Bachmann, 78 Luoxia Chen, 70 Lutz M. Kolbe, 47, 48 Lyubomir Kirilov, 140

M Mads Bødker, 146 Magdalene Fung, 92 Magnus Bergquist, 73 Mahei Manhai Li, 123 Malte Brettel, 58, 122 Manfred Geiger, 65, 116 Manjula Devananda, 80 Manuel Holler, 51 Manuel Trenz, 102 Manuel Wiesche, 45, 97, 126 Marc Adam, 105 Marc Govers, 53 Marc Premm, 140 Marc Schmalz, 143 Marc-André Kaufhold, 110 Marcel Rhyn, 144 Marc-Oliver Sonneberg, 83 Marcus Fischer, 63 Marcus Pfitzner, 134 Mareike Schoop, 87 Marek Kowalkiewicz, 71, 100 Margareta Heidt, 101 Marianne Kinnula, 103 Mario Nadj, 60, 105 Mark de Reuver, 78 Marko Niemimaa, 85 Markos Zachariadis, 93 Markus Bick, 48, 86 Markus Boehm, 124 Markus Lang, 106 Markus Salo, 116, 144 Markus Siepermann, 107 Markus Thimmel, 88 Markus Weinmann, 146 Marlon Dumas, 62 Marta Vos, 81 Martin Apitz, 140 Martin Boeckle, 48 Martin Riekert, 140 Martin Wagner, 140 Martin Wiener, 89 Mary Tate, 55, 100 Masood Rangraz, 53 Mateusz Dolata, 99 Mathias Klier, 66, 106 Matthias Eickhoff, 84 Matthias Feldotto, 148 Matthias Murawski, 86 Matthias Söllner, 125, 142 Matthias Trier, 92 Matthias von Entress-Fuersteneck, 126 Maximilian Fischer, 117

Maximilian Raab, 96 Maximilian Roeglinger, 88 Maximilian Schreieck, 97 Melanie Steinhueser, 92 Melody Kiang, 100 Michael Breitner, 83 Michael Cahalane, 138 Michael Kennedy, 143 Michael Leyer, 100 Michael Marcin Kunz, 66 Michael Mayer, 102 Michael Rosemann, 100, 112 Michael Scholz, 75 Michael Walch, 93 Michael Winikoff, 80 Michail Giannakos, 109 Michele Osella, 113 Michelle Carter, 143 Miguel Mira da Silva, 116 Mike Langendorf, 148 Milad Mirbabaie, 110 Minna Isomursu, 69 Mira Slavova, 81 Monideepa Tarafdar, 130 Moritz von Hoffen, 112 Morten Thanning-Vendelø, 95 Moufida Sadok, 124 Mukun Cao, 100

N Nadine Rückeshäuser, 111 Najmeh Hafezieh, 145 Natallia Pashkevich, 125 Netta Iivari, 103 Nick Letch, 53 Nico Wunderlich, 90 Nicola Terrenghi, 111 Nicolas Bodmer, 78 Nicolas Zacharias, 128 Nicole Neuss, 84 Nihal Islam, 76 Nikolai Stein, 61 Nikolaus Lipusch, 147 Nilmini Wickramasinghe, 121 Nils Bergmann, 133 Nils Urbach, 88, 126 Nina-Birte Schirrmacher, 65 Nnanyelugo Aham-Anyanwu, 67 Nugi Nkwe, 107 Nyree Taylor, 122

O Oktay Turetken, 112 Ole Hanseth, 69, 71 Olga Abramova, 74, 104 Olgerta Tona, 59 Oliver Englisch, 66


Oliver Heger, 140 Oliver Hinz, 50 Oliver Job, 78 Oliver Neuland, 137 Oliver Thomas, 131 Olli Korhonen, 69

P Paidi O'Raghallaigh, 85 Panos Constantinides, 81 Paolo Depaoli, 54 Pascal Ravesteijn, 46 Patrick Besson, 57 Patrick Delfmann, 131 Patrick Föll, 134 Patrick Mikalef, 89, 109 Patrick Zschech, 134 Paul A. Pavlou, 109 Paul Grefen, 112 Paul Hemsen, 148 Paul Paddle, 121 Pedro Gonçalves, 116 Peter Axel Nielsen, 73 Peter Buxmann, 76, 109 Peter Haddad, 121 Peter Nabende, 79 Petri Hallikainen, 72 Philip Calvert, 55 Philipp Brune, 50 Philipp Ebel, 147 Philipp Melzer, 87 Phillip Haake, 51 Phillip O'Reilly, 133 Pierre van Amelsvoort, 53 Piyush Yadav, 83 Prof Indranil Bose, 119

Q Qing Hu, 100 Quang Nguyen, 55

R Rabea Sonnenschein, 101 Rachelle Bosua, 122 Raghava Rao Mukkamala, 148 Raluca Bunduchi, 118 Randall Smith, 72 Rania Fahim El-Gazzar, 76, 114 Raphael Rissler, 105 Ravi Vatrapu, 148 Rebecca Bregant, 50 Reeva Lederman, 122 Regina Connolly, 80 Riccardo Reith, 117 Richard Lackes, 107 Rik Eshuis, 61

Rikke Gaardboe, 60 Risto Paavola, 72 Rita Marques, 116 Rob Gleasure, 133 Robert Buchmann, 93 Robert Davison, 45 Robert Heckman, 132 Robert J. Kauffman, 57 Robert Linden, 120 Rogier Van de Wetering, 89 Roman Beck, 90 Roman Rietsche, 142 Ronald Maier, 116 Ronny Schüritz, 58 Rouven-B. Wiegard, 56 Royal Holloway, 45 Ruben Pereira, 92 Rui Dinis Sousa, 92

S Sabine Seufert, 142 Safa’a AbuJarour, 45, 98 Sahar Sabbaghan, 121 Samantha Dick, 136 Sandra Oomen, 46 Sandy Staples, 82 Sarah Cherki El Idrissi, 138 Sascha Kraus, 77 Sean Maynard, 123 Sean Nevin, 133 Sebastian Göhrig, 139 Sebastian Olbrich, 45 Sebastian Schlauderer, 96 Shahper Vodanovich, 92 Shan Liu, 94 Shanping Li, 133 Shunan (Catherine) Lv, 82 Silvia Schacht, 132, 133 Simon Bründl, 98 Simon Chanias, 47 Simon Kloker, 130 Sofia Schöbel, 125 Solveigh Hieronimus, 66 Souleiman Hasan, 83 Stavros Lounis, 129 Stefan Henningsson, 78, 112 Stefan Kleinschmidt, 120 Stefan Lessmann, 104 Stefan Morana, 133 Stefan Pfosser, 137 Stefan Smolnik, 149 Stefan Thalmann, 116 Stefanie Paluch, 141 Stefano Za, 54 Steffen Höhenberger, 67 Stephen Cranefield, 80 Stephen McCarthy, 85 Stephen Treacy, 97


Stevan Matijas, 77 Steven Alter, 99 Susanne Leist, 106, 108 Sven Carlsson, 59 Sven Dittes, 149 Sven Jannaber, 131 Sven Overhage, 96 Sven Tuzovic, 141

U

T

Valentina Lichtner, 52 Verena Dorner, 139, 149 Veronica Luu, 117 Vijay Kanabar, 139 Vincent Bicudo de Castro, 56 Vincent Bremer, 79 Volkmar Mrass, 123

Tadhg Nagle, 90, 97 Tamsin Treasure-Jones, 116 Tanja Svarre, 60 Tapani Rinta-Kahila, 104 Tarun Goyal, 49 Thomas Falk, 108 Thomas Friedrich, 96 Thomas Hess, 98, 135, 142 Thomas John, 148 Thomas Kude, 65, 112 Thomas Lister, 138 Thomas MĂźller, 88 Thomas Niemand, 77 Thomas Wagenknecht, 143 Thuy Duong Oesterreich, 55 Tibebe Beshah, 119 Tiina Koskelainen, 116 Tilahun Arage, 119 Tillmann Grupp, 63 Tillmann Neben, 105 Timm Teubner, 143 Tina Jensen, 146 Tobias Kranz, 130 Tobias Lohse, 122 Tobias Potthoff, 135 Tobias Riasanow, 124 Tom Butler, 86 Tomi Dahlberg, 91 Tonja Molin-Juustila, 103 Tony Cornford, 52 Toomas Saarsen, 62 Tuomas Kari, 144 Tuure Tuunanen, 144

Ulf Melin, 68 Ulrich Bretschneider, 66 Ulrich Remus, 65, 89, 116 Urban Ask, 79

V

W W. Alec Cram, 89 Wael Soliman, 104 Walter Brenner, 51 Wanda Presthus, 105 Wei Liao, 139 Werner Esswein, 62 Wietske Van Osch, 108 Willem Mertens, 71 Wynne Chin, 117

Y Yajun Zhang, 94 Yannick Ouardi, 49 Yao-Hua Tan, 78 Yi-Chuan Wang, 108 Yizhou Li, 51 Yongxiang Dou, 115 Yu Zhang, 46 Yumeng Wang, 126 Yvonne Hong, 127 Yvonne O'Connor, 128, 136

Z Zafor Ahmed, 103