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RELIGION • B1

TOPIC • D1

FAITH FEST

PURE STYLE

5th annual event set for Friday in dowtown

Going green helps manage gardens

SATURDAY, m ay 29, 2010 • 50¢

people

ACTOR DEATH Child star Gary Coleman dies of brain hemorrhage at 42 C4

WEATHER Today: Mostly sunny; high of 87 Tonight: Partly cloudy; low of 65 Mississippi River:

42.7 feet No change Flood stage: 43 feet

A7

DEATHS • Michael Brown • Willie L. Lewis Jr.

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TODAY IN HISTORY 1765: Patrick Henry denounces the Stamp Act before Virginia’s House of Burgesses. 1790: Rhode Island becomes the 13th original colony to ratify the United States Constitution. 1917: The 35th president of the United States, John F. Kennedy, is born in John F. Brookline, Kennedy Mass. 1953: Mount Everest is conquered as Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Tensing Norgay of Nepal become the first climbers to reach the summit. 1973: Tom Bradley is elected the first black mayor of Los Angeles, defeating incumbent Sam Yorty.

meredith spencer•The Vicksburg Post

St. Aloysius baseball players, from left, Luke Burnett, Regan Nosser, Pierson Waring and, center front, Brendan Beesley, celebrate after

St. Aloysius reigns supreme on the diamond By Ernest Bowker ebowker@vicksburgpost.com

On C1

PEARL — The St. Aloysius Flashes are still kings of the Mississippi baseball mountain. The Flashes crushed Myrtle 18-1 Friday at Trustmark Park in Game 3 of the Mississippi High School Activities Association Class 1A championship series. The victory gave St. Al its second straight state title, and marked the second time in school history it has repeated as state champions. The 1975 and ’76 teams won the Class B and BB

Complete game coverage championships, respectively. St. Al finished the season with a record of 22 wins and eight losses. “It’s like nothing you can ever believe,” said St. Al catcher Brendan Beesley, one of seven seniors in the starting lineup Friday. “Back to back, doing it in your senior year, this is the last time I’ll ever play baseball. There’s nothing more you can ask for.”

a kiss for summer

INDEX Business................................A6 Classifieds............................. C6 Comics...................................D3 Puzzles................................... C5 Dear Abby............................ C5 Editorial.................................A4 People/TV............................. C4

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ONLINE

www.vicksburgpost.com VOLUME 128 NUMBER 149 4 SECTIONS

winning the state championship against Myrtle at Trustmark Park on Friday.

Colby Hopkins•The Vicksburg Post

Kimberly Bolls, 3rd grade teacher at Warren Central Intermediate, blows a kiss to the students as the buses leave on the last day of school Friday.

After cruising to the 2009 title, the Flashes overcame plenty of adversity in their quest to repeat. Two of their top players, infielders Ryno Martin-Nez and Justin Rushing, missed large chunks of the season because of injuries. After winning their first 11 games, the Flashes lost six of eight to finish the regular season. They then lost their first playoff game to Edinburg. St. Al reeled off seven straight wins before falling to Myrtle on Wednesday to set up Friday’s deciding third game. The Game 2 loss seemed devastat-

ing, at least for a day. St. Al scored three runs in the top of the first inning in Game 3, then exploded for 13 in the second inning. The offensive outburst also allowed the Flashes to finish the game with 18 runs on 14 hits — which adds up to 32, the uniform number of Kyle Coleson. Colesondied of leukemia last year. “They never back down from anything, whether it’s a teammate dying or a loss,” St. Al coach Clint Wilkerson said. “These kids have overcome a lot more than just a loss.”

Memorial Day weekend events Today • 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. — 4th Annual Holt Collier Sacred Harp Singing in the Courtroom at the Old Court House Museum. Free. • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — “Military Through The Ages” at the Vicksburg National Military Park visitor’s center. Staff and volunteers dressed in uniforms from conflicts from the Revolutionary War to the Vietnam War. Park admission charged. Sunday • Noon to 4 p.m. — 4th Annual Holt Collier Sacred Harp Singing in the Courtroom at the Old Court House Museum. Free. • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. — “Military Through The Ages” at the military park. Park admission charged. Monday • 10 a.m. — The Parade of Veterans along Washington Street. Free. • 11 a.m. — Memorial service at the Vicksburg Auditorium, featuring keynote speaker Col. William C. Schneck, Deputy Chief of Staff, Stra-

tegic Plans, 412th Engineer Command. Free. • 12:30 p.m. — Wreath-laying ceremony at the National Cemetery in the Vicksburg National Military Park, with a motorcade to the cemetery by way of Fort Hill Drive. • 7 p.m. — American Wind Symphony Orchestra concert at City Front. Free. Bring lawn chairs. • 8 p.m. — Before You Exit concert at Vicksburg Convention Center. Sponsored by Miss Mississippi’s Outstanding Teen pageant and benefits Children’s Miracle Network; $10 in advance at Crown to Heels, Michel’s Music, Paper Factory and Outlets at Vicksburg; $12 at door.

Rader pleads guilty to manslaughter in ’09 Easter slaying By Pamela Hitchins phitchins@vicksburgpost.com A guilty plea has been entered in the 2009 Easter Sunday shooting death of 25-year old Danny Miller, but with the cooperation of Miller’s family, the charge was reduced from murder to

On A2 • City man indicted on 10 child sex charges • Court report manslaughter. Adam Rader, 27, 103 Cross St., admitted in Warren

County Circuit Court May 3 that he shot Miller, but said it was accidental. He faces a maximum of 20 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. “The victim’s family wanted complete and sure closure to this case,” said Assistant District Attorney Dewey Arthur, explaining why the case did

not proceed to trial on the murder charge. “They did not want any chance of him being released or filing an appeal.” District Attorney Ricky Smith said it was an “open plea,” meaning prosecutors did not agree to a reduced sentence in return for the

plea. Sentencing will be June 11 at 9 a.m. by presiding Judge Isadore Patrick. Arthur and Miller’s family have asked Patrick to impose the maximum, while Rader’s father and his attorney, former Circuit Judge Frank Vollor, See Rader, Page A7.


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Saturday, May 29, 2010

ISSN 1086-9360 PUBLISHED EACH  DAY In The Vicksburg Post Building 1601-F North Frontage Road Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180 News, Sports, Advertising, Business: 601-636-4545 Circulation: 601-636-4545 Fax: 601-634-0897 SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION By Carrier Seven Days Per Week $14 per month Six Days Per Week (Monday-Saturday) $11.25 per month Fri., Sat., Sun. & Mon. $10.75 per month Advance payments of two months or more should be paid to The Vicksburg Post for proper credit. All carriers are independent contractors, not employees. By Mail (Paid In Advance) Seven Days Per Week $77.25/3 months Sunday Only $47.25/3 months DELIVERY INFORMATION To report delivery problems, call 601-636-4545: Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Holidays: 7 a.m.-9 a.m. Member Of The Associated Press

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City man faces 10 child sex abuse charges Neihaus, 21, also faces fed charges By Pamela Hitchins phitchins@vicksburgpost. com A Vicksburg man already facing federal child sexual exploitation charges has been indicted by a Warren County Grand Jury for 10 additional offenses involving child sexual abuse. Bryan Neihaus, 21, 452 Tilton Ranch Road, was arraigned Friday morning by presiding Judge Isadore Patrick after being named by the May term of the grand jury. Indictments are usually not made public until after the defendant has been arraigned, or formally advised in court of the charges against him. Neihaus is charged with six counts of sexual battery of a child under the age of 13; two counts of molesting a child under the age of 16; and two counts of child pornography depicting or recording a child under the age of 18 engaging in sexually explicit conduct. Offenses were said to have occurred between May 2007 and August 2008 and are named separately because they are “based on the same act or transactions, and/or ... two or more acts or transactions connected together and/or constituting parts of a common scheme or plan on the part of the defendant.” All the charges involved the same victim, who was between 8 and 10 years old during the period. Vicksburg attorney Michael Winfield, appointed by the

In Warren County Circuit Court for the week ending Friday: • Thomas A. Day, 58, 6632 Siwell Road, Jackson, was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Circuit Judge Isadore Patrick to three years in prison. Day was indicted in May 2007 for felony bad check. • Kelvin Jones, 31, 780 U.S. 61 North, Apt. 10A, pleaded guilty to statutory rape and was sentenced by Patrick to six years in prison followed by five years of probation, plus $322.50 in costs. Jones was arrested Jan. 14, 2009. • Bruce Lewis, 51, 251 Whatley Hollow Road, pleaded guilty to possession of precursor substances and was sentenced by Patrick to five years in prison followed by five years of probation, plus $2,822.50 in

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Tuesday Vicksburg AlAnon — Noon Tuesday; second floor, First Presbyterian Church, 1501 Cherry St.; 601634-0152. Overeaters Anonymous ­— Meeting canceled Monday; will resume June 7; www. oa.org; 1315 Adams St. American Wind Symphony Orchestra ­— 7 p.m. Monday; free; bring lawn chair; City Waterfront. Diabetes Classes — Designed for patients to receive diabetes self-management training; classes begin June 9; register Thursday and June 7; Come see what you can do to attract and feed your hummingbirds this summer! It's a Hummingbird’s Heaven!

Letters to the editor:

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Warren County Sheriff’s Department Investigator Todd Dykes, right, escorts Bryan Neihaus, 21, from the Warren County Courtcourt, entered a plea of not guilty. A trial was scheduled for Nov. 15. Patrick set bond at $100,000, stipulating Neihaus could post bond if he “can clear matters with the federal court.” Neihaus has been in federal custody since he was arrested Jan. 29 by FBI agents. A complaint from an unidentified source led the FBI to serve a search warrant and retrieve his computer, which revealed a video of him sexually assault-

house to the Warren County Jail after his arraignment Friday morning.

ing a pre-teen boy. A “be on the lookout for” bulletin was then issued in Warren County prior to Neihaus being located and arrested in Tunica. Neihaus has been incarcerated in the Madison County Detention Center since his arrest by FBI agents. He was taken to and from Friday’s arraignment by Warren County sheriff’s deputies. He had an initial hearing in February on the federal

charges before Magistrate Judge Linda R. Anderson of U.S. District Court, Southern District of Mississippi in Jackson. It was not known if Anderson set a bond amount. Another Vicksburg man, John Crumpler, 2957 Mount Alban Road, has also been charged by the FBI with two counts of sexual exploitation of a minor resulting from the same investigation.

court report from court records

fines and costs. Lewis must also complete long-term drug and alcohol rehabilitation. He was arrested Dec. 19, 2008. • Valerie Morris, 48, address unavailable, Greenville, pleaded guilty to felony shoplifting and was sentenced by Circuit Judge M. James Chaney to 18 months in prison followed by three years of probation, plus $1,322.50 in fines and costs, to be served concurrently with a Washington County sentence already imposed (unspecified). Morris was arrested Oct. 13. • Daren L. Scott, 22, 402 Locust St., was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Chaney to five years in prison. Scott was arrested April 9, 2005 for possession of

cocaine. • Dixie Latrice Terrell, 29, 418 Lower Woodville Road, Natchez, was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Patrick to 60 days in jail, followed by the resumption of probation per her original sentence, with supervision transferred to Adams County. Terrell was arrested Jan. 16, 2005 for felony shoplifting. • Lamont C. Turner, 35, 450 Lakehill Drive, No. 1610, was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Chaney to three years in prison with credit for time served. Turner was arrested April 5, 2000 for possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. • Derrick Williams, 31, 902 Blossom Lane, Apt. A1, pleaded guilty to robbery and was sentenced to 10 years in

prison followed by five years of probation, plus $322.50 in costs. Williams was indicted by the Warren County Grand Jury in August. In Sharkey County Circuit Court for the week ending Friday: • Cortez Clark, 19, 243 W. China St., Rolling Fork, pleaded guilty to two counts of burglary, non-residential, and two counts of grand larceny and was sentenced by Chaney to two years in prison followed by five years of probation, plus $2,645 in fines and costs. Clark was arrested Oct. 26. • Josh Lee Warren, 26, 239 Worthington Ave., was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Chaney to six years in prison with credit for time served. Warren was arrested in November 2006 for sale of cocaine.

community calendar We welcome items for the Community Calendar. Submit items by e-mail (newsreleases@vicksburgpost.com), postal service (P.O. Box 821668, Vicksburg, MS 39182), fax (634-0897), delivered in person to 1601-F N. Frontage Road, or by calling 636-4545 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays. If corresponding by fax, mail or e-mail, be sure to include your name and phone number.

General comments:

KATIE CARTER•The Vicksburg Post

8 sentenced in Warren County Circuit Court

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Mon.-Fri. 10 am-5 pm • Sat. 10 am-2 pm 1208 Washington Street • 601-661-6189

led by Lisa Camel and Katania Breland, RNs. Vicksburg Medical Associates, 2080 S. Frontage Road. Cedars Head Start — Accepting applications for 2010-2011 school year; 601-636-1360. Memorial Day Activities — Parade, 10 a.m. Monday, line up at 9 on Belmont Street; memorial service, 11 a.m. at City Auditorium; Minister Charles Grover of Edwards and Col. William C. Schneck of 412th Engineer Command, speakers; Willie Glasper, 601634-0163. Levi’s — A Gathering Place; 7-10 p.m. Saturday, music by Old Habits with special guest, Tommy Bishop; donations appreciated. How To Revive a Tired Lawn — Noon Tuesday; Jeff Richardson; WC Extension Service, 1100 C Grove St.; 601-6365442. 100% Narcotics Anonymous Recovery Group — 7 p.m. Thursdays and Saturdays;

Daily’s

Lucky Fisherman Live & Boiled Crawfish 601-831-0313 601-831-1335 Open: Thursday thru Sunday

Nate G., 731-460-9546; 1220 Clay St. Floral Industry — Noon-1 p.m. Thursday; Lynette McDougald, MSU Florist Manager; no charge; WC Extension; 601-636-5442. Veterans Benefits Seminar — 5:30 p.m. June 10; to inform family members of possible financial help for veterans of foreign wars and their widowed spouse; reservations John 601918-7844 or Adam 601-209-2633; Public Library. Guitar Blues Basic Workshop — Thursdays in July; Richard McComas, presenter; registration and prices 601-631-2997 or e-mail into@southernculture.org; 1302 Adams St.

CHURCHES Gospel Temple M.B. — A Time of Remembrance 2010, 4 today; presented by senior choir; 1612 Lane St. St. Mark M.B. ­— Women’s program, 5:30 tonight, 11:30 a.m. Sunday; Dr. Alphonso Butler of Gulfport, speaker; 3395 N. Washington St.

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County man missing since Sunday night A 31-year-old Warren County man has been missing since Sunday, and the man’s family and Warren County Sheriff ’s Department are hoping someone in the Vicksburg area may be able to help locate him. Jason Allen Ashley Sheriff Martin Pace said foul play is not suspected in the disappearance of Jason Allen Ashley, who resides with family members in the Floweree community in north Warren County, near the Issaquena County line. Ashley was last seen leaving a restaurant on U.S. 61 North in Vicksburg on Sunday, Pace said. He was driving a gray 2000 Jeep Cherokee with a temporary, paper license tag in the rear window. “There was no indication that he had planned on leaving for any considerable amount of time,” said Pace, noting Ashley’s cell phone charger, clothes and other belongings were all left at his home. Ashley’s family reported him missing Thursday, Pace said. “We’re making every effort possible to find this young man, and we’re encouraging anyone who has seen him or heard from him to call the sheriff’s office or crimestoppers,” said Pace. The sheriff’s department can be reached at 601-636-1761. The Crimestoppers hotline is 601355-8477, or 1-866-481-8477.

crime

from staff reports

VFD: Be wary of inspection scams Vicksburg fire officials are asking citizens and business owners to be wary of people offering to inspect fire extinguishers and other fire safety equipment for a fee. Vicksburg Fire Investigator Leslie Decareaux said reports have been made regarding people entering homes and businesses claiming to check fire equipment and fire extinguishers. “I’m afraid with the economy the way it is, we might have more,” Decareaux said. Anyone with information should call the VFD at 601634-4566 if someone requests cash for services without providing a valid receipt.

boil water BENEFITS Taking It Back Outreach Ministry — 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursdays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays; flower pots, children’s clothes, shoes, purses and linens; 1314 Fillmore St.; 601-638-0794 or 601-8312056.

CLUBS American Legion — 9-1 tonight; 8 p.m.-midnight Sunday; dance with Reo; 1618 Main St. VAMP — Noon Tuesday; Rett Evans, Bankwalker Inc., speaker; Ameristar’s Heritage Buffet; lunch $12; guests welcome. Vicksburg Kiwanis — Noon Tuesday, Jacques’ Cafe; Gus Black, Family Readiness Program, speaker. Lions — Noon Wednesday; Judge James Chaney, update on Circuit and Drug Courts; Jacques’ Cafe. Gaskin and Prentiss Family Reunion — July 30-31; deadline for payment is June 30.

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Great Luau!

Eagle Lake The Eagle Lake Water District on Friday lifted its precautionary boil water alert for its roughly 600 customers. Mississippi Department of Health tests indicate the water is safe to drink.

Hilldale A boil water notice issued on May 25 for Hilldale Water District customers on Garden Grove Street in the Oak Park Subdivision was lifted Friday. It is no longer necessary to boil water for cooking or drinking.

correction Applicants for a Mississippi Home Buyer Advantage Grant being administered by the Mississippi Development Authority may call 601-359-5052 for further information. An incorrect phone number appeared in Friday’s edition. •

The Vicksburg Post attempts to publish correct information. To report an error, call 601-636-4545, ext. 123 or 137.

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Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

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Feds voice displeasure to Ariz. brass over new law PHOENIX (AP) — Justice Department officials told Arizona’s attorney general and aides to the governor Friday that the feds have serious reservations about the state’s new immigration law. Attorney General Terry Goddard said he urged them not to sue. “I told them we need solutions from Washington, not more lawsuits,” he said. The Justice Department initiated meetings by phone and face-to-face in Phoenix with Goddard and aides to Republican Gov. Jan Brewer to reach out to Arizona’s leaders and elicit information from state officials regarding the Obama administration’s concerns about the new law. The strong message that the Justice Department representatives delivered at the private meetings — first with Goddard, then with Brewer’s staff — left little doubt that the Obama administration is prepared to go to court if necessary in a bid to block the new law, which takes effect July 29. Key provisions of the sweeping law include a requirement that police enforcing any other law question people about their immigration status if there is “reasonable suspicion” that the people are in the country illegally. It also makes it a state crime to be in the country illegally. Arizona has an estimated 460,000 illegal immigrants, and the law’s supporters contend it will save taxpayer money and reduce crime by pressuring illegal immigrants to “selfdeport.” Federal officials and other critics fear the state law could lead to racial profiling.

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A3

College Board taps Brigham as interim MUW president state

COLUMBUS, Miss. — Allegra Brigham, CEO and general manager of 4-County Electric Power Association, has been named interim president at the Mississippi University for Women. The state College Board made the decision Friday during a meeting on the Columbus campus. MUW President Claudia Limbert said in October that she would retire at the end of June when her current contract ends. She had been at MUW since April 2002. Brigham earned her bachelor’s and masters degrees from MUW. She was named to the post at 4-County in 2003 and has been with the electric cooperative for more than 20 years.

KATIE CARTER•The Vicksburg Post

Vicksburg emergency personnel work to secure Dorothy Gibbs, 30, 1203 Farmer St., Friday afternoon after her car struck a house at 3036 Drummond St. Gibbs was westbound on Mulvihill Street at 1:05 p.m. when she lost control of her 1994 Cadillac DeVille and ran over a stop sign and a barricade before hitting the house, Vicksburg Police Officer Burt

Ryan said. Gibbs was taken to River Region Medical Center. Her condition, as of Friday evening, was unknown, hospital spokesman Allen Karel said. Ryan said the wreck appears to be medically related, but added the crash is still under investigation. No one was home at the time of the crash.

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Philadelphia mulling Sunday beer sales PHILADELPHIA, Miss. — Philadelphia aldermen may decide next week whether to approve a proposal to allow beer sales on Sundays noon until 10 p.m., in restaurants, grocery stores and convenience stores. Alderman Joe Tullos said the change would help local businesses compete with the Pearl River Resort, where alcohol is available on Sundays, and with nearby cities such as Meridian, Newton and DeKalb where Sunday sales are allowed.

Auto supplier plans plant in Columbus

Sebastopol school to lose students

COLUMBUS, Miss. — Officials say a Wisconsin automotive supplier will locate a plant in Columbus and bring in about 240 jobs. The Milwaukee-based Janesville Acoustics is one of the world’s largest producers of acoustical and thermal fiber insulation and a producer of automotive trim and molded fiber products. The plant will locate in a building formerly occupied by American Nonwovens, off of Mississippi 69.

SEBASTOPOL, Miss. — The Justice Department says students from Leake County cannot attend a public school in Sebastopol in neighboring Scott County. The Justice Department said beginning this fall, those students must attend South Leake Elementary or South Leake High School located in Walnut Grove. Scott County schools superintendent Frank McCurdy says the order affects about 70-75 students.

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Not a Dillard’s Cardmember? Open a new account today and receive a 10% Off All-Day Welcome Shopping Pass in your 1st statement when you spend $100 the day you open your account (maximum discount $100)** *See Rewards Program terms for details. **Subject to credit approval. To qualify for this offer, you must open a Dillard’s Credit Card or Dillard’s American Express® Card account and make $100 of net purchases (merchandise less tax, adjustments and returns) with your Dillard’s Credit Card or Dillard’s American Express Card at Dillard’s stores or dillards.com the same day you open your account. The 10% Welcome Shopping Pass will be sent to you in your first statement and is valid for 10% off all merchandise purchases up to $1,000 (maximum discount $100) made in-store or online at dillards. com on the day of your choice. Shopping Pass must be used by the expiration date printed on the pass. Employees, officers and directors of Dillard’s Inc. are not eligible for this offer.

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A4

Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

THE VICKSBURG POST

EDITORIAL

Founded by John G. Cashman in 1883 Louis P. Cashman III, Editor & Publisher • Issued by Vicksburg Printing & Publishing Inc., Louis P. Cashman III, President Charlie Mitchell, executive editor | E-mail: post@vicksburg.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 132 | Letters to the editor: post@vicksburg.com or The Vicksburg Post, P.O. Box, 821668, Vicksburg, MS 39182

JACK VIX SAYS: Congratulations to all the graduates.

OUR OPINIONS

Where it belongs From other Mississippi newspapers: • The Sun-Herald, Biloxi-Gulfport: The $15 million that BP has given Mississippi for advertising to counter the effect of the oil spill on the tourism industry should be spent by officials on the coast, not in Jackson. “Our convention and visitors bureaus have more firsthand knowledge of what tourism needs here than the whole state put together,” said state Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian. The millions need to be spent quickly to counter the misinformation in the

media and the “guerrilla marketing” techniques of competing tourism destinations. And the most bang for those bucks would almost certainly come from their being spent by the Mississippi Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau, the largest and best equipped tourism agency in South Mississippi. If the $15 million is divvied up among various state and local tourism agencies, the message to potential visitors will be much less focused and therefore much less effective. The Coast Convention and Visitors

Bureau specializes in marketing this area and is most familiar with the problems we now face. And it is here that a loss of visitors will have the most adverse effect on the state’s economy. The message from the Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau should be positive and all encompassing: the entire coast is ready to host all comers with the hospitality and scenery it is famous for providing its guests. As Rep. Peranich put it: “We’ve got to beat this drum.”

Transportation investments still paying off The Natchez Democrat: America’s history is marked by significant progress with investment in transportation infrastructure. Early roads sped mail delivery. The proliferation of steamboats — many of which docked right here in Natchez — quickened the settlement and expansion of the Southern and Midwestern states. And, the American West was “won” economically by railroad expansion. Post-World War II development of the National Highway Defense System — our modern Interstate Highway system — was a wise investment.

Recently, as a national transportation group — the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials — met in Natchez, one of its focuses was to explain the importance of transportation on our nation’s economy. The two are so intertwined in our history that AASHTO president and Natchez native Larry L. “Butch” Brown recently coined the phrase “transconomy” to explain the concept that transportation and the economy are inseparable. To prove his point, Brown points to stats from federal stimulus spending in

2009. Transportation projects, he said, received 6 percent of the funding, but 14 percent of the jobs the stimulus spending has reportedly created or saved came from that spending. We have little doubt Brown’s new word has merit. Will America’s future be marked by creative, forward-thinking infrastructure investment? Or will we miss the opportunity to leap ahead now, take the economic bull by the horns, while the world economy is slow?

Good prosecutions, investigations cost money The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson: When it comes to the imposition of the death penalty in Mississippi, time is money. Is that too blunt? The complaint that there is too long an interim between the commission of a capital crime, a defendant’s conviction and death sentence and the imposition of the punishment is a common one. But the hard truth is that Mississippi taxpayers who complain about that long interim bear some responsibilities for it. If Mississippians want an expedited death penalty system in this state then they must first invest in that system. In an effort to speed executions and remove the financial strain of death penalty cases from counties, the Legislature in 2000 created an Office of Post Conviction Counsel in death penalty

cases. A 2005 law created the Office of Indigent Appeals, which now handles appeals for indigent defendants convicted of non-capital crimes. But that system has been plagued by problems and allegations that cases were intentionally sabotaged. The Office of Capital Defense Counsel originally received a General Fund appropriation. But because of funding shortages the office has never operated at full staffing. The 2005 Legislature voted to establish a $1.89 assessment on all criminal convictions, including traffic violations, to fund the office. But critics say the assessment is inadequate to fully fund the office. In 2005, Mississippi Supreme Court Justice James E. Graves wrote: “In essence, the state of Mississippi has failed to establish or fund a system of

indigent defense that is equipped to provide all defendants with the tools of an adequate defense and has therefore fallen short of its constitutional obligation.” Very little has changed since Graves wrote that assessment. Beyond death penalty appeals, Mississippi’s death investigation system is also suspect. The state has no full-time state medical examiner, the state Crime Lab is underfunded and the state’s ability to collect and preserve DNA evidence is not consistent statewide. All of those deficiencies raise fertile opportunities for endless appeals of death sentences. As long as Mississippi continues to fail to fund an adequate death investigation system and provide adequate counsel for death row inmates, these delays will continue.

OLD POST FILES 120 YEARS AGO: 1890 Features of the Blue and Gray Reunion are excursions to Port Gibson and Champion’s Hill. • Brady’s war scenes are showing at the opera house. • A splendid fireworks display is given. • David Kennedy leaves on the Anchor Line’s Belle of Memphis for St. Louis.

MODERATELY CONFUSED by Bill Stahler

40 YEARS AGO: 1970 Mrs. Christine Ellerbee dies. • Robert Culp stars in “Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice” at the Joy Theatre. • Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Hudson announce the birth of a son, Christopher Curtis, on May 27. • Mr. and Mrs. Henry Drake and daughter of Port Gibson are visiting relatives in Del Rio, Texas.

110 YEARS AGO: 1900 Charles McManus, now of Memphis, is here on a visit. • The Rev. Dr. Logan resigns as rector of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church. • Eugene Freeman dies in Memphis.

30 YEARS AGO: 1980

100 YEARS AGO: 1910

Rene Lambert, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Lambert, is pictured as she participates in the May crowning of the Blessed Virgin Mary. • John Carl Emerson celebrates his first birthday.

The state Supreme Court legalizes the sale of near-beer. • Edward P. Jones is orator of the day at Decoration Day exercises.

90 YEARS AGO: 1920 Gov. Charles Brough is here from Arkansas. • Col. H.M. Street, distinguished Mississippian, dies in Meridian. • Carolyn Billitz celebrates her 75h birthday.

80 YEARS AGO: 1930 Two hundred Confederate veterans, en route to the reunion in Biloxi, stop here and are given breakfast at the YMCA. • Dr. E. Rolvang, noted novelist, and family, visit Mr. and Mrs. J.K. Hirsch. • Mildred McLain returns from a visit to relatives in Gunn, Miss.

70 YEARS AGO: 1940 R.M. Kelly is speaker at the annual St. Aloy-

Vicksburg swimming pool. • Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Cannon celebrate their 35th wedding anniversary. • Charles A. Lee dies. • Tab Hunter stars in “That Kind of Woman” at the Rivoli Drive-In Theatre.

20 YEARS AGO: 1990 sius High School alumni banquet. • Esther Morrison returns to Louisville after visiting her father, Putnam Morrison.

60 YEARS AGO: 1950 Shirley Holland ranks first in the Carr Central graduating class of 1950. • A $125 price for the best planned soil conservation program of the Negro farmers in Warren County goes to Alonzo Henderson, farmer in the ballground area.

50 YEARS AGO: 1960 Formal opening ceremonies are held for the

Flood damage is estimated at $6.4 million for Vicksburg and Warren County. • Jodie E. Edleston, Delta resident, dies. • Dorothy Jane “Dee Jay” King celebrates her sixth birthday. • Kristin Nicole Crist celebrates her first birthday.

10 YEARS AGO: 2000 Mitch Crawford pulls a pair of catfish from Eagle Lake while hand-grabbing. • Pat Walker-Fields, formerly of Vicksburg, is honored as a Favorite Mississippi Artist by the State Medical Association. • Eric Biedenharn Jr. invents the Packseat.

You might have thought the world was a bit older than 6,000 years old and that dinosaurs roamed the Earth till the Ice Age. But prepare to believe.

Disney meets Bass Pro Shop in Kentucky IN THE BEGINNING, the earth around Petersburg in Kentucky was without form, and void, only a scrap yard and a few filling stations and the Cincinnati airport; and Australian Ken Ham said, “Let there be a 70,000-square-foot Creation Museum” that refutes proven science, conventional history, philosophy and most religions. And Ken Ham saw that curious folks, millions of them, were willing to pay up to $22 apiece for a contortionist head trip that explains how the earth is only 6,000 years old, and that was good. And Ken Ham created an ark, to scale, but only 1 percent as big as the Real Ark, which, of course, held two of all the animals of the earth, a feat RHETA explained by a talkgRIMSLEY ing mannequin Noah, whom Ham made as jolly as a departmentstore Santa. Noah — think Disney World meets Bass Pro — says that putting dinosaurs aboard the ark was not all that difficult, “Ho, ho, ho,” because he wisely rounded up only dino babies. And that was good. Ken Ham created a whole lot of other stuff, and saw that it was all good and filled a real niche, and he might have rested on the seventh day, but that would have been stupid since paying pilgrims were perfectly willing to show up on Sunday afternoon, noon till 6. The best thing Ken Ham created, somewhere around the sixth day, were two recurring dummies of Adam and Eve, who look a lot like a young Kris Kristofferson and Rita Coolidge, and who, despite not yet knowing the shame of nakedness, remain carefully up to their ears in ferns and lilypads lest visiting youngsters get the idea that it’s still OK to frolic in the nude. It is not. It is not because the Serpent created to tempt Eve succeeded, making it necessary thereafter to don animal skins to hide shame, and adding to the perfect world conflict, poisons, weeds, thorns and burdensome work. Oh, yes, the Original Sin also gave a more painful dimension to childbirth. Adam’s progeny were so wicked, in fact, that God flooded the Earth around 2348 B.C., when Noah was that middle-age crazy age of 600. The waters covered the Earth and killed things, which, of course, were buried in mud and created lots of fossils. “I never heard this before in school,” a pretend boy says in a cartoon balloon. Imagine. Because, as Ken Ham’s museum says, “Rocks and fossils don’t come with tags on them,” science is in the eye of the beholder. If you are, say, an “infidel philosopher” like Voltaire, or just one of the “willingly ignorant” hoi polloi, you might have thought the world was a bit older than 6,000 years old and that dinosaurs roamed the Earth till the Ice Age. But prepare to believe. The museum will show you that hunters killed off the dinosaurs — talk about your Big Game — and did so very quickly. Guards outside the museum make doubters wary, but armed guards are not nearly as intimidating as one rather large mother who pushes her charge up to a wall where the number “6,000” is posted. “That’s how old the Earth is,” the mother says loudly. “Not billions of years old, but 6,000 years old. Understand?” If the weather’s nice, Ken Ham has created a labyrinth of outdoor attractions, including a carnivorous bog garden and T. Rex topiary. But if it’s raining, console yourself with a lecture called “Big Bang: Exploding the Myth” or the incest tutorial that explains Cain having sex with his sister. (A more innocent age, that’s why.) •

JOHNSON

Rheta Grimsley Johnson writes for King Features Syndicate.


Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

A5

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A6

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Business

Obama: Spill is ‘an assault on our shores’

Fr o m s t a f f a n d A P r e p o r t s

LOCAL STOCKS The following quotes on local companies are provided as a service by Smith Barney Citi Group, 112-B Monument Place, 601-636-6914. Archer-Daniels (ADM)....25.27 American Fin. (AFG)........27.90 Ameristar (ASCA)..............18.02 Auto Zone (AZO)........... 190.88 Bally Technologies (BYI).42.50 BancorpSouth (BXS)........19.39 Britton Koontz (BKBK)....12.07 Cracker Barrel (CBRL)......49.83 Champion Ent. (CHB)...........20 Com. Health Svcs.............38.98 Computer Sci. Corp.........49.99 Cooper Industries (CBE).....46.97 CBL and Associates (CBL).....14.29 CSX Corp. (CSX).................52.25 East Group Prprties....... 36.98 El Paso Corp. (EP).............11.34 Entergy Corp. (ETR).........75.07

Fastenal (FAST)..................50.44 Family Dollar (FDO).........40.74 Fred’s (FRED).......................13.69 Int’l Paper (IP)....................23.23 Janus Capital Group.......10.66 J.C. Penney (JCP)..............27.49 Kroger Stores (KR)............20.13 Kan. City So. (KSU)...........38.17 Legg Mason (LM)........... 29.72 Parkway Properties..........16.85 PepsiAmerica Inc. (PAS).29.98 Regions Financial (RF)..... 7.63 Rowan (RDC)......................24.76 Saks Inc. (SKS)...................... 9.18 Sears Holdings (SHLD)...88.30 Simpson-DuraVent..........29.22 Sunoco (SUN).....................29.87 Trustmark (TRMK)............22.37 Tyco Intn’l (TYC)................36.19 Tyson Foods (TSN)...........17.58 Viacom (VIA).......................36.98 Walgreens (WAG).............32.04 Wal-Mart (WMT)...............50.56

ACTIVE STOCKS NEW YORK (AP) — Friday’s prices for NYSE listed most active stocks: Sales High Low CloseChg AKSteel .20 94396 15.41 AMR 116361 7.86 AT&TInc 1.68 294336 24.73 AbtLab 1.76f 108289 48.58 AMD 274595 8.87 AlcatelLuc 138162 2.63 Alcoa .12 206687 11.79 Altria 1.40 232029 20.65 AmbacFh 685491 1.29 AEagleOut .40 101539 13.22 AmExp .72 121779 40.71 Anadarko .36 97216 55.44 Annaly 2.69e 157981 17.13 BPPLC 3.36e 303310 43.84 BakrHu .60 141489 40.37 BcoBrades .76r 88997 16.54 BcoSantand .82e 192847 10.49 BkofAm .04 1566949 16.18 BkNYMel .36 107426 27.98 BarVixShT 334395 29.29 BostonSci 134006 6.20 BrMySq 1.28 97477 23.45 CBSB .20 86918 14.94 CVSCare .35 168169 34.98 Cemex .40t 85811 11.23 ChesEng .30 157566 22.75 Chevron 2.88f 142008 74.40 Chimera .54e 89090 3.98 Citigrp 5924432 4.04 CocaCl 1.76 114834 51.95 ConocPhil 2.20f 116971 52.58 Corning .20 225775 17.60 DenburyR 106278 17.53 DirFBearrs 729878 15.13 DrxFBulls .15e 514206 25.42 DirxSCBear 394164 7.01 DirxSCBull 4.85e 137785 50.06 DirxLCBear 94009 16.14 Disney .35 156379 34.05 DowChm .60 131636 27.97 DukeEngy .96 88165 16.13 EMCCp 296808 18.91 ElPasoCp .04 99751 11.68 ENSCO .14f 86206 38.75 ExxonMbl 1.76f 307016 61.67 FordM 761824 12.08 FredMac 100409 1.27 FMCG 1.20f 112550 71.35 GLGPtrs 123007 4.27 GenElec .40 690684 16.69 Genworth 110607 16.20 Gerdau .21e 83885 13.69 GoldmanS 1.40 104223 145.80 Hallibrtn .36 367838 27.03 HewlettP .32 188774 47.07 HomeDp .95 173662 34.64 HostHotls .04 117747 14.86 iShBraz 2.72e 238554 64.00 iShJapn .14e 283950 9.65 iSTaiwn .21e 146116 11.50 iShChina25 .55e 402593 39.77 iShEMkts .58e 1104926 38.59 iSEafe 1.44e 387544 49.15 iShR2K .75e 865154 67.17 iShREst 1.86e 153706 51.02 ItauUnibH .55r 146982 18.58 JPMorgCh .20 401655 40.35 JohnJn 2.16f 265259 59.12 JnprNtwk 85390 27.21 Keycorp .04 106823 8.23 Kraft 1.16 106849 29.16 Kroger .38 140092 20.46

14.72 7.56 24.29 47.50 8.45 2.51 11.54 20.25 .95 12.70 39.55 52.05 16.88 42.47 37.76 16.20 10.12 15.71 27.12 28.05 6.04 23.11 14.47 34.14 10.79 22.00 73.04 3.91 3.95 51.00 51.58 17.11 16.26 14.24 23.82 6.59 46.87 15.38 33.24 26.75 15.91 18.45 11.20 35.55 60.28 11.62 1.21 69.25 4.22 16.16 15.36 13.28 143.10 24.66 45.76 33.82 14.17 62.57 9.51 11.31 38.91 37.92 48.11 65.73 49.78 18.16 39.36 58.19 26.38 7.94 28.57 19.85

14.96—.28 7.67—.11 24.30—.33 47.56—.31 8.57—.23 2.57—.06 11.64—.18 20.29—.25 1.20+.25 13.10+.26 39.87—.46 52.33—3.24 16.96+.20 42.95—2.43 38.14—2.95 16.34—.27 10.15—.28 15.74—.44 27.20—.83 28.58+.25 6.05—.15 23.21—.13 14.56—.29 34.63+.04 10.83—.38 22.34+.12 73.87—.49 3.94+.01 3.96—.06 51.40+.17 51.86—.35 17.43—.09 16.45—.08 14.93+.78 24.14—1.41 6.86+.26 48.04—1.92 15.87+.52 33.42—.95 26.91—1.16 15.96—.02 18.62—.16 11.34—.07 37.40—1.42 60.46—1.00 11.73—.26 1.24+.01 70.05—1.02 4.26+.01 16.35—.31 15.59—.40 13.46—.05 144.26—.69 24.83—2.16 46.01—.93 33.86—.69 14.26—.47 63.52—.26 9.51—.16 11.36—.16 39.38—.35 38.10—.64 48.32—.95 66.25—.86 49.95—.76 18.41—.20 39.58—.84 58.30—.73 26.62—.64 8.02—.18 28.60—.46 20.13+.28

LSICorp 99016 5.47 LVSands 496279 24.49 Lowes .44f 111422 25.39 MBIA 91944 7.56 MFAFncl .96m 86551 7.39 MGMMir 350146 12.94 Macys .20 100759 22.62 MarathonO 1f 84666 31.74 MarinerEn 157976 21.85 MarshIls .04 89987 8.34 Medtrnic .82 88110 39.90 Merck 1.52 245759 34.12 MetroPCS 95098 9.13 Monsanto 1.06 184964 51.48 MorgStan .20 150843 27.75 Motorola 167701 6.94 Nabors 135563 19.72 NOilVarco .40a 94923 39.90 NobleCorp .20 201700 29.33 NokiaCp .56e 296328 10.34 OilSvHT 1.74e x107794 102.75 PMIGrp 154479 4.83 PetrbrsA 1.30e 85935 31.16 Petrobras 1.30e 188748 35.90 Pfizer .72 600892 15.59 PhilipMor 2.32 115567 44.80 PrUShS&P 537659 34.70 PrUShQQQ 211303 18.33 ProUltSP .41e 308526 37.13 ProUShtFn 175198 21.27 ProUSR2K 110538 20.69 ProctGam 1.93f 135705 61.68 ProLogis .60 95204 11.88 PulteGrp 88717 11.29 RadianGrp .01 120248 10.50 RegionsFn .04 162844 7.94 SpdrDJIA 2.60e 189323 102.63 SpdrGold 110150 118.90 SpdrRetl .50e 189386 41.16 SpdrOGEx .25e 83792 41.70 SandRdge 99916 6.57 SaraLee .44 130095 14.33 Schlmbrg .84 x273958 59.81 Schwab .24 107366 16.75 SemiHTr .55e 209660 27.88 SmithIntl .48 93686 39.89 SwstAirl .02 87013 12.64 SprintNex 571152 5.25 SPMatls .52e 146870 31.27 SPHlthC .53e 132652 29.16 SPConsum .41e 111796 32.92 SPEngy 1e 252760 54.01 SPDRFncl .20e 1225099 14.98 SPInds .59e 248098 30.02 SPTech .31e 120408 21.84 StratHotels 128517 5.05 Synovus .04 297331 2.97 TaiwSemi .46e 131871 9.98 TexInst .48 144396 24.90 TimeWarn .85 127085 31.69 Transocn 197592 58.49 USAirwy 110194 8.97 USBancrp .20 137143 24.44 USNGsFd 227307 7.50 USOilFd 103121 34.51 USSteel .20 139570 48.67 UtdhlthGp .50f 115069 29.41 ValeSA .52e 346439 27.80 ValeSApf .52e 159623 23.52 ValeroE .20 106293 19.00 VangEmg .55e 152929 38.61 VerizonCm 1.90 176821 27.67 WalMart 1.21f 137106 50.93 WeathfIntl 156807 14.42 WellsFargo .20 396771 29.50 Xerox .17 188709 9.50

5.25 5.33—.10 22.87 23.48—.35 24.58 24.75—.37 7.04 7.45+.29 7.23 7.33+.05 12.10 12.46—.36 21.93 22.21+.16 30.88 31.09—.55 21.11 21.38—.41 7.95 8.15—.10 39.12 39.18—.23 33.50 33.69+.07 8.83 8.99—.01 49.25 50.87+.60 26.83 27.11—.55 6.79 6.85—.07 18.23 19.03+.64 37.69 38.13—1.94 27.52 29.07—1.00 10.02 10.12—.21 97.78 98.21—5.83 4.45 4.69+.19 30.28 30.97+.19 35.01 35.62+.11 15.22 15.23—.14 44.02 44.12—.58 33.60 34.39+.87 17.72 17.99+.17 35.91 36.24—.96 20.39 21.08+.76 19.84 20.35+.48 60.85 61.09+.14 11.38 11.38—.37 10.95 11.14—.02 9.90 10.28+.26 7.59 7.63—.25 101.04 101.47—1.25 117.63 118.88+.19 40.18 40.64—.14 40.66 40.97—.15 6.25 6.44+.03 14.10 14.17—.05 55.46 56.15—3.66 16.26 16.34—.42 27.12 27.42—.45 37.19 37.56—2.61 12.31 12.44—.20 5.02 5.13—.06 30.53 30.75—.55 28.77 28.87—.14 32.18 32.37—.50 52.65 53.05—1.02 14.63 14.68—.33 29.31 29.60—.40 21.49 21.64—.18 4.75 4.90+.05 2.83 2.96+.06 9.73 9.75—.14 24.20 24.42—.43 30.61 30.99+.05 56.06 56.77—2.94 8.55 8.83+.09 23.85 23.96—.47 7.29 7.43+.10 33.50 34.04—.27 46.53 47.21—1.65 28.85 29.07—.25 26.84 27.19—.36 22.73 23.05—.22 18.42 18.68—.12 37.95 38.20—.58 27.19 27.52—.06 50.50 50.56—.14 13.75 14.12—.31 28.54 28.69—.72 9.23 9.31—.15

DR. GEORGE AT WORK Q: I am leaving a job on bad terms with my boss. Should I ask if I can use him as a reference? — Leaving Soon A: Why DR. GEORGE R. would you leave a job without another one? If you think you are going to get fired or laid off, let the company make the move first; don’t leave until then. In the meantime, get busy looking. If you are unemployed, that raises a red flag during an interview. Were you fired? Incompetent? Are you hard to get along with? The list goes on. Do yourself a favor, and stay put. The market is tough out there and some say for

ABRAHAM

The Vicksburg Post

every $5,000 you make, it takes a month to get a similar job. So, if you are making $50,000 a year, plan on 10 months to get a new one. Does your job sound more attractive now? Forgive your boss, or manage him or her better. Don’t let pride result in a bad decision. If you do leave, ask your boss for a written reference. That way, you will have more control over what he says. But as a rule, I wouldn’t put him or her on your list of references, especially if the relationship is bad. •

Dr. George R. Abraham is a native of Vicksburg and a former longtime educator, business manager and consultant. He is an author who contributes weekly to The Vicksburg Post and hosts “The Dr. George Show” on 1490 AM at the Klondyke in Vicksburg from 9 until 10 a.m. each Tuesday. He can be reached at georgerabraham@ aol.com.

BP exec says ‘top kill’ method to stop oil flow moving forward GRAND ISLE, La. (AP) — Kneeling to pick up tar balls the Deepwater Horizon Since the Deepwater Horizon on anSince oil-fouled beach and lisrig exploded April 20, BP and rig exploded April 20, BP and tening to “heartbreaking stoU.S. government estimates U.S. government estimates ries”have of loss, President varied widely onBarack the have varied widely on the Obama conamountpersonally of oil leaking daily. amount of oil leaking daily. fronted the spreading damage Estimated reported gallons of Estimated reported gallons of oil leaking daily by source: oil leaking daily by source: wrought by the crude gushing into the of Mexico AprilGulf 22: Coast Guard — and April 22: Coast Guard 336,000 336,000 the bitter anger that’s rising April 24: Coast Guard and BP April 24: Coast Guard and BP onshore. 42,000 42,000 “What can he really do?” April 28: Coast Guard, NOAA April 28: Coast Guard, NOAA said Billy Ward, a developer 210,000 210,000 May 2: Coast Guard and BP May 2: Coast Guard and BP who comes to his beach house 200,000 200,000 here every weekend and, like May 4: BP (testimony)* May 4: BP (testimony)* many other locals, had little 1.7 million to 2.5 1.7 million to 2.5 positive May to 20:say BP about Obama’s May 20: BP +210,000 +210,000 trip to the beleaguered region May 27: “If Coast May 27: Coast Guard on Friday. heGuard wants to do 504,000 to 798,000 504,000 to 798,000 something, let him get out * Range of worst case scenarios stated * Range of worst case scenarios stated thereduring and pump some Congressional hearings. mud during Congressional hearings. and cement into that hole. Just AP AP SOURCE: AP reporting SOURCE: AP reporting fix it. Help us.” tion won’t fade until the oil is BP PLC, even less popular <AP> OIL SPILL ESTIMATES stopped and cleaned up. here, kept up its efforts to 052810: Graphic shows estimated “It’s an assault our shores, “just fix it,” using its “top kill” reported gallons of oilon leaking in the on our people, on the regional by Editor’s note:to It is try mandatory to include procedure to stop the Gulf of Mexico on a daily basis all sources that accompany this graphic economy and on communisource since the explosion ; 1c x 4 deep oilrepurposing well leak by pumping when or editing it for inches; 47 mm x 102 mm;the withpresities like this one,” publicationmud. in heavy BC-US--Gulf Oil Spill; JB; ETA dent said from this small4:30 barBP’s chief operating officer p.m. </AP> on Friday said the attempt to rier island town threatened by plug the gushing Gulf oil well what is now established as the is going basically according largest oil spill in American history. “People are watching to plan. Doug Suttles said the com- their livelihoods wash up on pany has shot assorted junk the beach.” Amid concern that the enviinto the well along with heavy ronmental and economic drilling mud to try to overdisaster could also engulf come the pressure of the oil. The oil has been flowing his presidency, Obama has since the drilling rig Deepwa- stepped up his public appearter Horizon exploded April 20. ances this week to demonThe spill is now the worst in strate that he is engaged. He held a rare White House U.S. history. Suttles also says the drill- news conference on Thursing of a second relief well has day, focusing almost entirely been suspended to prepare for on the spill. And Friday, he a different way to try to cut off flew to the coast for an inspecthe oil if the top kill doesn’t tion tour and meetings that lasted about four hours — his work. Obama said he under- second visit in the 39 days of stands people “want it made the crisis. He noted that all may not right” and that their frustra-

Varying estimates

Varying estimates

The associated press

President Barack Obama takes a tour of areas impacted by the Gulf Coast oil spill on Friday. go well in such a massive, unprecedented undertaking. Mistakes are possible, Obama said. But a lack of urgency about plugging the leak and restoring the region is not, the president declared. “There are not going to be silver bullets or a lot of perfect answers for some of the challenges that we face,” he said in front of an incongruously pristine backdrop of sparkling

blue water with dolphins, fish and seabirds frequently spotted. “But we’re going to keep at this every day.” Obama made an unqualified promise to coast residents reminiscent of previous presidents speaking after disasters. “I’m here to tell you that you are not alone, you will not be abandoned, you will not be left behind,” Obama said.

Indoor or Outdoor

SWINGS! G I F T & B R I DA L R E G I S T R Y

1 3 2 2 Wa s h i n g t o n

6 0 1- 6 3 6 - 6 5 2 5

Airline ticket prices spike MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Just as family summer travel is taking off, so are ticket prices. Fares for the June-to-August period are up 24 percent from last summer to an average $321 round trip, according to fare-tracking website Bing Travel. Memorial Day fares are up 18 percent to an average of $332. Travel demand is picking up as the economy improves. At the same time, airlines haven’t rushed to bring back the planes and available seats

they took out of service during the recession. That allows them to push fares higher. So, travelers will be hard-pressed to find deals like last summer, when fares dropped to their lowest levels since 2004. In raising fares, the airlines are employing a tactic first used for Thanksgiving travel last year. Most of the big carriers added $10 to $30 “peak travel” surcharges each way on nearly every day between June 10 and Aug. 22, according to an analysis by FareCompare.com.

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1210 Washington St. 601-636-7531

In Downtown Vicksburg Since 1899


Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

A7

WH had Clinton try to ease Sestak out of Pa. race WASHINGTON — Forced to disclose backstage political bargaining, President Barack Obama’s embarrassed White House said Friday it had enlisted Bill Clinton to try to ease Rep. Joe Sestak out of Pennsylvania’s Senate primary with a job offer. Nothing wrong with that, the White House said. Oh, yes, there was, Republicans countered. The administration admission — it said Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel had asked the former president to call Sestak — left many questions unanswered, and it seemed unlikely the issue had been put to rest. For Obama, the revelations called into question his repeated promises to run an open government that was above back room deals. And for Sestak, they raised questions why he kept talking about up the offer — a 60-second conversation, he said Friday — in the first place. “I wasn’t interested, and that was the bottom line,” Sestak said on the steps of the Capitol. Seeking to quiet the clamor over a possible political trade, the White House released a report describing the offer that was intended to clear a path for Sen. Arlen Specter to win the Democratic nomination. Sestak stayed in the race and eventually defeated Specter to become the Democratic nominee, ending Specter’s

priority this year. The bill would give the Pentagon the rest of the year to study the issue before the repeal would take effect.

Report: 24 leaders among detainees

The associated press

Rep. Joe Sestak, D-Pa. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill on Friday.

washington

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 30-year Senate tenure. White House Counsel Robert Bauer rendered his own verdict in a two-page report that said there was no improper conduct in the offer. No one in the administration discussed the offer with Sestak, Bauer said. The report did not say what, if any, contacts or promises the White House had with Specter on the matter. It also did not reveal whether Obama was aware of Clinton’s role. Rep. Darrell Issa, the top Republican on the House oversight committee who

unsuccessfully had sought a Justice Department investigation, said Obama had become a part of the Washington culture he decried. “It’s pretty clear from the White House statement that they intended to get him out of the race by offering him a position, and that’s illegal and it’s unethical,” Issa said just moments after Sestak spoke.

House advances end to ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ WASHINGTON — The House on Friday passed a defense bill that paves the way for gays to serve openly

in the military for the first time, but advocates on both sides geared up for a fight in the Senate. Normally, defense bills pass by wider margins than Friday’s 229-186 vote, but many Republicans and a few conservative Democrats said they would vote against it because of the gay ban, which was added to the $700 billion bill in a 234-194 vote late Thursday. House approval of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” repeal was a victory for President Barack Obama, who has pledged to change the policy, and for gay rights groups, who have made it their top

WASHINGTON — About six dozen people who were being held at the Guantanamo Bay prison when President Barack Obama took office were directly implicated in terrorist attacks against the United States or played significant roles within al-Qaida and other terrorist groups, an administration task force concluded. The numbers were part of a yearlong review of each of the 240 detainees who were at the Navy-run prison in Cuba when Obama’s term began in January 2009. The task force recommended that 126 detainees be sent home or to a third country, 36 be referred for prosecution in either civilian or military courts and 48 continue to be held indefinitely without charge. The top-tier of terror detainees numbers roughly two dozen and includes purported Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, alleged Sept. 11 plotter Ramzi bin al Shibh, alleged Indonesian terror leader Hambali and Ahmed Ghailani, accused in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa.

Continued from Page A1.

KATIE CARTER•The Vicksburg Post

Adam Rader, right, is escorted from the Warren County Courthouse to the Warren County Jail by Sheriff’s Deputy Jerry Davidson after his sentencing hearing Friday morning. show leniency I would appreciate it and the family would appreciate it.” Rader, handcuffed and shackled as he took the stand, also apologized to Miller’s family. He said he had fired three shots at Miller but the victim “was still running” when he, Rader, handed the gun off to the other man and went back up the hill. “Why would you need to

hand the gun off to another person if he’d been run off?” countered Arthur. Miller, who was 25 and lived at 107 Belva Drive, was shot and killed April 12, 2009 after an afternoon-long party at a home in the 1400 block of Oakland Street, near Baldwin Ferry Road and Court Street, to celebrate a friend’s birthday. Rader, Miller and two other men fought when a

deaths Michael Brown

Willie L. Lewis Jr.

Services for Michael Brown will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Word of Faith Christian Center with Pastor Reginald Walker officiating. Burial will follow Michael at Cedar Hill Brown Cemetery under the direction of DillonChisley Funeral Home. Visitation will be at the church Monday from 10 a.m. until service. Mr. Brown died Tuesday, May 25, 2010, at his home. He was 40. He was a 1988 graduate of Vicksburg High School and a veteran of the U.S. Army. He was a member of Word of Faith Christian Center.

EDWARDS — Willie L. Lewis Jr. died Wednesday, May 26, 2010, at Central Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. He was 75. Mr. Lewis retired from International Paper and was a member of Friendship M.B. Church in Edwards. He was preceded in death by his parents, Pearlean and Willie Lewis Sr. He is survived by his wife, Norma Lewis of Edwards; two sons, Thomas T. Lewis and Marquis L. Lewis, both of Bakersfield, Calif.; two daughters, Nicole Marshall of Edwards and Dorothy G. Jones of Detroit; one sister, Verlean Holmes of Edwards; 17 grandchildren; 18 greatgrandchildren; and aunts, uncles and other relatives. Dillon-Chisley Funeral Home has charge of arrangements.

pint bottle of Crown Royal appeared to be missing. Miller was chased down a hill near the residence, and five or six shots were fired. Police responded to calls at 7:18 p.m. and found a chaotic scene with people screaming and at least one police officer attacked, said Vicksburg detective Brad Derring. Miller was pronounced dead at the scene. Rader later turned himself in to police on the advice of his father. Another man, Derrick Turner, 26, 401 Pleasant Valley Drive, was held on $75,000 bond for accessory after the fact. Smith said with Rader’s guilty plea, Turner’s case would probably not be prosecuted. The gun was not recovered, and no whiskey was ever found, Smith said. Rader faced at least three other charges of sale of a controlled substance in 2008 and 2009, and has been in the Warren County Jail. Smith said with this guilty

Frank J.

FISHER FUNERAL HOME

Mrs. Della McMillin

Service 11 a.m. Saturday, May 29, 2010 Frank J. Fisher Funeral Chapel Interment Green Acres Memorial Park Visitation 10 a.m. Saturday until the hour of service

Mrs. Josie P. Smith

Mrs. Betty Waring Aden

Arrangements to be announced

5000 Indiana Avenue

601-629-0000 www.charlesrilesfuneralhome.com

Service 11 a.m. Tuesday, June 1, 2010 Gibson Memorial United Methodist Church Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery Visitation 9:30 a.m. Tuesday until the hour of service at the church Memorials Gibson Memorial United Methodist Church

601-636-7373

1830 CHERRY STREET

BY CHIEF METEOROLOGIST BARBIE BASSSETT TONIGHT

sunday

65°

87°

A weak disturbance will move into the state over the weekend keeping the chances for pop-up storms in the forecast.

WEATHER This weather package is compiled from historical records and information provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the City of Vicksburg and The Associated Press.

LOCAL FORECAST sunday-tuesday Partly cloudy; chance of showers and thunderstorms; highs around 90, lows in the upper 60s

STATE FORECAST TONIGHT Partly cloudy; chance of showers and thunderstorms; lows in the 60s saturDAY-monday Partly cloudy; chance of showers and thunderstorms; highs in the upper 80s, lows in the mid 60s

Almanac Highs and Lows High/past 24 hours............. 89º Low/past 24 hours............... 71º Average temperature......... 80º Normal this date................... 75º Record low..............55º in 1906 Record high............94º in 1977

Rader asked Patrick for leniency. “It was a tragic, tragic thing for this community,” Patrick said Friday at a sentencing hearing, after listening to testimony from Rader and his wife and father, as well as tearful statements from Miller’s mother and sister. “We’re pleading, me and my family, for some kind of closure for my brother Danny Miller,” Retha Miller told the judge. “To watch my brother be murdered is the hardest thing I will have to deal with for the rest of my life.” She said Miller’s small nephews had been among those at a party when her brother, unarmed, had been threatened and then shot. “It took a toll on all of us. To me, he’s been cutting a deal,” she said of Rader, and pleaded with Patrick for the maximum penalty. Vollor said the shooting was a “stupid move on his part” but accidental, and that Rader and all his family is sorry for it. “Adam’s been a good boy,” the defendant’s father, Freddie Rader, told the judge tearfully. “He’s done this, and I think he was under the influence of alcohol. I’m very sorry. If you could

PRECISION FORECAST

plea, prosecutors would not go forward on the drug charges. Miller worked for a local landscaping company. He had attended Vicksburg High School. About 25 family members and friends of both Rader and Miller attended Friday’s hearing. Patrick cautioned them to exit the courthouse with dignity and respect, and the courtroom emptied without incident — Rader’s side under the direction of Vollor, and Miller’s with victim assistance coordinator Brenda Theriot.

GLENWOOD FUNERAL HOMES • VICKSBURG • ROLLING FORK • PORT GIBSON • UTICA • TALLULAH, LA

• Vicksburg •

Mrs. Susan Payne

Memorial Service 11 a.m. Saturday, May 29, 2010 Hawkins United Methodist Church Reception 12:30 - 4 p.m. Saturday at the Bazsinsky House 1022 Monroe Street Vicksburg, Mississippi

Mr. Lester Badeaux

Service 10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 29, 2010 Glenwood Chapel Interment Green Acres Memorial Park

Mr. Everett Ezell

Rainfall Recorded at the Vicksburg Water Plant Past 24 hours.........................N/A This month..............2.70 inches Total/year.............. 17.34 inches Normal/month......4.25 inches Normal/year........ 26.27 inches Solunar table Most active times for fish and wildlife Sunday: A.M. Active............................ 7:40 A.M. Most active................. 1:27 P.M. Active............................. 8:06 P.M. Most active.................. 1:53 Sunrise/sunset Sunset today........................ 8:02 Sunset tomorrow............... 8:03 Sunrise tomorrow.............. 5:58

RIVER DATA Stages Mississippi River at Vicksburg Current: 42.7 | Change: -0.1 Flood: 43 feet Yazoo River at Greenwood Current: 18.7 | Change: -0.3 Flood: 35 feet Yazoo River at Yazoo City Current: 24.9 | Change: N/C Flood: 29 feet Yazoo River at Belzoni Current: 20.5 | Change: +0.2 Flood: 34 feet Big Black River at West Current: 5.1 | Change: -0.6 Flood: 12 feet Big Black River at Bovina Current: 9.2 | Change: +0.3 Flood: 28 feet

Service 2 p.m. Saturday, May 29, 2010 Glenwood Chapel Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery • Port Gibson •

StEELE BAYOU friday Land....................................85.0 River....................................90.6

Mrs. Anita Davidson

Cairo, Ill. Sunday.................................... 39.1 Monday.................................. 36.8 Tuesday.................................. 34.1 Memphis Sunday.................................... 28.2 Monday.................................. 27.8 Tuesday.................................. 26.5 Greenville Sunday.................................... 47.9 Monday.................................. 47.8 Tuesday.................................. 47.8 Vicksburg Sunday.................................... 42.6 Monday.................................. 42.6 Tuesday.................................. 42.6

Service 10 a.m. Saturday, May 29, 2010 Glenwood Chapel Interment Cane Ridge Cemetery

Mrs. Francis Diane Stephens

Graveside Service 1 p.m. Saturday, May 29, 2010 Wintergreen Cemetery Visitation 10 a.m. Saturday until the hour of service at Port Gibson Baptist Church

www.GlenwoodFuneralHomes.com 601-636-1414 45 Highway 80

MISSISSIPPI RIVER Forecast


Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

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THE VICKSBURG POST

RELIGION SATURDAY, m ay 29, 2010 • SE C TI O N B DEVOTION B2 | CHURCH EVENTS B3 Karen Gamble, managing editor | E-mail: newsreleases@vicksburgpost.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 137

Children’s futures shaped by the past Q: I have heard you say we have shamefully mismanaged the present generation. Explain. A: I was referring to the many harmful influences that previous generations didn’t have to confront — at least not to the degree that we see today. That includes safe-sex ideology and violence and sexual imagery in movies, music and TV; it refers to gang activity and drug abuse. I was speaking also about the extreme emphasis on physical attractiveness. A study done at the UniFOCUS ON versity of THE FAMILY California showed that 80 percent of girls in the fourth grade have attempted to diet because they see themselves as fat. One elementary school girl justified her dieting by saying she wanted to be skinny so that no one would tease her. How sad it is that children in this culture have been taught to hate their bodies — to measure their worth by comparison to a standard that they can never achieve. At a time when they should be busy being kids, they’re worried about how much they weigh and how they look. For young girls this is magnified by the cruelties of childhood. Dozens of studies now show that overweight children are held in low regard by their peers. According to one investigation, silhouettes of obese children were described by 6-year-olds as “lazy,” “stupid,” “ugly.” This overemphasis on beauty does not occur in a vacuum, of course. Our children have caught our prejudices and our system of values. We, too, measure human worth on a scale of physical attractiveness. It’s bad enough when adults evaluate each other that way. It’s tragic when millions of children have concluded they’re hopelessly flawed. We must take the blame for the many pressures on today’s kids. Fifty years ago, adults protected kids — from pornography, sexual abuse, harmful ideas and dangerous substances. Millions of husbands and wives stayed together “for the benefit of the children.” It was understood that tender minds and bodies needed to be shielded from that which could hurt them. But now, child abuse, date rape and sexually transmitted disease are rampant. As the family unravels and as adults become more selfcentered and preoccupied, children are often left to fend for themselves in a very dangerous world. It may be our greatest failing as a people. •

DR. JAMES DOBSON

Dr. James Dobson is founder of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, P.O. Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO 80903. The Web site is www.family.org.

Fifth annual Faith Fest downtown Friday night By Manivanh Chanprasith mchan@vicksburgpost.com Faith Fest, a night of gospel music downtown, is returning for its fifth year. “This year, our goal is stopping violence in our community and reaching our youths,” said event organizer and Warren Central Junior High School teacher Andre’ Terrett. “The biggest issue

If you go Faith Fest will be from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday at River Stage Plaza, at Crawford and Washington streets. Admission is free, but donations to charity will be accepted. Call 601-218-3578 or 601-218-3577. you’ve heard throughout the decade is, ‘There’s nothing to do.’ I say if there’s nothing to do, then create it.” Sponsored by Our House

Ministries and King of Kings Christian Center, Faith Fest is set for 7 to 10 p.m. Friday at River Stage Plaza, at Crawford and Washington

streets. Featured will be live gospel music and children’s activities. Headlining the event will be Benjamin Cone III & Worship, from Jackson. Local group Christ Knight Soujas, Natchez soloist Jerome Myles and Natchez Christian rap artist True will also perform. True’s “music is a testament of his own life,” Terrett

said. “They’ll all come with a boom. The music quickly draws a crowd, but then they’ll see the fellowship.” Local dance troupes and praise teams will also entertain. Community leaders will offer sermons during the event. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted.

Saudi firm, U.S. clinic join to fight addiction Treatment scarce for followers of Islam By The Associated Press DETROIT — Mohammed Al-Turaiki left his traditional Saudi Arabian headdress behind in favor of a blazer and sweater as he made the rounds at one of the United States’ oldest addiction treatment centers. He had traveled 7,000 miles to Michigan in hope of finding answers to a problem so taboo in the conservative Muslim kingdom that no official statistics exist: alcohol and drug addiction. Alcohol is illegal in Saudi Arabia, where a strict interpretation of Islam forbids everything from liquor to allowing women to drive. For those who suffer from alcohol and drug abuse, treatment is scarce and the stigma so great that most never talk about their addiction, even to close family members. Al-Turaiki, the chief executive of the Riyadh-based Saudi Care for Rehabilitation and Health Care, is trying to change the negative image of addiction by creating a network of treatment facilities in the oil-rich kingdom. He came to Brighton Hospital earlier this year to check out the facility and its treatment programs that long have included the Detroit region’s large Arab and Muslim population. “When I made the rounds in the hospital, patients who saw me tossed out a few words in Arabic to see if I would respond,” Al-Turaiki said. “I felt at home.” During his weeklong visit, Al-Turaiki learned about the 60-year-old hospital’s links with the broader community, including ArabAmerican social services groups that provide substance abuse counseling and one that developed one of the country’s first ArabicEnglish 12-step programs. “We will need to build an Islamically grounded 12-step culture and meetings to support patients post-discharge,” said AlTuraiki, whose company plans to build a public-private 250-bed treatment hospital and referral centers not just in Saudi but throughout the Middle East. While at Brighton, he met with Alec Berry, an 82-yearold U.S.-born Arab and Muslim who helped create the bilingual program. Berry, an alcoholic who has been sober for more than 40 years, is planning to travel to Saudi Arabia later this year and develop post-treat-

The associated press

Alec Berry, a U.S.-born Arab and Muslim, talks with residents at a treatment center in Detroit. Berry, 82, is an alcoholic who’s been sober for more than 40 years. ment programs if Brighton and Saudi Care finalize their consulting agreement in the weeks ahead. Brighton and Saudi officials speak regularly by phone and the proposed agreement calls for Brighton officials to visit the kingdom. “They could see this is a very spiritual program that will fit in with Islam very easily — it’s seamless, almost,” said Berry, who has attended meetings at Brighton for years and credits the facility with assisting his own recovery. The 12-step program at Brighton forms the core of the recovery program established by Alcoholics Anonymous, which isn’t

allied with any religion or sect. But Al-Turaiki and Berry say the program resonates with Muslims, since the third step speaks of turning one’s life “over to the care of God as we understood him.” Despite the success of 12-step programs, one of the biggest roadblocks to recovery and awareness in Muslim and Arab communities is denial and shame. “In the Arabic-Muslim community, because Islam forbids the use of alcohol, you can imagine how much more intense the denial system is going to be,” said Berry, a therapist. Brighton tries to combat feelings by giving every patient a roommate, said

Dr. Mark Menestrina, director of the detoxification unit. And during meetings with patients, Menestrina said he has had an Arab-American friend who has been sober for more than three years talk with patients in Arabic. “It also helps to have identification with people similar,” he said. “They need to know they’re not alone.” Al-Turaiki knows of no statistics on the rates of addiction or relapse in Saudi Arabia, but said the odds of success “are at least twice as unfavorable as recorded in the best treatment centers in the U.S.” Though some in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East secretly seek treatment in

the West for addiction, AlTuraiki said the kingdom must have its own centers. “We know the gap is too wide between the needs of addicts for treatment and rehabilitation and the facilities and expertise to deliver it, because addiction is stigmatized and it is chronic,” he said. Berry said even with cultural modifications, getting more Arabs and Muslims to acknowledge addiction and enter treatment will require more people to carry the message. He said Al-Turaiki and Saudi Care recognized the power and potential of the first-person connection at their first meeting. “They saw a recovering Arab-Muslim,” he said.


THE VICKSBURG POST

RELIGION SATURDAY, m ay 29, 2010 • SE C TI O N B DEVOTION B2 | CHURCH EVENTS B3 Karen Gamble, managing editor | E-mail: newsreleases@vicksburgpost.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 137

Children’s futures shaped by the past Q: I have heard you say we have shamefully mismanaged the present generation. Explain. A: I was referring to the many harmful influences that previous generations didn’t have to confront — at least not to the degree that we see today. That includes safe-sex ideology and violence and sexual imagery in movies, music and TV; it refers to gang activity and drug abuse. I was speaking also about the extreme emphasis on physical attractiveness. A study done at the UniFOCUS ON versity of THE FAMILY California showed that 80 percent of girls in the fourth grade have attempted to diet because they see themselves as fat. One elementary school girl justified her dieting by saying she wanted to be skinny so that no one would tease her. How sad it is that children in this culture have been taught to hate their bodies — to measure their worth by comparison to a standard that they can never achieve. At a time when they should be busy being kids, they’re worried about how much they weigh and how they look. For young girls this is magnified by the cruelties of childhood. Dozens of studies now show that overweight children are held in low regard by their peers. According to one investigation, silhouettes of obese children were described by 6-year-olds as “lazy,” “stupid,” “ugly.” This overemphasis on beauty does not occur in a vacuum, of course. Our children have caught our prejudices and our system of values. We, too, measure human worth on a scale of physical attractiveness. It’s bad enough when adults evaluate each other that way. It’s tragic when millions of children have concluded they’re hopelessly flawed. We must take the blame for the many pressures on today’s kids. Fifty years ago, adults protected kids — from pornography, sexual abuse, harmful ideas and dangerous substances. Millions of husbands and wives stayed together “for the benefit of the children.” It was understood that tender minds and bodies needed to be shielded from that which could hurt them. But now, child abuse, date rape and sexually transmitted disease are rampant. As the family unravels and as adults become more selfcentered and preoccupied, children are often left to fend for themselves in a very dangerous world. It may be our greatest failing as a people. •

DR. JAMES DOBSON

Dr. James Dobson is founder of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, P.O. Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO 80903. The Web site is www.family.org.

Fifth annual Faith Fest downtown Friday night By Manivanh Chanprasith mchan@vicksburgpost.com Faith Fest, a night of gospel music downtown, is returning for its fifth year. “This year, our goal is stopping violence in our community and reaching our youths,” said event organizer and Warren Central Junior High School teacher Andre’ Terrett. “The biggest issue

If you go Faith Fest will be from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday at River Stage Plaza, at Crawford and Washington streets. Admission is free, but donations to charity will be accepted. Call 601-218-3578 or 601-218-3577. you’ve heard throughout the decade is, ‘There’s nothing to do.’ I say if there’s nothing to do, then create it.” Sponsored by Our House

Ministries and King of Kings Christian Center, Faith Fest is set for 7 to 10 p.m. Friday at River Stage Plaza, at Crawford and Washington

streets. Featured will be live gospel music and children’s activities. Headlining the event will be Benjamin Cone III & Worship, from Jackson. Local group Christ Knight Soujas, Natchez soloist Jerome Myles and Natchez Christian rap artist True will also perform. True’s “music is a testament of his own life,” Terrett

said. “They’ll all come with a boom. The music quickly draws a crowd, but then they’ll see the fellowship.” Local dance troupes and praise teams will also entertain. Community leaders will offer sermons during the event. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted.

Saudi firm, U.S. clinic join to fight addiction Treatment scarce for followers of Islam By The Associated Press DETROIT — Mohammed Al-Turaiki left his traditional Saudi Arabian headdress behind in favor of a blazer and sweater as he made the rounds at one of the United States’ oldest addiction treatment centers. He had traveled 7,000 miles to Michigan in hope of finding answers to a problem so taboo in the conservative Muslim kingdom that no official statistics exist: alcohol and drug addiction. Alcohol is illegal in Saudi Arabia, where a strict interpretation of Islam forbids everything from liquor to allowing women to drive. For those who suffer from alcohol and drug abuse, treatment is scarce and the stigma so great that most never talk about their addiction, even to close family members. Al-Turaiki, the chief executive of the Riyadh-based Saudi Care for Rehabilitation and Health Care, is trying to change the negative image of addiction by creating a network of treatment facilities in the oil-rich kingdom. He came to Brighton Hospital earlier this year to check out the facility and its treatment programs that long have included the Detroit region’s large Arab and Muslim population. “When I made the rounds in the hospital, patients who saw me tossed out a few words in Arabic to see if I would respond,” Al-Turaiki said. “I felt at home.” During his weeklong visit, Al-Turaiki learned about the 60-year-old hospital’s links with the broader community, including ArabAmerican social services groups that provide substance abuse counseling and one that developed one of the country’s first ArabicEnglish 12-step programs. “We will need to build an Islamically grounded 12-step culture and meetings to support patients post-discharge,” said AlTuraiki, whose company plans to build a public-private 250-bed treatment hospital and referral centers not just in Saudi but throughout the Middle East. While at Brighton, he met with Alec Berry, an 82-yearold U.S.-born Arab and Muslim who helped create the bilingual program. Berry, an alcoholic who has been sober for more than 40 years, is planning to travel to Saudi Arabia later this year and develop post-treat-

The associated press

Alec Berry, a U.S.-born Arab and Muslim, talks with residents at a treatment center in Detroit. Berry, 82, is an alcoholic who’s been sober for more than 40 years. ment programs if Brighton and Saudi Care finalize their consulting agreement in the weeks ahead. Brighton and Saudi officials speak regularly by phone and the proposed agreement calls for Brighton officials to visit the kingdom. “They could see this is a very spiritual program that will fit in with Islam very easily — it’s seamless, almost,” said Berry, who has attended meetings at Brighton for years and credits the facility with assisting his own recovery. The 12-step program at Brighton forms the core of the recovery program established by Alcoholics Anonymous, which isn’t

allied with any religion or sect. But Al-Turaiki and Berry say the program resonates with Muslims, since the third step speaks of turning one’s life “over to the care of God as we understood him.” Despite the success of 12-step programs, one of the biggest roadblocks to recovery and awareness in Muslim and Arab communities is denial and shame. “In the Arabic-Muslim community, because Islam forbids the use of alcohol, you can imagine how much more intense the denial system is going to be,” said Berry, a therapist. Brighton tries to combat feelings by giving every patient a roommate, said

Dr. Mark Menestrina, director of the detoxification unit. And during meetings with patients, Menestrina said he has had an Arab-American friend who has been sober for more than three years talk with patients in Arabic. “It also helps to have identification with people similar,” he said. “They need to know they’re not alone.” Al-Turaiki knows of no statistics on the rates of addiction or relapse in Saudi Arabia, but said the odds of success “are at least twice as unfavorable as recorded in the best treatment centers in the U.S.” Though some in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East secretly seek treatment in

the West for addiction, AlTuraiki said the kingdom must have its own centers. “We know the gap is too wide between the needs of addicts for treatment and rehabilitation and the facilities and expertise to deliver it, because addiction is stigmatized and it is chronic,” he said. Berry said even with cultural modifications, getting more Arabs and Muslims to acknowledge addiction and enter treatment will require more people to carry the message. He said Al-Turaiki and Saudi Care recognized the power and potential of the first-person connection at their first meeting. “They saw a recovering Arab-Muslim,” he said.


Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

B3

church events Continued from page B2.

Special events

accessible through the back gate on Adams Street. Call 601-529-4838.

House of Peace Activities at The House of Peace Worship Church International, 2372 Grove St., begin at noon today with an evangelism training class. Call 601-738-2784 to register. Services begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11. Intercessory prayer is at 6 p.m. Mondays and at 5 p.m. Tuesdays. Women of Peace fellowship begins at 6:30 p.m. Monday. Bible class is at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Men of Prosperity meets at 5:30 p.m., and choir rehearsal at 7 Thursday. Perfect Peace is broadcast at 6 a.m. Sundays on WAPT-16, at 6 p.m. Thursdays and Saturdays on Channel 17 and at 6 a.m. Monday through Friday on WUFX-11.

Immanuel Baptist Services at Immanuel Baptist Church, 6949 U.S. 61 South, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by morning worship and children’s church, led by children’s director Ashley Coomes, at 10:45. Discipleship training and preschool choir begin at 5 p.m., followed by evening worship at 6. On Wednesdays, prayer service/Bible study, children’s classes for grades K-6 and youth services begin at 7 p.m. Adult choir practice, led by interim music director Dale Yocum, begins at 8. A nursery is available.

Jones Chapel M.B. Services at Jones Chapel M.B. Church, 1340 Bay St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship and Communion are at 11 a.m. each fourth Sunday. Joseph L. Brown, pastor, will deliver the message.

King of Kings Services at King of Kings Christian Center, 4209 Mount Alban Road, begin at 9 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10. Evening service is at 5 each first and third Sunday. Children’s ministry for ages 2-6 is Sunday. Ages 2-10 meet Thursday. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday. Faith Fest is set for 7 p.m. June 4 at River Stage Plaza downtown. For transportation, call 601-661-6444 or 601-629-7791. Willie P. Taylor is pastor.

King Solomon Sunday services at King Solomon Baptist Church, 1401 Farmer St., begin at 8:15 a.m. with The Hour of SoulSaving Power. The Rev. R.D. Bernard will deliver the message. The praise team will provide the music. Worship is at 10 with R.D. Bernard, pastor, delivering the message. The mass choir will sing. Child care is provided beginning at 9:30. Children’s church/Sunday school is at 11. The message can be heard, live, at 11 a.m. on WTRM 100.5 and on WJIW 104.7, KJIW 94.5 and KCAT 1340, all at 7 p.m. CDs of the Sunday message may be obtained by calling 601-638-7658 and leaving a message. Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday and at noon Friday. From 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. June 5, the Breaking Down Walls Outreach Ministry will be at the Outlets at Vicksburg. Youth revival will be at 6 p.m. June 9-11. For transportation, call 601831-4387 or 601-630-5342 a day ahead.

Living Word Baptist Services at Living Word Baptist Church, 2845 Clay St., Suite 13 (in the Emmich Building), begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school and new members orientation. Worship is at 11. Morning Glory services are at 8:30 a.m. each first and third Sunday. Bible study is at 7 each Wednes-

TODAY • First Missionary Baptist ­— 6 p.m., Show Love and Help program; the Rev. Johnny Hughes; 5014 Old Mississippi 18 No 4. • Gospel Temple M.B. — 4 p.m., senior choir program, A Time to Remember; 1612 Lane St. • Pleasant Valley — 3 p.m., youth ministry program; Christopher Hood, speaker; refreshments served; 2585 N. Washington St. • St. Mark M.B. — 5:30 p.m., women’s program; Dr. Alphonso Butler, speaker; 3395 N. Washington St. • Second Baptist M.B. ­— 2 p.m., Sallie Blackburn’s 100th birthday celebration; the Rev. Ray E. Coleman Sr., guest speaker; the Rev. Leon Nelson, pastor; Port Gibson.

SUNDAY • Cool Spring M.B. — 11:30 a.m., Youth Day; the Rev. Byron Maxwell, pastor; 385 Falk Steel Road. • Greater Mount Olive ­— Noon, 139th church anniversary; the Rev. Reginald Anderson, pastor; the Rev. Douglas Harris, pastor; 109 N. Locust St. • Mount Carmel M.B. ­— 11 a.m., youth service; The Mighty Train of Gospel; the Rev. James T. Edwards Jr., speaker; Dr. Franklin L. Lassister, pastor; 2729 Alma St. • St. Mark M.B. — 11:30 a.m., women’s program; Dr. Alphonso Butler, speaker; 3395 N. Washington St. • St. Mary’s Catholic — 9 a.m., thanksgiving Mass and reception for the Rev. Francis Damoah, SVD; the Rev. Malcolm O’Leary, SVD; 1512 Main St. • St. Paul, Bovina — After 11 a.m. service until 2 p.m.; free clothes, household items, etc.; 601-831-0850; 437 Tiffintown Road. • Shiloh Baptist — 3 p.m., Youth Day; Darrell Brown, guest speaker; Dr. Willie J. Jones, pastor; 920 Green St. • Warren County Baptist Association — 7 p.m., fifth-Sunday fundraiser program; the Rev. Richard Johnson, speaker; Warren County Baptist Association and Shady Grove M.B. choirs; Straughter Baptist Memorial Center. • Warren County Sunday School Institute — 2 p.m., quarterly review; music by Inspiration choir; the Rev. Gregory Butler, speaker; Greater Mount Zion M.B., 907 Farmer St.

MONDAY • Holly Grove M.B. — 7 p.m., revival; James Archer, speaker; R.L. Miller, pastor; 746 Johnson St. • Mount Zion M.B. No. 4 — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Gregory Mayfield, guest speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; 122 Union Ave. • Pleasant Valley — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. David Brown, evangelist; the Rev. E.E. Gibbs, pastor; 2585 N. Washington St. • Zion Travelers M.B. — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Alfred E. Lassiter Jr., pastor; 1701 Poplar St.

TUESDAY • Holly Grove M.B. — 7 p.m., revival; James Archer, speaker; R.L. Miller, pastor; 746 Johnson St. • Mount Zion M.B. No. 4 — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Gregory Mayfield, guest speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; 122 Union Ave. • Pleasant Valley — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. David Brown, evangelist; the Rev. E.E. Gibbs, pastor; 2585 N. Washington St. • Zion Travelers M.B. — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Alfred E. Lassiter Jr., pastor; 1701 Poplar St.

WEDNESDAY • Holly Grove M.B. — 7 p.m., prayer meeting; James Archer, speaker; R.L. Miller, pastor; 746 Johnson St. • Mount Zion M.B. No. 4 — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Gregory Mayfield, guest speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; 122 Union Ave. • Pleasant Valley — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. David Brown, evangelist; the Rev. E.E. Gibbs, pastor; 2585 N. Washington St. • Zion Travelers M.B. — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Alfred E. Lassiter Jr., pastor; 1701 Poplar St.

THURSDAY • Holly Grove M.B. — 7 p.m., prayer meeting; James Archer, speaker; R.L. Miller, pastor; 746 Johnson St. day night. W.I.T.N.E.S.S., a women’s ministry, is at 10 a.m. each first and third Saturday. Man II Man, a men’s ministry, is at 8:30 a.m. each second and fourth Sunday. Dr. Stevie C. Duncan is senior pastor.

Locust Grove M.B. Worship at Locust Grove M.B. Church, 472 Stenson Road, begin at 8:30 a.m. with the Rev. Robert L. Miller delivering the message. Communion is at 10:30 a.m. each second Sunday and at 8:30 a.m. each fourth Sunday. Sunday school is at 10 a.m. each Sunday except the second. Bible study is at 6:30 each Wednesday night.

Lutheran Church of the Messiah The Festival of the Holy Trinity will be celebrated at 9 a.m. at the Lutheran Church of the Messiah (LCMS), 301 Cain Ridge Road. Sunday school for all ages begins at 10:30. Visit www.lutheranchur-

chofthemessiah.org, or call 601-636-1894.

Mercy Seat Baptist Services at Mercy Seat Baptist Church, 5 Dos Casas Lane, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school, led by Grace Brown. Friends and Family Day is from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. Communion services are at 11 a.m. each third and fourth Sunday. Covenant is shared during the third Sunday services. Choir practice, led by Mattie Lacey, begins at 6:30 p.m. each Thursday before the third and fourth Sunday. Musicians are Shirley ColemanHarris and Charlie Gross. Dinners will be sold from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday and June 5 from the kitchen of Lillie Flagg at 1323 South St. Pre-orders are now being accepted. Delivery is available for orders of three or more.The Rev. Rudy Smith is pastor.

Mount Alban M.B. Services at Mount Alban M.B. Church, 2385 Mount

• Mount Zion M.B. No. 4 — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Gregory Mayfield, guest speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; 122 Union Ave. • Pleasant Valley — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. David Brown, evangelist; the Rev. E.E. Gibbs, pastor; 2585 N. Washington St. • Zion Travelers M.B. — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Alfred E. Lassiter Jr., pastor; 1701 Poplar St.

FRIDAY • Cedar Grove M.B. — 7 p.m., movie night; “Saving God!”; free; 3300 Grange Hall Road. • St. James No. 1 — 6 p.m., Christian Evolution; minister Farrah Nicole Martin, speaker; Mount Zion No. 1 youth choir and the Mighty Train of Gospel; 400 Adams St. • Holly Grove M.B. — 7 p.m., prayer meeting; James Archer, speaker; R.L. Miller, pastor; 746 Johnson St. • Mount Zion M.B. No. 4 — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Gregory Mayfield, guest speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; refreshments served; 122 Union Ave. • Pleasant Valley — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. David Brown, evangelist; the Rev. E.E. Gibbs, pastor; 2585 N. Washington St. • Zion Travelers M.B. — 7 p.m., revival; the Rev. Alfred E. Lassiter Jr., pastor; 1701 Poplar St.

JUNE 5 • Hawkins United Methodist — 7 a.m., garage sale for Mexico mission trip; 3736 Halls Ferry Road. • King David M.B. No. 2 — 5:30 p.m., choir program; church choir, groups, soloists invited; Doris L. Clavelle 601-638-8784; Johnny L. Williams, pastor; 1224 Bowmar Ave.

JUNE 6 • New Mount Pilgrim M.B. — 3 p.m., Family and Friends Day; Henry J. Williams, pastor; 501 Poplar St.

JUNE 7 • Mount Zion M.B. — 7 p.m., revival, the Rev. Luster Lacey, speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; Eagle Lake community.

JUNE 8 • Mount Zion M.B. — 7 p.m., revival, the Rev. Luster Lacey, speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; Eagle Lake community.

JUNE 9 • King Solomon Baptist — 6 p.m., youth revival; Tammie and Tyrone Johnson, Diane and Charles Vessel, Tyrone and Gloria Polk, speakers; 1401 Farmer St. • Mount Zion M.B. — 7 p.m., revival, the Rev. Luster Lacey, speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; Eagle Lake community.

JUNE 10 • King Solomon Baptist — 6 p.m., youth revival; Tammie and Tyrone Johnson, Diane and Charles Vessel, Tyrone and Gloria Polk, speakers; 1401 Farmer St. • Mount Zion M.B. — 7 p.m., revival, the Rev. Luster Lacey, speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; Eagle Lake community.

JUNE 11 • King Solomon Baptist — 6 p.m., youth revival; Tammie and Tyrone Johnson, Diane and Charles Vessel, Tyrone and Gloria Polk, speakers; 1401 Farmer St. • Mount Zion M.B. — 7 p.m., revival, the Rev. Luster Lacey, speaker; the Rev. Henry Mayfield, pastor; Eagle Lake community.

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL JUNE 7-11 • King Solomon Baptist — 9 a.m.-noon; 1401 Farmer St. • Northside Baptist — 6- 8:30 p.m.; 4820 N. Washington St.

JUNE 21-25 • First Baptist — 8:30 a.m.-noon; 1607 Cherry St. Alban Road, begin at 9 a.m. with Sunday school led by Leonard Knight, deacon and superintendent. Worship with Communion is each first Sunday; praise and worship are each second Sunday; youth service is each fifth Sunday; all start at 11. Praise and worship are at 10 a.m. each third Sunday. On Wednesday, prayer/ Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. Choir rehearsal begins at 6 p.m. Thursday. Women of Faith Ministry is at 10 a.m. each second Saturday. The Rev. Henry Lee Taylor Jr. is pastor.

Mount Calvary Baptist Services at Mount Calvary Baptist Church, 1350 East Ave., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, directed by Al Evans, superintendent. Worship is at 11 with Mincer Minor, pastor, delivering the message. Communion is each second and third Sunday. Services are at 8 a.m. each fifth Sunday. Children’s ministry for ages 1-7 begins at 9:30 a.m. in the annex each Sunday. Brotherhood meets

at 6 p.m. each first Tuesday. Senior choir rehearses at 6 each Thursday. Ushers meet at 6 each Tuesday before the second Sunday. Wednesday’s youth Bible study and intercessory prayer begin at 6 p.m., followed by adult Bible study at 7. Male chorus rehearses at 6 p.m. each Thursday before the fifth Sunday. Junior choir rehearses from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. each Saturday before the first and third Sunday. The trustee board meets at 9 a.m. and deacons at 11 a.m. each Saturday before the second Sunday. For transportation call 601-636-4999.

Mount Carmel M.B. Services at Mount Carmel M.B. Church, 2729 Alma St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Keafur Grimes. Worship and Communion are each first Sunday; Sunday school enhancement each second Sunday; worship and testimony service each third Sunday; and youth services each fourth and fifth Sunday. All are at 11 a.m.

Wednesday’s Bible study/ prayer service is at 6:30 p.m. Male choir rehearsal begins at 7 p.m. each Friday before the third Sunday. Senior choir rehearsal is at 4 p.m. each Saturday before the first Sunday. Youth choir rehearsal is at 1 p.m. each fourth Saturday. Mission Society meets at 3 p.m. each second Monday at the church and at 2 p.m. each fourth Saturday at Carmel Manor on Bowman Street. Dr. Franklin L. Lassiter is pastor.

Mount Carmel Services at Mount Carmel Ministries, 2015 Grove St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school and new members training. Worship begins at 11, with Communion each first Sunday. Musicians rehearse at 5 p.m. Monday. Praise and worship choir rehearses at 5 p.m. Wednesday. Youth choir rehearses at noon Saturdays before the first and third Sunday. Bible study is at 7 p.m. Wednesday. On Thursdays, men’s fellowship is at 7 p.m. The Ultimate Slumber Party is from 7 p.m. June 11 until 8 a.m. June 12. Bring pillows, blankets and pajamas. Youths 10 and older and young adults are invited. For transportation, call 601638-9015.

Mount Hebron M.B. Services at Mount Hebron M.B. Church, Bovina, are at 11:30 a.m. each first Sunday and include Communion. Willie J. White is pastor.

Mount Olive Baptist Services at Mount Olive Baptist Church of Villa Nova, Oak Ridge community, begin at 8:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10. Worship with Communion is each third Sunday. Bible study is at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday. The Rev. Richard Hopkins is pastor.

Mount Pilgrim Services at Mount Pilgrim, Freetown, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school. First Sunday services begin at 11 a.m. and are led by Gracie Daniels, evangelist. Communion is each second Sunday and worship is each fifth Sunday; both begin at 11 a.m. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. The Rev. Joseph L. Brown is pastor.

Mount Zion M.B. No. 1 Services at Mount Zion M.B. No. 1, 920 Fifth North St., begin at 8:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:30. Holy Communion is each first Sunday. Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, followed by Bible study, led by Larry Brown, pastor. For transportation, call 601-638-1892 or 601-619-4978.

Mount Zion M.B. No. 4 Services at Mount Zion M.B. No. 4, 122 Union Ave., begin at 9 a.m. each second, third and fifth Sunday with Sunday school. Worship is at 9 a.m. each first and fourth Sunday. Choir practice begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday before the first and fourth Sunday. The Rev. Henry Mayfield Sr. is pastor.

Narrow Way M.B. Services at Narrow Way M.B. Church, 400 Adams St., begin at 11 a.m. each first and third Sunday. Communion is each first Sunday. The Rev. James E. Williams is pastor. Call 601-218-8061.

New Beginning Services at New Beginning Full Deliverance Ministries, 1890 S. Frontage Road, Suite 2, begin at 9:15 a.m. with Sunday school, followed at 10:15 with worship. Christian Education class begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Wednesday Bible class begins at 6 p.m. Continued on page B4.


B4

Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

church events Continued from page B3. Michelle King is pastor. Call 601-301-0586.

New Dimension World Services at New Dimension World, 2011 Washington St., begin at 11 a.m. Sunday. Morning services are broadcast on www.NDWorld.org. Family Prayer is at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday, followed by Tuesday Night Touch, at 7. Bishop George Tyler Straughter is founder and senior pastor. Call 601-4560215.

New Mount Elem M.B. Services at New Mount Elem M.B. Church, 3014 Wisconsin Ave., begin at 8 a.m. with praise and worship by the youth choir. The Rev. Earl Cosey Jr. will present the sermon. Sunday school will follow. On Tuesday, prayer/Bible class begins at 6:30 p.m. Dr. Leonard Walker is pastor.

New Mount Pilgrim Services at New Mount Pilgrim M.B. Church, 501 N. Poplar St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Leroy Gillium, deacon and assistant superintendent. At 11 a.m. are second Sunday services, Covenant after Sunday school each third Sunday and fourth Sunday Communion. Christian education class, Life Changing for Today’s Christian, is at 6:30 p.m. Monday. Minister Jacqueline Griffin is instructor. Prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. Tuesday, followed by a Bible study led by the Rev. Virdell Lewis. Senior choir practice led by Jean Thomas is at 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday before the second, third and fourth Sunday. The usher board meets at 11 a.m. each first Saturday. Recordings of services are available from Lee Griffin, deacon, or by calling 601-6366386. The Rev. Henry J. Williams is pastor.

New Rock of Ages M.B. Services at New Rock of Ages M.B. Church, 2944 Valley St., begin at 11 a.m. with the children’s anniversary being observed. Ernestine Boone is superintendent. Mission Society meeting is at 4 p.m. and Bible study is at 5 each Monday after the third Sunday. Usher meeting is at 1:30 p.m. and choir rehearsal is at 2:30 each third Saturday. Dr. Michael R. Reed Sr. is pastor.

Northside Baptist Services at Northside Baptist Church, 4820 N. Washington St., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by children’s church and worship with the Lord’s Supper being observed, led by Dr. Frank Lescallette, pastor, at 11. Dinner on the grounds, followed by fifth-Sunday singing, begins after the morning service. A nursery is provided for all services Wednesday activities begin at 6:30 p.m. with mission study, men’s Bible study and GAs, followed by Bible study/ prayer at 7. Preregister June 5 from 2 to 5 p.m. for vacation Bible school.

Oak Chapel M.B. Services at Oak Chapel M.B. Church, Bovina Community, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school, under the direction of Charles Winston, deacon and superintendent. Worship is at 11 each first, third and fifth Sunday. Holy Communion is each third Sunday. Youth church is each fifth Sunday. Choir rehearsal is at 11 a.m. Saturday before the fifth Sunday and at 6 p.m. Wednesday before the first and third Sunday. Dellie C. Robinson is pastor.

Oakland Baptist Services at Oakland Baptist Church, 2959 Oak Ridge

Road, begin at 9:30 a.m. with a morning devotional led by Ray Wade. Sunday school is at 9:45. Worship and children’s church begin at 10:45. Special music and messages of the day will be delivered by Justin Rhodes, pastor. Music is led by Lanny McCann. The Beth Moore Bible study continues at 5 p.m. Evening worship is at 6. Ladies night out is Tuesday at Jacques’. On Wednesday, youths will meet at 6:15 p.m. Awana closing ceremony and prayer service is at 7. A nursery is provided.

Open Door Bible Services at Open Door Bible Church, 4866 Mount Alban Road, begin at 10:15 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11:15. Youth and adult classes are offered. Call 601-638-2536.

Pleasant Valley M.B. Services at Pleasant Valley M.B. Church, 260 Mississippi 27, begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. A nursery is provided for children as old as 4 on Sunday mornings. On Tuesday, Covenant Nursing Home Ministry is at 6 p.m. Bible Institute is at 7. The Rev. Joe Harris is pastor.

Port Gibson U.M.C. Sunday is the First Sunday after Pentecost at Port Gibson United Methodist Church, 901 Church St. Sunday school begins at 10 a.m. and worship at 11. The Rev. David Harrison will bring the message. Professional counseling is offered through Grace Christian Counseling Center, 907 Church St., or by calling 601437-5046.

Porters Chapel U.M.C. Services at Porters Chapel United Methodist Church, 200 Porters Chapel Road, begin at 8:30 a.m. with early worship. The Good News Discussion Group meets at 9:45, and Sunday school at 10. Traditional worship service is at 11, with the Rev. D.R. Ragsdale delivering the sermon. Ken Warren will lead the singing. A nursery is provided for children as old as 5. Boy Scouts will meet at 7 p.m. Monday; Cursillo will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; and Sisters by Choice will meet at 6 p.m. Thursday. Call 601-636-2966.

Redbone U.M.C. Sunday school at Redbone United Methodist Church, Redbone Road, begins at 10 a.m. Worship is at 11. The program will be called A Visit to the Galleries. A fellowship dinner will follow. The Rev. Thomas M. Shreve is pastor.

Redwood U.M.C. Memorial Day services at Redwood United Methodist Church, 101 Redwood Road, across from Redwood Elementary, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11, with the Rev. Barbara Hite bringing the sermon and veterans being recognized. Colt Lee and Logan Sanderford will be acolytes. Christopher and Adam Lee will be ushers. A nursery is provided.Adult choir practice is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Call 601-218-6255.

Refuge Services at Refuge Church, 6202 Indiana Ave., begin at 10:45 a.m. with Bethany Winkler, music pastor, leading praise and worship. Tony Winkler, senior pastor, will bring the morning message. Kidz Konstruction for ages 4-9 begins at 10:45. Evening services are canceled. Wednesday Family Night begins at 7 in the Family Life Center. The adults will study Exodus. A nursery is available for children as old as 4. Call 601-638-4439.

Ridgeway Baptist Services at Ridgeway Baptist Church, 4684 Redwood Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by children’s church and worship at 11. Special music is by Liz Dobbins. Evening worship begins at 6, the Rev. Gene Jacks, pastor, will deliver both messages of the day. Group prayer meets at 10 a.m. on Tuesday. Bible study/ prayer meeting is at 7 p.m. on Wednesday.

St. Alban’s Episcopal Services for Trinity Sunday at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 5930 Warriors Trail, Bovina, begin at 8:30 a.m. with Holy Eucharist, Rite I. Choir practice, led by organist and choirmaster Joan Leese, is at 9:45, followed by Christian Education at 10. Holy Eucharist, Rite II, is at 11. The Rev. Billie Abraham, rector, will celebrate at both services. Child care is provided during the 11 a.m. service. Coffee and fellowship will follow both services. Healing Service and Eucharist are at 6 p.m. Wednesdays. Call 601-636-6687.

St. George Orthodox Services at St. George Antiochian Orthodox Christian Church, 2709 Washington St., consist of: The Feast of All Saints; The Commemoration of Isaac; Martyrs Natalios and Barlaam of Caesarea in Cappadocia; Martyrs Eusebios and Christina, Great Vespers, at 5:30 tonight; Matins at 9:30 a.m. Sunday; and the Divine Liturgy followed by the Knelling Prayers of Pentecost at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The Very Rev. John W. Morris is pastor.

St. James M.B. No. 1 Services at St. James M.B. Church No. 1, 400 Adams St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school directed by Robert Hubbard, superintendent, and Walter Bell, assistant superintendent. Worship is at 11 a.m. each second and fourth Sunday. Communion is each second Sunday. Bible study is at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Willie J. White is pastor.

the message and serve at the Eucharist. Coffee and snacks are available before and after the service in the parish hall.

St. Paul Catholic St. Paul Catholic Church, 713 Crawford St., will celebrate Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity. Sacrament of Reconciliation and Rosary are at 5 p.m. each Saturday. Vigil Mass is at 5:30 tonight, and Sunday Mass is at 10:30 a.m. Mass is at 7 a.m. Tuesday-Friday. First Friday Mass and Anointing of the Sick is at 7 a.m., followed by First Friday Adoration until 8 p.m. in the chapel. First Saturday Fatima Rosary will be at 9 a.m. June 5 in the chapel.

Shady Grove Services at Shady Grove Baptist Church, 61 Shady Grove Circle, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11 each first and fourth Sunday. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Adult choir rehearsal begins at 11 a.m. Saturday before the first and fourth Sunday. Youth choir rehearsal begins at noon Saturday before the first Sunday. Richard Johnson is pastor.

Shiloh Baptist Sunday services at Shiloh Baptist Church, 926 Meadow St., begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. George Kennedy Sr. is superintendent. Communion is at 11 a.m. each third Sunday. Covenant is each second Sunday. Choir rehearsal is at 6 p.m. each Tuesday after the second Sunday. The Rev. Willie Jones is pastor.

Shiloh Primitive Services at Shiloh Primitive Baptist Church, Warriors Trail, begin at 10:30 a.m. with singing, prayers and a sermon. Dr. Reid Bishop will begin the service, followed by Elder Charles Holden, pastor, speaking.

Southside Baptist

Services at St. Mark Free Will Baptist Church, 2606 Hannah St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Oscar Denton is superintendent. Second Sunday worship begins at 11 a.m. Fourth-Sunday Communion is at 11 a.m. Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Choir rehearsal is at 10 a.m. each third and fourth Wednesday. Elder Jeffrey D. MaGee is pastor.

Services at Southside Baptist Church, 95 Baptist Drive, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11 with Greg Clemts, pastor, speaking. Andrew Clemts, interim song director, and Jim Bowman, instrumentalist, will lead the music. Sunday evening adult choir practice is at 4. Bible study is at 5, followed by worship at 6 with Chronicle in concert. Midweek prayer services are at 10 a.m. Wednesday, and Bible study/prayer services are at 7 p.m. Call 601631-0047.

St. Mary’s Catholic

Standfield New Life

St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 1512 Main St., will celebrate the Most Holy Trinity at 9 a.m. Sunday. The Rev. Francis Damoah, SVD, will celebrate his first Mass on Sunday, followed by a reception. He served as a lay brother for eight years at St. Mary’s. Mass is at 6:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday in the parish chapel. Devotion to the Blessed Mother is at 7 p.m. each Monday in the chapel. Choir rehearsal is at 6 p.m. each Wednesday. The Rosary is recited at 8:30 a.m. each Sunday before Mass. The Sacrament of Penance is at 8:45 a.m. each Sunday, or by appointment. Youth Mass is each fourth Sunday. CCD classes and CYO are canceled Sunday, they will resume in September. The Rev. Malcolm O’Leary SVD is pastor. Call 601-6360115.

Services at Standfield New Life Christian Church, 1404 Lane St., begin at 10 each Sunday morning. Bible study is at 6 p.m. each Wednesday. Outreach is Mondays and Fridays. Men and women ministries meet each Monday and Tuesday after the fourth Sunday. Angel Food orders are taken monthly; call 601-6385380.

St. Mark Free Will

St. Mary’s Episcopal St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 900 First North St., will observe the First Sunday after Pentecost, Trinity Sunday, with Holy Communion, Rite II, at 10:30 a.m. The Rev. Denny Allman will bring

Travelers Rest Baptist Services at Travelers Rest Baptist Church, 718 Bowmar Ave., begin at 9 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:30. Baptism is at 10 each first Sunday. A nursery is available, as is children’s church. Music will be by United Voices of Worship. The deacons ministry meets at 7:30 p.m. each second Monday. The missionary ministry meets at 10 a.m. each first and third Saturday. The ushers and wellness ministries meet after services each third Sunday. Men of Purpose rehearses at 6:30 p.m. each first and third Monday. Youth tutorial meets at 7 each Tuesday night. Boy Scouts meets at 6:30 p.m. each second and

fourth Tuesday. Bible study/prayer is at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Midweek Bible study/prayer begins at 10 a.m. Wednesday. Perfect Praise choir rehearsal is at 6 p.m. each fourth Wednesday. Inspirational choir rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m. each second Wednesday. United Voices of Worship rehearsal is at 7 p.m. each Wednesday. Call 601-636-3712. Thomas E. Bernard is pastor.

Trinity Baptist Sunday services at Trinity Baptist Church, 3365 Porters Chapel Road, begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:45. Turing Point begins at 4:45 p.m., followed at 5 with worship.The Gathering begins at 3 p.m. Wednesday. The Gathering and age-graded studies begin at 6, and choir rehearsal is at 6:45. The Rev. Ron Burch is pastor. Tim Goodson is minister of music and youths.

Triumph Services at Triumph Church, 136 Honeysuckle Lane, begin with prayer at 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Worship is at 8:30 and 10:30 with Mike Fields, pastor, bringing the message. Kingdom Kids Church and a teen class are available. A nursery is provided for children as old as 3. Corporate prayer is at 6 a.m. Tuesday and at 6 p.m. Saturday. Wednesday services begin at 6 p.m. and include Elevate Your Life classes, 24/7 youth ministries and Kingdom Kids church. Men’s Fraternity begins at 8 a.m. each first Saturday.

Triumphant Baptist Services at Triumphant Baptist Church, 124 Pittman Road, begin at 8:30 a.m. with New Sunday Connection/ New Members Transition Classes at the Kings Empowerment Center. Partners in Prayer begins at 9:30 a.m. in the sanctuary, followed by worship at 10. Women’s ministry is at 5:30 p.m. Monday in the administration building. Activities at the Kings Empowerment Center include aerobics at 6 p.m. Monday and Thursday, and Bible study at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Mass choir rehearsal is at 7 p.m. Thursday at the church. Elders’ Bible study is at noon Friday in the administration building. For transportation, call 601218-1319. The Rev. Dexter Jones is pastor.

WC Ministers Alliance Warren County Ministers Alliance meets at 9:30 a.m. each Saturday at the E.D. Straughter Building on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. The aim is to benefit ministers and discuss Sunday school lessons. Ministers and community members are invited. Robert L. Miller is moderator.

Warrenton Independent Services at Warrenton Independent Baptist Church, 829 Belva Drive, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11 with Marvin E. Curtis Jr., pastor, preaching. P.J. Griffing will lead the singing. Junior church is during worship and is led by Scott Audirsch, associate youth pastor. A hamburger and hot dog lunch will follow the service. All proceeds benefit the youth fund. Evening worship begins at 6 with popcorn, preaching and singing. Wednesday prayer meeting begins at 7 p.m.

Wayside Baptist Services at Wayside Baptist Church, 6151 Jeff Davis Road, begin with Sunday school at 9:45 a.m., followed by worship at 11 with Jason Wooley, pastor, leading. Evening worship begins at 6. Wednesday prayer meeting/Bible study begins at 7 p.m. A nursery is provided Sunday mornings.

Westminster Services at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 3601 Halls Ferry Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school and Adult I, II and III classes, taught by Scott Reiber, pastor, and Jeff Brannen. Worship is at 11 with Reiber preaching. Elder Bob Walker will assist. Evening worship begins at 6 with Reiber preaching. Jim Harrison will assist. Mary Claire Allison is choir director. Dr. Gwen Reiber is organist. Well Spring Women’s Ministry will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Prayer begins at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday.

Wilderness Baptist Services at Wilderness Baptist Church, 5415 Gibson Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by Worship at 11 with a message by Bob Conrad, pastor. Evening service begins at 5 with monthly praise and testimony and birthday/anniversary fellowship. On Wednesday, old-time prayer begins at 6:30 p.m., followed by monthly business meeting.

Woodlawn Baptist Services at Woodlawn Baptist Church, 2310 Culkin Road, begin at 9:40 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. The Rev. Kent Campbell is pastor. The Rev. Mike Barber is minister of music. Devin Rost is minister of students. A nursery is provided for children as old as 3. Children’s church is available for ages 4 through second grade, following Sunday school. Morning services are at 11 on WBBV-101.3-FM or www.woodlawnbc.com. Evening service and youth Bible study begin at 6. On Wednesday, early service begins at 10 a.m. Youth Underground Connections and worship are at 6. The sanctuary choir will practice at 7. Call 601-636-5320.

Word of Faith Services at Word of Faith Christian Center, 3525 Wisconsin Ave., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:30. Corporate prayer is at 10:15 a.m. Sunday and at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday. Midweek services and Glorify God Youth Ministry begin at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Children’s church and a nursery are provided. The Rev. Reginald L. Walker is pastor. Bishop Keith A. Butler is founder. Call 601-638-2500.

Worship Christian Center Services at Worship Christian Center, 3735 Fisher Ferry Road, begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed at 11 with worship. Money Matter classes are at 6 p.m. Wednesdays, and Bible study is at 6:30. P.A.U.L. summer enrichment program begins at 5 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays. Praise practice begins at 9 a.m. Saturdays. G2R and 4-H youth activities are at 10 a.m. Saturdays. Malcolm Goodman is pastor.

Zion Traveler M.B. Services at Zion Traveler M.B. Church, 1701 Poplar St., begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., under the direction of Virginia Houston, minister and superintendent. Elbert Cox Jr., minister and deacon, is assistant superintendent. The following activities begin at 11 a.m. — Communion each first Sunday; worship each second and fourth Sunday; women’s ministry each third Sunday; and youth ministry each fifth Sunday. Choir practice is on Monday after the second and fourth Sunday and Thursday after the first and third Sunday at 6 p.m. On Tuesday, intercessory prayer is at 6 p.m. Prayer meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible study is at 6. Sunday school lesson planning meeting is Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Alfred E. Lassiter Jr. is pastor.


THE VICKSBURG POST

SPORTS saturDAY, may 29, 2010 • SE C TI O N c PUZZLES C5 | CLASSIFIEDS C6

Steve Wilson, sports editor | E-mail: sports@vicksburgpost.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 142

Twice is nice Still standing Ole Miss, Southern Miss advance at conference tournaments/C3

SCHEDULE

SUMMER BASEBALL

Warren Central hosts Pearl Tuesday, 5 p.m.

YOUTH SWIMMING

Stamm Family Invitational June 4-6, at City Pool

ON TV

7:30 p.m. TNT - The Los Angeles Lakers can finish off the Phoenix Suns and set up yet another NBA Finals matchup between themselves and the Boston Celtics by winning Game 6 of the Western Conference finals tonight.

WHO’S HOT

RYNO MARTIN-NEZ

St. Aloysius first baseman went 3-for3 with four RBIs and four runs scored in Friday’s 18-1 rout of Myrtle in the Class 1A championship game.

SIDELINES

Celtics close out Magic in six games

BOSTON (AP) — The NBA’s most-decorated team avoided the biggest playoff collapse in league history and earned a chance to hang an unprecedented 18th championship banner from the rafters. Paul Pierce had 31 points and 13 rebounds, and little-used backup Nate Robinson gave the Celtics a boost with 13 secondquarter points as Boston beat the Orlando Magic 9684 on Friday night, earning a chance to play for a second NBA title in three years. The finals will begin Thursday in either Los Angeles or Phoenix. The Lakers lead the Western Conference finals 3-2, and a victory over the Suns in Game 6 tonight would set up the cross-coast rivals for a rematch of the 2008 finals — and 10 other championship series from 1959-87. “We got back to moving the ball, playing good defense, not allowing them to shoot the 3-point shot. That was the key,” Pierce said. Dwight Howard had 28 points and 12 rebounds as the Magic failed to get back to the finals.

LOTTERY

Due to technical difficulties at the Louisiana Lottery office, Friday’s numbers were not available. They will appear in Sunday’s editions. Weekly results: C2

meredith spencer•The Vicksburg Post

St. Aloysius players dogpile in the middle of the field at Trustmark Park after beating Myrtle for the Class 1A championship Friday.

St. Al crushes Myrtle 18-1, repeats as Class 1A champs By Ernest Bowker ebowker@vicksburgpost.com PEARL — Two pitches into Friday’s Class 1A championship game, the tone was set for St. Aloysius. Pierson Waring drove a 1-0 pitch into the gap in rightcenter field. He rounded first as Myrtle’s Larry Parks got to the ball and, ignoring a stop sign from coach Chris Buse, hustled toward second for a leadoff double. Waring scored moments later on a single by Blake Haygood and, just like that, the Flashes were off and running with a clear message. This was their day. Their championship. No one was going to take it from them. The Flashes pummeled

Myrtle 18-1 in Game 3 of the Class 1A championship series at Trustmark Park to earn their second consecutive state title. The victory brought a triumphant close to a season in which St. Al overcame injuries to two key players, a late-season losing streak and two elimination games in the playoffs to finish with a 22-8 record. “It’s unbelievable. I can’t describe it,” St. Al coach Clint Wilkerson said. “This year was such a grind. We had to battle to get back here. To do it again is unbelievable, but to do it the way we did is phenomenal.”

“We had to battle to get back here. To do it again is unbelievable, but to do it the way we did is phenomenal.”

ings,” said St. Al pitcher Stephen Evans, who earned the win in Game 3 and allowed one run in 12 innings during Clint Wilkerson the series. “With St. Al Coach all the stuff we’ve been through, it’s a This season’s celebradream come true.” tion at Trustmark lasted A 10 a.m. start limited the nearly as long as last year’s. crowd to a few hundred rauAbout 45 minutes after the cous fans, nearly all of them game ended and the stream supporting St. Al, but the of snapshots was startFlashes gave them plenty to ing to slow, a grounds crew cheer about. member chased the Flashes Theyscored two more runs off the field with a lawnafter Haygood’s RBI single in mower as he began cutting the first inning, then erupted grass. Last May, the team cel- for 13 runs in the second ebrated long enough for the to start the party early. St. outfield sprinklers to kick on. Al sent 18 men to the plate “It’s one of the best feelwhile collecting six hits, five

walks and two hit batsmen. Ryno Martin-Nez had a pair of two-run singles in the second inning and finished the game 3-for-3 with four RBIs and four runs scored. Regan Nosser struck out swinging for the second out, then redeemed himself later in the inning with the second of his three RBI singles. Every St. Al batter came to the plate twice and all of them reached base at least once. By the time it was over, St. Al had a 16-1 lead. “They woke up a demon after that loss. They put a spark in us,” Martin-Nez said, referring to Myrtle’s 5-4 victory in Game 2 on Wednesday. See St. Al, Page C3.

Flashes take command with 13-run outburst By Jeff Byrd jbyrd@vicksburgpost.com PEARL — It was a half inning that seemed as if it would never end. It included 13 runs, 18 batters and 59 pitches. When it finally did end, more than 40 minutes after it started, St. Aloysius had put a padlock on its second straight Class 1A championship. The Flashes took a 16-1 lead with the huge rally and went on to beat Myrtle 18-1 Friday in Game 3 of the Class 1A finals at Trustmark Park. St. Al senior Ryno MartinNez capped his career with a pair of two-run singles in the inning. The first came off Hawks’ starter Beau Cummings and the last against reliever Adam Baker. “I don’t think I’ve done that in a game before,” Martin-Nez said. “I was glad to show a little of the old ‘Ryno’ there.” Cummings, Myrtle’s ace, didn’t have it Friday. He

was sharp in a Game 1 loss but lasted just 1 2/3 innings in Game 3. He gave up 11 runs, five hits, four walks and hit three batters in his short stint. Cummings threw 39 pitches in the top of the second and 59 total. As the second inning progressed, Cummings became visibly upset on the mound. “He got angry and then frustrated,’ Martin-Nez said. The Flashes struck for three runs in the first inning off Cummings. Then a simple ground ball to third started his downfall. Third baseman Justin Pickens had been Myrtle’s most reliable infielder in the championship series with six errorless chances, including a double play in the first inning of Game 3. But his throw on Brendan Beesley’s roller went too high for first baseman Jimel Judon. Judon tagged Beesley on top of the helmet, but Beesley See Rally, Page C3.

meredith spencer•The Vicksburg Post

St. Aloysius’ Luke Burnett celebrates while scoring a run in the Class 1A championship game against Myrtle Friday at Trustmark Park.


C2

Saturday, May 29, 2010

on tv

SCOREBOARD

AUTO RACING 6 a.m. Speed - Formula One, qualifying for Turkish Grand Prix 8:30 a.m. Speed - NASCAR, Nationwide Series, qualifying for Tech-Net Auto Service 300 10:30 a.m. Speed - NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Coca-Cola 600 11:30 a.m. Speed - NASCAR, Sprint Cup, final practice for Coca-Cola 600 1:30 p.m. ABC - NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Tech-Net 300 COLLEGE SOFTBALL Noon ESPN - NCAA Division I, super regionals, California at Georgia 1:30 p.m. ESPN - NCAA Division I, super regionals, Oregon at Missouri 4 p.m. ESPN - NCAA Division I, super regionals, Hawaii at Alabama 6:30 p.m. ESPN - NCAA Division I, super regionals, Arizona St. at Florida 8 p.m. ESPN2 - NCAA Division I, super regionals, La.-Lafayette at UCLA GOLF 9 a.m. TGC - European PGA Tour, Madrid Masters Noon TGC - PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza Invitational 2 p.m. CBS - PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza Invitational 2 p.m. NBC - PGA of America, Senior PGA Championship MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 3 p.m. Fox - St. Louis at Chicago Cubs COLLEGE BASEBALL 11 a.m. FSN - ACC Tournament, Virginia vs. Miami 3 p.m. FSN - ACC Tournament, Clemson vs. Georgia Tech 7 p.m. FSN - ACC Tournament, Virginia Tech vs. N.C. State MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE 3 p.m. ESPN2 - NCAA Division I semifinal, Notre Dame vs. Cornell 6:30 p.m. ESPN2 - NCAA Division I semifinal, Duke vs. Virginia NBA PLAYOFFS 7:30 p.m. TNT - L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, Game 6 NHL PLAYOFFS 7 p.m. NBC - Philadelphia at Chicago, Game 1 SOCCER 12:30 p.m. ESPN2 - Men’s national teams, U.S. vs. Turkey TENNIS 11 a.m. NBC - French Open (tape)

mlb

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

sidelines

from staff & AP reports

NFL Seahawks waive White just weeks after trade SEATTLE — The Seahawks unexpectedly waived running back LenDale White on Friday just weeks after the splashy draft-day trade that brought him to Seattle from Tennessee. “It became apparent at this time that LenDale was not ready to be a member of the Seattle Seahawks,” general manager John Schneider said. He did not elaborate. NFL Network, citing unnamed sources, reported Friday that White was “likely” facing a four-game suspension for violating the NFL’s drug policy. “We have not announced any such suspension,” league spokesman Greg Aiello told The Associated Press on Friday night. “I have no other information on it.” The list of players enrolled in the league’s substance-abuse program for a prior incident, and therefore subject to discipline, is confidential. Agent Drew Rosenhaus did not immediately return phone and e-mail messages left by the AP.

flashback

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS May 29 1922 — The Supreme Court rules organized baseball is primarily a sport and not a business and therefore not subject to antitrust laws and interstate commerce regulations. 1977 — A.J. Foyt becomes the first driver to win four Indianapolis 500 races and Janet Guthrie becomes the first woman in the race. Guthrie is forced to drop out after 27 laps with mechanical problems. 1998 — Eighteen-year-old Marat Safin, ranked 116th in the world and playing in his first Grand Slam tournament, beats defending champion Gustavo Kuerten, 3-6, 7-6 (7-5), 3-6, 6-1, 6-4 in the second round of the French Open. 2002 — Roger Clemens records the 100th double-digit strikeout game of his career, fanning 11 in seven innings against Chicago. Only Nolan Ryan (215) and Randy Johnson (175) have more games with 10 or more strikeouts.

SEC Tournament

American League East Division

W Tampa Bay....................33 New York.......................29 Toronto..........................28 Boston...........................27 Baltimore.......................15

L 16 19 22 23 34

Central Division

W Minnesota......................28 Detroit............................25 Chicago.........................21 Kansas City...................21 Cleveland.......................17

L 20 22 27 28 29

Pct .673 .604 .560 .540 .306

GB — 3 1/2 5 1/2 6 1/2 18

Pct .583 .532 .438 .429 .370

GB — 2 1/2 7 7 1/2 10

West Division

W L Pct GB Texas.............................26 22 .542 — Oakland.........................26 23 .531 1/2 Los Angeles..................23 26 .469 3 1/2 Seattle...........................18 28 .391 7 Friday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 8, Cleveland 2 Oakland 5, Detroit 4 Toronto 5, Baltimore 0 Chicago White Sox 4, Tampa Bay 2 Kansas City 12, Boston 5 Minnesota 2, Texas 1 Seattle at L.A. Angels, (n) Today’s Games Cleveland (D.Huff 2-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3), 12:05 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at Toronto (Cecil 4-2), 12:07 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-4) at L.A. Angels (Jer. Weaver 4-2), 3:05 p.m. Texas (C.Wilson 3-2) at Minnesota (Pavano 4-5), 3:10 p.m. Oakland (Bre.Anderson 1-1) at Detroit (Porcello 4-4), 6:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Danks 4-3) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-4), 6:10 p.m. Kansas City (Greinke 1-5) at Boston (Buchholz 6-3), 6:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, 12:05 p.m. Oakland at Detroit, 12:05 p.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 12:07 p.m. Kansas City at Boston, 12:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, 12:40 p.m. Seattle at L.A. Angels, 2:35 p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 7:05 p.m. ———

National League East Division

W Philadelphia...................27 Atlanta...........................25 New York.......................25 Washington....................24 Florida............................24

L 20 22 24 24 25

Central Division

W Cincinnati.......................29 St. Louis........................28 Chicago.........................23 Milwaukee......................20 Pittsburgh......................20 Houston.........................16

L 20 21 26 28 28 32

Pct .574 .532 .510 .500 .490

GB — 2 3 3 1/2 4

Pct GB .592 — .571 1 .469 6 .417 8 1/2 .417 8 1/2 .333 12 1/2

West Division

W L Pct GB San Diego.....................28 19 .596 — Los Angeles..................26 21 .553 2 Colorado........................25 22 .532 3 San Francisco...............24 22 .522 3 1/2 Arizona..........................20 28 .417 8 1/2 Friday’s Games St. Louis 7, Chicago Cubs 1 Cincinnati 15, Houston 6 Philadelphia 3, Florida 2 Milwaukee 2, N.Y. Mets 0 Pittsburgh at Atlanta, (n) L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, (n) Washington at San Diego, (n) Arizona at San Francisco, (n) Today’s Games St. Louis (Ottavino 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Silva 6-0), 3:10 p.m. Houston (Moehler 0-1) at Cincinnati (Harang 3-5), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Nieve 1-2) at Milwaukee (M.Parra 1-3), 6:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Halladay 6-3) at Florida (Jo.Johnson 5-1), 6:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Burres 2-2) at Atlanta (Medlen 1-1), 6:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-2) at Colorado (Cook 1-3), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Martin 0-0) at San Diego (Latos 4-3), 7:35 p.m. Arizona (Buckner 0-2) at San Francisco (J.Sanchez 2-4), 8:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Houston at Cincinnati, 12:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 12:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 2:10 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Washington at San Diego, 3:05 p.m.

minor league baseball Southern League North Division

W Tennessee (Cubs).........28 West Tenn (Mariners)...24 Huntsville (Brewers)......23 Carolina (Reds).............23 Chattanooga (Dodgers).20

L 20 23 25 25 28

Pct. .583 .511 .479 .479 .417

GB — 3 1/2 5 5 8

W L Pct. Jacksonville (Marlins)....30 17 .638 Montgomery (Rays).......26 21 .553 Mississippi (Braves)...24 24 .500 Mobile (Diamondbacks).24 24 .500 Birm. (White Sox)..........16 31 .340 ——— Friday’s Games Jacksonville 4, Chattanooga 3 Mississippi 8, Mobile 6 Montgomery 6, Tennessee 1 Carolina 2, West Tenn 1 Birmingham 8, Huntsville 6 Today’s Games West Tenn at Carolina, 5:15 p.m. Birmingham at Huntsville, 6 p.m. Chattanooga at Jacksonville, 6:05 p.m. Tennessee at Montgomery, 7:05 p.m. Mississippi at Mobile, 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Birmingham at Huntsville, 1 p.m. West Tenn at Carolina, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Montgomery, 2:05 p.m. Mississippi at Mobile, 6:05 p.m. Chattanooga at Jacksonville, 6:05 p.m.

GB — 4 6 1/2 6 1/2 14

South Division

college baseball Conference USA Tournament

At Houston, Texas Wednesday’s Games Southern Miss. 8, Memphis 2 Rice 11, East Carolina 3 Houston 11, Marshall 7 Thursday’s Games East Carolina 8, Southern Miss 1 Marshall 10, Memphis 7 Rice 24, Houston 3 Friday’s Games Memphis 3, East Carolina 2 Rice 18, Marshall 0 Southern Miss vs. Houston, (n) Today’s Game Southern Miss vs. Rice, 7 p.m. ———

At Hoover, Ala. Double-elimination Wednesday’s Games Alabama 7, Auburn 1 Ole Miss 3, South Carolina 0 LSU 10, Florida 6 Vanderbilt 2, Arkansas 0 Thursday’s Games Auburn 3, South Carolina 1, 12 innings, South Carolina eliminated Florida 5, Arkansas 4, Arkansas eliminated LSU 7, Vanderbilt 5 Alabama 6, Ole Miss 3 Friday’s Games Ole Miss 10, Auburn 7, 10 innings, Auburn eliminated Vanderbilt vs. Florida, (n) Today’s Games LSU vs. Ole Miss, 9:30 a.m. Alabama vs. Vanderbilt or Florida, 1 p.m. LSU vs. Ole Miss, 5 p.m., if necessary Alabama vs. Vanderbilt or Florida, 8:30 p.m., if necessary Sunday’s Game Championship game, 1 p.m.

Friday’s Scores TOURNAMENTS

Atlantic Coast Conference Third Round Florida St. 12, Boston College 2 Virginia Tech 9, Clemson 8 Georgia Tech vs. N.C. State, ppd., rain Atlantic Sun Conference Third Round ETSU 12, Fla. Gulf Coast 10 Big South Conference Coastal Carolina 15, High Point 9 Big 12 Conference Kansas St. 10, Kansas 5 Mid-American Conference Bowling Green 7, Cent. Michigan 3 Ohio Valley Conference Third Round Murray St. 10, E. Kentucky 2 Sun Belt Conference Third Round Fla. International 10, South Alabama 9 Troy 6, Middle Tennessee 5

prep baseball MHSAA championship schedule

All games at Trustmark Park May 25 St. Stanislaus 5, Amory 4 St. Aloysius 6, Myrtle 0 Sumrall 12, Water Valley 2 Richton 8, Hamilton 4 May 26 Long Beach 2, Ridgeland 1 Petal 2, Madison Central 1 Myrtle 5, St. Aloysius 4 Richton 5, Hamilton 0, Richton wins Class 2A championship May 27 Sumrall 11, Water Valley 1, Sumrall wins Class 3A championship St. Stanislaus 6, Amory 0, St. Stanislaus wins Class 4A championship Long Beach 2, Ridgeland 1, Long Beach wins Class 5A championship Madison Central 6, Petal 5 Friday St. Aloysius 18, Myrtle 1, St. Aloysius wins Class 1A championship Today Madison Central vs. Petal, 4 p.m.

ST. ALOYSIUS 18, MYRTLE 1

Game 3 St. Aloysius...........................3(13)0 20 — 18 14 0 Myrtle........................................100 00 — 1 4 4 WP-Stephen Evans (12-4). LP-Beau Cummings (8-2). 2B-Pierson Waring (SA), Brendan Beesley (SA). Multiple hits-Ryno Martin-Nez (SA) 3, Regan Nosser (SA) 3, Waring (SA) 2, Blake Haygood (SA) 2, Evans (SA) 2, Beesley (SA) 2, Jimel Judon (M) 2.

nba CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary)

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Boston 4, Orlando 2 May 16: Boston 92, Orlando 88 May 18: Boston 95, Orlando 92 May 22: Boston 94, Orlando 71 May 24: Orlando 96, Boston 92, OT May 26: Orlando 113, Boston 92 Friday: Boston 96, Orlando 84

WESTERN CONFERENCE

L.A. Lakers 3, Phoenix 2 May 17: L.A. Lakers 128, Phoenix 107 May 19: L.A. Lakers 124, Phoenix 112 May 23: Phoenix 118, L.A. Lakers 109 May 25: Phoenix 115, L.A. Lakers 106 May 27: L.A. Lakers 103, Phoenix 101 Today: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 8 p.m. ———

NBA FINALS

(Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) June 3: Boston vs. L.A. Lakers or Phoenix, 8 p.m. June 6: Boston vs. L.A. Lakers or Phoenix, 7 p.m. June 8: Boston vs. L.A. Lakers or Phoenix, 8 p.m. June 10: Boston vs. L.A. or Phoenix, 8 p.m. x-June 13: Boston vs. L.A. or Phoenix, 7 p.m. x-June 15: Boston vs. L.A. or Phoenix, 8 p.m. x-June 17: Boston vs. L.A. or Phoenix, 8 p.m. ———

CELTICS 96, MAGIC 84

ORLANDO (84) Barnes 0-0 1-2 1, Lewis 3-11 1-2 7, Howard 11-17 6-12 28, Nelson 5-14 0-0 11, Carter 6-15 4-5 17, Redick 2-7 2-2 7, Pietrus 2-3 1-2 7, J.Williams 2-4 0-0 5, Gortat 0-0 1-2 1, Bass 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 31-72 16-27 84. BOSTON (96) Pierce 9-15 9-10 31, Garnett 5-10 0-0 10, Perkins 1-4 0-0 2, Rondo 5-13 3-5 14, R.Allen 6-13 5-6 20, Davis 2-5 2-2 6, Wallace 0-5 0-0 0, T.Allen 0-0 0-0 0, Robinson 4-10 3-4 13. Totals 32-75 22-27 96. Orlando 19 23 19 23 — 84 Boston 30 25 27 14 — 96 3-Point Goals—Orlando 6-22 (Pietrus 2-3, J.Williams 1-2, Carter 1-4, Redick 1-4, Nelson 1-5, Lewis 0-4), Boston 10-22 (Pierce 4-5, R.Allen 3-7, Robinson 2-6, Rondo 1-3, Wallace 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 44 (Howard 12), Boston 56 (Pierce 13). Assists—Orlando 14 (Nelson 4), Boston 19 (Rondo 6). Total Fouls— Orlando 21, Boston 25. Technicals—Orlando defensive three second 2. Flagrant Fouls—Nelson. A—18,624 (18,624).

Tank McNamara

The Vicksburg Post

nhl

golf

NHL Playoff Schedule STANLEY CUP FINALS

Colonial Invitational Par Scores

(Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) Philadelphia vs. Chicago Today: Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. Monday: Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. Wednesday: Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. June 4: Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. x-June 6: Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m. x-June 9: Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. x-June 11: Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 p.m.

nascar Sprint Cup Schedule

Through May 22 May 1 — Crown Royal Presents The Heath Calhoun 400 (Kyle Busch) May 8 — Showtime Southern 500 (Denny Hamlin) May 16 — Autism Speaks 400 (Kyle Busch) May 22 — x-Sprint Showdown (Martin Truex Jr.) May 22 — x-Sprint All-Star Race (Kurt Busch) May 30 — Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. June 6 — Gillette Fusion 500, Long Pond, Pa. June 13 — Heluva Good! 400, Brooklyn, Mich. June 20 — Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. June 27 — Lenox Tools 301, Loudon, N.H. July 3 — Coke Zero 400, Daytona Beach, Fla. July 10 — LifeLock.com 400, Joliet, Ill. July 25 — Brickyard 400, Indianapolis Aug. 1 — Pennsylvania 500, Long Pond, Pa. Aug. 8 — Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips at The Glen, Watkins Glen, N.Y. Aug. 15 — Carfax 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Aug. 21 — Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. Sep. 5 — Labor Day Classic 500, Hampton, Ga. Sep. 11 — One Last Race to Make the Chase, Richmond, Va.

Sprint Cup standings

Through May 22 1. Kevin Harvick.............................................. 2. Kyle Busch.................................................. 3. Matt Kenseth............................................... 4. Jimmie Johnson.......................................... 5. Denny Hamlin............................................. 6. Jeff Gordon................................................. 7. Greg Biffle................................................... 8. Jeff Burton.................................................. 9. Kurt Busch.................................................. 10. Carl Edwards............................................ 11. Mark Martin............................................... 12. Martin Truex Jr......................................... 13. Ryan Newman.......................................... 14. Tony Stewart............................................. 15. Clint Bowyer.............................................. 16. Dale Earnhardt Jr..................................... 17. Jamie McMurray....................................... 18. Joey Logano............................................. 19. Juan Pablo Montoya................................. 20. David Reutimann......................................

1,768 1,699 1,642 1,637 1,618 1,605 1,581 1,569 1,531 1,487 1,475 1,434 1,404 1,397 1,392 1,391 1,346 1,332 1,322 1,262

——— Nationwide Series Schedule

Through May 15 April 19 — O’Reilly Auto Parts 300 (Kyle Busch) April 25 — Aaron’s 312 (Brad Keselowski) April 30 — BUBBA burger 250 (Brad Keselowski) May 7 — Royal Purple 200 (Denny Hamlin) May 15 — Heluva Good! 200 (Kyle Busch) May 29 — TECH-NET 300, Concord, N.C. June 5 — Federated Parts 300, Lebanon, Tenn. June 12 — Meijer 300, Sparta, Ky. June 19 — Bucyrus 200, Elkhart Lake, Wis. June 26 — New England 200, Loudon, N.H. July 2 — Subway 250, Daytona Beach, Fla. July 9 — Dollar General 300, Joliet, Ill. July 17 — Mo.-Ill Dodge 250, Madison, Ill. July 24 — Kroger 200, Indianapolis July 31 — U.S. Cellular 250, Newton, Iowa Aug. 7 — Zippo 200, Watkins Glen, N.Y. Aug. 14 — Carfax 250, Brooklyn, Mich. Aug. 20 — Food City 250, Bristol, Tenn. Aug. 29 — NAPA Auto Parts 200, Montreal

Nationwide Series standings

Through May 15 1. Brad Keselowski......................................... 2. Kyle Busch.................................................. 3. Kevin Harvick.............................................. 4. Carl Edwards.............................................. 5. Justin Allgaier............................................. 6. Paul Menard............................................... 7. Greg Biffle................................................... 8. Joey Logano............................................... 9. Jason Leffler............................................... 10. Brian Scott................................................

Sprint Cup Coca-Cola 600 Lineup

1,766 1,755 1,702 1,546 1,521 1,404 1,239 1,228 1,204 1,181

After Thursday qualifying; race Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 187.546 mph. 2. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 187.292. 3. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 187.188. 4. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 187.169. 5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 186.974. 6. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 186.825. 7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 186.767. 8. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 186.728. 9. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 186.528. 10. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 186.053. 11. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 186.021. 12. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 185.803. 13. (83) Casey Mears, Toyota, 185.535. 14. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 185.459. 15. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 185.452. 16. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 185.052. 17. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 184.932. 18. (43) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 184.906. 19. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 184.856. 20. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 184.634. 21. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 184.609. 22. (36) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 184.464. 23. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 184.407. 24. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 184.344. 25. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 184.344. 26. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 184.326. 27. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 184.181. 28. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 184.093. 29. (64) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 184.049. 30. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 184.037. 31. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 183.949. 32. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 183.855. 33. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 183.586. 34. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 183.542. 35. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 183.306. 36. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 183.281. 37. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 182.599. 38. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 182.562. 39. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, Owner Points. 40. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, Owner Points. 41. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (34) Kevin Conway, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (46) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 183.243.

Friday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,204; Par 70 Second Round Bryce Molder..............65-62—127.......................-13 Jason Bohn................63-65—128.......................-12 Brian Davis.................64-65—129.......................-11 Kris Blanks.................65-64—129.......................-11 Jeff Overton................63-67—130.......................-10 Boo Weekley..............67-63—130.......................-10 Corey Pavin................67-64—131.........................-9 John Mallinger............65-66—131.........................-9 Carl Pettersson..........65-66—131.........................-9 Zach Johnson.............65-66—131.........................-9 John Merrick...............66-66—132.........................-8 Ben Crane..................68-64—132.........................-8 Kenny Perry...............68-64—132.........................-8 Ricky Barnes..............66-66—132.........................-8 Bo Van Pelt................67-66—133.........................-7 Aron Price..................65-68—133.........................-7 Blake Adams..............63-70—133.........................-7 Bill Haas.....................65-68—133.........................-7 Derek Lamely.............67-66—133.........................-7 Scott Verplank............67-66—133.........................-7 Paul Goydos...............69-65—134.........................-6 James Nitties..............68-66—134.........................-6 Nick Watney...............68-66—134.........................-6 Spencer Levin............65-69—134.........................-6 Kyle Stanley...............68-66—134.........................-6 K.J. Choi.....................67-67—134.........................-6 John Daly...................66-69—135.........................-5 Greg Chalmers...........70-65—135.........................-5 Cameron Beckman....67-68—135.........................-5 David Toms................68-67—135.........................-5 Kevin Na.....................67-68—135.........................-5 Matt Jones..................69-66—135.........................-5 Steve Stricker.............68-67—135.........................-5 Nathan Green.............65-70—135.........................-5 Brendon de Jonge.....69-66—135.........................-5 Lee Janzen.................70-66—136.........................-4 Alex Prugh..................71-65—136.........................-4 Henrik Stenson...........67-69—136.........................-4 Paul Casey.................66-70—136.........................-4 Angel Cabrera............68-68—136.........................-4 Michael Bradley..........67-69—136.........................-4 John Senden..............69-67—136.........................-4 Tim Petrovic...............68-68—136.........................-4 Graham DeLaet..........68-68—136.........................-4 Michael Sim................69-67—136.........................-4 Chad Collins...............70-66—136.........................-4 Mike Weir...................68-68—136.........................-4 Martin Laird................69-67—136.........................-4 Charlie Wi...................68-69—137.........................-3 J.J. Henry...................67-70—137.........................-3 Stewart Cink...............69-68—137.........................-3 Jason Day..................66-71—137.........................-3 Brian Gay...................68-69—137.........................-3 Pat Perez...................69-68—137.........................-3 Jerry Kelly..................67-70—137.........................-3 Ben Curtis..................70-67—137.........................-3 J.P. Hayes..................67-70—137.........................-3 Justin Rose................67-70—137.........................-3 Fredrik Jacobson........68-69—137.........................-3 Lucas Glover..............72-65—137.........................-3 Tim Clark....................67-70—137.........................-3 Geoff Ogilvy...............70-67—137.........................-3 Vijay Singh.................67-70—137.........................-3 Brandt Snedeker........71-66—137.........................-3 Rickie Fowler..............70-67—137.........................-3 Brett Quigley..............71-66—137.........................-3 Kevin Stadler..............69-68—137.........................-3 Jerod Turner...............69-68—137.........................-3 Kevin Sutherland........71-67—138.........................-2 Rory Sabbatini............67-71—138.........................-2 Tom Gillis...................69-69—138.........................-2 Billy Mayfair................69-69—138.........................-2 Ian Poulter..................69-69—138.........................-2 Matt Kuchar................69-69—138.........................-2 Stephen Ames............68-70—138.........................-2 Heath Slocum.............69-69—138.........................-2 Failed to qualify Mark Brooks...............71-68—139.........................-1 Tim Herron.................67-72—139.........................-1 Jim Furyk....................72-67—139.........................-1 Ryan Palmer..............72-67—139.........................-1 Trevor Immelman.......71-68—139.........................-1 Jonathan Byrd............68-71—139.........................-1 Webb Simpson...........70-69—139.........................-1 Justin Leonard............67-72—139.........................-1 Chris Stroud...............71-69—140......................... E Stuart Appleby............72-68—140......................... E Michael Connell..........68-72—140......................... E Woody Austin.............67-73—140......................... E Steve Marino..............68-72—140......................... E Shaun Micheel...........70-70—140......................... E Rod Pampling.............70-70—140......................... E Sean O’Hair................70-70—140......................... E Hunter Mahan............73-67—140......................... E Ryuji Imada................69-71—140......................... E Chad Campbell..........70-70—140......................... E Y.E. Yang...................73-68—141......................+1 Kevin Streelman.........72-69—141......................+1 Byeong-Hun An..........71-70—141......................+1 David Duval................68-73—141......................+1 Steve Elkington..........71-70—141......................+1 D.J. Trahan................69-72—141.................. +1sz

LOTTERY Sunday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 1-8-4 La. Pick 4: 1-1-2-7 Monday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 9-5-7 La. Pick 4: 0-1-5-1 Tuesday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 4-7-1 La. Pick 4: 6-3-0-4 Wednesday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 5-0-8 La. Pick 4: 5-1-4-7 Easy 5: 8-19-20-32-34 La. Lotto: 7-11-20-25-27-40 Powerball: 1-6-10-13-20 Powerball: 32; Power play: 4 Thursday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 8-3-0 La. Pick 4: 4-5-9-8 Friday’s drawing La. Pick 3: n/a La. Pick 4: n/a Saturday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 7-9-0 La. Pick 4: 5-2-3-5 Easy 5: 12-14-29-30-35 La. Lotto: 9-15-22-23-34-38 Powerball: 19-20-40-47-57 Powerball: 29; Power play: 2


Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

Hashman’s homer lifts Rebs

St. Al Continued from Page C1. Myrtle forced the deciding game with a late-inning comeback. As Friday’s series finale spiraled out of control, however, coach Robert Gordon could do little but tip his cap to the Flashes. “We couldn’t throw strikes, got behind in the count, and it seemed like every part of the field that was open they were driving balls to,” Gordon said. “Today, if they weren’t hitting it we were walking or hitting them. They just had so many clutch hits. One through nine, at some point, did it for them.” Wilkerson barked at his team to keep the pressure on, not wanting to give Myrtle even an inch of daylight. After the second inning, though, the only real question was how many runs the Flashes could score. They tacked on two more in the fourth to make it 18-1, then Evans did what he does best. The senior right-hander needed fewer than five pitches to retire the side in the fifth. The final out was a a fitting tribute to the seniorladen team. Evans induced a grounder to Waring at short, who threw to Martin-Nez at first. All three of them have been starters since the seventh grade, and are among seven seniors in Friday’s lineup who have been starters for at least three years. “I knew I had a group of kids that wanted to play baseball,” Wilkerson said of his initial impressions when he inherited this team in 2005. “They always accepted the challenge and met it. I don’t know if I’ll ever coach another group like them.”

meredith spencer•The Vicksburg Post

St. Aloysius’ Breedan Beesley celebrates after scoring a run against Myrtle in the Class 1A championship game at Trustmark Park on Friday. Below, St. Al pitcher Stephen Evans delivers to the plate.

“Many Sizes To Choose From.”

From staff reports

on Wednesday. “These guys have a lot of fight in them. I knew we were deep in pitching. Even though we had our guy on the mound, we had our No. 3 guy ready to go. The thing with their guy, though, was he fell behind. When he got behind, we hit everything hard. You could tell he was tired. He was leaving the ball up,” Wilkerson said. Evans, the Game 1 winner, was appreciative of the run support, even though he did have to sit a lot during the carnage. “I just tried to stay cool. When they got two out, I started to toss a little. I was

glad to have all the run support, but I knew I wanted to go out there and fill the zone even more,” Evans said. The Game 3 demolition of Myrtle sent St. Al’s seven seniors out on an excellent note. Six of them had huge series. In three games, Martin-Nez went 5-for-8 with four RBIs and five runs scored. Waring, Haygood, Nosser and Evans all drove in four runs apiece. And Beesley, the senior catcher in the nine hole, had a team-high five RBIs. “This was the best. What a great way to go out,” Nosser said.

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and turned into a 3-hour, 50-minute marathon. Brett Huber (3-0) overc a m e t wo walks with a pair of strikeTaylor outs and then Hashman a groundout by Wes Gilmer in the bottom of the 10th inning. “I thought it was a great college baseball game,” Rebels coach Mike Bianco said. “It had a little bit of everything.” Hashman and Alex Yarbrough both had three hits for Ole Miss, which capitalized on five Auburn errors. Hunter Morris had a threerun homer for Auburn (40-19) to tie it at 7-all in the seventh. Tony Caldwell went 3-for-4 with a two-run homer and

three runs scored. The Tigers were playing without stars Trent Mummey (hamstring) and Brian Fletcher (bruised hand), who were injured in Thursday’s game. Mummey pinch-hit in the eighth but hit into a double play for the league’s top hitting team. “Even without those two guys, it just brings their offense down to a great offense,” Bianco said. The Rebels came into the tournament on a five-game losing streak and were swept by Auburn by a combined score of 34-8 in three games last weekend. “We were really pumped to play them again and show them we could compete better than we did last week,” Hashman said. “I wouldn’t say it was revenge but we were pretty pumped up to play the game, and we’re pretty happy with the outcome.”

Thanks to its biggest rival, Southern Miss will get to play for the Conference USA championship. Memphis’ Tyler Huelsing hit a two-run home run in the bottom of the ninth Friday to give Memphis a 3-2 victory over East Carolina in the Conference USA Tournament. The Tigers’ victory put Southern Miss into tonight’s championship game against Rice based on a three-way tiebreaker. Although East Carolina routed Southern Miss 8-1 on Thursday, its loss created the three-way tie in Pod 2. In that scenario the highest-seeded team — Southern Miss — advances to the championship game. USM played Houston in Friday’s final game. The contest was delayed by weather and finished late, but the outcome

didn’t matter. If the Golden Eagles beat Houston they would finish pod play with a 2-1 record and finish first in Pod Tyler 2 outright. Huelsing If they lost, it would have created the three-way tie between them, Memphis and East Carolina, all of which would have 1-2 records. “They were having a good time coming in and talking to us. I have some good friends on Southern Miss, and they were really letting me have it,” Huelsing said.

Point Loma Nazarene 9, Belhaven 1 Behind a complete-game sixhitter by Chad Blauer, Point

Loma Nazarene handled Belhaven in the Avista-NAIA World Series Friday in Lewiston, Idaho. Belhaven fell into the double-elimination losers’ bracket and will play Idaho’s Lubbock Christian at 8:30 a.m. today. Point Loma Nazarene (39-181), from California, advanced to take on top-seeded LewisClark State at 8 p.m. Blauer had 11 strikeouts against Belhaven (43-16) and walked one batter. The Blazers had several scoring opportunities, but left nine runners on base. Leadoff hitter Drew Dillard went 2-for-5. Tyler Kuehl went 3-for-4 with a double and two runs scored for Point Loma Nazarene. Rashad Taylor and Wes Kartch also had three hits and scored three runs apiece. Overall, the Sea Lions compiled 12 hits, including four doubles.

     

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HEGGINS P ORTABLE B UILDINGS

AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — Taylor Hashman’s three-run homer with two outs in the top of the 10th inning lifted Ole Miss to a 10-7 victory over Auburn in an elimination game of the Southeastern Conference Tournament Friday night. Zach Miller drew a one-out walk to chase pitcher Sean Ray. Bradley Hendrix set down Matt Smith, but then Matt Snyder singled to bring up Hashman. He delivered a shot to center field for his ninth home run of the season. “I knew the guy was throwing pretty hard and was probably going to challenge me with a fastball,” Hashman said. “I just got the barrel on it and it went out.” Now, the Rebels (38-21) will have to beat LSU twice today to make the championship game with less than 13 hours between games. Friday’s game was delayed nearly 2 hours by heavy rains and lightning

USM advances to C-USA final

Rally Continued from Page C1. was ruled safe. Judon then fired the ball back toward the mound and past his pitcher, allowing Beesley to go to second base on the play’s second error. “You could tell he was ticked off,” St Al pitcher Stephen Evans said. “And I know, it is hard to pitch when you are ticked off.” Cummings’ command, which wasn’t that good to begin with in the first inning, vanished when he hit Pierson Waring and Blake Haygood with consecutive pitches. Martin-Nez followed with the first of his two RBI hits, a laser to left field. Cummings then walked four of the next five batters with the only solace being a strikeout. A bases-loaded walk to Josh Eargle made it 8-1 and Myrtle coach Robert Gordon had seen enough. “My No. 1 guy just did not have his best stuff today. He said before the game that he felt good. We had rehabbed him pretty good after the start on Tuesday. But some days he’s had those issues with control. He got behind hitters. He couldn’t spot his fastball, he couldn’t spot his curveball and when he did, they hit it. I knew we were in trouble when I saw early on how out of control he was,” Gordon said. Baker relieved Cummings, but didn’t fare any better. He was rocked for five hits, including Beesley’s tworun double, Waring’s tworun single and Martin-Nez’s second two-run hit of the inning. Evans and Regan Nosser capped the 13-run rally with RBI singles to give the Flashes an incredible 16-1 lead. St. Al coach Clint Wilkerson felt his team would respond after letting Myrtle off the hook in Game 2 as the Hawks rallied for a 5-4 win

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

   

    

                 



     




C4

Saturday, May 29, 2010

TONIGHT ON TV n MOVIE “Wrong Turn 2: Dead End” — Deranged cannibals terrorize contestants, Erica Leerhsen and Texas Battle, competing on a reality TV show in the wilderness of West Virginia./6 on SYFY n SPORTS NHL — The battle for Lord Stanley’s Cup begins as the Philadelphia Flyers battle the Chicago Blackhawks in the Windy City./7 on NBC n PRIMETIME Texas Battle “Bones” — After Booth’s gun is taken away because he maliciously shot a clown ornament on an ice-cream truck, Brennan must go to Florida alone to investigate the death of a college student whose body is found inside an alligator./9 on Fox

THIS WEEK’S LINEUP n EXPANDED LISTINGS TV TIMES — Network, cable and satellite programs appear in Sunday’s TV Times magazine and online at www.vicksburgpost. com

MILESTONES n BIRTHDAYS Kevin Conway, actor, 68; Danny Elfman, movie composer, 57; Ted Levine, actor, 53; Annette Bening, actress, 52; Rupert Everett, actor, 51; Melissa Etheridge, singer, 49; Melanie Brown, singer, 35; Brandon Mychal Smith, actor, 21.

peopLE

50 Cent drops 50-plus pounds for film Losing 50-plus pounds was a complicated process for 50 Cent — but not an entirely new one. The rapper plays a football player with cancer in the upcoming film “Things Fall Apart.” He dropped from 214 pounds to 160 in nine weeks after liquid dieting and running on a treadmill three hours a day. But the 33-year-old tells The Associated Press 50 Cent that when he was shot in the jaw in 2000, he could drink only liquids and his weight dropped to 157. He says that “it was a lot tougher” this time. The film is about the rapper’s childhood friend who died of cancer and is in production. The rapper says he currently weighs 198 pounds. He released his fourth album in November and kicks off a North American tour in Detroit on Saturday.

New court date for Sheen over arrest Actor Charlie Sheen has a new court date over domestic violence allegations involving his wife, as settlement talks continue. Sheen has pleaded not guilty to menacing, criminal mischief and assault charges stemming from an argument with his wife, Brooke Mueller Sheen, on Christmas Day at an Aspen home where they were on vacation. A hearing is scheduled June 18, but the court Charlie Sheen this week set another hearing for June 7. Sheen’s attorney Richard Cummins said the hearing was set “in contemplation of a final disposition being made that’s acceptable to the district attorney’s office.” Aspen prosecutor Arnold Mordkin declined to comment on settlement discussions.

Investors offer to buy owner of ‘Idol’ A group of investors led by British media mogul Simon Fuller is offering to buy CKX, the owner of the “American Idol” reality TV show. Fuller created the “Idol” franchise but sold his company to CKX Inc. in 2005. CKX says it is evaluating the proposal and other strategic alternatives, but did say how much Fuller’s group is offering to pay. The company also owns the rights to the name, image and likeness of Elvis Presley and Muhammad Ali. Fuller’s bid comes after a seven-year run for “American Idol,” which said goodbye to its famously caustic judge Simon Cowell on Wednesday.

Bullock to get MTV Generation Award Sandra Bullock is coming to the MTV Movie Awards. The network says the 45-year-old actress will attend the June 6 ceremony to accept the MTV Generation Award, its highest honor. The Oscar winner, who has kept a low profile since her public split from husband Jesse James, is the first woman to receive the award. Past recipients include Tom Cruise, Ben Stiller, Adam Sandler, Mike Myers and Jim Carrey. MTV General Manager Stephen Friedman says Bullock is “adored by our audience as both Sandra an actress and a role model.” Bullock Hosted by Aziz Ansari, the MTV Movie Awards will be broadcast live from the Gibson Amphitheatre. Presenters include Sandler, Cruise, Robert Pattinson, Taylor Lautner, Chris Rock, Steve Carell and Cameron Diaz.

AND ONE MORE

Inmate kills entangled deer at farm An inmate on a work crew killed and butchered a deer that was entangled in netting at the prison’s pheasant farm near Walla Walla, the Washington State Penitentiary said. Spokesman Shari Hall said the minimum-security prisoner killed the deer last Saturday using a box cutter that the crew is allowed to use. Investigators acting on a tip Tuesday found about 15 pounds of venison in garbage bags in the farm’s break room. Hall said she didn’t know what the inmate intended to do with the meat. The break room has no cooking equipment, and no campfires are allowed on the farm.

The Vicksburg Post

‘Diff’rent Strokes’ star Coleman dies at 42 PROVO, Utah (AP) — Gary Coleman, the child star of the smash 1970s TV sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes” whose later career was marred by medical and legal problems, has died after suffering an intercranial hemorrhage. He was 42. Utah Valley Regional Medical Center spokeswoman Janet Frank said life support was terminated and Coleman died at 1:05 p.m. Coleman, with his sparkling eyes and perfect comic timing, became a star after “Diff’rent Strokes” debuted in 1978. He played the younger brother in a pair of African-American siblings adopted by a wealthy white man. His popularity faded when the show ended after six seasons on NBC and two on ABC. Coleman suffered continuing ill health from the kidney disease that stunted his growth and had a host of legal problems in recent years. Coleman suffered the hemorrhage Wednesday at his Santaquin home, 55 miles south of Salt Lake City. A statement from the family said he was conscious and lucid until midday Thursday, when his condition worsened and he slipped into unconsciousness. Coleman was then placed on life support. Diff ’rent Strokes” that debuted on NBC in 1978 drew most of its laughs from the tiny, 10-year-old Coleman. Race and class relations became topics on the show as much as the typical trials of growing up. Coleman was an immediate star, and his skeptical “Whatchu talkin’ ’bout?” — usually aimed at his brother, Willis — became a catchphrase. In a 1979 Los Angeles Times profile, his mother, Edmonia Sue Coleman, said her son had always been a ham as a small child. He acted in some commercials before he was signed

Adviser to celebrities is charged with fraud NEW YORK (AP) — Prosecutors have charged a financial adviser who has worked for Wesley Snipes, Sylvester Stallone and Martin Scorsese with stealing $30 million from clients and accused a former city council president of lying about his own finances during the probe. Kenneth Starr, 66, was ordered held without bail on charges of wire fraud, investment adviser fraud Kenneth and money Starr laundering after a prosecutor said Starr hid behind coats in a closet at his home when agents came to arrest him, forcing them to yank him out by the collar. Also arrested in the probe was former New York City Council President Andrew Stein, 65, who was charged with making false statements in a filing with the Internal Revenue Service and making false statements to a federal officer. U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said at a news conference that Starr stole money in a Ponzilike scheme from January 2008 through April after gaining the trust of wealthy and influential clients and sometimes controlling their finances. There’s no indication Snipes, Scorsese or Stallone were victims. An IRS criminal complaint said cheated clients included a former hedge fund manager and well-known philanthropist, an actress who was a longtime friend of Starr’s, a former talent agency executive and his wife, an heiress and a prominent jeweler with a flagship Manhattan store.

by T . A . T . , the production company that created “Diff’rent Strokes.” “Gary remembers everything. Gary EVERYColeman THING,” coproducer and director Herb Kenwith told the newspaper. “His power of concentration is unlike any adult’s I know.” Asked by Ebony magazine in

1979 how he learned his lines so easily, young Gary replied, “It’s easy!” But the attention his starring role brought him could be a burden as well as a pleasure. Coleman told The Associated Press in 2001 that he would do a TV series again, but “only under the absolute condition that it be an ensemble cast and that everybody gets a chance to shine.” “I certainly am not going to be the only person on the show working,” he said. “I’ve

done that. I didn’t like it.” The series lasted six seasons on NBC and two on ABC and lives on thanks to DVDs and YouTube. But its equally enduring legacy became the former child star’s troubles in adulthood, including the 1999 suicide of Dana Plato, who played the boys’ white, teenage sister. Todd Bridges, who played Coleman’s brother, was tried and acquitted of attempted murder.

A Salute to

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Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

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Sisters clash over homework help for boyfriend DEAR ABBY ABIGAIL

VAN BUREN

ness. I’d really appreciate your opinion. — Helping or Cheating? Sacramento, Calif. Dear Helping: Thank you for asking. I’m sure you care deeply for Rory, but sometimes — with the best of intentions — a person can do too much. When you suggest topics for your boyfriend’s essays, then edit them so the teacher won’t see where he needs to strengthen his English skills, what you’re really doing is preventing him from learning how to properly spell or construct a sentence. And when you’re no longer around to be his filter, it’s going to become apparent. The same goes for math. If you tell Rory what steps to take to solve his math problems, he won’t master the

TOMORROW’S HOROSCOPE

BY BERNICE BEDE OSOL • NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION If tomorrow is your birthday: Expanding your range of interests in the year ahead opens up a whole new world to explore and enjoy. Don’t settle for the status quo. Look for new opportunities to expand your life both socially and career-wise. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Don’t be disappointed if that ticket to success you’re holding won’t get you very far until you pay the additional fees. There are no free rides in this world. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — If you are too lackadaisical about making any decisions, those who know what they want will do your thinking for you, and will come up with all the wrong answers. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Being undiscriminating about whom you hang out with could be asking for problems. If they turn out to be troublemakers, you can bet your bottom dollar that they’ll get you in a lot of trouble. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — If your hopes and expectations are built upon faulty premises, it will be impossible for them to be realized. Get back in form and be realistic about what you can or cannot logically achieve. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Be mindful of your behavior, because whether you like it or not the spotlight will be focused squarely on you. Whether you win or lose, do so with grace. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Although it might be merely an innocent flirtation to you, the recipient is likely to read a lot more into it than you had intended, and put you in a very embarrassing position. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Financial situations could have many hidden dangers lurking in the background. If you’re contemplating making an investment, be sure you have the very best information available. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Instead of worrying about whether or not others will treat you kindly and/or fairly, concentrate more on what to give to them to make their lives easier and happier. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Give of yourself without expecting anything back in return, and that good rapport you’d like to have with others will automatically be there. In life, you get what you give. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) — The best way to deprive someone of his ability to make you feel inferior and deny him of having power over you is to maintain your composure at all times, no matter what. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Inclinations to always be right could cause you to engage in some rather strong debates with others. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Being a daydreamer could cause you to see things as you wish them to be instead of looking at life realistically. It’s OK to hope for the best, but unless you face facts, you’ll never be satisfied.

TWEEN 12 & 20

BY DR. ROBERT WALLACE • NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION Dr. Wallace: I’ve got a beef and I hope you have the courage to print my letter. At age 18, I can vote, leave home, marry without parental consent, be a soldier, be tried as an adult if I commit a crime, own my own automobile, obtain with proper credit my personal credit card, and purchase cigarettes. But if I want to have a glass of wine with my supper in a restaurant, I’m told that I am too young. I know there is little you can do to change the law, but I would like to hear your comment. — Jake, Rockford, Ill. Jake: Unfortunately, courage is not needed to print your letter. You sound bitter and maybe you have a right to be. It is true that there are people over 21 who legally can purchase alcoholic beverages, but they should not be allowed to because they cannot handle the responsibility that goes with drinking. I’m sure some 18-year-olds could handle the responsibility. But they would be in the minority. I am not a fan of consuming alcohol, so lowering the drinking age to 18 would not be, in my opinion, a wise decision. Dr. Wallace: You told a girl that 20 minutes was long enough to spend on the telephone talking with friends. I talk with my best friend every night. We are on the phone over a half-hour and we still don’t get to discuss everything that we want to. My mother understands that girls like to chat. When she talks with her friends on the phone, she sometimes talks for over two hours. Let’s face it, girls like to chat more than guys. — Erin, Hagerstown, Md. Erin: I always thought that girls might spend more time on the telephone on social calls, but I’m glad that you said it, not I. • Dr. Robert Wallace writes for Copley News Service. E-mail him at rwallace@Copley News Service.

concepts or memorize the formulas. Heaven help him if he plans to take a college entrance exam! While the argument you had with your sister was regrettable, please try not to be so defensive. She was trying to tell you something important, and it couldn’t hurt to really listen. Dear Abby: I’m a 13-yearold girl in junior high. I am very shy and self-conscious. When I see skinny girls, I look at myself and feel embarrassed or ashamed. I have a lot of friends who support me. They say I shouldn’t worry about my weight and that I don’t need to lose any more. I would like some words of encouragement from you. It seems like nothing can stop the way I feel. I have a boyfriend, but our relationship is long-distance. We talk online and he is as supportive as he can be, but I still feel self-conscious. Please help me with this. — Teen in Need in North Carolina Dear Teen: The harder we stare at our imagined flaws,

the bigger they become. So please stop constantly comparing yourself to others. It’s a depressing waste of time. Very few people are completely confident and self-assured at 13, and there are more important qualities to focus on in life than whatever happens to be the ideal of physical perfection at the moment. Your time would be better spent developing qualities that not only make you special, but also will last a lifetime — your personality, your intellect and your talents. So listen to what your friends and your boyfriend are telling you. Spend a few minutes every day reminding yourself of all the things you have going for you and the special qualities you have to offer. If you do you’ll have less time to dwell on the negative.

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• Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.Dear Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Teen feels pressures from parents, teachers Dear Dr. Gott: I’m 17 and having difficulties meeting the expectations of my parents and teachers. The pressure is really strong and is a burden on the already heavy load I’m carrying. Can you help? Dear Reader: Most students consider themselves knowledgeable, if not expert, regarding the subject of student pressure. The many theories of this phenomenon do little to solve the problem of what this is and what can be done about it. While the medical director of a local private school for 33 years, I saw the multifaceted consequences of this ubiquitous blight. Neither the problems nor the consequences have changed much over the years and, in fact, they may have exacerbated. All we need do is read the daily newspaper or watch television to see the horror stories unfurl when students and faculty are pressed too hard. There seems to exist two basic classes of student pressure — external and internal. External pressure, either flamboyant or insidious, is delivered up by the environment. For example, consider pressure from teachers. “I don’t care that you’ve got a two-hour test tomorrow; tonight’s history assignment is STILL 60 pages!” Or from parents: “If I’m going to send you to a fancy private school, you should try harder to get good grades!” Or from peers: “Oh, c’mon. One little puff or a can of beer isn’t going to kill you!” External pressure can be destructive if it takes the form of unrealistic expectations that students may find difficult or impossible to meet. Such demands can be seen in the teacher who flunks threequarters of an entire class or in a parent who insists that his child must attend an Ivy League college. Students who accomplish goals solely to please their parents or other adults may become unhappy achievers under a constant blanket of pressure. External pressure is difficult to control because certain people “own” it and use it in an attempt to force other people into developing “maturity and independence.” This approach may be necessary in raising children, but in the adolescent, it can result in uncomfortable feelings. On the other hand, internal pressure can be a positive force, as in, for example, the student who achieves because he wants to. Once a person develops a system of internal pressure, he may no longer need to be told what to do. This type of pressure enables people to make valid judgments regarding situations — for instance, “If I wait until the last minute to write my term paper, I’ll be sorry.” Students who are operating under internal pressure may feel rushed and exasperated,

Graduation Invitations

ASK THE DOCTOR Dr. PETER

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

NARBD ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

CHOPE

GOTT

but they seldom feel the need to escape. While there are no easy answers to the problem of student pressure, perhaps some students would feel better by developing a certain amount of internal pressure that will enable them to pick appropriate goals and organize suitable methods of achieving them.

SWAALY YESANU Answer: ITS

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

Dear Abby: I’m an “A” student, but my boyfriend, “Rory,” has a difficult time in school, so he often comes over for help. We work at the computer in the room my sister and I share so she listens to everything we discuss. She says we are cheating because I’m doing most of his homework for him. I don’t give Rory the answers to questions, but I do give him “hints” and tell him where he’s likely to find the answers in the textbooks. I always check that the answers are correct. With his math homework, I tell him each step he needs to take, but he actually does the math himself and then I check for accuracy. If he needs to write an essay, I suggest what he might want to write and help him with some of the edits. My sister thinks what I do goes far beyond help, and that I’m enabling him to cheat. She feels that while it may help his grades now, I am doing him no favors in the long run. We had a big argument over this. I don’t think it’s any of her busi-

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

AND

• Jumbles: Yesterday’s Write to Dr. Peter Gott in care of United Answer: Media, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092RELEASE DATE– Saturday, May 29, 2010

(Answers Monday) FRANC BASIN QUENCH DABBLE What the tile shoppers sought — A “SQUARE” DEAL

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS 1 Powder holders 5 Movie warning 15 Elision from Eliza 16 Unequaled 17 Times when the French fry? 18 Stern boss 19 Orphaned author raised by the Allans 20 Winter warmer 21 __’clock scholar 22 Incomplete rainbow 24 It may be fit for a queen 26 Dry gulch 27 Buff 29 Kit Carson House site 30 They may come in a pack 32 Verbal flourishes 36 “Here __ Again” (Whitesnake #1 hit) 37 Start of a religious title 39 Amphibian youngster 40 Score markings 43 When both hands are up 44 Some bank holdings 45 Club newsletter 47 Like some kisses 49 Winter warmer 51 “Let’s keep moving!” 52 Champagne designation 53 Tangles, or disentangles 57 Year before Columbus’s fourth voyage 58 California shopping mecca 60 Penn name 61 “It doesn’t get any better than this” 62 Pioneering puppeteer Tony 63 Alabama and Mississippi are in it 64 Large order

DOWN 1 Doesn’t quit 2 Posse 3 Where one might anticipate being introduced 4 M.O. 5 Vernacular jackpot 6 No-see-um, e.g. 7 Mike holder’s opening, often 8 Cod cousin 9 Cell dweller 10 Dietary no. 11 Fiesta fare 12 Decide to compete 13 “Uncle Vanya” role 14 “Stoned Soul Picnic” songwriter 20 Today, in Tijuana 23 List of acceptable behavior 25 1099-__: bankissued tax form 27 Record holder? 28 Five-time Japan Senior Open winner Aoki 31 Ending for Louis

33 Richard Simmons weight-loss program with color-coded cards 34 At night 35 Sports page feature 38 Cheeky 41 Sign to heed 42 Nettle 44 Average fellow? 46 Party locale

48 Shipping wts. 49 Ad 50 Review of books? 52 __-a-brac 54 __ League 55 On the qui __: alert 56 Big name in jumping 59 “Well, well!” 60 157.5 degrees from N

xwordeditor@aol.com

05/29/10

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

By Fred Jackson III (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

05/29/10


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Saturday, May 29, 2010

01. Legals The following vehicle is considered abandoned and will be sold for towing, labor and storage fees incurred. 2000 Chrysler Concorde 4 door VIN: 2C3HD36J3YH427189 Date of Sale: Monday, June 7th, 2010 Time of Sale: 10:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Jackson Auto and Towing 97 Sammy Young Road Vicksburg, MS 39180 Publish: 5/22, 5/29, 6/5(3t)

02. Public Service FREE GOURDS! Various shapes and sizes. Call 601638-7624.

FREE TO GOOD HOME. 3 Black, White and Grey kittens. 1 male, 2 females. 7 weeks old. Litter box trained. 601-218-8222 or 601-619-1625. KEEP UP WITH all the local news and sales...Subscribe to The Vicksburg Post TODAY!! Call 601636-4545, Circulation. KITTIES FREE TO GOOD HOMES! 3 tabbies, 3 months old. 5 tabbies and a Siamese, 5 months old. Call 601-415-4569, if no answer, please leave message.

05. Notices

07. Help Wanted

GARAGE SALE, HAWKINS United Methodist Church, 3736 Halls Ferry, Saturday, June 5th, 7am- until, come out and find a bargain! All proceeds to benefit 2010 Mexico Mission Team trip.

DUE TO INCREASED business, an Experienced Service Technician position is now open at Vicksburg Honda. Must have own tools. Contact George at 601-636-1800 for interview.

Is the one you love hurting you? Call

Haven House Family Shelter 601-638-0555 or 1-800-898-0860 Services available to women & children who are victims of domestic violence and/or homeless: Shelter, counseling, group support. (Counseling available by appt.) KEEP UP WITH all the local news and sales...subscribe to The Vicksburg Post Today! Call 601-636-4545, ask for Circulation. ONE DAY COIN show. Vicksburg Battlefield Inn. June 5. 9am- 5pm. Sponsored by Vicksburg Coin Club. Information 601-6381195.

Runaway Are you 12 to 17? Alone? Scared? Call 601-634-0640 anytime or 1-800-793-8266 We can help! One child, one day at a time.

06. Lost & Found

05. Notices Center For Pregnancy Choices Free Pregnancy Tests (non-medical facility)

¡ Education on All Options ¡ Confidential Counseling Call 601-638-2778 for appt www.vicksburgpregnancy.com

$200 REWARD LOST small (2 ½ pounds) Black and White Female Fox Terrier. Near Mosswood Country Club. Highway 61 South of Port Gibson. Wearing small pink collar. 601-4375920 or 601-660-7428.

FOUND! MEN'S STAINLESS STEEL wedding ring. Please call with description, 601-636-8886, leave message.

FOUND! EMERGENCY CA$H BORROW $100.00 PAYBACK $105.00 BEST DEAL IN TOWN VALID CHECKING ACCOUNT REQUIRED FOR DETAILS CALL

601-638-7000 9 TO 5 MON.- FRI. ENDING HOMELESSNESS. WOMEN with children or without are you in need of shelter? Mountain of Faith Ministries/ Women's Restoration Shelter. Certain restrictions apply, 601-661-8990. Life coaching available by appointment.

SET OF KEYS. Found intersection of Mission 66 and Clay Street. 601-631-0980, 601-415-7397. LOST A DOG? Found a cat? Let The Vicksburg Post help! Run a FREE 3 day ad! 601-636-SELL or e-mail classifieds@vicksburg post.com MISSING FROM WARRIORS Trail/ Highway 27 area. Small Female Dachshund. Blue eyes. Dappled colored. If found $200 REWARD! Call 601966-1619 or 601-529-3943.

07. Help Wanted â&#x20AC;&#x153;ACEâ&#x20AC;? Truck Driver Training With a Difference Job Placement Asst. Day, Night & Refresher Classes Get on the Road NOW! Call 1-888-430-4223 MS Prop. Lic. 77#C124

**************************** Attention Students! SUMMER WORK -$15 Starting Pay -Flexible Schedules -Customer Sales/Service -All Ages 17+ Call NOW 601-501-4598 CONFEDERATE RIDGE APARTMENTS now accepting applications for Certified HVAC maintenance person. Experience is a must! Call 601-638-0102, for information.

TRUCK DRIVER needed for delivery of storage containers. Must have minimum Class A License. Apply in person @ Sheffield Rentals 1255 Hwy. 61 S. Vicksburg, MS

Find a Honey of a Deal in the Classifieds...Zero in on that most wanted or hard to find item.

JOURNEYMAN PLUMBERS:COMMERCIAL experience. Minimum 5 years. License preferred. Benefits offered, Pay DOE. Call MDES for appointment, 662-321-5441. 212 St. Paul St., Pearl, MS 39208. Ivey Mechanical Company, AA/EOE

Local Truck Drivers needed. Must apply in person. 1001 Haining Rd. Bring current CDL and health card.         

   !! " # $%&'$($' )*)* #     ' + " QUALITY CONTROL. EARN up to $100 per day! Evaluate retail stores, training provided, no experience required. Call 877-6999772. QUALITY TRANSPORT INC. Regional drivers needed for bulk petroleum products. Must have Class a with X end. Good driving record required. Company paid health insurance, 401K, and other benefits. SIGN ON BONUS. New equipment. Call 800-7346570. REGIONAL FULL SERVICE beauty distributor. Needs motivated self starter for salon sales. Experience helpful. Will train. Send resume to fax: 318-325-0696. SMALL BUSINESS SUPPLIERS NEEDED. L.W. Matteson, Inc. is a Marine and Dredging contractor working on the Ouachita and Mississippi Rivers. We are currently seeking qualified Small Business vendors registered with the Federal Government in the areas of marine supplies, diesel fuel, hardware and/ or general supplies. Please contact our office at 319754-6705 or email dredge@lwmatteson.com. All vendors must have a valid registration in the Federal Contractors Registry (CCR). THE CEDAR GROVE Missionary Baptist (MB) Church is currently seeking a full time Pastor to provide strong, visionary and spiritual leadership to the congregation and community. Please send your resume to P.O. Box 821373, Vicksburg Ms. 39182, Attention Pastor Search Committee.

No matter what type of work youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeking, the Classifieds can help you find it!

40. Cars & Trucks

07. Help Wanted TO BUY OR SELL

AVON

CALL 601-636-7535

The Vicksburg Post

14. Pets & Livestock

18. Miscellaneous For Sale

18. Miscellaneous For Sale

www.pawsrescuepets.org

Spring Into Savings at

PEAVY BASS AMP and Bass. $400. 601-661-6136.

DISCOUNT FURNITURE BARN

Foster a Homeless Pet!

YELLOW TAG SALE! 600 Jackson Street

$10 START UP KIT

10. Loans And Investments â&#x20AC;&#x153;WE CAN ERASE your bad credit- 100% guaranteed.â&#x20AC;? The Federal Trade Commission says the only legitimate credit repair starts and ends with you. It takes time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Any company that claims to be able to fix your credit legally is lying. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc.gov/credit A message from The Vicksburg Post and the FTC.

11. Business Opportunities NEIGHBORHOOD GROCERY STORE for rent or lease. 601-218-9117 for more information.

13. Situations Wanted WILL SIT WITH elderly. Kind, gentle, compassionate care provided. References. 601-831-2762.

14. Pets & Livestock AKC/ CKC REGISTERED YORKIES, Poodles and Schnauzers $200 to $700! 601-218-5533,

   FULL BLOODED RED nose Pitt Puppies. 6 Weeks. 8 Females.$200.All Red and White. 601-885-8860.

VICKSBURG WARREN HUMANE SOCIETY

Highway 61 South

601-636-6631

Currently housing 84 unwanted and abandoned animals.

43 dogs & puppies 41 cats & kittens Please adopt today! Call the Shelter for more information. HAVE A HEART, SPAY OR NEUTER YOUR PETS! Look for us on www.petfinder.com LAB PUPPIES. 3 male, 5 female. All chocolate. AKC 6 weeks on 6/5. 601-6368062 or 601-415-6278. littlecreekpuppies.com CKC Shih tzus ready now. $250 and up. 318-2375156.

601-638-7191 POODLE PUPPIES. 3 jet black males, shots, wormed, 10 weeks old. 601636-4564, 601-415-1786. TOY POODLES, YORKIES, Pomeranians, Maltipoos, Chihuahuas, Shih-tzu. Deposit Welcome. PayPal, Cash. Health Guarantee. 318-728-5128. www.littlepawkennel.com

15. Auction LOOKING FOR A great value? Subscribe to The Vicksburg Post, 601-6364545, ask for Circulation.

George Edna Sherman Estate Sale Friday, May 28 & Saturday, May 29, 8 AM - 2 PM # 7 Briarwood, turn on Hawkins by Hawkins Methodist Church, Halls Ferry Road, keep straight. Lovely furnishings: dining room, Êtagère, sofas, corner shelves, lamps, washer, dryer, freezer, German & Austrian glassware. All quality, no clothes or knickknacks. Real Estate Agent on Site Please no early birds.

BLUE CLOTH LOVE seat and couch. $200 love seat and $300 couch. Good shape. 601-636-4961.

CANCE LLED!

BRUNSWICK POOL TABLE with accessories, $2500. Calders Spa with cover, seats 6, $800. 601636-6602.

FIREWOOD CITY Oak Firewood. Delivered, $90 load. 1/2 cord. Call 601-415-6326. FOR LESS THAN 45 cents per day, have The Vicksburg Post delivered to your home. Only $14 per month, 7 day delivery. Call 601-636-4545, Circulation Department. GO GREEN! SAVE on gas! Increase gas mileage 7 percent 14 percent, for gas or diesel. Call for details, 601-629-6231. MOTORIZED SCOOTER CHAIR. Good condition. Asking $500. 769-203-2630. NEW, BOWLENS YARD TRACTOR, used twice. 42 inch cut, 15.5 horse power Briggs and Stratton engine. $700. 601-636-1861.

17. Wanted To Buy

THE PET SHOP â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vicksburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pet Boutiqueâ&#x20AC;?

CASH PAID FOR COINS, war relics, antique books and collectibles. Call 601618-2727. WE HAUL OFF old appliances, lawn mowers, hot water heaters, junk and abandoned cars, trucks, vans, etcetera. 601-940-5075, if no answer, please leave message.

Finding the car you want in the Classifieds is easy, but now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practically automatic, since weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve put our listings online.

Bring Your Best Friend to our NEW LOCATION, 3508 South Washington Street Not so far, just 1 mile south of Belmont St. Same Great Pet Merchandise, Just More Room!

USED TIRES! LIGHT trucks and SUV's, 16's, 17's, 18's, 19's, 20's. A few matching sets! Call TD's, 601-638-3252.

K and K Crawfish Purged 5 sacks and up $1.25 a pound. Under 5 sacks $1.50 a pound.

318-207-6221

www.vicksburgpost.com

318-574-4572

WE PAY CASH! for gold, silver, diamonds & coins Scallions Jewelers 1207 Washington St. â&#x20AC;˘ 601-636-6413

WACKER 5600 WATT Commercial Generator. 11 horse power. $600 cash. 601-638-0066, 12 noon8pm. WEDDING DRESS. Strapless, size 8, ivory, comes with slip. $500. 601218-8583, leave message.

Fresh Seafood, & Sack Oysters,

Live Crawfish $1.50/ lb LIVE MUSIC Saturday 9pm-1am Bob Mitchell Band

19. Garage & Yard Sales 418 Garden Grove, Oak Park, Saturday, 7am-until, lots of great stuff, priced to go! HUGE GARAGE SALE. Saturday 7- noon. Lots of Everything. 5550 Oak Ridge Road. SATURDAY 7am1. 8773 Fisher Ferry Road. Bassinet, baby swing, lawn mowers, weed eaters, swimming pool, dishes, bedding, jewelry, perfume, pots & pans, ab lounger, Lots of miscellaneous. SATURDAY 7AMNOON. Exercise equipment, electronics, Name brand clothes, shoes, purses, children items. 1585 Porters Chapel Road.

C heapest Prices in Town

STRICKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SEAFOOD 601-218-2363

Crawfish Cooking Every Sunday

19. Garage & Yard Sales 2600 CLAY STREET, the old T.D.'s Tires building. Friday and Saturday 7am-until. Couches, dressers, dining room tables, etcetera. Washer, dryer, refrigerator, and lots more!

608 NEWITT VICK Drive, Openwood Plantation, Saturday, 5:30am-11:30am, Huge sale, stop here first, rain or shine, tools, power tools, hardware, t.v., appliances, smoker, exercise equipment, weights and bench, working HP printer, desks, file cabinets, entertainment center, trendy home dĂŠcor, bookshelf, bathroom sink, Jeep bikini top, shoes, clothes, VHS, DVD's, cheap, cheap, all must go!

07. Help Wanted

STILL HAVE STUFF after your Garage Sale? Donate your items to The Salvation Army, we pick-up! Call 601-636-2706. What's going on in Vicksburg this weekend? Read The Vicksburg Post! For convenient home delivery call 601-636-4545, ask for circulation.

21. Boats, Fishing Supplies What's going on in Vicksburg this weekend? Read The Vicksburg Post! For convenient home delivery, call 601-636-4545, ask for circulation.

22. Musical Instruments VARIOUS MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS for sale. 601831-8788 or 601-619-0279.

CALL 601-636-SELL AND PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TODAY.

07. Help Wanted

LOCAL FIRM

needs Work Oriented Person for position in professional office. Unlimited potential, benefits, great work environment! Please mail detailed resume to: Dept. 3724, The Vicksburg Post P.O. Box 821668, Vicksburg, MS 39182

Classified Advertising really brings big results!

40. Cars & Trucks

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY Score A Bullseye With One Of These Businesses! â&#x20AC;˘ Glass

â&#x20AC;˘ Construction

Barnes Glass

CONSTRUCTION

Quality Service at Competitive Prices #1 Windshield Repair & Replacement

Vans â&#x20AC;˘ Cars â&#x20AC;˘ Trucks â&#x20AC;˘Insurance Claims Welcomeâ&#x20AC;˘

AUTO â&#x20AC;˘ HOME â&#x20AC;˘ BUSINESS Jason Barnes â&#x20AC;˘ 601-661-0900

ROSS

New Homes

Framing, Remodeling, Cabinets, Flooring, Roofing & Vinyl Siding State Licensed & Bonded

Jon Ross 601-638-7932 ROYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CONSTRUCTION

â&#x20AC;˘ Bulldozer & Construction

RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL New Construction & Remodeling

BUFORD Haul Clay, Gravel, Dirt, Rock & Sand All Types of Dozer Work Land Clearing â&#x20AC;˘ Demolition Site Development & Preparation Excavation Crane Rental â&#x20AC;˘ Mud Jacking

River City Landscaping, LLC â&#x20AC;˘ Dozer / Trackhoe Work â&#x20AC;˘ Dump Truck â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Bush Hogging â&#x20AC;˘ Box Blade â&#x20AC;˘ Demolition â&#x20AC;˘ Debris Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Maintenance â&#x20AC;˘ Deliver Dirt -13 yd. load $85 locally â&#x20AC;˘ Gravel â&#x20AC;˘ Sand â&#x20AC;˘ Rock Res. & Com. â&#x20AC;˘ Lic. & Ins. Robert Keyes, Jr. (Owner) 601-529-0894

PATRIOTIC â&#x20AC;˘ FLAGS â&#x20AC;˘ BANNERS â&#x20AC;˘ BUMPER STICKERS â&#x20AC;˘ YARD SIGNS

Show Your Colors! Post Plaza

601-631-0400 CABINETS, ADDITIONS, METAL ROOFS, 1601 N. Frontage Rd. VINYL SIDING, PATIO DECKS, Vicksburg, MS 39180 DOZER & EXCAVATOR WORK, SEPTIC SYSTEMS, â&#x20AC;˘ HandyMan Lawn Care LOT CLEAN UP Services LICENSED

CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 601-636-4813 State Board of Contractors Approved & Bonded

â&#x20AC;˘ Printing

â&#x20AC;˘ Signs

â&#x20AC;˘ BONDED â&#x20AC;˘ INSURED

DWAYNE ROY 601-415-6997 JOSHUA ROY 601-831-0558

WE

ACCEPT MOST

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS .

e y r

SPEEDIPRINT & OFFICE SUPPLY

â&#x20AC;˘ Business Cards â&#x20AC;˘ Letterhead â&#x20AC;˘ Envelopes â&#x20AC;˘ Invoices â&#x20AC;˘ Work Orders â&#x20AC;˘ Invitations (601) 638-2900 Fax (601) 636-6711 1601-C North Frontage Rd Vicksburg, MS 39180

YOUR

RIVER CITY HANDYMAN BUSINESS Joe Rangel - Owner

601.636.7843 â&#x20AC;˘ 601.529.5400 From small repair projects to home upgrades...Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not satisfied until You are. Call today for your Free Estimate!

All Business & Service Directory Ads MUST BE PAID IN ADVANCE !

COULD BE HERE! Call Today! 601-636-SELL â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ In the Classified Business Directory, your ad is viewed daily by over 33,500 readers!

Call today about our special long term ad runs available in the Business Directory. We offer specials from 3 months to 12 months at a great price deal !

â&#x20AC;˘

June 24, 2010

Salute to

Tell your family story as only you can. This is one of our most popular sections every year with our readers and advertisers alike. Advertising Rates: 1/8 Page: . . . 1/4 Page: . . . 1/2 Page (H): 1/2 Page (V): Full Page: . . Back Page: . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. 4.75â&#x20AC;? x 2.5â&#x20AC;? . . 4.75â&#x20AC;? x 5.25â&#x20AC;? .9.75â&#x20AC;? x 5.25â&#x20AC;? . .4.75â&#x20AC;? x 10.5â&#x20AC;? . .9.75â&#x20AC;? x 10.5â&#x20AC;? . .9.75â&#x20AC;? x 10.5 . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

.$ 99 .$193 .$370 .$370 .$725 .$855

Business

Publication Date: Thursday, June 24, 2010 Advertising Deadline: Tuesday, June 08, 2010

â&#x20AC;˘ CLASSIFIEDS â&#x20AC;˘ 601-636-7355 â&#x20AC;˘ www.vicksburgpost.com â&#x20AC;˘


The Vicksburg Post

Saturday, May 29, 2010

29. Unfurnished Apartments 2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath. 1214 Main Street, central air/ heat. $495 plus deposit. 601-831-1728. CYPRESS HILL APARTMENTS- 402 Locust Street. 1 bedroom $375 monthly/ $250 deposit. Section 8 welcome. 601-456-3842.

Spring Move-In Special • 1 & 2 Bedroom Studios & Efficiencies • Utilities Paid No Utility Deposit Required

• Downtown Convenience to Fine Restaurants, Shops, Churches, Banks & Casinos

24. Business Services AFFORDABLE PAINTING. Quality work, interior/ exterior, pressure washing. References. 601-218-0263. BARBARA'S LAWN SERVICE. Grass too tall, give us a call. Low prices, great service. 601-218-8267, 601629-6464, leave message.

Toni Walker Terrett Attorney At Law 601-636-1109

29. Unfurnished Apartments CONFEDERATE RIDGE 780 Hwy 61 North

Let us be your Best Home Ever! Currently offering special pricing! Call for Details

601-638-0102

ROOFING & RESTORATION

•Roof & Home Repair (all types!) •30 yrs exp •1,000’s of ref Licensed • Insured

ELVIS YARD SERVICES. General yard clean-up, rake leaves, grass cutting, tree cutting, reasonable. 601415-7761. Quick response.

Vicksburg’s Most Convenient Luxury Apartments! • Cable Furnished! • High Speed Internet Access Available! 601-636-0503 2160 S. Frontage Rd. Vicksburg, MS 39180

BEAUTIFUL LAKESIDE LIVING

26. For Rent Or Lease DUPLEX-2 UNITS. Central air/ heat, tile flooring, 1 bath, 3 bedrooms, fenced backyard. $650. 601-218-4543. Rent or Lease this large family home. Fisher Ferry Road, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, bonus room, office. $1350 monthly, deposit/ references. 601-218-0214.

28. Furnished Apartments 1 BEDROOM. FURNISHED, with utilities, washer/ dryer, wireless internet, cable, garage. $200 weekly. 601-638-1746. BOARDING HOUSE. $100 weekly, includes cable and utilities. $150 Deposit. References required. 601-218-4543. CORPORATE APARTMENT. Fully furnished. $800 monthly, utilities, weekly cleaning, off street parking. 601-661-9747.

801 Clay Street • Vicksburg

Commodore Apartments 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms

Office or Retail Suite B-Apprx. 2450 sq. ft. Great Location! Easy Access! High Visability!

Brian Moore Realty Connie - Owner/ Agent

318-322-4000 EXECUTIVE PLAZA. North Frontage Road, #11, on front. Available June 1st. $600 monthly. Call 601-5293666.

BEAUTIFUL HOME ON Colonial Drive. 4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH. On quiet cul-de-sac. Fireplace. 2 Kitchens. Over 3,000 square feet. $1200 monthly. Call 601-831-4506. LARGE FAMILY HOME. Fisher Ferry Road, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, bonus room, office. $1350 monthly, deposit/ references. 601218-0214. LOS COLINAS. SMALL 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Cottage. Close in, nice. $795 monthly. 601-831-4506. NEAR DOWNTOWN 2 bedroom, stove, refrigerator, central air/heat, lighted parking. 601-636-7107 trip@msubulldogs.org

Voted #1 Apartments in the 2009 Reader’s Choice

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts. • Beautifully Landscaped • Lake Surrounds Community

• Pool • Fireplace • Spacious Floor Plans 601-629-6300 501 Fairways Drive Vicksburg

Call 601-636-SELL to sell your Car or Truck!

31. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 BED, 1 BATH, Grange Hall Road. Application, deposit required. Call 601831-4833. 3 BEDROOMS, 2 baths. 61 South area, deposit required. 601-619-9789.

29. Unfurnished Apartments

Bradford Ridge Apartments Live in a Quality Built Apartment for LESS! All brick, concrete floors and double walls provide excellent soundproofing, security, and safety.

601-638-1102 * 601-415-3333

MAGNOLIA MANOR APARTMENTS FOR ELDERLY & DISABLED CITIZENS! • Rent Based On Income

3515 MANOR DRIVE VICKSBURG, MS

Toll Free 1-866-238-8861 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

34. Houses For Sale

By owner- 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath completely remodeled brick home. Bovina area, hardwood & ceramic flooring, new metal roof, approx. 1558 sq. ft. $135,000. For appointment, 601-415-4518

BIDS ARE BEING Considered for home at 114 Hillside Circle. Bid period closes Friday June 11th, 2010. Call 601-636-2483 For Details.

JOHN ARNOLD NEED BUYERS: I have access to homes in all prices & sizes to show you, as well as land & commercial property. Central Drive: Nice home w/hardwood floors, freshly painted inside & out, fenced backyard, workshop & 16x16 covered back porch. $69,000. Call John Arnold, Vicksburg Realty, LLC.

Ask Us.

McMillin Real Estate 601-636-8193 VicksburgRealEstate.com

Candy Francisco FHA & VA Mortgage Originator Conventional ! Construction Mortgage ! First-time Loans Homebuyers !

601.630.8209

2150 South Frontage Road

bkbank.com

34. Houses For Sale

www.godfreyandivy.com

Call for More Information.

17895 Hwy.465 5BR/3BA 200 Ft. Pier w/ Gazebo 2 Boat Houses & Lifts Eagle Lake Fully Furnished 1010 Eagle Lake Shore Rd. 3BR/2BA-Log Cabin New Price Family Room w/ F.P Waterfront w/ Eagle Lake Pier

Call Jennifer Gilliland McMillin Real Estate 601-218-4538

601-634-8928 2170 S. I-20 Frontage Rd. www.ColdwellBanker.com www.homesofvicksburg.net Rental including Corporate Apartments Available

455 DOGWOOD LAKE DRIVE. By owner. Custom built, 4000 square feet brick home on 10 wooded acres on lake front. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, formal living and dining rooms, family room with fireplace, built-in bookcases and entertainment center. Large kitchen with breakfast room, office, laundry room upstairs and downstairs. Bonus room, walk-in attic over 3-car garage. Appointment only. $495,000. 601-6366823, 601-218-3600.

BEVERLY MCMILLIN Realtor

Big River Realty Rely on over 19 years of experience in Real Estate.

DAVID A. BREWER 601-631-0065

600 Blossom Lane 3 BR, 2 BA home with inground pool & large workshop.

HELP!!! My property listings in this ad keep selling! I need MORE LISTINGS! Give me a call to discuss putting your property on the market and IN THIS AD.

Bigriverhomes.com

601-415-9179

Mc Millin Real Estate

VicksburgMsRealEstate.com READ THE CLASSIFIEDS daily!

29. Unfurnished Apartments

•Mission Park Dr, Mission 66 Commercial lots, $50,500. •Pear Orchard Offices 1000 sq ft $73,500. •Redwood Rd 1 acre lots $20,000. •Newit Vick, 6 acres $72,500. •898 National St. Duplex $44,500. •Openwood, Clubhouse Cir., Shop 5000 sq ft $69,900. •Openwood 1112 Choctaw Tr.2600 sq ft built in 1985. Swimming pool, deck, fenced in yard. $249,900. •100 Wigwam 4 BR 2 BA $107,900. •1 Grey Creek 30 acres off Freetown Rd $187,500. •1800 Hwy 61 N 4750 sq ft $385,000. •Hwy 61 N Port Gibson 16,800 sq ft on Black River $220,000 •Savannah Hills lot $39,900.

Kay Odom..........601-638-2443 Kay Hobson.......601-638-8512 Jake Strait...........601-218-1258 Bob Gordon........601-831-0135 Tony Jordan........601-630-6461 Alex Monsour.....601-415-7274 Jay Hobson..........601-456-1318 Kai Mason...........601-218-5623 Daryl Hollingsworth..601-415-5549 Sybil Caraway....601-218-2869 Catherine Roy....601-831-5790

Rick McAllister..601-218-1150 Mincer Minor.....601-529-0893 Jim Hobson.........601-415-0211

V

ARNER

REAL ESTATE, INC

Don’t miss a day of The Vicksburg Post! Our ePost now available! Call 601-636-4545, Circulation for details!

29. Unfurnished Apartments

COME CHECK US OUT TODAY YOU’LL WANT TO MAKE YOUR HOME HERE

Jones & Upchurch Real Estate Agency Mary D. Barnes.........601-966-1665 Stacie Bowers-Griffin...601-218-9134 Rip Hoxie, Land Pro....601-260-9149 Jill Waring Upchurch....601-906-5012 Carla Watson...............601-415-4179 Judy Uzzle-Ashley....601-994-4663 Andrea Upchurch.......601-831-6490 Broker, GRI

MODERN OFFICE SUITE NEAR CORPS Museum. Kitchenette, shower, Wi-Fi, parking, 600 square feet. $495. 601-529-6093.

Open Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:30pm

40. Cars & Trucks

Licensed in MS and LA

GODFREY & IVY REALTY, INC

CINDY ROBERSON

!

34. Houses For Sale

1803 Clay Street www.jonesandupchurch.com

601-415-5880

Member FDIC

I-20 AREA. 2,000 square feet. Commercial. Call 601-218-9631.

“Simply the Best”

www.thelandingsvicksburg.com

Framing, additions, decks, porches & painting. All types remodeling & repairs. Metal roofs & buildings. Mobile home repairs. No job too small. Dewayne Kennedy 601-638-0337 601-529-7565

601-630-2921

3 BEDROOMS, 1 bath. Great city location, newly remodeled. $750 monthly plus deposit. 601-831-1728.

DIRT AND GRAVEL hauled. 8 yard truck. 601638-6740.

River City Lawn Care You grow it - we mow it! Affordable and professional. Lawn and landscape maintenance. Cut, bag, trim, edge. 601-529-6168.

1911 Mission 66

118 WOODLAND DRIVE 2 bedroom 2 bath, sun room, screen porch. $850 monthly. 601-218-7449.

601-618-0367

JOHNSON PAINTING AND MORE Interior & Exterior Painting, Faux Finishing, Staining, Sealing, Power-washing, Drywall & Minor Carpentry. 601-634-8709 (Hm) 601-415-8554 (Cell)

1800 SQUARE FOOT on Highway 61 North. Close to River Region Hospital. 601-218-2582.

✰✰FOR LEASE✰✰

Classic Elegance in Modern Surroundings

34. Houses For Sale

601-529-7376 1713 CLAY STREET. 1,200+ square feet available/ office space. Call 601618-8659 or 601-429-5005.

Secure High-Rise Building • Off Street Parking • 9 1/2 Foot Ceilings • Beautiful River Views • Senior Discounts •

30. Houses For Rent

TREY GORDON

J & H TREE SERVICES. Experienced, Licensed and Insured. Free estimates! Cut, trim, remove, no job too big or small. 601-4156074 or 601-618-0407

33. Commercial Property

601-638-2231

FREE ESTIMATES

FOR HOME REPAIR. 13 years experience. Plumbing, electrical, carpentery, painting. Call R. Smith. 601638-2606 or 601-415-1710.

KEEP UP WITH ALL THE LOCAL NEWS AND SALES... SUBSCRIBE TO THE VICKSBURG POST TODAY! CALL 601-636-4545, ASK FOR CIRCULATION.

✦ From $495.00 ✦

605 Cain Ridge Rd. Vicksburg, MS 39180

• Bankruptcy Chapter 7 and 13 • Social Seurity Disability • No-fault Divorce

32. Mobile Homes For Sale

C7

JIM HOBSON

601-636-6490 135 Sullivan Cove Eagle Lake, 3/2, lakeview, private street, community pier/ boat launch. Call Bette Paul Warner, 601.218.1800 McMillin Real Estate www.lakehouse.com

36. Farms & Acreage • 10.46 acres Freetown Rd., Bovina, rolling pasture, beautiful home sites, $55,000. • 21.52 acres China Grove Road, wooded, $85,000 (financing available) May & Campbell Land Co., 601-634-8255

37. Recreational Vehicles 2005 KEYSTONE. 27 foot, 1 slide, bumper pull, with hitch. New condition. $6,500. 601-638-3653 or 601-218-1838. 2008 HONDA TRX 500. Power steering, 63 hours, Mud Runners with rims, Front and rear racks. $5,000. Day time 601-636-7551.

40. Cars & Trucks

Classifieds Really Work!

29. Unfurnished Apartments

2006 GMC SIERRA. Short wheel base, like new, power windows, locks, seats, only 48,000 miles. Call Bobby, 601-636-0658, 601-218-9654. 2006 TOYOTA AVALON. 47,000 miles. $17,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601636-2855. 2007 DODGE CHARGER. 84,000 miles. $9,000. Call 601-415-0760. 2007 JEEP WRANGLER. $21,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601-636-2855. 2008 GMC SIERRA SLE. Red, extended cab, 2 wheel drive. Certified. Call Charlie Belden at 601-529-6677. Dealer. 2008 SATURN VUE XR. A great crossover SUV for the family. White, only 37,020 miles with a 100,000 mile power train warranty. Call Charlie Belden at 601529-6677. Dealer. 2008 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER. $30,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601636-2855. 2009 FORD E-150 Van. 8,000 miles. $20,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601636-2855.

BAD CREDIT? NO PROBLEM! 1999 Ford Explorer 1999 Ford Expedition 2000 Ford F150 2001 Chrysler Sebring 2004 Saturn L200 More to Choose From Gary Cars *Hwy 61 South 601-883-9995 For pre-approval* www.garyscfl.com

BIG DEAL AUTO SALES Retail

Our Price

‘03 Chevy Silverado

1991 Chevrolet Extended cab 1500 truck. 6 cylinder, cold air. 145,000 miles. Needs paint. $2,000. 601218-1448. 1995 FORD PICK UP. 4X4. Excellent condition. Well maintained. High Mileage. $4,000. Call 601279-6210 or 601-540-1827 1999 ¾ TON DODGE Diesel. 20 miles per gallon, no known mechanical defects. $5900. 817-705-8245. 2003 MAZDA PROTEGE. $8,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601-636-2855. 2004 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER. Like new, low miles, extra nice vehicle. Call 601634-0320. 2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA. 86468 miles, large 4 door sedan. Great for family runs, clean! Must sell! Only $8977. Call Charlie Belden at 601-529-6677. Dealer.

REALTOR®•BUILDER•APPRAISER

601-636-0502

2006 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER. Pewter, has passed 117-point Certification inspection. Lots of extra warranty for only $13,977. Call Charlie Belden at 601529-6677. Dealer.

2005 DODGE RAM pickup. 2 door. With Hemi, 29,000 miles. $13,000. 601218-4714.

29. Unfurnished Apartments

8,675 5,325 **56,000 actual miles 5,425

NEWLY RENOVATED. Completely furnished corporate apartment. All utilities provided including cable and internet. Laundry room, courtyard, security entrance. Great location. $750 - $900 month. 601-415-9027, 601-638-4386.

29. Unfurnished Apartments 1 Bedroom $400. 2 bedroom $425. 3 bedroom $450. All have $200 deposit. Refrigerator and Stove Furnished. 601-634-8290. 1, 2 AND 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS, downtown. $400 to $650 monthly, deposit required. 601-638-1746.

No matter what type of work you’re seeking, the Classifieds can help you find it!

Be the first to live in one of our New Apartments! Available January 1st 2010 SUPERIOR QUALITY, CUSTOM OAK CABINETS, EXTRA LARGE MASTER BEDROOM, & WASHER / DRYER HOOKUPS SAFE!!! ALL UNITS HAVE AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEM

SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT

5,400

2,900

3438 Halls Ferry Road 601-940-8480 601-218-7356

BOTTOM LINE AUTO SALES We finance with no credit check! Corner of Fisher Ferry Road and Jeff Davis Road. 601-529-1195. GAS SAVER! 2005 HONDA Civic Hybrid. Great for college or town. Only $10,477. Call Charlie Belden at 601-529-6677. Dealer. TOYOTA CAMRY. CLEAN, low miles. Financing available, no credit check. Call 601-634-0320. WANT A NEW Car, Truck or SUV? Please call Charlie Belden at Atwood Chevrolet 601-529-677, Dealer.

Classified Advertising really brings big results!

29. Unfurnished Apartments

1, 2, & 3 bedrooms and townhomes available immediately. and

Great Location, Hard-Working Staff

601-638-7831 • 201 Berryman Rd

AUDUBON PLACE For those adults who like a safe community setting with the best neighbors in Vicksburg.

VICKSBURGS NEWEST, AND A WELL MAINTAINED FAVORTIE. EACH WITH SPACIOUS FLOOR PLANS AND SOPHISTICATED AMENITIES.

FOR LEASING INFO, CALL 601-636-1752 www.parkresidences.com • www.bienvilleapartments.com

Discount for Senior Citizens available

The Car Store

415-3333 • 638-1102 • 636-1455

CARS • CARS • CARS• CARS• CARS 00 CADILLAC CATERA V1326AR................24 Months @ 270 per month ......$775*down 02 NISSAN SENTRA GXE V1915 ..........24 Months @ 320 per month ......$835*down 06 CHEVY COLBALT LS V1973 ..............24 Months @ 360 per month ......$925*down 02 FORD FOCUS SE V1778R ..................10 Months @ 260 per month ......$980*down 02 BUICK LESABRE V2003 ......................24 Months @ 270 per month ......$985*down 00 BUICK CENTURY LIMITED V1976 ....24 Months @ 280 per month ..$1060*down 95 TOYOTA AVALON XLS V1984 ..........24 Months @ 310 per month ....$1075*down 99 FORD MUSTANG V2001......................24 Months @ 310 per month ....$1075*down 04 CHEVY CAVALIER LS V1982 ..............24 Months @ 330 per month ....$1120*down 04 CHEVY MALIBU LS V1986 ................24 Months @ 350 per month ....$1165*down TRUCKS • TRUCKS • TRUCKS • TRUCKS 00 FORD EXPLORER XLS V1485RR ........17 Months @ 270 per month ......$880*down 00 DODGE DURANGO SPORT 4X4 V1981 24 Months @ 340 per month ..$1090*down 00 FORD F150 XLT EXT CAB V1910 ....24 Months @ 390 per month ..$1465*down 03 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT RV1995 24 Months @ 390 per month $1570*down 02 FORD EXPEDITION EDDIE BAUER V2004 24Months @ 370 per month ..$1735*down $

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

601-661-0765 • 601-415-3333

3,600

‘01 Nissan Quest V6SE

$

SHAMROCK A PA RT M E N T S

3,995

‘96 Ford Explorer XLT 4dr.

$

LUXURY CORPORATE APARTMENT. Newly furnished 1 BR, hardwood floors, utilities, 12 ft ceilings, wireless Internet, cleaning (2x/ month). $900 mthly. 601-456-4398 662-822-9222

5,550

‘97 Mazda Miata conv.

WE FINANCE OUR OWN ACCOUNTS *Plus Tax & Title, 0% APR WAC

601-638-6015 • 2800 Clay Street • Vicksburg, MS


C8

Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

MAY MADNESS SALE

*

0% APR up to 72 Months or Rebates Up To $6000 2010 GMC Sierra

2010 GMC Sierra

2010 GMC Sierra

Equipped with SLE package, skid plate, 4.8L V8 engine, H.D. trailering equipment package and much more. #41278

Equipped with work truck package, cruise control, automatic transmission, air conditioner and much more. #41287

Equipped with sliding rear window, power sunroof, front heated and cooled leather seats, navigation system, rear vision camera and more. #41296

Ext. Cab 4X4 SLE

Regular Cab

$

34,520 $ Sale Price - 32,495 $ Rebates - 5,000 M.S.R.P. -

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

$

*

27,495

2010 GMC Terrain

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

24,595

Crew Cab SLE

$

35,120 $ Sale Price - 32,995 $ Rebates - 5,000

$

*

44,995

Equipped with V8 engine, 1 year OnStar Safe and Sound, SLE preferred equipment package. #41281 $

30,605 $ Sale Price - 28,895 $ Rebates - 5,000 MAY MADNESS PRICE!

$

*

23,895

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

$

38,065 $ Sale Price - 35,995 $ Rebates - 5,000 M.S.R.P. -

$

30,995

2010 GMC Yukon XL

2010 GMC Yukon SLT

0% APR

0% APR

for

for

60 Months

In Lieu of Rebate

In Lieu of Rebate

Equipped with white diamond paint, 2nd row bucket seats, SLT equip. pkg., heated front and 2nd row seats, pwr. operated lift gate, 2nd row power release seat and more. #41199

Equipped with 2nd row bucket seats, power sliding sunroof, heated front & 2nd row seats, rear seat entertainment, 20” polished aluminum wheels, SLT package and more. #41300

$

50,674 $ Sale Price - 47,795 $ Rebates - 3,000 M.S.R.P. -

$

*

44,795 27,995 0% FINANCING

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

*

Crew Cab 4 Wheel Drive

60 Months

M.S.R.P. -

$

Equipped with 6-way power seat, 5.3L V8 engine, HD cooling, locking differential, HD trailering equipment, SLE package, Z71 package and more. #41290

25,010

*

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

51,940 $ Sale Price - 49,995 $ Rebates - 5,000

2010 GMC Sierra

$

$

*

17,495

M.S.R.P. -

2010 GMC Sierra

Equipped with front bucket seats, 6-way power seat adjuster, 5.3L V8, 6-speed automatic transmission, H.D. cooling, locking differential, 17” polished aluminum wheels and more. #41282

$

$

M.S.R.P. -

2010 GMC Sierra

#41284

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

$

22,500 $ Sale Price - 21,995 $ Rebates - 4,500 M.S.R.P. -

Extended Cab SLE

HARD TO FIND, IN STOCK NOW! M.S.R.P. -

Denali Crew Cab

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

MAY MADNESS PRICE!

$

51,155 Sale Price - 47,995 $ Rebates - 3,000 M.S.R.P. -

$

$

*

44,995

for 60 Months* with GMAC Approved Credit

ON EVERY 2010 GMC ACADIA Bobby Bryan Clyde McKinney An experienced sales staff to Tim Moody Baxter Morris Tim Moody meet all of your automotive needs. Preston Balthrop Salesman of the Mike Francisco Kevin Watson Month of April Come to George Carr, Zachary Balthrop Debbie Berry James “P’Nut” Henderson Herb Caldwell You’ll Be Glad You Did. For a complete listing of our used vehicles visit our website at www.georgecarr.com

GeorgeCarr BU IC K • PON T IAC • CADI LL AC • GMC

www.georgecarr.com • 601-636-7777 • 1-800-669-3620 • 2950 S. Frontage Road • Vicksburg, MS Special finance rates with GMAC approved credit. GMAC financing with approved credit. All rebates assigned to dealer. See dealer for complete details. Art for illustration purposes only, actual vehicle may vary.


THE VICKSBURG POST

TOPIC SATURDAY, m ay 29, 2010 • SE C TION D kids page D2 | comics D3

Pure Style

Karen Gamble, managing editor | E-mail: newsreleases@vicksburgpost.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 137

MUSIC

The Stone Temple Pilots, from left, are Dean DeLeo, Eric Kretz, Robert DeLeo and Scott Weiland.

STPs’ new album reflection of maturity By Sandy Cohen AP entertainment writer SANTA MONICA, Calif. — As he reflects on Stone Temple Pilots’ history, frontman Scott Weiland quietly breaks into song: “The long and winding road.” His band mates — guitarist Dean DeLeo, bassist Robert DeLeo and drummer Eric Kretz — spontaneously sing backup. It’s an apt description for the journey the quartet has been on from its grunge-rock beginnings to its self-produced, selftitled album, released this week. The band has weathered drugs, breakups, arrests, a changing music business and some 20 years together. They’re all grown-up now, with families and studios of their own, and they drew on that maturity — and their shared musical history — for the new record and world tour set to follow. “Every record’s different and that’s kind of the way we like it,” Weiland says. “If you look at it, the greatest recording band and writing band of all time, the Beatles, that was their philosophy, so why not try to aim at that kind of goal?” Some of the songs on “Stone Temple Pilots” were a decade in the making. Some, like the new single, “Between the Lines,” came together during sound checks on STPs’ recent reunion tour. Others “were just written right after dinner,” Kretz says. The sound is pure “sweet but meaty” STP, says Robert DeLeo. Perhaps the biggest difference from their five previous albums is that the foursome recorded and produced this one themselves. Using their own studios, they had unprecedented flexibility, time and control. “For my studio, I built it around all the experiences we had as bands and the studios we’ve been recording in, so it had all the pluses and the sound we wanted to get,” Kretz says. “But having the different studios, we could explore so many more avenues.” Musically, they challenged each other to reach new heights, says Dean DeLeo. “We’re our own worst critics,” he says. “It’s actually healthy, because there’s a lot of talent within this band, and if you want a song on the record or you want your song to be accepted, there’s a pretty high bar set.” Sitting side-by-side in a See STP, Page D2.

KATIE CARTER•The Vicksburg Post

Rocks placed around the Morses’ shrubs, giving the look of a riverbed, provide decoration and prevent erosion.

Disappointments few if gardens mimick nature Green living is a topic getting considerable coverage in the media today. Hundreds of new products designed to be friendlier to the environment have entered the marketplace. Local Master Gardener Jerry Morse has found earthfriendly practices well suited for managing the gardens surrounding the home he shares with his wife, Billie. Heavy shade dominates the front drive and garden area. When they got married six years ago, the front garden consisted of mature Pride of Mobile azaleas, some day lilies and low mondo grass near the front door, a four-tiered fountain and lots of untouched woodland, Billie Morse said. She and her late husband, Howard Miller, who built the home, preferred leaving the grounds as a natural setting so they could enjoy the wildlife that frequented the area. Morse’s first project was the addition of a small bed with four roses near the fountain. Next, a 6-foot retaining wall was built in the backyard to secure the soil on the ridge behind the house. A level spot was thus created at the top of the retaining wall where a small raised vegetable garden and rose beds now stand. A row of bright knock-out roses sit atop the wall and are visible from the dining room windows and courtyard garden area.

IN THE GARDEN MIRIAM

JABOUR

A 16-by-32-foot garden shed is located along the pathway between the lower section of the backyard and the level area at the top of the retaining wall. Morse stores garden equipment here and has a high wattage grow light inside that enables him to grow tomatoes all winter in the shed. He collects rainwater from the roof of the shed in two 550 black tanks outside. He collected more than 10,000 gallons last year from the shed roof, enough for all the water he needed for his vegetable and ornamental garden areas. A covered compost bin is nearby, and there he composts leaves and kitchen scraps. He relies on the compost combined with alfalfa tea — mix 12 cups alfalfa meal, 30 gallons water, ½ cup Epsom salts and 1 cup Miracle Grow in a large trash can and allow to sit three days, stir and pour ½ gallon on each rose or vegetable plant — cottonseed meal and other organic products for all his fertilizer needs. Erosion was a big challenge on the shady property. He took a course on permaculture and has used techniques learned

Jerry Morse opens the lid to his compost bin. there to control the water issues and build soil structure. He developed swells along the contours of the land that allow water to collect and infiltrate into the soil rather than run off and cause erosion. Low mondo grass, as well as the low groundcover hedges of Asian Star jasmine at the entrance to the driveway, also assists with water control. Leaves remain where they drop, decompose and build the soil, just as nature intended and leaves collected from the driveway are shred-

ded and recycled. “Gaia’s Garden – A Guide to Home Scale Permaculture” by Toby Hemenway and “Permaculture — A Designers Manual” by Bill Mollison are two good books that he recommends for those who wish to learn more about permaculture. “I learned a lot about shade gardening at Crystal Springs and have planted many of the shade plants I saw there,” Morse said. He grew up in Oklahoma and South Dakota and has had a lot to learn

about gardening in the South. With the water run-off addressed, he planted camellias, autumn fern, Chinese mahonia, fatsia, aspidistra, Persian shield and hosta in the shadiest woodland areas. Lady in Red hydrangeas, impatiens and wax begonias provide color along the dappled shade drive near the house along with the original day lilies. A Japanese maple, pittosporum, Sweet Bay magnolias under planted with camellia sasanqua and loropetalum and a grouping of miscanthus ornamental grass showcase the front of the house. Water from the roof is directed away from the house via round river stones over landscape cloth. They camouflage the drainage and blend in beautifully with the nearby wooden decking. Two large cement urns overflow with lush green ivy and flank the front steps to direct visitors to the main entrance of the home. Serious gardeners such as Morse readily admit gardening is a challenge, requires hard work and is a never-ending learning experience. Work with nature and you will never be disappointed. •

Miriam Jabour, a Master Gardener and Master Flower Show judge, has been active in the Openwood Plantation Garden Club for over 35 years. Write to her at 1114 Windy Lake Drive, Vicksburg, MS 39183.


D2

Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

Dr. Beach: New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Southampton sand leads best list SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hamptons hoi polloi probably assumed it was always No. 1. Coopers Beach, with pristine white sand gently sloping toward a shoreline of lapping waves, convenient parking and amenities and nary a gum wrapper in sight, has been selected as Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best beach in an annual survey released Friday to coincide with the start of the summer vacation season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New York has world-class beaches, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think a lot of people in the United States know about them,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Stephen Leatherman, director of Florida International Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Laboratory for Coastal Research. Known by the moniker Dr. Beach, this is Leathermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20th year of compiling a list of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top 10. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list includes two beaches in Florida, and Leatherman said he was not worried

Top 10 Here is the list of top 10 beaches for 2010 from Stephen P. Leatherman, director of Florida International Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Laboratory for Coastal Research, also known as Dr. Beach. 1. Coopers Beach, Southampton, N.Y. 2. Siesta Beach, Sarasota, Fla. 3. Coronado Beach, San Diego. 4. Cape Hatteras, Outer Banks, N.C. 5. Main Beach, East Hampton, N.Y. 6. Kahanamoku Beach, Waikiki, Honolulu. 7. Coast Guard Beach, Cape Cod, Mass. 8. Beachwalker Park, Kiawah Island, S.C. 9. Hamoa Beach, Maui, Hawaii. 10. Cape Florida State Park, Key Biscayne, Fla. The associated press

Main Beach in East Hampton, N.Y. about pollution from the oil spill affecting those locations. Siesta Beach in Sarasota took the No. 2 spot on the list, and Cape Florida State Park in Key Biscayne was No. 10. He said Cape Florida, on the southeast coast, â&#x20AC;&#x153;doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get

the wave activityâ&#x20AC;? that can lead to tar balls washing up. As for Siesta Beach, he said he had looked at currents and believes â&#x20AC;&#x153;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very low probability the oil will get to southwest Florida.â&#x20AC;? Leathermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list also features

another New York beach, Main Beach in East Hampton, Long Island, not far from Southampton. Main Beach takes the No. 5 spot on this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s survey. Rounding out the top 10 are Coronado Beach, Calif. (3), Cape Hatteras, N.C. (4), Kahanamoku Beach in Waikiki, Honololu (No. 6), Coast Guard

STP

Beach in Cape Cod, Mass. (7), Beachwalker Park in Kiawah Island, S.C. (8), and Hamoa Beach in Maui, Hawaii (9). Coopers Beach has been a contender for the top spot in recent years, but this is the first time a New York beach has made it to No. 1, Leatherman said. He considers factors

Puzzle answers, games, opinion polls and much more at:

Continued from Page D1. plush suite overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the band is united. But things havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always been so smooth for STP. Weiland, 42, has been dogged by drug problems since the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early days. His arrests for drug possession and stints in rehab led the group to cancel tour dates and contributed to their breakup in 2003. He went on to front Velvet Revolver, and the DeLeo brothers formed a band called Army of Anyone. Weiland says those side projects helped the rockers eventually reunite in 2008. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to fortunately do other musical projects with other people,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is inspiring for a while but it leads you back to feeling like, I miss home.â&#x20AC;?

www.kidscoop.com

The band hit the road for a reunion tour in 2008, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be away most of the summer supporting the new album. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still a big appetite for STP, says Michael Endelman, senior editor at Rolling Stone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s alternative guitar rock sound is still a big part of what modern rock is today,â&#x20AC;? he says. Maturity inspired STP to change its approach to the road as well. Instead of staying away for months at a stretch, the band builds in breaks for family time and sometimes brings their broods along. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to figure out a way where you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get burned out,â&#x20AC;? Weiland says.

601-636-5947 601-415-4114

REAL leechrealestate@cablelynx.com ESTATE www.vanessaleech.com VANESSA LEECH, Broker/Owner

Digital Printing

This page is made possible by these businesses who encourage all of us to support our most important resource in the world today â&#x20AC;&#x201C; our children! To advertise on this page call the advertising department at 601-636-4545 JOE BONELLI

JOE BONELLI

Can you say that five times fast? Australian children learn at an early age the five steps to protecting their skin from the sun. They are:

a T-shirt.

CONSTRUCTION C O M PA N Y I N C

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on protective clothing like on sunscreenâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;SPF 30+. on a hat with a brim. some shade. on sunglasses.

If you forget to VOLS VORSVODSVHHN and VOLGH your skin can burn. A burn from the sun is called a sunburn.

Find these things hiding in this picture: a banana, a house, a crayon, a fish, a surfboard and a dinosaur.

A sunburn can be very painful and is much like a burn from fire. Your skin will turn red, and if the sunburn is bad, you may get blisters. As the burned area heals, your skin peels, which can be very itchy.

After finding the hidden pictures, sort each object by the number of syllables.

â&#x20AC;˘ Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use soap, as this could dry and irritate your burned skin. â&#x20AC;˘ Stay cool and rest. â&#x20AC;˘ IMPORTANT: If watery blisters appear on your skin, you should see your doctor.

2150 Iowa Blvd Vicksburg, MS 39180 (601) 638-9164 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION SERVICE Donnie Remore Owner 560 HWY 80 Vicksburg, MS

â&#x20AC;˘ Take a cool bath or use wet cloths to cool down the burned part of your skin. â&#x20AC;˘ Apply special lotion for sunburned skin.

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like water quality and temperature, cleanliness, weather, sand, safety and facilities in making his list. Once a beach makes it to the top spot, it is retired from consideration in future years, he said. Leatherman added that designation as the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 1 beach usually brings as much as a 20 percent bump in tourism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both Main and Coopers beaches have been recognized in the past as being among the top 10 beaches in the country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and to now hold the top spot is especially significant when you consider the quality of the company weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in,â&#x20AC;? Moke McGowan, president of the Long Island Convention & Visitors Bureau, said in a statement. Main Beach was in the headlines in April after a 13-ton baby whale washed ashore and had to be euthanized.

The sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s are made up of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Too much to UV rays can not only a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skin, but also trigger more problems, such as skin and eye damage.

601-638-4441 New Tires Look through the newspaper for as many words as you can that you think relate to good health. Select five words. Try to use these words when speaking for the rest of the day.

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100% financing available to qualified RHS Direct and Guaranteed SFH loan Applicants. 33 years at 4.875%. Cash sale also available. For more information contact USDA-Rural Development at 601-894-1118, Ext. 4, or USDA Service Center, 27169 Hwy 28, Suite B, Hazlehurst, MS. 39083

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Collins Eye Clinic and Optical Boutique

C. Chris Collins, O.D.

www.resales.usda.gov

Boydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Accounting Service This page is made possible by these and Econotax businesses who encourage all of us to Year Round Service Since 1985 support our most important resource in the Federal/State Tax Returns Electronic Filing world today â&#x20AC;&#x201C; our children! To advertise on Refund Anticipation Loans this page call the advertising department at 722 Belmont Street 601-636-4545 ext. 151 601-634-1473 â&#x20AC;˘ 601-636-5701

Miller Electric, Inc.

RURAL DEVELOPMENT HOME OF THE WEEK

B u n n yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Child Care Inc.

2362/2364 Grove St. â&#x20AC;˘ Vicksburg, MS 2 WEEKS to 12 YEARS

Monday - Friday 5:30am - 6:00pm

David Vanderberry

2500 Hwy. 61 South Vicksburg, MS 39150 Fax 601-636-0066 Toll Free: 1-800-416-6797

601-634-8068

Everybody Needs A Helping Hand For The Health Of Their Family We have the ability to add flavor to liquid medicines for kids! Monday-Friday 9am-7pm Saturday 9am-3pm Closed Sunday

Owners - Angie Daquilla, R.Ph., Michael Jones, R.Ph.

Convenient Drive-thru Window

601-636-1493

601-631-6837 1670 Hwy. 61 N â&#x20AC;˘ Vicksburg

McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Vicksburg

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Down Home. Down the Streetâ&#x20AC;?

Extended Hours by Appointment â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til 10:30 pm.

Certificates Welcome.

601-638-3027

iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m lovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; it

MORGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Yazoo Valley Electric Power Association Locally Owned, Locally Involved www.yazoovalley.com 1-800-281-5098

WARFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SERVICENTER General Repair - Majorâ&#x20AC;˘Minor â&#x20AC;˘COMPUTER DIAGNOSTICS â&#x20AC;˘COMPLETE A/C SERVICE â&#x20AC;˘ELECTRICAL SERVICE â&#x20AC;˘FUEL INJECTION â&#x20AC;˘CV AXLES â&#x20AC;˘TUNE UPS

2610 1/2 CLAY STREET VICKSBURG, MS 39183 eywr

601-638-1752

Dr. Kimberly Winters, DMD

New Patients Welcome

Family Dentistry

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good Habits Start Early And Span A Lifetimeâ&#x20AC;?

4306 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601-636-2717 www.pigglywiggly.com

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 1002 Mission Park Dr. Mon.-Thurs. Vicksburg, MS 39180 www.drkimberlywinters.com ey Insurance â&#x20AC;˘ CHIPS

601-638-0321


Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post MONTY

BABY BLUES

ZITS

DILBERT

MARK TRAIL

BEETLE BAILEY

BIG NATE

BLONDIE

SHOE

SNUFFY SMITH

FRANK & ERNEST

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

NON SEQUITUR

THE BORN LOSER

GARFIELD

CURTIS

ZIGGY

ARLO & JANIS

HI & LOIS

CATHY

www.4kids

Each Wednesday in School·Youth

D3


D4

Saturday, May 29, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

Visit Your House of Worship The sponsors of this feature do so with the hope that more people will attend a church or synagogue of their choice on a weekly basis. David J. Boolos Accounting Business/Individual Tax Returns • Payroll Services 3527 Wisconsin Avenue 601-634-1512

Scallions Jewelers

From Dreams to Reality

Danny Scallion & Staff “We Buy and Sell Gold and Diamonds” Appraisals • In-Store Repair 1207 Washington Street 601-636-6413

Be A Big Fish.SM 1400 Hwy 61 North 601.636.1445 2125 North Frontage Rd 601.661.7312 702 Market St, Port Gibson, Ms 601.437.4271 www.riverhillsbank.com Member FDIC

Mike Hogan, Owner Roofing • Slate & Tile Roof Repair General Sheet Metal Work • Gutters 804 Madison Street 601-831-0002

Firearms Outfitters Jimmy Bagby Sales & Repair • Firearms & Accessories Inside Hadad’s Outdoor World 940 Hwy. 61 North 601-638-7621

Shawn Kurtz Custom Built Cabinets & Trim Shop

Kitchen Remodeling • Crown Molding Base Boards & Chair Rails Entertainment Centers 601-415-9540 © istockphoto.com/NoDerog

Magnolia Lawn & Tractor, Inc.

Investors Realty Group, Inc.

Philip Jones Electric Co.

Commercial • Residential • Industrial Family owned for Over 40 years 601-636-5199

Captain Jack’s

Open Thursday-Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3 1901 N. Frontage Road 601-638-7001

Thorne’s Collision Center

Randy Thorne, owner 4075 Pemberton Square Boulevard 601-636-8604 www.Thornescc@gmail.com

Stacia Johnson Alfa Insurance Co.

“Let’s Talk About Tomorrow” Auto • Home • Life 1640 Highway 61 N. 601-636-3433

Super Jr’s Grocery & Meats J. M. Tidwell, Jr. 1490 Highway 61 N. 1095 Oak Ridge Road 4300 Nailor Road

Jackson Auto & Towing Michael & Sandy Jackson 97 Sammy Young Road 601-636-1328 601-218-1831

Collins Eye Clinic and Optical Boutique

We Have Our Eyes On You 1206 Mission 66 601-638-2081

Heard Electric Company, Inc. In Business Since 1952 Commercial • Industrial 601-636-4711

S&S Automotive & Transmission 3660 Hwy. 61 South 601-661-0039

BancorpSouth

820 South Street • 601-636-3752 1240 Hwy. 61 N • 601-634-4347 3312 Pemberton Blvd. • 601-634-6750 3134 Indiana Avenue • 601-634-4340 www.bancorpsouth.com

Sanders-Hollingsworth Builders, LLC

Remodeling • New Homes • Additions Drainage Improvements 601-629-7808

Bob Bell Insurance, Inc.

Life, Health & Employee Benefits Quality Plans, Personal Service at Great Rates 100 Pear Orchard, Suite F 601-638-7781 Bob Bell, CLU & Michele Bell - Agents

Vicksburg Toyota

4105 East Clay Street Vicksburg MS 39180 601-636-2855 1-800-499-5926

Porter Paints & Decorating Center Johnny Means & Staff 1882 South Frontage Road 601-630-9090

Neill Gas, Inc.

No. 4 Port Terminal Circle Industrial Harbour 601-636-0924

Thomas W. Houseal, Doctor of Chiropractic 1825 N. Frontage Road, Suite D 601-634-1600

RiverHills Bank

Riverbend Construction Company, Inc.

Danny Rice / Broker “Land is our Business” 601-638-2236 • cell: 601-529-2847 www.investorsrealtyinc.net

New Health Chiropractic Center

H

ow do dreams become reality? How did such qualities as freedom, individualism, justice and opportunity advance from conception to completion? What was the catalyst here? The answer to these questions is also the reason we celebrate Memorial Day. These dreams did not become reality without the sacrifice of thousands of lives in battle. We live in freedom today, thanks to the heroes who gave up their fledgling futures for us. They gave us a personal definition of patriotism. Though these courageous men and women were afforded little goodness in battle…there was one item many insisted on keeping close to their heart. That was the Bible, the comfort of God’s Holy Word that saved souls even when life could not be preserved. Honor those who have served our country when you worship this week.

Sunday Acts 2.1-13

Monday Acts 2.14-28

Tuesday Acts 2.29-47

Wednesday Acts 3.1-10

Thursday Acts 3.11-26

Friday Acts 4.1-22

Saturday Acts 4.23-37

Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com

Superior Heating & Cooling Larry Ray, Owner Sales • Service • Installation Commercial • Residential 601-638-9225

Automatic Transmission Service Donnie Remore, Owner 560 Highway 80 601-638-4441

Hill City Radiator

New & Used Radiators Truck & Farm Equipment 1717 Washington Street 601-636-0162

Miller’s Tire Mart

“Your Goodyear Dealer” 1709 Clay Street 601-636-7551 Robert & Marion Murphy

Atwood Chevrolet

2339 N. Frontage Road 601-638-1252 Parts: 601-638-4131 Body Shop: 601-638-4445 www.atwoodchevrolet.com

Helping Hand Family Pharmacy Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., Sun. Closed 1670 Highway 61 North 601-631-6837

The County Market

2101 Clay Street Jerry Stuckey, Manager

Warfield’s Service Center

Carl Smith & Employees Your Full Service Center Tune Up • A/C Service Brake Service • General Repairs 2610 1/2 Clay Street 601-638-1752

Wesley B. Jones Electrical Co. Residential • Commercial 50’ Bucket Trucks 6611 Paxton Road 601-636-9591 Fax: 601-636-9413

Dave’s Custom Meats

We process deer meat Specializing in Smoked Sausage 1580 Highway 80 601-636-0342

Blackburn Motor Company

www.blackburnmotor.com • Blackburn Nissan 2135 N. Frontage Road 601-636-2766 • Blackburn Chrysler Dodge Jeep 2195 N. Frontage Road 601-661-7565

Shipley Do-Nuts

1405 Clay Street, 601-638-3024 3424 Halls Ferry Road, 601-638-6675 885 Hwy. 61 N. Frontage Road, 601-630-9244

Griffith Florist

When The Occasion Calls For Flowers 1019 Jackson Street 601-636-9461

McAlister’s Deli

Sandwiches • Soups • Spuds • Salads Lunch • Dinner • Take Out & Catering 4200 Clay St. 601-619-8222

Breithaupt Real Estate, LLC 2735 Washington Street 601-638-6243

Foam Packaging, Inc.

Manufacturers of Extruded Polystyrene Foam Sheets, Egg Cartons & Containers 35 Stennis Drive • Vicksburg, MS 39180 P. O. Box 1075 • Vicksburg, MS 39181 601-638-4871 • 601-636-2655 (fax) www.foam-packaging.com

Cook Tractor Company

“Your Kubota Dealer” 680 Hwy. 80 601-636-4641 Steve & William Cook & Family

Leech Real Estate of Vicksburg Vanessa Leech, Broker/Owner www.VanessaLeech.com 601-636-5947

Billy Shinn 1029 Hwy. 61 North 601-636-3461

Mobil 1 Lube Express Charles & Betty Pendleton 4326 Highway 61 South 601-631-8000

Caruthers HVACR, LLC The Caruthers Family Sales • Service • Installation Residential • Commercial • Industrial 3300 Washington Street 601-636-9433

Taco Casa Two Locations To Serve You! Drive-In • Drive-Thru • Takeout Pemberton Blvd. 601-638-4026 Delchamps Plaza 601-638-6895 Catering 601-638-9408

Barnes Auto Glass & Windshield Repair Jason Barnes Mobile Service to Your Home or Office 1900 S. I-20 Frontage Road 601-661-0900

Heritage House Nursing and Retirement Center Robert Greer, Administrator, and Staff 3103 Wisconsin Avenue 601-638-1514

Corner Drug Store Joe A. Gerache, Sr. & Joe A. Gerache, Jr. 1123 Washington Street 601-636-2756

Taylor’s Audit & Tax Service Carlis Abney & Staff 4402 Halls Ferry Road 601-636-7268 or 601-636-1661

River City Body & Wrecker Service David Vanderberry & Staff Foreign and Domestic 2005 Highway 61 South 601-636-1493

Ricky’s Welding & Machine Shop 1721 Levee Street 601-638-8238 Rick Lowery & Employees Easterling Enterprises, Inc. dba

T.D.’s Tires & Accessories 2704 Clay Street Vicksburg, MS 39183-3131 601-638-3252

George Carr Buick • Pontiac • Cadillac • GMC 2950 S. Frontage Road 601-636-7777 • 1-800-669-3620 www.georgecarr.com

Vicksburg Telephone Systems, Inc. Robert Henley & Staff 955 Hwy. 61 N. Bypass 601-634-1838 www.vicksburgtelephone.com

Battlefield Discount Drugs John Storey 3040A Indiana Avenue 601-636-3374

Kinder Morgan Bulk Terminals, Inc. Port of Vicksburg Vicksburg, Mississippi 601-636-6643

“In God I have put my trust; I will not be afraid. ” – Psalm 56 : 11

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May 29, 2010

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