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RELIGION • B1

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OUR GIRLS – PART II

HERITAGE FEST

Annual celebration next weekend in Port Gibson

Church comes to Haitian orphans’ aid

SATURDAY, MARcH 20, 2010 • 50¢

SPORTS

Spring is here

By Danny Barrett Jr. dbarrett@vicksburgpost.com

MOvING ON Ole Miss advances past Memphis in NIT c1

WEATHER Today: Partly cloudy; high of 71 Tonight: Showers; low of 44 Mississippi River:

28.8 feet Rose: 1.7 foot Flood stage: 43 feet

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DEATHS • Herschel J. Watson Sr.

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TODAY IN HISTORY 1727: Physicist, mathematician and astronomer Sir Isaac Newton dies in London. 1815: Napoleon Bonaparte returns to Paris after escaping his exile on Elba, beginning his “Hundred Days” rule. 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s influential novel about slavery, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” is first published in book form after being serialized. 1899: Martha M. Place of Brooklyn, N.Y., becomes the first woman to be executed in the electric chair as she is put to death at Sing Sing for the murder of her stepdaughter. 1969: John Lennon marries Yoko Ono in Gibraltar. 1985: Libby Riddles of Teller, Alaska, becomes the first woman to win the Iditarod Trail Dog Sled Race. 1999: Bertrand Piccard of Switzerland and Brian Jones of Britain become the first aviators to fly a hot-air balloon around the world nonstop.

INDEX Business ...............................A5 Classifieds ............................ C6 Comics ..................................A6 Puzzles ..................................D3 Dear Abby ...........................D3 Editorial ................................A4 People/TV ............................D2

cONTAcT US Call us

Advertising ...601-636-4545 Classifieds ...... 601-636-SELL Circulation .....601-636-4545 News................601-636-4545

E-mail us

See A2 for e-mail addresses

ONLINE www.vicksburgpost.com VOLUME 127 NUMBER 79 4 SECTIONS

Armstrong to restart production at port plant

KATIE CARTER•The Vicksburg PosT

Today is the first day of spring, and the signs are everywhere. At her Vicklan Street home, Hannah Hendrix, 20, above right, takes in the sunshine with her “Nanny,” Nettie Russell, and fellow Mississippi State student Josh Walden, 22. Below, at left, the Bradford pear trees at

Bradford Ridge apartments on Cain Ridge Road are in full bloom, and, at right, a patch of daffodils blows in the breeze. Expect a chance of isolated thunderstorms today and a high in the mid-70s. Temperatures will drop into the 30s tonight.

Colby HopKIns•The Vicksburg PosT

KATIE CARTER•The Vicksburg PosT

Armstrong World Industries will restart veneer production at its Port of Vicksburg plant in late April, a spokesman at the company’s Lancaster, Pa.-based corporate office said Friday. The hardwood manufacturing plant had closed and cut 124 jobs in January 2009 as part of downsizing associated with the recession and the housing market collapse. The restart is expected to employ 77 people, said Beth A. Riley, vice president of investor relations, communication and diversity, in an e-mail response to inquiries about recent activity at the plant. “We are posting the available jobs through the state job service and Express Employment Professionals temporary agency,” Riley said, adding the Vicksburg operation will supply two engineered wood plants in Statesville, N.C., and Somerset, Ky. Shutdowns cut 600 jobs at the global producer of flooring products and ceiling systems’ plants in Vicksburg, Jackson, Texas, Missouri, Nebraska and Tennessee during 2009. The company had said when the Vicksburg closing was announced last year that it could be temporary, depending on market forces. Worldwide employment at the company dropped to 10,800 in 2009 from 12,200 in 2008 due to declines in sales volumes, according to the company’s annual report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. At year’s end, Armstrong operated 36 manufacturing plants in nine countries, with 22 in See Plant, Page A7.

Cha-ching: Casinos President making final appeals post February gains DeCISION IN SIGHT

ahead of House health care vote By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — One by one, Democratic fence-sitters began choosing sides Friday, and the long, turbulent struggle over landmark health care legislation tilted unmistakably in President Barack Obama’s direction. In full campaign mode, his voice rising, the president all but claimed victory, declaring to a cheering audience in Virginia, “We are going to fix health care in America.” With the showdown vote set for Sunday in the House, Obama decided to make one final, personal appeal to rank-and-file Democrats, arranging a visit today to the Capitol. Republicans, unanimous in opposition to the bill, complained anew about its cost and reach. Under a complex — and controversial — procedure the Democrats have devised,

The associaTed Press

President Barack Obama speaks at an event at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Friday. a single vote probably will be held to send one bill to Obama for his signature and to ship a second, fix-it measure to the Senate for final passage in the next several days. Democratic leaders and Obama focused last-minute lobbying efforts on two separate groups of Democrats, 37 who voted against an earlier

bill in the House and 40 who voted for it only after first making sure it would include strict abortion limits that now have been modified. Reps. John Boccieri of Ohio, and Allen Boyd and Suzanne Kosmas of Florida became the latest Democrats to announce support for the bill See Health care, Page A7.

By The Associated Press Mississippi’s state-licensed casinos showed post-recession life last month while posting a strong rebound in money won from players, the State Tax Commission reported Friday. Gamblers left behind $222.3 million in February, up 15 percent from $192.3 million in January. The state’s casinos also managed a 3.6 percent increase from the $216.5 million won in February 2009, the first such comparative gain since the economic meltdown in the fall of 2008. Casinos along the Mississippi River, including Tunica County, Vicksburg and Natchez, enjoyed a 24.9 percent jump in revenue from January to February, taking in $126.6 million last month. Casinos along the Mississippi coast, which have recently been facing more competition from Florida tribal casinos, posted a 5.9 percent

gain, winning $95.8 million. The boost for Mississippi exceeded that of neighboring Louisiana, where statelicensed casinos won 10 percent more in February than in January, but still were down 6 percent from February 2009. Allen Godfrey, deputy director of the Mississippi Gaming Commission, said February has historically been a strong month for the casinos, perhaps in part because people are starting to get tax refunds. However, Godfrey noted that Louisiana and other casino states have recorded recent revenue gains that could indicate the business is shaking its downturn. “It’s a good development and we hope it continues,” he said. Tax revenue for February totaled $21.5 million, bringing the Mississippi’s fiscal year total to $182 million. At See Casinos, Page A7.


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Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

Lenten Fine Arts Series

thanks & appreciation

ISSN 1086-9360 PUBLISHED EACH  DAY In The Vicksburg Post Building 1601-F North Frontage Road Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180

‘Thanks’ not enough

News, Sports, Advertising, Business: 601-636-4545 Circulation: 601-636-4545 Fax: 601-634-0897 SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION By Carrier Seven Days Per Week $14 per month Six Days Per Week (Monday-Saturday) $11.25 per month Fri., Sat., Sun. & Mon. $10.75 per month Advance payments of two months or more should be paid to The Vicksburg Post for proper credit. All carriers are independent contractors, not employees. By Mail (Paid In Advance) Seven Days Per Week $77.25/3 months Sunday Only $47.25/3 months DELIVERY INFORMATION To report delivery problems, call 601-636-4545: Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Holidays: 7 a.m.-9 a.m. KATIE CARTER•The Vicksburg Post

Member Of The Associated Press The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to the use for republication of all the local news and photographs printed in this newspaper. All other rights are reserved by Vicksburg Printing and Publishing Company Inc.

Postmaster Send address changes to: The Vicksburg Post Post Office Box 821668 Vicksburg, Mississippi 39182 National Advertising Representatives: Landon Media Group 805 Third Ave. New York, NY 10022 • Mississippi Press Services 371 Edgewood Terrace Jackson, MS 39206 Political advertising payable in advance Periodicals Postage Paid At Vicksburg, Mississippi

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Scottye Adkins, from right, Deborah Felt and Dorothy McInnis sing “Masquerade” from “The Phantom of the Opera” during Broadway Meets the Bible, part of The Church of the Holy Trinity, Episcopal’s, Lenten Fine Arts Series. The

Former cop again appeals extortion conviction By Danny Barrett Jr. dbarrett@vicksburgpost.com A former Vicksburg police officer convicted of taking bribes to protect what he thought were shipments of cocaine into the city has asked a federal judge to throw out his sentence. Kevin Dewayne Williams contends he relied on erroneous advice from his attorney during his October 2007 criminal trial to plead guilty to an extortion charge, according to a motion filed this week in

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federal court in Jackson. He was sentenced initially to 188 months in prison by U.S. District Judge David Bramlette. It was upheld last year by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which also upheld the subsequent reduction of his sentence to 120 months by the district court. The reduction was due to the court’s taking into account Williams’ service in the Army after his indictment. At the time of his conviction, Williams was represented by Jackson-based attorney

clubs Vicksburg High Class of ‘75 Reunion — Planning meeting, 9:30 today; LD’s Restaurant on Halls Ferry Road. MXO Girls — 10:30 today; Alcorn branch office, Cherry Street. Mu Xi Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority — Noon today, monthly meeting; the Rev. Casey D. Fisher Multipurpose Building, 2715 Alcorn Drive. Alma J. Brown Youth Council — 4 today, pre-Easter talent practice; Fidelity Lodge, 916 Walnut St. Levi’s — A Gathering Place; 7-10 tonight, music by Grassfire; donations appreciated. Magnolia Ballroom Dancers’ Association — 8-11 tonight, monthly dance; Forestry Auditorium of the Agricultural and Forestry Museum, Lakeland Drive, Jackson; info and price: Nola Gibson, 601-506-4591 or nolakdances@comcast.net. Letitia Street Neighborhood Reunion — Planning meet-

ing, 3 p.m. Sunday; 245 Valley View Lane; 601-218-3869. Rosa A. Temple Class of 1960 — 5 p.m. Sunday, planning reunion and refreshments; LD’s Kitchen on Mulberry Street. Vicksburg Kiwanis — No meeting Tuesday. Hinds Community College Preview Night — 4-6:30 p.m. Tuesday; Angel Powell, 601857-3744; Vicksburg campus on Mississippi 27. Jackson Audubon Society — 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; Dave Hill, falconer; Eudora Welty Library, 300 N. State St. Openwood Garden — 7 p.m. Tuesday; 5 Beauguard Drive. Fashion and Hair Show — 7 p.m. March 27; Martha Gail Foster, Martha’s Designer Labels for Less and other vendors; tickets: $10; Unique Banquet Hall; Dorothy Holmes, 601-638-5284; Ida Kennedy, 601-278-0054; Barbara Johnson, 601-636-9597; sponsored by National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women.

STEP INTO SPRING WITH A NEW

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3150 S. Frontage Road • 601-636-5810

1318 Washington St. •601-638-3442

Monday - Saturday - 8am - 5:30pm

sergeant in the city’s narcotics division. Williams, 39, was arrested in March 2007 in Hawaii, where he was serving as an Army military police officer. He is serving his sentence at a federal prison camp in Seagoville, Texas, a low-security facility near Dallas. His release date is Dec. 1, 2016, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons. •

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

St. Aloysius/St. Francis Alumni Banquet — April 24; to submit change of address for invitations or questions, 601-630-9762. Retired Education Personnel of Vicksburg-Warren County — Scholarship applications for college students majoring in teach education; available at Vicksburg Warren School District instructional services office, Hinds Community College or Walter Sheriff at 601-638-7812; deadline: May 14.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS Overeaters Anonymous — 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays; www.oa.org; 1315 Adams St. Not Tonight, Deer — 5:307 p.m. Monday; free seminar with Jim Brannon and Ann Sherard, master gardener; Warren County Extension Service; 601-636-5442. Vicksburg Al-Anon — Noon Tuesday; second floor, First Presbyterian Church, 1501 Cherry St.; 601-634-0152. Friends and Flowers Plant

Swap — 1-3 p.m. March 27; bring potted perennial or house plant; 601-619-7844; 1022 Crawford St.

BENEFITS Taking It Back Outreach Ministry — 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesdays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays; winter clothes half price; plus-size, children’s and men’s clothes; all bags of clothes, $5 Saturday; 1314 Fillmore St.; 601-638-0794 or 601-831-2056. Car Wash — 8 a.m.-1 p.m. March 27; LD’s Restaurant on Halls Ferry Road; for Vicksburg Eagle youth football.

churches House of Peace Worship — Ninth anniversary appreciation service for Linda Sweezer, pastor, 3 p.m. Sunday; Eyvone Smith, guest speaker; 2372 Grove St. King Solomon Baptist — 150th church anniversary; noon today, youth balloon launch and cookout; 2 p.m. Sunday, service with the Rev.

DOG

OBEDIENCE CL ASSES REGISTRATION MARCH 22ND.

601-634-0199

Easter Gift Headquarters!

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601-636-5947 601-415-4114

REAL leechrealestate@cablelynx.com ESTATE www.vanessaleech.com

Letters to the editor:

post@vicksburg.com

Sanford Knott. Vicksburgbased attorney Josie Mayfield Hudson has represented Williams since in his appeal process. Williams claims in the new court documents that he was led to believe he would get a shorter prison sentence by pleading guilty although there was no plea agreement with prosecutors. Prosecutors say Williams took bribes totaling $3,000 in November 2002 and May 2003 from undercover FBI officers. At the time, Williams was a

community calendar

Post photographers:

photography@vicksburgpost.com

weekly performances, which feature a gumbo lunch, will wrap up Friday with a 12:05 p.m. show by Beechwood Elementary Honor Choir. Lunch is $10. Call 601-636-0542 for reservations.

I was shocked to see my daughter, Avery Elizabeth Bell, on the front page of The Vicksburg Post as we sat in a hospital room in New York City. Avery is a miracle baby due to her diagnosis of Turner’s Syndrome. Most babies with that diagnosis do not live past 22 weeks in the womb. Avery was born June 9, 2009. She had two congenital heart defects. One was repaired successfully at 2 weeks old and the other at 8 months old in New York. While there are also other concerns, she is expected to live a normal, healthy life. There has been such an outpouring of support and love from my hometown community of Vicksburg. The words “thank you” seem so minuscule when trying to show my extreme gratitude to all of those who have shown love, given support and aided us financially. I know in my heart that Avery is with us today due to God’s grace and the multitude of prayers sent up from people not only in Mississippi, but all around the United States. So many have helped, but I would like to say a special thank you to Bowmar Baptist Church for helping with our flights and handling donations, not to mention getting the message out of our prayer needs. They have not only called themselves a church, they are living as the church. My Pearl Upper Elementary coworkers not only donated funds, but their own personal sick days allowing me to be with Avery through surgery, recovery and appointments. In Vicksburg, City Hall, former Mayor Laurence Leyens, The Vicksburg Post, Kim Hopkins, Mrs. Barbara of Willingham’s, Ms. Norma of Frederick’s, Mrs. Doris at This’n’That Gifts and More and Redwood Elementary staff, just to name a few, have all been so supportive and loving to us. All of our dear friends and family — we couldn’t have made it through everything without them. Thank you all from the bottom of my heart! Megan Beauman Bell Vicksburg

G I F T & B R I DA L R E G I S T R Y

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Jesse Horton, guest speaker; the Rev. R.D. Bernard, pastor; 1401 Farmer St. Pleasant Valley M.B. — Choir rehearsal, 11:30 today; Willing Worker Club, 3 p.m. today; 2585 N. Washington St. Southside Baptist — Revival; Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Monday-Friday, 7 p.m.; evangelist Don Savell, guest speaker; Ronnie Lacaze, guest song leader; 601-631-0047; 95 Baptist Drive. St. Mark Free Will Baptist — Bible study, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; the Rev. J.D. MaGee, interim pastor; 2606 Hannah St. Jackson Street M.B. — Women’s conference: 6 p.m. Friday, evangelist Hope Evans, speaker; the Revs. John W. Carroll Sr. and Mike Wesley Sr.; Marq Powell and Voices of Christ; March 27: 9 a.m. brunch; tickets $10; Betty Tyler and Fredessa Sharp, speakers.

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Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

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2 found guilty in separate trials Day care students, driver hurt in wreck In separate trials, jurors this week found two defendants guilty in Warren County Circuit Court. Roosevelt Harris, 18, 270 Railroad Alley, was convicted of selling cocaine in a twoday trial with Circuit Judge M. James Chaney presiding. The verdict carries a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison and $5,000 to $1 million in fines. The case was prosecuted by Assistant District Attorneys Dewey Arthur and Lane Campbell, with James “Buck” Penley as the defense attorney. Separately, Harris is set for trial June 7 for the murder of Antonio Turner, 25, who was shot while in a car on Alcorn Drive March 15, 2009. Also following a two-day trial with Chaney presiding, Algernon Williams, 25, 308 Pleasant Valley Drive, was found guilty of shooting into a dwelling. Williams faces a max of 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. He was defended by Mike Bonner and Travis Vance, with Arthur and Campbell prosecuting. Sentencing for Harris and Williams, who are in the Warren County Jail, was delayed pending completion of pre-sentencing reports. Also this week: • Derrick Lashawn Brown, 32, 203 Signal Hill Road, pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, third offense, and was sentenced by Chaney to a year of house arrest followed by four years of probation, plus fines and court costs of $2,322.50. Brown was arrested Dec. 26, 2008. • Mary Ann Buck, 54, 20 Waterwell Road, pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and was sentenced by Chaney to three years in prison followed by five years of probation, plus fines and costs of $5,622.50. Buck was arrested Jan. 29, 2009. • Delton Burns, 37, 5737 Gibson Road, pleaded guilty to possession of precursor substances and was sen-

court report from court records

tenced by Chaney to six years in prison followed by two years of probation, plus fines and costs of $2,322.50. Burns was arrested April 24, 2008. • Rajesh Dyron Ellis, 22, 802 Reed St., pleaded guilty to shooting into a dwelling and was sentenced by Judge Isadore Patrick to 168 days in jail followed by one year of house arrest and five years of probation, plus fines and costs of $1,322.50. Ellis was arrested May 25. • James Stacy Fondren, 40, 3192 Star Road, Florence, pleaded guilty to eluding an officer and was sentenced by Patrick to two years in prison to be served concurrently with a prison term imposed in Webster County Circuit Court. Fondren was indicted by a Warren County grand jury in August. • Derrick Dwayne Funches, 36, 2326 Iowa Ave., pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and was sentenced by Patrick to seven years in prison plus fines and costs of $3,000. Funches was arrested Dec. 17, 2008. • Eddie Harris, 43, 646 Cain Ridge Road, was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Patrick to the MDOC Restitution Center for the payment of $1,715 in restitution, fines and costs, followed by two years of house arrest and probation until his original five year sentence is completed. He was arrested Aug. 20, 2002, for auto theft. • Cairo P. Howard, 29, 2715 Jeannette St., pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance and was sentenced by Patrick to seven years in prison followed by five years of probation, plus fines and costs of $2,622.50. Howard was arrested April 1. • Dalton W. Hynum, 41, 678 Kirkland Road, pleaded guilty to possession of precursor substances and possession of a weapon following a felony conviction and was sentenced by Chaney to 10 years in prison followed by five years of pro-

bation, plus fines and costs of $3,122.50. Hynum was arrested Dec. 15, 2008. • Joseph Carl Lane, 18, 733 Johnson St., pleaded guilty to robbery and was sentenced by Chaney to two years in prison followed by five years of probation, plus fines and costs of $1,822.50. Lane was arrested Aug. 13. • Kimberly Lynn McCarty, 36, 1001 First North St., was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Patrick to the MDOC Restitution Center in Flowood for the payment of $3,026.60. She was arrested Jan. 9, 2007, for false pretense. • David Benard Minor Jr., 26, 108 Second Ave., pleaded guilty to statutory rape-child 14 or 15 and was sentenced by Patrick to five years of probation plus fines and costs of $3,322.50. Minor was arrested June 17. • Corey Leon Patterson, 32, 801 First East St., pleaded guilty to receiving stolen property and was sentenced by Chaney to one year in prison followed by three years of probation, plus fines and costs of $1,937.50. Patterson was arrested April 10. • Anthony Reynolds, 49, 128 Village Drive, pleaded guilty to DUI third offense and was sentenced by Patrick to Drug Court for a period not to exceed five years, plus restitution, fines and costs totaling $3,822.50. Reynolds was arrested Jan. 10. • Christopher Carlton Strawbridge, 29, 70 Upland Drive, pleaded guilty to three counts of uttering a forgery and was sentenced by Patrick to a year and a day in prison followed by five years of probation, plus restitution, fines and costs of $2,705.50. He was arrested March 27. • Terry Deshawn Williams, 19, 113 Starlight Drive, was found guilty of violating probation and sentenced by Patrick to 250 days in jail followed by five years of probation, plus restitution, fines and costs of $3,322.50. Williams was arrested Dec. 27, 2007, for burglary and malicious mischief.

Hood will seek re-election as AG JACKSON (AP) — Democrat Jim Hood said Friday he’ll seek a third term as Mississippi attorney general in 2011, ending speculation that he might run for governor. Hood, 47, was elected in 2003 and re-elected in 2007. He said in a statement Friday that he

JUST ARRIVED

SHOELESS JOE

GLOVES!

is “fortunate to have a job that allows me to help those who need it the most. That is worth more to my soul than pay.” The qualifying deadline for statewide candidates is March 1, 2011. Steve Simpson, the commissioner of public safety, said

last year he might run for attorney general in 2011. He could not be reached for comment Friday. Gov. Haley Barbour is in his second term and can’t run again, so the 2011 governor’s race is expected to attract several candidates.

Blooming Japanese Magnolia & Forsythia

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Nine students from Kids Are Kids Learning Center and their driver were taken to hospitals after a Friday afternoon wreck on North Washington Street. Gail Renee Albert, 40, 132 Pebble Beach Drive — driving a Chevrolet Ventura — was turning onto Irene Street just before 3:53 p.m. when the van was hit from behind by an 18-wheeler driven by Patrick Edwards, 40, of Greenwood, Vicksburg police patrolman Bobby Jones said. Edwards told police, when he topped a hill on North Washington, Jones said, he didn’t see that the van was stopped and couldn’t slow down. Albert, registered at River Region under the last name Caples, and four of the children —Damonica South, 6; Ronersha Anderson, 10; Tyronda Mitchell, 8; and Jasmine Thornburg, 11 — were at the hospital Friday night, but their conditions were unknown, spokesman Diane Gawronski said. Shecoby Robinson and Rashad Flaggs, both 7, and Jakayla Roby, 8, were treated and released, Gawronski said, but she had no record of Lydell Hardy, 8. Alexus Mitchell, 8, was transferred to the University of Mississippi Medical Center, but a spokesman could not be reached Friday night. The driver of the 18-wheeler was not injured, and no citations were issued.

crime & accident from staff reports

Boy crossing Clay struck by vehicle A 10-year-old boy was hit by an SUV Friday afternoon while trying to cross Clay Street at Fifth North Street. Reginald Sims, address unavailable, was taken to River Region Medical Center after a westbound Chevrolet Blazer driven by Jeanette Patterson, age and address unavailable, struck him around 3:30 p.m., Vicksburg police patrolman Curtis Judge said. Patterson told police she did not see the child, who was trying to follow a friend who had crossed the busy, four-lane street, Judge said. Reginald was transferred to the University of Mississippi Medical Center, but a spokesman could not be reached for a condition report Friday night.

U.S. 80 wreck injures two A Vicksburg man and a Pattison woman were injured in a two-vehicle wreck on U.S. 80 Friday afternoon. An eastbound 2001 Dodge Dakota driven by Travis McCullough, 27, 49 Cottonwood Drive, collided with a 2009 Nissan Altima driven by Lakendra N. McGrew, 23, 6006 Pattison-Hermanville Road, who had turned onto the highway from a private

driveway near Cook Tractor, said Trooper Wayne Smith of the Highway Patrol. Both drivers were taken to River Region Medical Center, Smith said, but hospital spokesman Diane Gawronski said she had no record of them.

Two jailed in theft of wallet from casino Two people were in the Warren County Jail Friday night, accused in a March 11 theft at Riverwalk Casino. Stephanie Parson, 28, 166 Elizabeth Circle, and Rodrick Sturgis, 30, 335 Meadowville Drive, are accused of taking a wallet with $800 from the Warrenton Road casino, Vicksburg police Lt. Bobby Stewart said. Parson and Sturgis were being held on $1,500 bond each.

Lumber, diesel fuel reported missing Lumber and fuel were reported missing in Warren County Friday. At 8:57 a.m., about 35 pieces of plywood valued at $1,200 were reported stolen from a shed in the 9200 block of Mississippi 27. Several hours later, at 12:08 p.m., 175 gallons of diesel valued at $214 and four batteries valued at $486 were reported stolen from a 1986 Mack truck that had been parked at St. Michael Place and Fisher Ferry Road.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ADOPTION OF FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION ORDINANCE

In order to meet the minimum criteria of the National Flood Insurance Program administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency for continued participation in the National Flood Insurance Program by Warren County, Mississippi the Warren County Board of Supervisors must adopt the “Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance” promulgated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The stated purpose of this ordinance is to promote the public health, safety and general welfare and to minimize public and private losses due to flood conditions in specific areas. The Warren County Board of Supervisors gives notice of a public hearing on the “Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance” to be held on Monday, April 5, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. in the meeting room of the Board of Supervisors on the third floor of the Warren County Courthouse. Statements, both oral and written, will be heard from those in attendance who wish to present same. Copies of the Federal Emergency Management Agency “Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance” will be on file for review by the public at the following locations: 1. Office of the chancery clerk on the first floor of the Warren County Courthouse 2.Office of the Warren County Board of Supervisors at 913 Jackson Street, Vicksburg, Mississippi 3. Warren County - Vicksburg Public Library at 700 Veto Street, Vicksburg, Mississippi The Warren County Board of Supervisors will accept written statements during the thirty (30) day period following the public hearing set for Monday, April 5, 2010. Subsequent to the close of the thirty (30) day period, the Board of Supervisors, at its next regularly scheduled meeting, or at such other regularly scheduled meeting as the Board of Supervisors may choose, will adopt the Federal Emergency Management Agency “Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance”.

WARREN COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS RICHARD GEORGE, President

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Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

THE VICKSBURG POST

EDITORIAL

Founded by John G. Cashman in 1883 Louis P. Cashman III, Editor & Publisher • Issued by Vicksburg Printing & Publishing Inc., Louis P. Cashman III, President Charlie Mitchell, executive editor | E-mail: post@vicksburg.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 132 | Letters to the editor: post@vicksburg.com or The Vicksburg Post, P.O. Box, 821668, Vicksburg, MS 39182

JACK VIX SAYS: Spring, at last.

OTHER OPINIONS

Welfare

Mississippi proving transitions possible From other Mississippi newspapers: • The Enterprise-Journal, McComb: It’s not often that Mississippi is held up as a national model. Although it’s gratifying to receive accolades about how well the state is moving people from welfare to work, what’s most gratifying is the hope that this success is slowly — family by family — breaking the cycle of welfare dependency. When Bill Clinton was president during the 1990s, one of the Democrat’s most impressive initiatives was welfare reform. The cause firmly established him at the political center and helped pave the way for his election to a second term. The legislation was designed to cure the unintended consequences of the first 60 years of the welfare system, which in its well-meaning effort to help the poor had hooked them on a life of taxpayer-funded handouts.

Welfare reform, first enacted in 1996, imposed a five-year lifetime limit on benefits, required able-bodied recipients to go to work within two years and gave states incentives to create jobs for people on welfare. Mississippi has done better than most states in carrying out what the reform effort envisioned. In 2008, the latest year for which statistics are available, 63 percent of the state’s welfare recipients were participating either in work or job-training programs designed to move them toward work — more than double the national average. The state Department of Human Services administers the program. Officials in that agency say its case workers have taken seriously the mandate of the federal law to wean welfare recipients from government dependency. The program helps make that transition possible by providing assistance not only with job

training but with subsidies for child care and transportation — two of the greatest handicaps faced by the chronically underemployed or unemployed. Plus, there are financial incentives for establishing a stable work record — a one-time $3,000 bonus for holding a job for at least a year. Although there may be some on welfare who would prefer to stay home indefinitely and draw a check, that’s not the majority’s sentiment. Most of the poor want to be able to provide for their own children. They crave the pride that bringing home a hard-earned paycheck instills. Sometimes, though, they don’t have the background, the family support or the confidence to try to become selfreliant. Mississippi obviously believes more than most states that these obstacles can be overcome. It’s proving it by its numbers.

Consider furloughs, day cuts separately The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, Tupelo: The Mississippi House should defeat or allow to die in the Education Committee a bill, H.B. 1170, that would reduce the number of required classroom days through the 2011-2012 school year from 180 to 175. The Senate amended the bill to allow the reduction, based on assertions that it would save money without damaging academic integrity. One legislator and some well-known educators irresponsibly claimed, without full knowledge of statewide school practice, that no teaching goes on during the last five days of school. In the case of the former educators, that may be a sad truth for the way they ran schools, but it’s not correct statewide.

The same bill also authorizes mandatory, limited, unpaid furloughs for teachers and administrators, a proposition that should be separately considered on its merits, as supported by the Mississippi Board of Education’s Legislative Committee. The proposed classroom day reduction sends all the wrong signals about Mississippi’s commitment to education. Decades of legislative and policy battles went into establishing the annual school year at 180 days in a state where an eightmonth term once was widespread. State board trustee Claude Hartley of Tupelo, who chairs the Legislative Committee, said in a letter to all legislators, “As you know, there is a greater emphasis on student achievement and account-

ability than there has ever been. Based on this factor and others, including national and international comparisons, now is certainly not the time to threaten the integrity of the classroom by reducing instructional days. While the ability to furlough all employees on non-instructional days will be an important tool for some school districts to survive budget cuts, reducing the school calendar may be viewed as an opportunity to reduce education funding. ...” Hartley’s right. The class-days reduction also is opposed by Gov. Haley Barbour, State Superintendent of Education Tom Burnham, and House Education Committee Chairman Cecil Brown, D-Jackson. Kill the proposed class-days reduction.

State playing catch-up on cemetery cons The Mississippi Press, Pascagoula: Although Mississippi has improved its oversight of cemeteries in recent years, families are still suffering as they learn that services they paid for in advance will not be provided. As The Mississippi Press reported, even a Pascagoula attorney who is now involved in the receivership of a local cemetery had to buy a grave marker that was supposed to have already been paid for before his mother died in 2008. The attorney, James Heidelberg, voluntarily manages a trust fund for the upkeep of Jackson County Memorial Park and Perpetual Care Cemetery. The cemetery has been in receivership since May 2008. The owner, 79-year-old Nell Morgan, faces an 11-count indictment, including allegations that she owes

nearly $1 million to about 150 people. Her attorney says Morgan was overwhelmed after her husband died in the mid-1990s and simply doesn’t have the money. The Vicksburg Post recently reported on a similar situation in that city: a cemetery under state receivership, an investigation into hundreds of thousands of dollars missing from its pre-need account, and people who say they paid in advance for services that they now fear they won’t get when the time comes. A total of five Mississippi cemeteries have been taken over by Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann. Last year the Legislature tightened state oversight of cemeteries, with Hosemann’s office now responsible for approving pre-need contracts and trust agreements, among other changes.

A $10 surcharge on pre-need contracts now will go into a fund to pay off the claims of insolvent cemeteries. Still, consumers should look very hard — with the assistance of an attorney or an accountant — at pre-need contracts, accounts and plans offered by any funeral service provider. One industry spokesman even recommends setting up a private account to pay for a funeral rather than buying a plan from a funeral home, cemetery or other provider. For some families, there may be no good resolution. They may have to pay again for markers and services they thought were already paid for. The steps taken by the state, however, should help ensure that no one else is put in that situation.

OLD POST FILES 120 YEARS AGO: 1890 Tansey knocks out Burke in the seventh round and another fight is planned here soon. • There is to be a hop at Professor Hirsch’s dancing academy. • E.C. Russell purchases the law office of S.M. Shelton over the Vicksburg bank.

MODERATELY CONFUSED by Bill Stahler

50 YEARS AGO: 1960 Randy Sherard is serving as a page in the Mississippi House of Representatives. •Robert Mitchum stars in “The Lusty Men” at the Rivoli Drive-In Theatre.

40 YEARS AGO: 1970

M. Wolf will run for mayor in the next city election. • Angelo Palmer dies.

Mr. and Mrs. E. David Walley announce the birth of a son, Jason David, on Feb. 28. •St. Aloysius High School band presents its annual spring concert.

100 YEARS AGO: 1910

30 YEARS AGO: 1980

Sam Thigpen goes to Brown’s Well to assume charge of the hotel. • Ernest Howard goes to Savannah, Ga., where he will join the ball team of that city.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest L. Williams Jr. announce the birth of a daughter, Lynn Michelle, born March 16. • Dan Rogers is sworn in as Vicksburg’s new alderman.

90 YEARS AGO: 1920

20 YEARS AGO: 1990

The singing class at the Presbyterian Church is proving successful. • The Gibson Memorial Church ladies will start a study mission.

Michael Causey is featured learning to rappel at the Boy Scout Camporee held at the Grey Ferris farm on Fisher Ferry Road. • Vicksburg resident Marvin L. Roberson dies.

110 YEARS AGO: 1900

80 YEARS AGO: 1930 Nineteen U.S. Army bomber planes and one scouting plane pass over the city. • Mrs. Julius Podesta, who has been ill, is improving.

70 YEARS AGO: 1940 Extensive repairs are planned at City Hall. •

A sunrise Easter service is planned at Oak Ridge Methodist Church.

60 YEARS AGO: 1950 Harvey P. Grant Sr., who operated Route Coal Co., dies. • Fans of the Vicksburg Billies will see some new faces this year, according to a story in the Vicksburg Evening Post.

10 YEARS AGO: 2000 Ann Morris is serving her sixth year as a Spring Pilgrimage hostess at The Mary Harwood Home. • The Council of Garden Clubs donates 33 crepe myrtles to be planted downtown.

Those who did survive Shiloh two days in April 1862 grew up in a hurry. Those who didn’t were dumped in mass graves to prevent the spread of disease.

Battlefields great places for reflection SHILOH, Tenn. — It is odd to have so many fond memories wrapped up in a battlefield. Strange to feel at peace near Civil War landmarks called Bloody Pond, Hornet’s Nest and Sunken Road. I’ll admit: At this military park I see not so much death and mayhem, attacks and retreats, batteries and strategies, but a timeline of my life, at least the last half. I remember the beauty of Shiloh’s full moons and of its groomed grounds iced with late berets of snowfalls. I almost can feel my cold fingertips and nose on a frigid, long ago New Year’s Eve in a duck boat on the Tennessee River near Pittsburg Landing. I can close my eyes and see schoolchildren scampering across the infamous Peach Orchard in springtime and taste a sweet picnic apple on the spot where Gen. Johnston bled to death. I recall my happy RHETA nephews donning gRIMSLEY the visitor center’s blue and gray props and posing for photographs, laughing at themselves in the mirror. And, if the moment is right, I still see candles, thousands of them, burning holes in a January night. It comes to this: Scabbed-over battle sites make good parks. This day, I am trying to concentrate on the reason my personal, poignant playground exists. I make an effort, a month before the battle’s anniversary, to remember the tremendous cost: nearly 24,000 casualties. It is cliche that war is not begun by those who must finish it. But cliches are nothing but truth described well. Not only did the soldiers here at Shiloh not start the fight, most didn’t know how to fight. They were about as equipped for battle as my giggling young nephews preening in those oversized park service coats. Those who did survive Shiloh two days in April 1862 grew up in a hurry. Those who didn’t were dumped in mass graves to prevent the spread of disease. In a way, the war finished all of them. You would think a nation so soon at war with itself might forever shy from battles beyond its shores, but that luxury has eluded us. Even now, young men and women who didn’t start the conflicts are enduring and finishing them in places most of us citizens couldn’t find on a map. And the shark politicians and their military industrial complex handlers are forever voting, investing and planning for more war. My family has letters from my greatgreat-grandfather lost at Second Manassas. He wrote to his wife in a scrawled longhand, his vocabulary better than his spelling. He gave instructions about how to make the most of the family farm’s corn, thanked his wife for sending locks of their children’s hair and asked for shirts made from dark cloth, as dark as she could weave. And he addressed contingencies: “If it should happen so I never should see you in this world I am in hopes we will meet in a world where there is no such thing as war and disturbance. ... We may get a long happy life together yet and if gain our liberty it will give me and you great satisfaction to know that I took a part in the conflict.” There was to be no long, happy life, or future togetherness, no great satisfaction in taking part in the conflict. There was nothing, not a proper burial or even definite word to her of his death. Where he fell, however, there is a park, and luckier souls than he today fly kites and ride bicycles, hike and picnic, remembering occasionally and at leisure the reason the roads are paved and the monuments gleam. •

JOHNSON

Rheta Grimsley Johnson writes for King Features Syndicate.


Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

Business

Stocks fall as Greece debt worries return

Fr o m s t a f f a n d A P r e p o r t s

LOCAL STOCKS The following quotes on local companies are provided as a service by Smith Barney Citi Group, 112-B Monument Place, 601-636-6914. Archer-Daniels (ADM)....29.09 American Fin. (AFG) .......27.93 Ameristar (ASCA) .............17.10 Auto Zone (AZO) .......... 172.28 Bally Technologies (BYI)37.72 BancorpSouth (BXS).......20.60 Britton Koontz (BKBK) ...12.24 Cracker Barrel (CBRL) .....47.19 Champion Ent. (CHB)...........20 Com. Health Svcs. ...........38.16 Computer Sci. Corp. .......54.56 Cooper Industries (CBE)45.99 CBL and Associates (CBL)14.97 CSX Corp. (CSX)................51.51 East Group Prprties ...... 38.62 El Paso Corp. (EP) ............11.13 Entergy Corp. (ETR) ........80.69

A5

Fastenal (FAST).................46.98 Family Dollar (FDO)........35.82 Fred’s (FRED)......................10.45 Int’l Paper (IP) ...................25.82 Janus Capital Group ......14.02 J.C. Penney (JCP) .............31.42 Kroger Stores (KR)...........21.64 Kan. City So. (KSU) ..........35.75 Legg Mason (LM) .......... 29.40 Parkway Properties.........17.95 PepsiAmerica Inc. (PAS) 29.98 Regions Financial (RF) .... 7.38 Rowan (RDC) .....................26.39 Saks Inc. (SKS) ..................... 8.30 Sears Holdings (SHLD)103.61 Simpson-DuraVent .........27.23 Sunoco (SUN)....................29.79 Trustmark (TRMK) ...........25.06 Tyco Intn’l (TYC)...............36.79 Tyson Foods (TSN) ..........17.72 Viacom (VIA) ......................33.69 Walgreens (WAG) ............34.53 Wal-Mart (WMT) ..............55.34

Greece said it might need to turn to the International Monetary Fund for support if European leaders can’t agree on a bailout plan next week. Worries about the country’s ability to handle its massive debt load have set off periodic bouts of stock selling in the U.S. and overseas over the past two months.

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks halted their steady climb Friday after renewed concerns about Greece’s ability to pay its debts left investors questioning a global economic recovery. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 37 points after advancing for eight straight days. Broader indexes also fell. Major indexes posted gains for the week. Greece said it might need to turn to the International Monetary Fund for support if European leaders can’t agree on a bailout plan next week. Worries about the country’s ability to handle its massive debt load have set off periodic bouts of stock selling in the U.S. and overseas over the past two months. Investors also were cautious after India’s central bank raised interest rates to combat rising prices. That prompted

concern that central banks in other countries would follow suit. Reports in the U.S. during the week signaled that inflation is minimal. The news out of Greece and India chilled an advance in U.S. stocks that grew out of rising optimism about a recovery. “The economic data so far continues to be friendly, but there are a lot of concerns out there,” said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at the brokerage Avalon Partners Inc. in New York. “The Greek situation is affecting the dollar.” The dollar, regaining its

appeal as a safe investment, rose against the euro and other currencies. Concerns remain that debt problems could spill over to other weak European countries like Spain and Portugal, Cardillo said. Stocks in the U.S. have been rising since a January-February slump. Investors are encouraged that the economy is getting better, even if it’s at a slow pace. The modest improvements have translated into a stock market that creeps higher rather than leaps as it did last year. Still, even with incremental gains some analysts warn that the

ACTIVE STOCKS NEW YORK (AP) — Friday’s prices for NYSE listed most active stocks: Sales High Low AMR 134167 9.60 9.01 AT&TInc 1.68f 350231 26.31 25.99 AbtLab 1.76f 160076 53.90 53.19 AMD 158109 9.41 9.10 Aetna .04 141833 34.94 33.31 AlcatelLuc 126654 3.30 3.18 Alcoa .12 406231 14.54 14.07 Altria 1.40f 153404 20.55 20.25 AmExp .72 102398 41.28 40.28 AIntlGprs 109514 35.02 33.85 Annaly 2.54e 108261 18.71 18.45 ArchCoal .36 95403 24.75 23.41 AvisBudg 99930 11.63 10.73 BakrHu .60 99553 49.25 47.11 BkofAm .04 1686541 17.23 16.74 BarVixShT 98185 22.71 21.78 BarrickG .40 123970 39.89 38.81 BestBuy .56 138874 41.80 40.80 Boeing 1.68 160367 73.30 70.72 BostonSci 407728 7.24 7.04 BrMySq 1.28 145411 26.25 25.86 CBSB .20 96953 14.63 13.98 CVSCare .35 155135 35.26 34.23 ChesEng .30 254469 24.43 23.40 Chevron 2.72 163859 75.16 73.89 Chimera .54e 138629 4.14 4.03 4874140 4.05 3.90 Citigrp CocaCl 1.76f 208839 55.06 53.60 Comptngh 239631 1.16 1.02 ConocPhil 2 113324 52.98 51.70 Corning .20 239117 19.73 19.31 DeltaAir 95499 13.09 12.56 DirFBearrs 595800 14.30 13.72 DirFBullrs .29 248351 95.49 91.50 DirxSCBear 265055 7.46 7.04 DirxSCBull 4.75e 96893 56.00 52.71 Discover .08 95686 15.66 15.15 Disney .35 160166 33.98 33.48 DowChm .60 154061 30.20 28.95 DuPont 1.64 128588 37.42 36.61 Dynegy 144850 1.47 1.39 EMCCp 190379 18.83 18.50 ElPasoCp .04 105328 11.25 10.98 ExxonMbl 1.68 439821 67.89 66.43 FannieMae 290010 1.15 1.06 FordM 2435717 13.92 13.04 FMCG .60 151904 80.96 78.11 GenElec .40 1128411 18.34 17.93 Genpact .18 98065 15.51 15.23 Genworth 155230 16.54 15.78 GoldmanS 1.40 102073 178.21 175.95 HRPTPrp .48 277540 7.37 7.23 Hallibrtn .36 183142 31.90 30.21 HartfdFn .20 187872 27.98 26.91 HeclaM 144992 5.73 5.44 Hersha .20 113104 4.83 4.32 HewlettP .32 200766 52.95 52.21 HomeDp .95f 221924 32.57 32.10 HonwllIntl 1.21 96074 44.29 43.60 HostHotls .04 124269 13.82 13.55 iShBraz 2.72e 208028 72.92 71.17 iShJapn .14e 175685 10.37 10.26 iSTaiwn .21e 118566 12.58 12.40 iShSilver 105772 17.04 16.64 iShChina25 .55e 203092 41.50 40.88 iShEMkts .58e 620650 41.87 41.13 iSEafe 1.44e 169777 55.91 55.11 iShR2K .72e 749522 68.51 67.16 iShREst 1.94e 141733 50.87 50.05 IBM 2.20 99781 128.93 126.78 ItauUnibH .49r 109275 20.91 20.33 JPMorgCh .20 348941 43.89 43.13 JohnJn 1.96 226596 65.49 64.81

Close Chg 9.01—.53 26.24+.18 53.46—.31 9.11—.28 34.46+1.22 3.18—.06 14.26—.04 20.34—.12 40.33—.67 34.80+.16 18.70+.20 23.60—.99 10.80—.69 47.53—1.84 16.82—.26 22.34+.26 39.42—.36 40.99+.54 70.72—.15 7.13+.06 26.01—.06 13.98—.39 34.55—.54 24.21+.42 74.98+.22 4.05—.01 3.90—.12 54.75+.80 1.16+.09 52.37—.34 19.39+.15 12.57—.54 14.17+.30 92.34—2.13 7.41+.30 53.23—2.20 15.24—.28 33.64—.14 28.95—1.05 36.86—.21 1.40—.05 18.61—.03 11.13—.01 67.04—.35 1.15+.06 13.29—.44 78.51—1.76 18.07—.12 15.50+.37 15.78—.62 177.90+.45 7.33—.17 30.50—1.08 27.26—.58 5.49—.21 4.79+.27 52.49—.24 32.36—.04 43.82+.39 13.55—.13 71.30—1.14 10.30—.02 12.44—.07 16.65—.43 41.08—.34 41.19—.54 55.37—.57 67.41—.85 50.16—.43 127.71—.67 20.49—.32 43.45—.19 65.11+.05

Keycorp .04 148240 7.67 7.47 Kraft 1.16 162419 29.99 29.50 Kroger .38 148142 22.24 21.49 LSICorp 209133 6.52 6.29 LVSands 227046 19.58 19.25 LloydBkg 1.43r 123358 3.75 3.64 Lowes .36 156316 25.01 24.65 MGMMir 159101 12.05 11.56 Macys .20 107489 21.50 20.81 MktVGold .11p 171702 46.08 44.87 MarshIls .04 119552 8.06 7.65 McDnlds 2.20 100349 66.91 66.00 Merck 1.52 278737 38.84 37.85 MorgStan .20 227826 30.21 29.50 Motorola 227490 7.42 7.10 Nabors 140602 20.66 19.57 NokiaCp .56e 203721 15.26 15.03 PepsiCo 1.92f 104053 66.98 66.26 Petrobras 1.16e 178139 46.29 45.12 Pfizer .72f 1124169 17.30 16.80 PhilipMor 2.32 141243 52.85 51.83 Pier1 148954 7.01 6.42 PrUShS&P 351002 31.82 31.05 PrUShQQQ 154211 17.38 16.94 ProUltSP .35e 121596 42.16 41.13 ProUShtRE 148583 6.09 5.90 ProUltRE .13e 121429 8.35 8.08 ProUltFin .04e 123687 6.75 6.55 ProctGam 1.76 162211 64.00 63.52 ProLogis .60 95109 14.72 14.03 QwestCm .32 397978 5.12 5.01 RegionsFn .04 220909 7.60 7.32 RiteAid 113222 1.65 1.53 SpdrDJIA 2.51e x118610 108.17 106.92 SpdrGold 237934 110.29 107.85 S&P500ETF 2.21ex1995102117.29115.52 SpdrRetl .50e x106649 40.91 40.31 SpdrMetM .37e x96553 56.99 55.05 Safeway .40 112829 24.80 23.90 SaraLee .44 111765 14.11 13.81 Schlmbrg .84 182816 65.78 63.74 Schwab .24 131342 18.96 18.58 SemiHTr .50e 139668 27.91 27.29 SmithIntl .48 112713 44.41 42.98 SwstAirl .02 103115 13.21 12.73 SwstnEngy 145453 41.10 38.25 SprintNex 575407 3.80 3.69 SPMatls .52e x106135 33.92 33.24 SPEngy 1e x219013 58.25 56.76 SPDRFncl .20e x867881 15.87 15.63 Synovus .04 129318 3.61 3.38 TaiwSemi .46e 122668 10.34 10.08 TenetHlth 102692 5.80 5.64 TexInst .48 163337 24.73 24.13 TimeWrnrs .85f 129068 31.64 30.93 Travelers 1.32 116831 53.60 52.78 TrinaSols 97374 21.45 20.25 UtdMicro 102608 3.69 3.51 USBancrp .20 135324 26.39 25.77 USNGsFd 217527 7.55 7.38 USOilFd 135700 39.97 38.85 USSteel .20 149889 60.55 58.24 UtdhlthGp .03 214449 34.70 33.72 ValeSA .52e 217796 30.37 29.50 ValeSApf .52e 113496 26.70 25.96 ValeroE .20m 95492 20.66 19.96 VangEmg .55e 121743 41.83 41.16 VerizonCm 1.90 191160 30.54 30.25 VimpelCm .33e 144791 17.85 17.00 WalMart 1.21f 168159 56.27 55.15 WeathfIntl 282545 16.76 15.92 WellPoint 116979 65.84 64.25 WellsFargo .20 494428 30.54 29.96 XTOEngy .50 137215 47.77 46.86 Xerox .17 174608 9.94 9.52 Yamanag .04 162463 10.29 9.99

7.60+.04 29.63—.20 21.64—.60 6.41+.06 19.50+.22 3.72+.31 24.78—.12 11.75—.16 20.89—.50 45.31—.66 7.80—.11 66.53—.15 38.06—.39 29.63—.45 7.18—.17 19.88—.75 15.07—.21 66.56+.04 45.43—.80 16.91—.32 52.68+.86 6.71—.03 31.58+.31 17.26+.20 41.45—.42 6.06+.11 8.08—.19 6.59—.10 63.84+.11 14.04—.55 5.02+.05 7.38—.12 1.65+.09 107.34—.19 108.28—2.06 115.97—.59 40.49—.29 55.37—.95 24.04—.61 13.87—.22 64.32—.93 18.58—.21 27.49—.36 43.31—.74 12.81—.25 39.60—1.18 3.76—.04 33.28—.36 57.28—.69 15.69—.10 3.46—.12 10.09—.25 5.75+.09 24.36—.36 31.24+.08 53.46+.08 21.30+.76 3.51—.13 26.14+.15 7.52+.13 39.20—.72 59.24—.69 34.39+.80 29.77—.28 25.98—.53 20.31—.24 41.29—.41 30.41+.11 17.82+1.05 55.34—.60 16.07—.91 65.07+1.25 30.38+.09 47.21—.27 9.57—.29 10.18—.06

ABRAHAM

www.kidscoop.com

Louisa’s family did not have much money. To help out, Louisa started taking on as many jobs as a young girl could find. She read for an elderly man and his sister. Louisa and her sister Anna taught young children and mended and washed laundry.

Louisa May Alcott was born on November 29, 1832. She was the second oldest of four girls. Her love of her sisters helped her to become one of America’s most beloved children’s book authors.

In 1852, Louisa’s first poem was published in a magazine, and she made her first money from writing.

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As a child, Louisa and her family moved to Boston, Massachusetts where her father, Amos Alcott, set up a school based upon his beliefs about education.

In 1855, her first book, )ORZHU)DEOHV was published. In 1862, Louisa went to Washington, D.C. to serve as a Civil War nurse. Like many other nurses, Louisa contracted typhoid fever. Although she got better, mercury in the medicine caused her suffering for the rest of her life. In Washington, Louisa continued to write and published two more books. Her publisher, Thomas Niles, asked that she write “a girl’s story.” Having spent her life with three interesting sisters, Louisa wrote /LWWOH:RPHQ based on her own experiences. The novel, published in 1868, was an instant success. It has now been a favorite book for generations. RMUETGL

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much you lose in a month. This might be enough to buy several meals at a restaurant, or more groceries. If you are playing the stock market, make sure you are investing in relatively safe bets. Re-finance your home. Interest is low now, and you could save a lot of money. Finally, don’t waste food. If you don’t eat it all at a restaurant, take it home. Take an inventory of what’s in your refrigerator, and use it before it spoils. •

Dr. George R. Abraham is a native of Vicksburg and a former longtime educator, business manager and consultant. He is an author who contributes weekly to The Vicksburg Post and hosts “The Dr. George Show” on 1490 AM at the Klondyke in Vicksburg from 9 until 10 a.m. each Tuesday. He can be reached at georgerabraham@ aol.com.

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Though poor themselves, Louisa’s family always tried to help people who were worse off than they were. Look through the newspaper to find a person or people you could help.

Louisa worked hard to help women get the right to vote. She wrote articles about equality for women and went door-to-door encouraging women to register to vote. In 1879, Alcott became the first woman in Concord, Mass. to register to vote when she cast a ballot for the village school committee.

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DR. GEORGE AT WORK Q: Will you give me some specific actions to help me during this recession? — Help A: I will DR. GEORGE R. give this t o yo u i n two columns, as I have many suggestions. First, pay off as much of your credit card debt as possible. And use it only if you must. Take a vacation in your own hometown. You would be surprised how little you know about Vicksburg. Stop playing the lottery. Do you think your chances are favorable? If you play cards for money, write down how

Puzzle answers, games, opinion polls and much more at:

market needs some pullbacks to avoid getting overheated. The Dow fell 37.19, or 0.3 percent, to 10,741.98. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 5.93, or 0.5 percent, to 1,159.90. The Nasdaq composite index fell 16.87, or 0.7 percent, to 2,374.41. For the week, the Dow rose 1.1 percent, the S&P 500 index advanced 0.9 percent and the Nasdaq rose 0.3 percent. Bond prices were little changed. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves opposite its price, rose to 3.70 percent from 3.68 percent late Thursday. The dollar rose against other major currencies; gold fell. Crude oil fell $1.52 to settle at $80.68 per barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange as the dollar rose. The stronger dollar made commodities more expensive to foreign buyers. That hurt demand.

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A6

Saturday, March 20, 2010

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The Vicksburg Post


Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

A7

Judge orders renegotiation of 9/11 settlement NEW YORK — A federal judge on Friday rejected a legal settlement that would have given at least $575 million to people sickened by ash and dust from the World Trade Center, saying the deal shortchanged 10,000 ground zero workers whom he called heroes. “In my judgment, this settlement is not enough,” said U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein, who delivered his pronouncement to a stunned gallery at a federal courthouse in Manhattan. Rising from his chair, the 76-year-old jurist said he feared police officers, firefighters and other laborers who cleared rubble after the 9/11 terror attacks were being pushed into signing a deal few of them understood. Under the terms of the settlement, workers had been given just 90 days to say yes or no to a deal that would have assigned them payments based on a point system that Hellerstein said was complicated enough to make a Talmudic scholar’s head spin. “I will not preside over a settlement that is based on fear or ignorance,” he said. Of the proposed settlement of $575 million to $657 million, workers stood to get amounts ranging from a few thousand dollars to more than $1 million. Hellerstein said the deal should be richer. Too much of it would be eaten up by legal fees, he said.

The associated press

Firefighters, a month after 9/11, make their way over the ruins of the World Trade Center.

nation

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

$5 million settlement in Minn. bridge case MINNEAPOLIS — Contractor URS Corp. and the state of Minnesota reached a $5 million settlement Friday in the state’s lawsuit over the 2007 downtown Minneapolis bridge collapse that killed 13 people and injured 145 others. URS had a long-standing contract with the Minnesota Department of Transportation to evaluate the structural integrity of the 40-yearold Interstate 35W bridge and recommend ways to shore it up before it fell. URS did not admit any liability or fault for the collapse, nor did the state. In a statement, URS called the collapse a “tragedy,” but said the company “was

not involved in the design or building of the bridge, nor was it involved in any of the later construction work, including the resurfacing work being done when the bridge collapsed.” URS and its insurers will pay $5 million under the mediated agreement. In exchange, URS will be released from future state claims connected to the collapse. The company’s statement said the settlement allows it to avoid the cost and time of further litigation.

Organics market lacks oversight, report says WASHINGTON — The Agriculture Department has failed to enforce penalties against some who falsely marketed foods as organic, according to an internal department investigation. A report by the agency’s

Plant

Health care

Continued from Page A1.

Continued from Page A1.

the U.S. Armstrong World Industries purchased the Vicksburg plant in 2006 from Capella Wood Floors, which was started by Anderson-Tully Co. in 2000. Two new businesses opened at the port in 2009, Five Stars Lighting Ltd. and Vicksmetal Company. Replacement of the access bridge to industries at the port is expected to continue until 2011, when a new, wider E.W. Haining Road bridge will be able to handle greater volumes of trucks. The current structure will be dismantled.

after voting against an earlier version that passed, bringing the number of switches to six. On the other side of the ledger, Rep. Michael Arcuri of New York became the first Democratic former supporter to announce his intention to oppose the bill. Rep. Anh Cao of Louisiana, the only Republican to support the earlier measure, has also announced his opposition. The historic legislation, affecting virtually every American and more than a year in the making, would extend coverage to an estimated 32 million Americans who lack it, forbid insurers to deny coverage on the basis of pre-existing medical conditions and cut federal deficits by an estimated $138 billion over a decade. Congressional analysts estimate the cost of the two bills combined would be $940 billion over a decade. For the first time, most Americans would be required to purchase insurance, and they would face penalties if they refused. Billions of dollars would be set aside for subsidies to help families at incomes of up to $88,000 a year afford the cost. And the legislation also provides for an expansion of

Casinos Continued from Page A1. the same stage of the last fiscal year, $202.2 million had been taken in. The figures do not include Indian reservation casinos, which are not required to report their winnings to the public. Vicksburg has five casinos. Locally, a 3.2 percent gaming revenue tax is divided among the city, county and public schools on a 65-2510 percentage basis. Additionally, a state-set 0.8 percent revenue tax is divided between the city and county based on population, and each casino is required to pay the city a $150 device fee for every gaming station. Since the fiscal year began Oct. 1 through February, gaming tax proceeds have netted $3.62 million for the city, county and schools — down nearly 11 percent from the $4.06 million collected through February last fiscal year.

death The Vicksburg Post prints obituaries in news form for area residents, their family members and for former residents at no charge. Families wishing to publish additional information or to use specific wording have the option of a paid obituary.

Herschel J. Watson Sr. OAKLAND, Calif. — Hershel J. Watson Sr. died Tuesday, March 9, 2010. He was 67. Mr. Watson was a graduate of Rosa A. Temple High School and a former member of Bethel A.M.E. Church. He served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. He was a retired bus driver. He was preceded in death by his mother, Thelma S. Watson; his father, James H. Watson Sr.; a son, Herschel J. Watson Jr.; two sisters, Martha Love and Burnadette Yates; and two brothers, James H. Watson Jr. and

Alvin Watson. Survivors include his wife, Inez Watson of Oakland; two sons, Carlos Herschel of Orlando and Shann Herschel of Oakland; three sisters, Thelma J. Watson of Vicksburg, Hazel B. Hill of Chicago and Doris Adams of Los Angeles; two brothers, Leon Watson of Oakland and Rueben Watson of Shaw, Miss.; seven grandchildren; and other relatives and friends. Services were Friday at New St. Paul Community Baptist Church in Oakland. Burial followed at Sacramento Valley VA National Cemetery with the McNaryMorgan-Greene and Jackson Morturary of Oakland in charge.

inspector general says the agency needs to step up enforcement of those who sell products under the “USDA Organic” label but do not meet government standards to do so. The report says the department has made improvements in maintaining the integrity of the organic program in recent years, but needs to better handle complaints about potential violators. The internal report says the department has failed to monitor some companies it had already identified as improperly marketing their products as organic. In one case, the department never issued enforcement action against an operation that had marketed non-organic mint under the department’s label for two years.

Texas polygamist sentenced to 75 years SAN ANGELO, Texas — The latest member of a polygamist group whose sprawling West Texas ranch was raided in 2008 has been sentenced to 75 years in prison for sexual assault of a child. Thirty-five-year-old Merril Leroy Jessop was sentenced Friday. Jurors earlier this week also found he violated Texas laws prohibiting bigamy. Prosecutors say Jessop tried to delete photos and other documents connecting him to an underage bride.

Medicaid that would give government-paid health care to millions of the poor. Several lawmakers who opposed the earlier version on abortion grounds announced they would vote in favor of the new bill, and there was talk among others of finding a largely symbolic way that would allow them to follow. Rep. Marcy Kaptur of Ohio, said in an interview she would support the bill if Democratic leaders would first allow a standalone vote on tougher abortion restrictions, even though that vote evidently would not affect the health care measure itself. The political ramifications remained to be fought out in November. Arcuri’s announcement of opposition reaped a threat from his former allies at the Service Employees International Union, which vowed to try and unseat him in this fall’s Democratic primary in favor of “someone who shares our progressive values.” Boccieri’s decision to support the bill drew a tart response from the House Republican campaign committee, which issued a warning — “Ohio Dem Uses Press Conference to Announce End of Stint

in Congress” — that predicted the first-term lawmaker’s political demise. Republicans and their allies unleashed a fresh barrage of criticism, warning the bill would eviscerate a private Medicare program that serves 10 million seniors and would impose new burdens on businesses in a time of recession. But they stopped well short of predicting they could stop the bill, and there were questions about the authenticity of a purported Democratic strategy memo they circulated in an effort to raise doubts about the legislation. One day after Democrats released 153 pages of revisions to their bill, they were back at it, responding to fresh concerns from some of the rank and file about disparities in payment levels to Medicare providers in different areas of the country. “I’m a ‘no’ unless they fix it,” said Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore. “We spent months working this out. If we don’t get it in this bill, we will never get it.” Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said changes were in the works. Republicans said, as they have from the outset, that Democrats were angling

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Lehman executive questioned numbers NEW YORK — A Lehman Brothers whistleblower warned his bosses that accounting gimmicks the bank used before its collapse may have been illegal, his lawyer said Friday. Matthew Lee, 56, a former Lehman senior vice president, was fired days after questioning the accounting tricks in a letter to his superiors, attorney Erwin Shustak said. Shustak gave a copy of the letter to The Associated Press. Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. imploded in September 2008, becoming the biggest corporate bankruptcy in U.S. history. The collapse sent financial markets across the globe into a free-fall and prompted a massive bailout of the U.S. banking system. An examiner appointed by the bankruptcy court said in a 2,200-page report last week that Lehman hid its debt and perilous financial condition by using an accounting gimmick called Repo 105.

for a government takeover of health care. They also said the cost of the bill would be covered by $900 billion in higher taxes and cuts in future Medicare payments. The Republicans circulated a letter from Caterpillar Vice President Gregory S. Foley to House leaders, warning that passage of the legislation would raise the company’s health care costs by “more than 320 percent (over $100 million) in the first year alone and put at risk the coverage out current employees and retirees receive.” The insurance industry said the latest Democratic legislation would decimate a private alternative to traditional Medicare that counts 10 million subscribers. It will “end Medicare Advantage as we know it,” said Robert Zirkelbach, a spokesman for American Health Insurance Plans.” He said Democrats were cutting $200 billion over a decade in projected federal subsidies, and he predicted premiums for seniors would rise as a result. The government subsidizes private plans at a higher rate than traditional Medicare, and the cuts are aimed at reducing the difference.

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Jessop is the fourth member of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints to be tried since authorities raided and seized documents from the Yearning For Zion Ranch. The weeklong raid temporarily sent 439 children to foster care. Eight more group members are awaiting trial.

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PRECISION FORECAST BY CHIEF METEOROLOGIST BARBIE BASSSETT TODAY

TONIGHT

71°

44°

A cold front will increase chances for rain and thunderstorms, and much cooler temperatures will move in Sunday.

WEATHER This weather package is compiled from historical records and information provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the City of Vicksburg and The Associated Press.

LOCAL FORECAST SUNday-TUESday Slight chance of rain on Sunday; highs around 60; lows in the 40s

STATE FORECAST TOday Chance of showers; highs in the 70s; lows in the upper-30s SUNday-TUESday Chancec of showers and thunderstorms clearing

Almanac Highs and Lows High/past 24 hours............. 72º Low/past 24 hours............... 45º Average temperature......... 59º Normal this date................... 59º Record low..............24º in 1988 Record high............87º in 1948 Rainfall Recorded at the Vicksburg Water Plant Past 24 hours.........................N/A This month..............1.20 inches Total/year.............. 10.80 inches Normal/month......3.80 inches Normal/year...........3.99 inches Solunar table Most active times for fish and wildlife Sunday: A.M. Active..........................10:14 A.M. Most active................. 4:00 P.M. Active...........................10:42 P.M. Most active.................. 4:28 Sunrise/sunset Sunset today........................ 7:14 Sunset tomorrow............... 7:14 Sunrise tomorrow.............. 7:04

RIVER DATA friday Stages Mississippi River at Vicksburg Current: 28.8 | Change: +1.7 Flood: 43 feet Yazoo River at Greenwood Current: 19.8 | Change: -0.4 Flood: 35 feet Yazoo River at Yazoo City Current: 19.3 | Change: -1.0 Flood: 29 feet Yazoo River at Belzoni Current: 21.0 | Change: -0.9 Flood: 34 feet Big Black River at West Current: 8.6 | Change: -2.6 Flood: 12 feet Big Black River at Bovina Current: 21.3 | Change: -0.6 Flood: 28 feet StEELE BAYOU friday Land....................................75.0 River....................................75.9

MISSISSIPPI RIVER Forecast Cairo, Ill. Sunday.................................... 44.7 Monday.................................. 45.3 Tuesday.................................. 45.5 Memphis Sunday.................................... 25.5 Monday.................................. 26.7 Tuesday.................................. 27.6 Greenville Sunday.................................... 37.6 Monday.................................. 38.5 Tuesday.................................. 39.4 Vicksburg Sunday.................................... 32.0 Monday.................................. 33.0 Tuesday.................................. 33.9


A8

Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

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The associaTed press

An earthquake survivor peeks out of his tent during heavy rains in Port-au-Prince Friday.

Heavy rains wreak havoc on earthquake-torn Haiti PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti bare hands to dig drainage (AP) — One of the heaviest ditches around their tarps and rainfalls since Haiti’s Jan. 12 shanties. Marie Elba Sylvie, 50, could earthquake swamped homeless camps Friday, sweep- not decide whether it was ing screaming residents into worth repairing damage to eddies of water, overflow- her lean-to of scrap wood and ing latrines and panicking plastic. “It could be fixed but when it thousands. The overnight downpour rains again it will be the same sent water coursing down the problem,” said the 50-year-old slopes of a former golf course mother of four. Standing water and mud that now serves as a temporary home for about 45,000 also pervaded a tarp-and-tent city on the outskirts of Cite people. There were no reports of Soleil, several miles away. deaths in the camp, a town- Residents waded through the size maze of blue, orange and shallow flood collecting their silver tarps located behind the belongings. Officials country club used by the U.S. The overnight downpour k n ow t h e y Army 82nd Air- sent water coursing down m u st m ove many of the 1.3 borne as a forward-operating the slopes of a former golf million people base. course that now serves displaced by the earthquake But the deluge terrified fami- as a temporary home for b e f o r e t h e lies who just about 45,000 people. rainy season starts in eartwo months ago nest in April. survived the collapse of their homes in the U.N. Secretary-General Ban magnitude-7 earthquake and Ki-moon told reporters at the are now struggling to make golf-course camp Sunday that do in tent-and-tarp camps that the people living there were in officials have repeatedly said particular danger. But after two months of must be relocated. “I was on one side (of the searching and wrangling with tarp), the children were on the landowners, the government other side and I was trying has still not opened any of the to push the water out,” Jack- five promised relocation sites quine Exama, a 34-year-old that are better able to withmother of seven, said through stand rain and aftershocks on the capital’s northeastern tears. “I’m not used to this,” she outskirts. Aid groups are also strugsaid. Aid workers said people gling to open their own were swept screaming into camps. “It’s been frustrating to us eddies of water and flows ripped down tents an Israeli because we need to have those aid group is using to teach sites in order to build something ... better. Until we can school. “They were crying. There do that people have no incenwas just fear down there. It tive to move,” U.N. humaniwas chaos,” said Jim Wilson of tarian chief John Holmes told the aid group Praecipio, who The Associated Press during came running from his own Ban’s visit. “We’re running out of time, shelter up the hill when he honestly,” Holmes said. heard the screams. People used sticks and their

Lawyer for U.S. missionaries arrested in human trafficking SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) — A fugitive who once acted as the lawyer for a group of U.S. Baptist missionaries accused of kidnapping 33 Haitian children was arrested on humantrafficking charges, authorities said Friday. Jorge Puello, 32, was detained at the United States’ request as he left a McDonald’s restaurant late Thursday in the Dominican capital, Santo Domingo, said National Drug Control Agency spokesman Roberto Lebron. A judge has 30 days to meet with Puello, Dominican authorities, and an attorney representing the U.S. government before deciding whether to honor the government’s extradition request, he said. Puello is wanted in the U.S. state of Vermont and in Canada for smuggling illegal immigrants, and in the U.S. city of Philadelphia for probation violations related to fraud charges, said a statement from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. He is wanted in El Salvador for crimes against children; sexual exploitation of minors for pornography and prostitution; organized crime; and human trafficking, ICE said. Interpol issued an arrest warrant for Puello at El Salvador’s request.

Puello has denied the allegations. His mother, Soledad Puello, secretary of internal affairs for the National Jorge Party of VeterPuello ans and Civilians, said she will represent him in court. “In the Dominican Republic ... the entire community will come out to defend him,” she said. Soledad Puello had told the AP on Thursday that she and others were negotiating with Salvadoran prosecutors for her son to turn himself in. Puello initially served as legal adviser and spokesman for the 10 U.S. Baptists who were detained in Haiti on child-kidnapping charges in February, but authorities later identified him as the man wanted in El Salvador. Puello attracted international attention when he provided the missionaries with food, medicine and legal assistance. One of the Baptists’ Haitian lawyers, Aviol Fleurant, told the AP that Puello absconded with $30,000 in legal fees the Americans had raised for Fleurant. Puello was born in New York but holds both U.S. and Dominican citizenships.

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THE VICKSBURG POST

RELIGION SATURDAY, mARch 20, 2010 • SE C TI O N B DEVOTION B2 | CHURCH EVENTS B3 Karen Gamble, managing editor | E-mail: newsreleases@vicksburgpost.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 137

Any kind of parent-child separation is devastating Q: Everyone knows divorce is tough on children. What about parent-child separation that occurs for reasons other than divorce? Is the pain any less intense? A: Research confirms the consequences of any parent-child separation can be severe. In one study of fathers whose jobs required them to be away for long periods of time, the children tended to experience numerous negative reactions, including anger, depression and a decline in school performance. FOCUS ON Some of THE FAMILY those conclusions were presented at a White House conference at which I spoke a few years ago. The other speaker was Dr. Armand Nicholi, a psychiatry professor at Harvard. Nicholi explained how family circumstances that make parents inaccessible produce some of the same effects as divorce. Parents in the United States spend less time with their children than parents in any other nation. For decades, millions of fathers have devoted themselves exclusively to their occupations. More recently, mothers have joined the work force in huge numbers, rendering themselves exhausted. The result: No one is there to meet the needs of millions of children. Most important Nicholi stressed the undeniable link between the interruption of parent-child relationships and the escalation of psychiatric problems. If the numbers of dysfunctional families and absentee parents continued to escalate, he said, problems were inevitable. One-half of all hospital beds in the United States at that time were taken up by psychiatric patients. That figure could hit 95 percent if the incidence of divorce, child abuse, child molestation and child neglect continue to soar. In that event, Nicholi said, we would also see vast increases in teen suicide, drug abuse and violence. I have reason to understand a measure of the pain spoken of by Nicholi. I experienced it when I was 6. My parents left me with my aunt for six months while they traveled. That last night, I sat on my mother’s lap while she told me how much she loved me and that she and my father would come back. Then they drove away. My pain can be recalled instantly today, decades later. In short, even when separation occurs for valid reasons, a child can interpret the departure as rejection. If we have any choice, we should not put them through that. •

‘Our Girls’

The rest of the story

DR. JAMES DOBSON

Dr. James Dobson is founder of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, P.O. Box 444, Colorado Springs, CO 80903. The Web site is www.family.org.

THE aSSOCIaTED pRESS

Kayla Zimmerman, right, studies her weekly lesson on Haiti as her adopted sister, Valancia, looks to their teacher.

Tragedy sends families rushing to help Haitian orphans They were “our girls” — the children of a Haitian orphanage, taken to heart by a Tennessee church. But then an earthquake struck, and the congregation sprang to action. The second of two parts. • By Adam Geller AP national writer KNOXVILLE — “It has been a very long and deadly night for our friends and family in Haiti,” Mark Zimmerman e-mailed the worshippers of White Stone. And in Knoxville, too, the morning after the quake, Wednesday, Jan. 13, was slow to come. Zimmerman, the church’s worship pastor, and others had been awake all night — dialing Haiti again and again. But six years after the congregation stumbled on the country and then embraced children in two of its mountain villages, they felt powerless. Atanie — the 4-year-old girl whom church members Lorie and Darrell Johnson hoped to adopt — was dead, crushed when the orphanage at Coq Chante collapsed. Sixteen girls who’d fled the orphanage — including Valancia, the 12-year-old the Zimmermans sought to adopt — had spent the night sleeping on the ground. Another girl, 10-year-old Odette, was supposed to have been with them. But it turned out she’d gone to Port-au-Prince with her birth parents to finish the adoption papers for church members Andy and Allyson Coleman. No one had heard from them since. The fate of Wousamy, 6, was also unknown.

White Stone pastor Mark Zimmerman looks at the collapsed orphanage at Coq Chante. “I don’t have words for the past 24 hours,” Allyson wrote on the family’s blog, Bringing Odette Home. • At a vigil Wednesday night, Allyson Coleman and Lorie Johnson wept. Church leaders agreed on the need for action. The next day, member Brian Lloyd left for Haiti — through the Dominican Republic, then up to Coq Chante by motorcycle and on foot, a journey that would take three days. Zimmerman began gathering supplies and a relief team to follow. Kevin Rudd worked the phones. Thursday morning, Allyson Coleman’s phone rang. “Your baby’s OK!” Rudd said. Odette and her parents had survived the quake. Two days later, Karen Bates was in the living room, still staring at footage of the earthquake, when the phone rang: Wousamy was safe. “Thank you, Lord,” she said.

Late Monday, Jan. 18 the Obama administration announced that Haitian children in the process of being adopted by U.S. families would be allowed to enter the country immediately. White Stone’s families rushed to prepare. Three nights later, Rudd flew to Fort Lauderdale to rally with a pilot and private plane, paperwork for Wousamy and five girls from Coq Chante in hand. He called ahead to Lloyd and Zimmerman in Haiti, telling them to have the six children waiting on the runway Friday morning. Back in Knoxville, the congregation waited for word from Rudd, who rushed to the U.S. embassy in Port-au-Prince for final approval. “THEY HAVE THE PAPERS!!!” Andy Coleman posted to his blog, as word came that the plane with the children had lifted off. At the airport, more than 200 people packed a civil

aviation terminal. Then the doors slid open — and Wousamy walked in to a pandemonium of cheers. It took until Sunday night for Allyson Coleman — after a whirlwind day of introducing Odette to hot running water and drinking straws — to take a seat at the computer and reflect on all that had happened. “God is GOOD!!” she wrote. • For six children and six families, this is only the beginning of the story. On a Friday morning at Copper Ridge Elementary, Angie Zimmerman is simultaneously finding her way through three new roles. She’s the teacher of a fifth-grade class that just welcomed a new student from Haiti. She’s the mom to Kayla, who talks happily about sharing her clothes and bedroom with a new sister. She’s the adopting mother of Valancia, who until a few weeks ago had

never seen a water fountain or an elevator — and who now sits beside Kayla in Zimmerman’s Room 133. Today’s lesson is drawn from the Weekly Reader, with a photo of a boy’s bandaged head on the cover. “Healing Haiti,” reads the headline. “Not only are they going to have to rebuild their buildings and homes,” Angie says to her students. “They’re going to have to rebuild their relationships — and rebuild trust.” The lesson must be all too real for Valancia. But it’s hard for Angie to know, exactly, partly because of the language barrier. English is the first hurdle for Valancia and the others, though they seem to comprehend much more than they vocalize and they vacuum up new words fast. Then there are all the things beyond vocabulary and grammar that are harder to quantify. • On a Sunday morning, four weeks after the celebration at the airport, the folding table in the hallway outside the gym/sanctuary is spread with pictures of 19 faces from a faraway world. The adults are juggling parenting, plans to rebuild the orphanage and efforts to bring 12 remaining girls to the U.S. At times, it still doesn’t seem real. But their children embrace the moment. “Odette. Benita. Valancia. Islande,” read cards and signs, decorated with hearts and flowers and posted on bulletin boards around the perimeter of the gym. “Welcome Home.”


B2

Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

church events Antioch Baptist Sunday services at Antioch Baptist Church and Unity Outreach Ministries (A Full Gospel Ministry), 1800 Poplar St., behind Jones-Upchurch Realty, begin at 9:15 a.m. with children’s church, followed by worship at 10 weekly. Tuesday prayer service is at 6:30 p.m., and midweek service/Bible study is at 7. Alfred E. Lassiter Sr. is pastor.

Berachah Activities at Berachah Church, 2918 Fisher Ferry Road, begin at 7 tonight with praise and worship and prophet Tim Hines bringing the message. Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m., followed at 10:30 by praise and worship, with Hines leading, and children’s church for ages 4-8. Women’s Bible study begins at 6:30 p.m. Monday. Wednesday Bible study begins at 7 p.m. Second Watch prayer will be from 9 p.m. to midnight Friday. Roger Cresswell is pastor.

Bethel A.M.E. Services at Bethel A.M.E. Church, 805 Monroe St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11 a.m. Communion is each first Sunday. On Wednesday, Bible study begins at 6:30 p.m. Membership training is 10 a.m. each Saturday before the first and third Sunday. Choir rehearsal is each Saturday before the fourth Sunday. Board meeting is each second Sunday following the service. The Rev. Quincy Jones is pastor.

Bethlehem M.B. Services at Bethlehem M.B. Church, 3055 N. Washington St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Mattie Brown, superintendent. Communion service is each fourth Sunday. Covenant meeting is at 11 a.m. each third Sunday. Fifth Sunday services are at 11:30 a.m. Bible class is at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Choir rehearsals are at 7 p.m. Wednesday and at 10 a.m. Saturday before the fourth Sunday. Usher meeting is each fourth Sunday after the service. Radio ministry is at 7:30 a.m. Sundays with the Rev. David Brown Jr., pastor, on station 1680 AM. Kevin Winters is musician.

Bovina Baptist Services at Bovina Baptist Church, 5293 U.S. 80, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school led by Larry Oakes. Worship is at 11 with the sanctuary choir, led by minister of music Jerry Stuart, singing and the Rev. Jess Sumrall, pastor, delivering the message. Donna Harper is pianist. Bobbie Bruce is organist. Brian Parker is minister of students and education. Jo Sumrall is minister of children. Evening services begin at 5 with First Place, discipleship training, mission organizations and youth Bible study. Worship is at 6 with Sumrall delivering the message. Wednesday night supper is at 5, followed by youth choir rehearsal at 5:30. Prayer service, children’s choir and youth Bible study begin at 6. Adult choir rehearsal is at 6:45. A nursery is provided.

Bovina U.M.C. Services at Bovina United Methodist Church, 70 Bovina Drive, begin at 9:30 a.m. with a special time for children. The Rev. Lister Bowdoin is pastor.

Bowmar Baptist Services at Bowmar Baptist Church, 1825 U.S. 61 South, begin at 8:30 a.m. with classic worship followed by Bowmar University, junior and senior high and children’s lifegroups at 9:20. Creative worship for families and Stepping Stones (5-year-old worship), Kids on the Rock

(grades 1-6) and junior high worship begin at 10:30. Senior high worship begins at 6 p.m. Sign language for the hearing impaired is available upon request during the classic and creative services. Adult Growth Groups meet throughout the week.

Bradley’s Chapel U.M.C. Services at Bradley’s Chapel United Methodist Church, 13815 Oak Ridge Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. Music is led by Hope Raney. Earlene Alexander is pianist. Children’s church is led by Ann Grimshel. Evening worship is canceled.Wednesday evening prayer begins at 6 at the home of Thomas and Faye Powell. The Rev. Harry Hawkins is pastor.

Bypass Church of Christ Services at Bypass Church of Christ, 787 U.S. 61 North, begin with Bible classes at 10 a.m., followed by worship at 11 with Dr. Willie Nettle, minister, speaking. Worship consists of congregational and a cappella singing and observance of the Lord’s Supper. A ministry fair will begin at 4 p.m. Evening service begins at 6 with Nettle speaking. Midweek Bible classes are at 7 p.m. each Wednesday. For transportation or a free home Bible study or free Bible correspondence course, call 601-638-6165.

Calvary Baptist Activities at Calvary Baptist Church, 2878 Old Highway 27, begin at 6 tonight with Christ in the Passover, presented by Jews for Jesus. Services begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11 with J. Macon Phillips, pastor, delivering the message. R.L. Sigrest is worship leader. Deacon nominations will be taken at the end of the service. Sunday evening activities begin at 3:30 with choir practice, followed by Discipleship Training at 5 and worship at 6. Visitation begins at 6 p.m. Monday. Children’s activities with Bible drills for grades 4-6, Youth-the-Gathering and prayer meeting begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday.

Calvary Baptist Services at Calvary Baptist, 406 Klein St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Communion is at 11 a.m. each first Sunday. Mission meeting is each third Sunday, covenant is each fourth Sunday and worship services are each fifth Sunday at 11 a.m. Bible class is at 6 p.m. each Wednesday. Toni Green is musician. Nathaniel Williams is choir director. Johnny May Marble is choir president. Rudy L. Smith is associate minister.

Cedar Grove M.B. Services at Cedar Grove M.B. Church, 3300 Grange Hall Road, begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Jimmie Jefferson, superintendent. Worship begins at 11. Communion is each third Sunday. Choir rehearsal begins at 7 p.m. each Monday with Travanti Hill, minister of music, leading. On Wednesday, Midday Bible study is at 11:30 a.m. Prayer meeting/Bible study is at 6:30. Wednesday Night Live worship is at 6:30 p.m. each first Wednesday. Children’s choir rehearsal is at 7 p.m. each fourth Thursday. Brotherhood Ministry meets at 7 p.m. each second Friday.

Christ Episcopal Christ Episcopal Church, 1115 Main St., will celebrate the Fifth Sunday in Lent with Holy Eucharist, Rite I, at 8 a.m. in the chapel and at 10 in the nave. The Rev. David Elliott will preach and celebrate at both services. Fellowship and refreshments will follow in the parish hall. Choir practice begins at 9.

devotion “For if ye live after the flesh, ye shall die: but if ye through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, ye shall live.” Romans 8:13 • We preachers are fond of saying, “Get right with God. You may die!” It is far better to say, “Get right with God. You may live!” The greatest joy in life is living for Jesus. Why waste more time? There is a life to live. • Friend, the best thing that you can say about a life lived without Christ is that it is a wasted life. Billy Sunday, a revival preacher from the 1920s, said that the deathbed repentance is “burning the candle of life for the devil, and then blowing the smoke in God’s face.” • If you are not saved, it is not too late for you. If you want to be saved — wherever you are, whoever you are, whatever you have done, Jesus wants to save you. Repent and believe and you will be saved.

• Devotion written by Dr. Adrian Rogers in conjunction with Love Worth Finding Ministries. Web site: http://www.lwf.org Youth Sunday school will join the 10 a.m. service, during which child care is provided. The coffee/Bible study group meets at 10 a.m. Wednesday in the Sunday school building. A healing service is at 12:15 p.m. in the chapel. A soup supper will be at 5:30 p.m., followed by a Lenten study, Discovering Everyday Spirituality, at 6. A class of instruction for centering prayer is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday in the nave. Stations of the Cross is at 5:30 p.m. Fridays during Lent. Call 601-638-5899 or visit www.christchurchvburg. dioms.org.

Church of Christ Services at Church of Christ, 3333 N. Frontage Road, begin at 9 a.m. with Bible classes. Eric Welch will present the lessons for worship at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Ladies Bible class begins at 9:45 a.m. Wednesday, and Bible classes for all ages are at 7 p.m. For a free correspondence course or home Bible study, call 601-636-4801.

The Church of the Holy Trinity, Episcopal The Church of the Holy Trinity, Episcopal, South and Monroe streets, will celebrate the Fifth Sunday of Lent with The Great Litany, Holy Eucharist, Rite I, at 8 a.m. and The Great Litany Holy Eucharist, Rite II, at 10:30. The Rev. Michael C. Nation will preach and celebrate at both services. Choir rehearsal begins at 9, and Sunday school at 9:15. A nursery is provided from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Youth meeting begins at 2 p.m. Sunday. On Monday, Vestry meeting, Holy Eucharist, begins at 6 p.m. On Tuesday and Thursday, Holy Eucharist begins at 7 a.m. Lunch Bunch group begins at 12:10 p.m. Tuesday. ECW meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. at Donna Saunders’ home. Pilates is at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday. Wednesday Healing Service begins at 12:05 p.m., and congregational supper is at 6. Stations of the Cross are at 6:30 On Friday, the Lenten Fine Arts series featuring Beechwood Elementary Honor Choir begins at 12:05 p.m., followed by a gumbo lunch at 12:35.

Clover Valley M.B. Services at Clover Valley M.B. Church, 7670 Mississippi 27 South, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school followed by worship at 11. Communion is each first Sunday. Pantry donations are taken each second Sunday. Covenant is each third Sunday. Devotional services, led by the women’s ministry, are each fourth Sunday. All begin at 11 a.m. Bible study is at 7 p.m. each Tuesday. Missionary workers meet at 6:30 p.m. each second Tuesday. Choir rehearsal begins at 5 p.m. each Monday and at 11 a.m. each Saturday before the second Sunday. Elder Clavorn Logan Sr. is pastor. Call 601-636-6375.

Cool Springs M.B. Sunday services at Cool Springs M.B. Church, 385 Falk Steel Road, begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. weekly. Communion is observed at 11 a.m. each first Sunday. Regular services are at 11 each third Sunday. Tuesday prayer service begins at 6 p.m., followed by Bible study. Byron Maxwell is pastor.

Crawford Street U.M.C. Services at Crawford Street United Methodist Church, 900 Crawford St., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school and confirmation class. Chancel choir rehearsal is at 10:40, and worship is at 10:55. MAD Sunday will meet today from 5 until 7. Memorial Hall will be open from 2 until 5 for youth activities. UMYF will meet at 5. The Rev. Cary Stockett is pastor. The sanctuary and Sunday school rooms are handicap accessible in Wesley Hall. Ruth Circle will meet at 6 p.m. Monday. On Tuesday, men’s breakfast and devotional begin at 6:50 a.m., and Rachel Circle will meet at 9:30 a.m. at Faye Wilkinson’s home. On Wednesday, Bible study is at 10 a.m. Dinner will be served at 5:15. Children’s activities, adult handbells rehearsal and MOMS meeting are at 5:45. A study of Philippians led by Stockett and youth meeting are at 6, and chancel choir rehearsal is at 6:45. Family game night begins at 5:30 Friday.

Eagle Lake Baptist Activities at Eagle Lake Baptist Church, Eagle Lake community, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. with Dwight Sibley, pastor, delivering the messages. Leadership team meeting begins at 5. Wednesday prayer service begins at 6:30 p.m., followed by a business meeting.

Eagle Lake U.M.C. Sunday worship at Eagle Lake United Methodist Church, 16682 Mississippi 465, begins at 9 a.m. with the Rev. Barbara Hite bringing the sermon. Fellowship time follows, and Sunday school is at 10:19. The Eagle Lake Hi-Steppers walk in the fellowship hall at 8:30 a.m. weekdays. The Lenten Bible study begins at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The Joy Prayer Circle will meet at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. Call 601-218-6255.

Ebenezer Baptist Services at Ebenezer Baptist Church, 2346 Grove St., begin with Sunday school at 9 a.m. Willie H. Smith is superintendent. Communion is each fourth Sunday at 5:30 p.m. David Brown Jr. is pastor.

Edwards Baptist Services at Edwards Baptist Church, 101 Magnolia St., begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. Choir practice begins at

9:15. Bible study begins at 6 p.m. Sunday and Wednesday. All services are led by Dr. John McCall, interim pastor. Curlee Green is minister of music. Linda Dickson is pianist. A nursery is provided and managed by Debby Best.

Faith Christian Center Services at Faith Christian Center, 1100 Main St., begin at 9 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10. Children’s church and a nursery are provided. Men’s and women’s fellowship is at 5 p.m. each first Sunday. On Wednesday, intercessory prayer is at 6 p.m., followed by Bible class and teens ministry at 7. Dr. Ollie Hardaway Jr. is pastor. For transportation, call 601-638-1600.

Family Life Cathedral Sunday Friends and Family Day at Family Life Cathedral, An Oasis of Love, 2832 Ken Karyl Ave., begins at 9:30 a.m. with Successful Living classes, followed by praise and worship at 11. A nursery is provided for children as old as 3, and children’s church is available. Tutoring classes are from 3:30 until 5:30 p.m. MondayThursday. Friday early morning prayer is from 6 to 9. Call 601-629-3900, 601-6383433 or e-mail flcoasisoflove@cablelynx.com. Betty J. Young Tyler is pastor.

First Baptist Services at First Baptist Church, 1607 Cherry St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Bible study, followed by worship at 10:50 with Dr. Matt Buckles, pastor, delivering the message. Sunday school and morning worship for the hearing impaired are available. A nursery is provided for all services. E-Groups begin at 5 p.m. On Monday, Life Hurts/God Heals for students begins at 6 p.m. Celebrate Recovery, GriefShare, DivorceCare and Celebration Station begin at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Mafan Building, 1315 Adams St. On Wednesday, English as a second language begins at 8:30 a.m.; Mission Mosaic at 4:30 p.m.; and preschool and children’s choirs at 5. Church family time is at 5:50; English as a second language at 6; adult and youth Bible study, RAs, GAs, Mission Friends and adult choir rehearsal at 6:15; and family night supper is from 4:45 until 6. Celebrate Recovery will meet at 6 p.m. Friday at the Mafan Building. Revival, featuring Mississippi State quarterback Tyson Lee, begins at 6:30 p.m. Friday. Revival with Dr. Ron Meeks begins at 6:30 p.m. March 27.

First Baptist Services for First Baptist Church, 1511 1/2 Lane St., begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., followed by worship at 11 each first and third Sunday. Communion is each first Sunday. Prayer and Bible study meet at 6 each Wednesday night. Choir rehearsal is at 3 p.m. each Saturday before the first Sunday and at noon each Saturday before the third Sunday. Roosevelt Smith is pastor.

First Church of the Nazarene Services at First Church of the Nazarene, 3428 Wisconsin Ave., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:50 with Kelvin Boone preaching. Music is led by Dwain Butler. Nursery worker is Dorothy Matthews. Evening service begins at 6. Midweek Bible study is at 7 p.m.

First Methodist Protestant Services at First Methodist Protestant Church, 500 Porters Chapel Road, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11 with Robert C. Andrews, pastor, delivering the mes-

sage. Children’s church is led by Daphne Bagley. A nursery is provided. Church women will meet at 4 p.m. in the fellowship hall for dessert and fellowship. Wednesday night adult Bible study, children’s choir and youth and young adult Bible study begin at 6. A nursery is provided during Bible study.

First Presbyterian Services at First Presbyterian Church, Cherry and South streets, begin at 9:30 a.m. with worship led by the Rev. Tim Brown. Sunday school is at 10:45. The choir director is Sharon Penley. The organist is Barbara Tracy. On Monday, Boy Scouts meet at 7 p.m. On Tuesday, men’s Bible study begins at 7:15 a.m., and Al Anon meets at noon. On Wednesday, confirmation class begins at 4 p.m.; the choir interns meet at 4:45; dinner begins at 5:15; adult, junior and senior high Bible study and Palm Sunday rehearsal for children as old as sixth grade are at 6; and choir is at 7.

Gibson Memorial U.M.C. Services at Gibson Memorial United Methodist Church, 335 Oak Ridge Road, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. The Rev. Greg Hazelrig is pastor. Paul Ballard is worship leader. The Dabney Bible Class is broadcast Sunday mornings at 10 a.m. on WBBV 101.3. Bell choir practice begins at 5:15 p.m. Tuesday. Choir practice is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Goodrum Baptist Services at Goodrum Baptist Church, 4569 Fisher Ferry Road, begin with Sunday school at 9:45 a.m., followed by worship at 11. Mike Pennock will deliver the message. Jack Hollingsworth will lead the music. A nursery is provided. Call 601-529-4700.

Gospel Temple M.B. Services at Gospel Temple M.B. Church, 1612 Lane St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship and Communion are at 11 a.m. each second and fourth Sunday. Women’s ministry meets at 6 p.m. each Monday. Prayer and Bible study begin at 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday. Recco Owns is Sunday school superintendent. Bennie Slaughter, deacon, is assistant superintendent. For information or transportation, call 601-634-0759. Walter Edley is pastor.

Grace Baptist Services at Grace Baptist Church, 729 Hankinson Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Bible study, followed by worship at 11 with the Rev. Bryan Abel, pastor, delivering the message. Hubert Stroud will lead the music. Evening services begin at 5:30 with discipleship training, followed by worship at 6:30. On Wednesday, GAs, RAs, youth-adult Bible studyare at 6:30 p.m.

Greater Grove Street Services at Greater Grove Street M.B. Church, 2715 Alcorn Drive, begin with worship at 8:30 a.m. Fourth Sunday worship services are at 8:30 and 10:15 a.m. Fifth Sunday services will be at 10 a.m. The Lord’s Supper is observed each first Sunday. Children’s church and a nursery are provided. Bible school begins at 6 p.m. with Hour of Power service each Wednesday before the fourth Sunday. A baptismal is each last Wednesday. On Thursday, Bible class and fellowship led by evangelist Mable Jennings are from 10:30 until 11:30 a.m. Valet parking is available for the handicapped or Continued on Page B3.


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The Vicksburg Post

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church events Continued from Page B2. senior citizens. For information, transportation or prayer request call 601-218-3911. C.J. Williams is music minister. The Rev. Dr. Casey D. Fisher is pastor.

Greater Jerusalem Services at Greater Jerusalem Baptist Church, 5026 Mount Alban Road, begin at 8:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 9:30. The Lord’s Supper is observed each first and third Sunday morning. Tuesday night Men of Jerusalem rehearsal is at 6:30, and Voices of Jerusalem rehearsal is at 8. Wednesday night prayer service begins at 6:30, followed by Bible class at 7:30. Deacons meeting is at 7 p.m. each last Friday. Youth choir rehearsal is at noon each third and fourth Saturday. A tape of the morning service is available, call 601634-8186. Kemp Burley Jr. is pastor.

Greater Mount Lebanon M.B. Services at Greater Mount Lebanon M.B. Church, 339 Alpine St., begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Worship and Communion services are at 11 a.m. each first and third Sunday. Bible study is at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The Rev. Curtis Ross is pastor.

Greater Mount Zion Services at Greater Mount Zion Baptist Church, 907 Farmer St., begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. Communion is each first Sunday. Youth ministry meets at 6:30 p.m. each second and fourth Tuesday. Youth choir rehearses at 6:30 each third Monday before the fourth Sunday. Prayer meeting is at 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday. Bible study is at 7. The inspirational choir rehearses at 7 p.m. each Monday after the first Sunday. GMZ mass choir rehearses at 6:30 each fourth Monday before the first Sunday. The usher board meets at 3 p.m. each second Saturday. The male chorus rehearses at 1 p.m. each first and fourth Saturday. Women’s ministry meets at 6:30 each first and third Tuesday. Recordings of worship services are available from Jesse Trotter. Transportation is available upon request. Contact 601636-0826.Gregory Butler is pastor.

Greater Oak Grove Services at Greater Oak Grove, 3302 Patricia St., begin at 8 a.m. with worship. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. The Rev. James C. Archer is pastor.

Hawkins U.M.C.

Special eventS tODAY • Family Life Cathedral — 8 a.m., Morning of Glory; Rhonda Cresswell, guest speaker; 2832 Ken Karyl Ave. • King Solomon Baptist — Noon, 150th anniversary events; 1401 Farmer St.

sunDAY • Clover Valley M.B. — 2 p.m., 153rd anniversary; the Rev. Dellie C. Robinson, guest speaker; 7670 Mississippi 27. • Greater Mount Olive — Noon, ninth anniversary of the Rev. Douglas Harris, pastor; the Rev. Gerald Williams, guest speaker; dinner served; 109 N. Locust St. • King Solomon Baptist — 2 p.m., 150th anniversary events; the Rev. Jessie Horton, guest speaker; 1401 Farmer St. • Mount Calvary — 98th anniversary; 8 a.m., continental breakfast; 11, service with the Rev. James O. Bowman, guest speaker; dinner afterward; Mincer Minor Jr., pastor; 1350 East Ave. • Soul Saving M.B. — 1:30 p.m., 17th anniversary; the Rev. Willie White, speaker; the Rev. Jessie L. Jones, pastor; 522 Locust St.

McAlister and the Praise Band. On Wednesday, worship begins at 7 p.m. with Randy Grey delivering the message. On Saturday, youth activities and cookout for ages 10-18 are from 6 until 9 p.m. at the church. Children under 10 are invited but must be accompanied by an adult. Call 601-218-1150 or visit www.vicksburghealingplace. com.

Holy Cross Anglican Services for Fifth Sunday of Lent at Holy Cross Anglican Church (Reformed Episcopal Church), 1021 Crawford St., begin at 9 with morning prayer. Bible study begins at 9:30 and continues with the Sermon on the Mount. Holy Communion using the “1928 Book of Common Prayer” is at 10:30 with the Rev. Mark Bleakley, rector, officiating. Baptized Christians may participate in Communion. Child care is provided. The sanctuary and Sunday school rooms are accessible to the handicapped through the back gate on Adams Street. Call 601-529-4838 or visit www.holycrossvbg.com.

House of Peace Services at The House of Peace Worship Church, 2372 Grove St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11. The ninth anniversary appreciation service for Linda Sweezer, pastor, begins at 3 p.m. Sunday with Eyvone Smith as guest speaker. On Monday, intercessory prayer begins at 6 p.m. Women of Peace fellowship begins at 6:30. On Tuesday, intercessory prayer is at 5 p.m., followed by Bible class at 6. On Thursday, Men of Prosperity meets at 5:30 p.m., and Evangelistic Outreach Ministry and choir rehearsal are at 7. Perfect Peace is broadcast at 6 a.m. Sundays on WAPT16, at 6 p.m., Thursdays and Saturdays on Channel 17 and at 6 a.m. Monday through Friday on WUFX-11.

Services at Hawkins United Methodist Church, 3736 Halls Ferry Road, begin at 8:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10. Bible study for adults and children’s activities begin at 5. Snack supper begins at 5:30. UMYF begins at 6. On Monday, Feeding the Homeless meets at 5 p.m., Cub Scouts at 6 and Boy Scouts at 7. On Tuesday, VBS meeting is at 5:30 p.m., and prayer group meets at 6. On Wednesday, handbells are at 5:45, and chancel choir is at 7. On Thursday, adult Bible study begins at 9 a.m.

Islamic Center

Healing Place

King David M.B. No. 1

Services at Healing Place, 1201 Grove St., begin with worship at 10:30 a.m. with Rick McAlister, pastor, delivering the message. Congregational singing will be led by the Healing Place Praise Band. A nursery is available for ages up to 3. Sunday evening service begins at 6 with

Services at King David M.B. No. 1 Church, 2717 Letitia St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Jannie Dishmon, superintendent. Communion service is at 11 a.m. each second Sunday. Choir rehearsal is at 6 p.m. each first, third and fourth Monday. Bible study is at 6

Services at Islamic Center of Vicksburg, 6705 Paxton Road, include Fajar (morning prayer) at 6:30 a.m., Maghrib (sunset prayer) at 7:30 and Jummah (Friday prayer) sermon at 12:45 p.m.

Jones Chapel M.B. Services at Jones Chapel M.B. Church, 1340 Bay St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school each Sunday. Worship and Communion are at 11 a.m. each fourth Sunday. Joseph L. Brown is pastor.

p.m. each Wednesday. Usher Board meeting is at 11 a.m. each second Saturday. Creative woman’s ministry is at 9 a.m. each fourth Saturday. The Rev. A.L. Hines is pastor.

King of Kings Sunday services at King of Kings Christian Center, 4209 Mount Alban Road, begin at 9 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10. Evening services will be held each first and third Sunday at 5. Children’s ministry for ages 2-6 is Sunday. Ages 2-10 meet Thursday. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. each Thursday. Girl Scouts meets at 3:30 p.m. each second Sunday. Call 601-218-5529 or 601638-2513. Willie P. Taylor is pastor.

King Solomon Baptist The 150th anniversary celebration at King Solomon Baptist Church, 1401 Farmer St., continues at noon today with a balloon launch and cookout for youths. Sunday services begin at 8:15 a.m. with Hour of SoulSaving Power. The Rev. R.D. Bernard will deliver the message, and the praise team will provide the music. Worship is at 10 with Bernard preaching. The senior choir will sing. Child care is provided at 9:30 a.m. Children’s church is also provided. Dinner will be served. The 150th anniversary celebration concludes at 2 p.m. with a service featuring the Rev. Jessie Horton as guest speaker. Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday and at noon Friday. The message can be heard, live, at 11 a.m. on WTRM 100.5 and also WJIW 104.7 and KJIW 94.5, both at 7 p.m. CDs of the Sunday message may be obtained by calling 601-638-7658. For transportation, call 601-831-4387.

Lighthouse Assembly of God Services at Lighthouse Assembly of God, 1790 Sherman Ave., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school for all ages, followed by worship at 10:45 with Debbie Quimby leading musice. Children’s church, led by Harry and Vickie Ogle, begins after worship. George Farris, pastor, will bring the message. Evening worship is at 6. Adult Bible study, youth service and Children’s Bible Explorers are at 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Call 601-636-4213.

Lighthouse Baptist Services at Lighthouse Baptist Church, 1804 Sky Farm Ave., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school. Mike Sharp will lead the adult class. Women’s intercessory prayer is between Sunday school and the 11 a.m. worship, which is led by Dr. E.L. Sharp, pastor. Men’s prayer is at 5:30 p.m., and worship is at 6. Bible study and prayer service are at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

• Zion Travelers — 11 a.m., Elbert Cox Jr.’s first service; 1701 Poplar St.

tuesDAY • New Mount Elem — 7 p.m., fellowship services; the Rev. Percy Turner, guest speaker; Dr. Leonard Walker, pastor; 3014 Wisconsin Ave.

WeDnesDAY • New Mount Elem — 7 p.m., fellowship services; the Rev. Percy Turner, guest speaker; Dr. Leonard Walker, pastor; 3014 Wisconsin Ave.

thursDAY • New Mount Elem — 7 p.m., fellowship services; the Rev. Percy Turner, guest speaker; Dr. Leonard Walker, pastor; 3014 Wisconsin Ave.

FrIDAY • Pleasant Valley M.B. — 6:30 p.m., Friends and Family Day; the Rev. E.E. Gibbs, pastor; 2585 N. Washington St.

Living Word Baptist

Services at Living Word Baptist Church, 2845 Clay St., Suite 13 (in the Emmich Building), begin with Sunday school and new members orientation at 9:30 a.m. Worship is at 11. Morning Glory worship services are at 8:30 a.m. each first and third Sunday. Bible study is at 7 each Wednesday night. W.I.T.N.E.S.S., a women’s ministry, is each first and third Saturday at 10 a.m. Man II Man, a men’s ministry, is each second and fourth Sunday at 8:30 a.m. Dr. Stevie C. Duncan is pastor.

Lutheran Church of the Messiah The Fifth Sunday in Lent will be celebrated at 9 a.m. at the Lutheran Church of the Messiah (LCMS), 301 Cain Ridge Road. Sunday school is at 10:30. Visit www.lutheranchurchofthemessiah.org or call 601-636-1894.

Mercy Seat Baptist Services at Mercy Seat Baptist, 5 Dos Casas Lane, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school led by Grace Brown. Communion services are at 11 a.m. each third and fourth Sunday. Covenant is shared during third-Sunday services. Choir practice led by Mattie Lacey begins at 6:30 p.m. each Thursday before the third and fourth Sunday. Musicians are Shirley Coleman-Harris and Charlie Gross.The Rev. Rudy Smith is pastor.

Morning Star M.B. Services at Morning Star M.B. Church, 848 Glass Road, begin with Holy Communion at 11 a.m. each third Sunday. Youth worship is at 11 each first Sunday. Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m. weekly. Prayer is at 7 p.m. each Wednesday, followed by Bible class at 7:30. James C. Archer is pastor.

Mount Alban M.B. Sunday services at Mount Alban M.B. Church, 2385 Mount Alban Road, begin at 9 a.m. with Sunday school directed by Leonard Knight, deacon and superintendent. Worship with Communion is each first Sunday; praise and worship is each second Sunday; youth service is each Fifth Sunday; all start at 11. Praise and worship are at 10 a.m. each third Sunday. On Wednesday, prayer/ Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, choir rehearsal begins at 5:30 p.m. Women of Faith is at 10 a.m. each second Saturday. The Rev. Henry Lee Taylor Jr. is pastor.

Mount Ararat M.B. Services at Mount Ararat M.B. Church, Eagle Lake community, are at 1:30 p.m. each second Sunday. Dr. L.A. Hall Sr. is pastor.

Mount Calvary Baptist Services at Mount Calvary Baptist Church, 1350 East Ave., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Al Evans, superintendent. Worship is at 11 with Mincer Minor, pastor, delivering the message. Communion is at 11 each second and third Sunday. Services are at 8 a.m. each fifth Sunday. Children’s ministry for ages 1-7 begins at 9:30 a.m. each Sunday. Brotherhood meets at 6 p.m. each first Tuesday. Ushers meet at 6 p.m. each Tuesday before the second Sunday. Wednesday’s youth Bible study and intercessory prayer begin at 6 p.m., followed by adult Bible study at 7. Senior choir rehearses at 6 p.m. each Thursday. Junior choir rehearses from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. each Saturday before the first and third Sunday. The trustee board meets at 9 a.m. and deacons at 11 a.m. each Saturday before the second Sunday.

Mount Carmel M.B. Services at Mount Carmel M.B. Church, 2729 Alma St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Keafur Grimes. Worship and Communion are each first Sunday; Sunday school enhancement each second Sunday; worship and testimony service each third Sunday; youth services each fourth and fifth Sunday; and children’s church each first and third Sunday. All are at 11 a.m. Mission Society meets at 3 p.m. each second and fourth Monday. Wednesday’s Bible study/ prayer service is at 6:30 p.m. The senior choir rehearses at 6 p.m. each Saturday before the first Sunday, and the male choir rehearses at the same time each Saturday before the third Sunday. Dr. Franklin L. Lassiter is pastor.

Mount Carmel Ministries Services at Mount Carmel Ministries, 2015 Grove St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school and new members training. Worship with Communion begins at 11 each first Sunday. Musicians rehearsal is at 6 p.m. Monday. Praise and worship choir rehearses at 5 p.m. Wednesday. Youth choir rehearses at noon Saturdays before the first and third Sunday. Midweek Bible study is at 7 p.m. Wednesday. On Thursdays, Bible class is at noon; bring lunch. Men’s fellowship is at 7 p.m. Family and Friend’s Day will be at 3 p.m. March 28. Henry W. Bolden III, pastor of Perfecting Faith Church in Detroit, will be the guest speaker. Call 601-638-9015 or e-mail mtcarmelministri@bellsouth.net.

Mount Givens Baptist Services at Mount Givens Baptist Church, 210 Kirkland Road, begin at 9:30 a.m. with

Sunday school each second, third, fourth and fifth week. Alice Scott is teacher, and Sarah Cosey is superintendent. Worship and Communion are at 11 each fourth Sunday. Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday and is led by the Rev. Terry Moore, pastor. Senior choir rehearsal is at 6:30 p.m. each Friday before the third and fourth Sunday and is led by Karen Baker, musician. Shady Lawn Nursing Home ministry is at 10 a.m. every other Saturday. Call 601-6310602.

Mount Hebron M.B. Services at Mount Hebron M.B. Church, Bovina, are at 11:30 a.m. each first Sunday and include Communion. Willie J. White is pastor.

Mount Heroden Baptist Services at Mount Heroden Baptist Church, 1117-19 Clay St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, directed by Hilda Y. White, acting superintendent. Worship is at 11. Communion is each first Sunday at 11. Youth service is at 11 each second Sunday. Prayer meeting/Bible study is at 5 p.m. each Wednesday. Senior choir rehearses each first and third Tuesday at 4 p.m. Youth choir rehearses each second Saturday at 12:30 p.m.; activities follow. Dr. Louis A. Hall Sr. is pastor.

Mount Pilgrim Services at Mount Pilgrim, Freetown, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school. First Sunday services begin at 11 a.m. and are led by Gracie Daniels, evangelist. Communion is each second Sunday and worship is each fifth Sunday; both begin at 11 a.m. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. The Rev. Joseph L. Brown is pastor.

Mount Zion M.B. No. 1 Services at Mount Zion M.B, No. 1 Church, 920 Fifth North St., begin at 8:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10. Holy Communion is each first Sunday. On Wednesday, prayer meeting begins at 6:30 p.m., followed by Bible study led by Larry Brown, pastor. On March 27, musician appreciation program for Chandra White begins at 3 p.m. For transportation, call 601-638-1982 or 601-619-4978.

Narrow Way M.B. Services at Narrow Way M.B. Church, 400 Adams St., begin at 11 a.m. each first and third Sunday. Communion is observed each first Sunday. The Rev. James E. Williams is pastor. Call 601-218-8061.

New Beginning Services at New Beginning Full Deliverance Ministries, 1890 S. Frontage Road, Suite 2, begin at 9:15 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:15. Christian Education Class begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Bible class begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Clarence and Lavern Walsh are senior pastors. Call 601717-3306 or 601-454-2062. Michelle King is pastor. Call 601-301-0586.

New Mount Elem M.B. Services at New Mount Elem M.B. Church, 3014 Wisconsin Ave., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. A combined evening service with Christians Home and New Jerusalem churches will be at 6:30 p.m. with the Rev. Kemp Burley speaking. On Tuesday, intercessory prayer begins at 6:30 p.m., followed by Bible class at 7. Dr. Leonard Walker is pastor.

New Mount Pilgrim Services at New Mount Pilgrim M.B. Church, 501 N. Poplar St., begin at 9:30 a.m. Continued on Page B4.


B4

Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

church events Continued from Page B3. with Sunday school led by Leroy Gillium, deacon and assistant superintendent. Second Sunday services are at 11 a.m. Covenant is after Sunday school each third Sunday. Communion services are at 11 each fourth Sunday. Prayer meeting begins at 6 p.m. Tuesday, followed by a Bible study led by the Rev. Virdell Lewis. Choir practice is at 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday before the second, third and fourth Sunday. The usher board meets at 11 a.m. each first Saturday. Recordings of services are available from Lee Griffin, deacon. The Rev. Henry J. Williams is pastor.

New Popular Grove Independent Methodist Services at New Popular Grove Independent Methodist Church, Mississippi 27 North, Utica, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school led by Marshall Harris, superintendent. Worship is at 11 a.m. Sunday at 11 a.m. members will worship at Mount Calvary Baptist, 1350 East Ave., which is celebrating its 98th anniversary with James O. Bowman, guest speaker. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. Thursday. T.L. Moore is associate minister.

New Rock of Ages M.B. Sunday services at New Rock of Ages Church, 2944 Valley St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Ernestine Boone, superintendent. Worship is at 11. Bible study is at 6 p.m. each Monday after the third Sunday. NBC training is at 5 p.m. Thursday. Choir rehearses at 2:30 p.m. each third Saturday. Dr. Michael R. Reed Sr. is pastor.

Northside Baptist Services at Northside Baptist Church, 4820 N. Washington St., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school. Children’s church and worship are at 11 and are led by Dr. Frank Lescallette, pastor. Evening activities begin at 5 with Kids’ Time, followed by Youth Explosion and evening service at 6. Wednesday evening activities begin at 6:30 with women’s Mission Study, men’s Bible Study and GAs, followed by Bible study and prayer time at 7.

Oakland Baptist Services at Oakland Baptist Church, 2959 Oak Ridge Road, begin at 9:30 a.m. with a devotional led by Ray Wade. Sunday school is at 9:45. Children’s church and worship begin at 10:45. Lanny McCann will lead the music and provide special music. Justin Rhodes, pastor, will deliver both messages of the day. Deacons meeting is at 4:30 p.m. The Beth Moore Bible study series continues at 5. Evening worship begins at 6, followed by a business meeting. On Wednesday, S.W.A.T. youth class will meet at 6:15 p.m., Awana will meet at 6:30. Prayer service is at 7.

Open Door Bible Services at Open Door Bible Church, 4866 Mount Alban Road, begin at 10:15 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11:15. Youth and adult classes are offered. Call 601-638-2536.

Pentecostal Explosion Services at Pentecostal Explosion Ministries, 2130 Washington St., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by praise and worship at 10:45.Wednesday Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. Corporate prayer/Bible study is at 7 p.m. each second and fourth Friday. Leonard and Paula Calcote are pastors. Call 601-636-4978.

Pleasant Valley M.B. Services at Pleasant Valley

M.B. Church, 260 Mississippi 27, begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Edward Wheeler, deacon, followed by worship at 11. A nursery for children as old as 4 is provided during Sunday morning services. On Tuesday, Bible Institute begins at 7. The Rev. Joe Harris Jr. is pastor.

Pleasant Valley M.B. Services at Pleasant Valley M.B. Church, 2585 N. Washington St., begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school led by Silas Bright. Worship with Communion is at 11:30 a.m. each first Sunday. Worship is at 11:30 each third Sunday. On Tuesday, prayer service begins at 6 p.m., followed by Bible study at 6:30. Choir rehearsal is at 5:30 p.m. each Friday before the first Sunday and at 11:30 a.m. each Saturday before the third Sunday. Ladies auxiliary is at 6:30 p.m. each Friday after the first Sunday. The Rev. E.E. Gibbs is pastor.

Port Gibson U.M.C. On the Fifth Sunday in Lent at Port Gibson United Methodist Church, 901 Church St., Sunday school begins at 10 a.m., followed by worship at 11. The Rev. David Harrison will bring the message. Professional counseling is offered through Grace Christian Counseling Center, 907 Church St. Call 601-437-5046.

Porters Chapel U.M.C. Services at Porters Chapel United Methodist Church, 200 Porters Chapel Road, begin at 8:30 a.m. with early informal service, followed by the Good News Discussion Group at 9:45. Sunday school is at 10. Traditional worship service is at 11. The Rev. D.R. Ragsdale will deliver the sermon, and Ken Warren will lead the music. A nursery is provided for children as old as 5. On Monday, Boy Scouts will meet at 7 p.m. On Tuesday, Cursillo will meet at 6:30 p.m. On Wednesday, Lenten lunch -eon begins at noon with Dr. Bob Ford leading. On Thursday, Frances Hathorn Circle will meet at 7 p.m. in the fellowship hall.

Redbone U.M.C. Sunday school at Redbone United Methodist Church, Redbone Road, begins at 10 a.m. Worship is at 11. The program will be called God’s Ultimate Word to Us. The Rev. Thomas M. Shreve is pastor.

Redwood U.M.C. Services at Redwood United Methodist Church, 101 Redwood Road, across from Redwood Elementary, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11 with the Rev. Barbara Hite bringing the sermon and a special time for youths. Alainna Neumann and Logan Sanderford will be acolytes. Johnny and Christopher Lee will be ushers. A nursery is provided. On Wednesday, the adult choir rehearses at 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, the last Lenten Bible study begins at 7 p.m. Call 601-218-6255.

Refuge Services for Refuge Church, 6202 Indiana Ave., begin at 9:45 a.m. with Word Power for all ages, followed by praise and worship at 10:45. with Bethany Winkler, music pastor. Tony Winkler, senior pastor, will bring the morning message. Kidz Construction for ages 4 to 9 begins at 10:45. Evening services are canceled. Wednesday Family Night begins at 7 in the Family Life Center. The adults will study Genesis. Call 601-638-4439.

St. Alban’s Episcopal Services for the Fifth Sunday in Lent at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 5930 Warriors Trail, Bovina, begin with Holy Eucharist, Rite 1,

at 8:30 a.m. Choir practice is at 9:30. Christian Education is at 10. Holy Eucharist, Rite II, is at 11 with the Rev. Billie Abraham, rector, celebrating at both. Child care is provided during the 11 a.m. service. Coffee and fellowship follow both services. Holy Eucharist and unction begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday. The Lenten Arts Series concludes Wednesday with a soup supper at 6:30 and a concert at 7 by the Bovina Baptist Church Handbells Choir.

St. George Orthodox Services at St. George Antiochian Orthodox Christian Church, 2709 Washington St., include: The Fifth Sunday of Great Lent: Commemoration of our Righteous Mother Mary of Egypt; Great Vespers at 5:30 tonight; Matins and Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Sunday; The Divine Liturgy at 10:30 a.m. Sunday; The Divine Liturgy of the Feast of the Annunciation at 7 p.m. Wednesday; and Little Compline with the Akathist Hymn at 7 p.m. Friday. The Very Rev. John W. Morris is pastor. Visit www. stgeorgevicksburg.org.

St. James M.B. No. 1 Services at St. James M.B. Church No. 1, 400 Adams St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school led by Robert Hubbard, superintendent, and Walter Bell, assistant superintendent. Worship is at 11 a.m. each second and fourth Sunday. Communion is each second Sunday. Bible study is at 6 Tuesday. Willie J. White is pastor.

St. Luke Church of God in Christ Services at St. Luke Church of God in Christ, 915 First East St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Morning and evening worship are canceled. Members will travel to Beulah Land Church in Centerville for a 2 p.m. service. Elder Douglas Anderson, pastor will be the guest speaker. One Hour of Prayer is at 8 a.m. Saturdays. On Tuesday, prayer/Bible study is at 7 p.m. A home and foreign missions Bible study is at 7 p.m. Friday, followed by an evangelism service each first and third Friday. Choir rehearsal is at 8 p.m. each second and fourth Friday. For transportation, call 601638-0389.

Holy Communion, Rite I. The Rev. Denny Allman will bring the message and serve at the Eucharist. Coffee and snacks will be provided. On Wednesday, Lenten studies and snacks begin at 5 p.m. in the parish hall.

St. Paul Catholic St. Paul Catholic Church, 713 Crawford St., will celebrate the Fifth Sunday of Lent. Vigil Mass is at 5:30 p.m. today. Sunday Mass is at 10:30 a.m. Rosary and Sacrament of Reconciliation are at 5 p.m. each Saturday. Daily Mass is at 7 a.m. TuesdayFriday. On Wednesday, senior citizens Lenten program begins at 10:30 a.m. with the Sacrament of Reconciliation, followed by Mass, Anointing of the Sick and luncheon. RCIA program is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in Glynn Hall. Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament is each Friday during Lent after the 7 a.m. Mass until noon. Way of the Cross is at 5:15 p.m. each Friday in Lent.

Shady Grove Baptist Services at Shady Grove Baptist Church, 61 Shady Grove Circle, begin at 10 a.m. with Sunday school weekly. Worship begins at 11 each first and fourth Sunday. Outreach Ministry begins at 1:30 p.m. Sunday at Vicksburg Convalescent Home. Bible class is at 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday. Adult choir rehearsal begins at 11 a.m. each Saturday before the first and fourth Sunday. Youth choir rehearsal begins at noon each Saturday before the first Sunday. Richard Johnson is pastor.

Shiloh Baptist Sunday services at Shiloh Baptist Church, 920 Meadow St., begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. George Kennedy is superintendent. Covenant meeting is at 10:45 a.m. each second Sunday. Communion is at 11 a.m. each third Sunday. Choir rehearsal is at 6 p.m. each Tuesday before the third Sunday. Bible study is each Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. Dr. Willie Jones is pastor.

Shiloh Primitive Services at Shiloh Primitive Baptist Church, Warriors Trail, begin at 10:30 a.m. with singing, prayers and a sermon. Elder Charles Holden is pastor.

St. Mark Free Will

Southside Baptist

Services at St. Mark Free Will Baptist Church, 2606 Hannah St., begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school. Oscar Denton is superintendent. Worship and fellowship services begin at 11 a.m. each second Sunday. Communion is at 11 a.m. each fourth Sunday with music by the senior choir. Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday with the Rev. J.D. MaGee leading during March. Judith T. Hodge is musician.

Services at Southside Baptist Church, 95 Baptist Drive, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:50. Revival begins Sunday with Don Savell, evangelist, as guest speaker. Ronnie Lacaze will lead the music. Revival continues at 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Adult choir practice is at 4 p.m., followed by Bible study at 5. Evening worship is at 6. Midweek prayer services are at 10 a.m. Wednesday, and Bible study/prayer service is at 7 p.m. For more information call 601-631-0047.

St. Mary’s Catholic St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 1512 Main St., will celebrate the Fifth Sunday of Lent at 9 a.m. Daily Mass is at 6:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday in the parish chapel. Devotion to the Blessed Mother is at 7 p.m. Mondays in the chapel. Choir rehearsal is at 6 p.m. each Wednesday. Stations of the Cross is at 7 p.m. Fridays. The Rosary is recited at 8:30 a.m. each Sunday before Mass. The Sacrament of Penance is at 8:45 a.m. each Sunday or by appointment. Youth Mass is each fourth Sunday. CCD/CYO classes are each Sunday after Mass. The Rev. Malcolm O’Leary, SVD, is pastor.

St. Mary’s Episcopal St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 900 First North St., will observe at 10:30 a.m. the Fifth Sunday in Lent with

Springhill M.B. Services at Springhill M.B. Church, 815 Mission 66, begin with worship at 9 a.m. each second, fourth and fifth Sunday. Communion is each second Sunday. Bible study is at 6 p.m. Wednesday. The Rev. Reginald Anderson is pastor.

Temple of Empowerment Sunday services at Temple of Empowerment, 707 Pierce St., begin with worship at 9 a.m. Communion is each first Sunday. Intercessory prayer/ Bible study is at 6:30 p.m. each Wednesday. G. Tyrone Haggard is pastor.

Travelers Rest Baptist Services at Travelers Rest Baptist Church, 718 Bowmar Ave., begin at 9 a.m. with

Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:30. Baptism is at 10 a.m. each first Sunday. A nursery is available. Children’s church for grades 1-6 is provided. Music is provided by Untied Voices. The missionary ministry meets at 10 a.m. each first and third Saturday. The ushers and wellness ministries meet after services each third Sunday. The deacons ministry meets at 7:30 p.m. each second Monday. Youth tutorial meets at 7 each Tuesday night. Boy Scouts meets at 6:30 p.m. each second and fourth Tuesday. Bible study/ prayer is at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Midweek Bible study/prayer begins at 10 a.m. Wednesday. Perfect Praise choir rehearsal is at 6 p.m. each fourth Wednesday. United Voices of Worship rehearsal is at 7 p.m. each Wednesday. Thomas E. Bernard is pastor.

Trinity Baptist Services at Trinity Baptist Church, 3365 Porters Chapel Road, begin at 9:30 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 10:45. Turning Point begins at 4:45 p.m., followed by worship at 6. On Wednesday, The Gathering begins at 3 p.m. A meal will be served at 5. The Gathering and Age graded studies begin at 6. Choir rehearsal is at 6:45. The Rev. Ron Burch is pastor. Tim Goodson is minister of music and youths.

Triumph Services at Triumph Church, 136 Honeysuckle Lane, begin with pre-service prayer at 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Worship is at 8:30 and 10:30 with Mike Fields, pastor, bringing the message. Kingdom Kids Church and a teen class is available. Corporate prayer is at 6 a.m. Tuesday and 6 p.m. Saturday. Men’s Fraternity is each first Saturday at 8 a.m. Wednesday services begin at 6 p.m. and include Elevate Your Life classes, 24/7 youth ministries and Kingdom Kids church .

Triumphant Baptist Services at Triumphant Baptist Church, 124 Pittman Road, begin at 8:30 a.m. with New Sunday Connection/ New Members Transition Classes at the Kings Empowerment Center. Partners in Prayer begins at 9:30 a.m. in the sanctuary, followed by worship at 10. Women’s ministry is at 5:30 p.m. Monday in the administration building. Activities at Kings Empowerment Center include aerobics at 6 p.m. Monday and Thursday and Bible study at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Mass choir rehearsal begins at 7 p.m. Thursday at the church. Elders’ Bible study is at noon Friday in the administration building. Usher/Helps Ministry is at 4 p.m. each fourth Saturday at the administration building. For transportation, call 601-218-1319, 601-638-8135 or 601-638-8108. The Rev. Dexter Jones is pastor.

WC Ministers Alliance Warren County Ministers Alliance meets at 9:30 a.m. each Saturday at the E.D. Straughter Building on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. The aim is to benefit ministers and discuss Sunday school lessons. Robert L. Miller is moderator.

Warrenton Services at Warrenton Independent Baptist Church, 829 Belva Drive, begin at 8 a.m. with the men’s breakfast. Sunday school is at 10, followed by worship at 11 with Marvin E. Curtis Jr., pastor, delivering the message. P.J. Griffing will lead the singing. Junior church is during worship with Scott Audirsch, youth pastor. Evening worship begins at 6 with Curtis delivering the message.

On Wednesday, prayer meeting begins at 7 p.m. with Curtis delivering the message.

Wayside Baptist Services at Wayside Baptist Church, 6151 Jeff Davis Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11 with Jason Wooley, pastor, speaking. Evening worship begins at 6. A nursery is provided. Wednesday prayer meeting/Bible study begins at 6:30 p.m. A nursery is not provided for this service.

Westminster Services at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 3601 Halls Ferry Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11 with Scott Reiber, pastor, preaching. Elder Jim Harrison will assist. Youths meet at 4:30 p.m. Evening worship begins at 6 with Reiber preaching. Chandler Whitney will assist. Mary Claire Allison is choir director. Dr. Gwen Reiber is organist. On Wednesday, Meals on Wheels begins at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday evening, bell choir is at 5:15, followed by adult choir at 6. Prayer/Bible study is at 7:15.

Wilderness Baptist Services at Wilderness Baptist Church, 5415 Gibson Road, begin at 9:45 a.m. with Sunday school. Worship is at 11. The message will be delivered by Bob Conrad, pastor. Sunday evening service is at 6 and will include the coronation of three GMA girls. On Wednesday, old-time prayer begins at 6:30 p.m.

Woodlawn Baptist Services at Woodlawn Baptist Church, 2310 Culkin Road, begin at 9:40 a.m. with Sunday school, followed by worship at 11. The Rev. Kent Campbell is pastor. The Rev. Mike Barber is minister of music. Devin Rost is minister of students. A nursery is provided for children as old as 3. Children’s church is available for 4 years through second grade. Morning services are at 11 on WBBV-101.3-FM or www. woodlawnbc.com. Awana meets at 4:45 p.m. Sunday, and evening service and youth Bible study begins at 6. On Wednesday, early service begins at 10 a.m. Family activities begin with supper at 5 p.m. Reservation deadline is noon Tuesday. Children’s missions and music are at 5:40. Youth Underground Connections and worship are at 6. The sanctuary choir will practice at 7. Call 601-636-5320.

Worship Christian Center Services at Worship Christian Center, 3735 Fisher Ferry Road, begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., followed by worship at 11. G2R Praise Choir Practice is each Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. Bible study is each Wednesday at 6 p.m. Praise practice is each Saturday at 9 a.m. Malcolm Goodman is pastor.

Zion Travelers M.B. Services at Zion Travelers M.B. Church, 1701 Poplar St., begin with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Communion each first Sunday; worship each second and fourth Sunday; women’s ministry each third Sunday; and youth ministry each fifth Sunday. At are 11 a.m. Choir practice is the Monday after the second and fourth Sunday and Thursday after the first and third Sunday at 6 p.m. Tuesday intercessory prayer is at 6 p.m. Prayer meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, followed by Bible study at 6. Sunday school lesson planning is each Saturday at 3:30 p.m.


THE VICKSBURG POST

SPORTS saturDaY, march 20, 2010 • SE C TI O N C CLASSIFIEDS C6

Steve Wilson, sports editor | E-mail: sports@vicksburgpost.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 142

Few upsets on second day By The Associated Press

march madness Friday’s Scores • Cornell 78, Temple 65 • West Virginia 77, Morgan State 50 • Missouri 86, Clemson 78 • Wisconsin 53, Wofford 49 • Purdue 72, Siena 64 • Xavier 65, Minnesota 54 • Texas A&M 69, Utah State 53 • Pittsburgh 89, Oakland 66 • Duke 73, UAPB 44 • Georgia Tech 64, Oklahoma St. 59 • Michigan St. 70, New Mexico St. 67 • Gonzaga 67, Florida St. 60 • Syracuse 79, Vermont 56 • Ohio State 68, UC-Santa Barbara 51 • California 77, Louisville 62 • Maryland 89, Houston 77 Tournament scores, schedule/C2

SCHEDULE PREP SOFTBALL VHS at Grace, La. tourn. Today, 10 a.m.

PREP BASEBALL PCA hosts Parklane Monday, 6 p.m.

ON TV

11 a.m. ESPN - North Carolina makes its first trip ever to Starkville for today’s second-round NIT game against Mississippi State.

WHO’S HOT KATIE BOOK Tallulah Academy runner finished first in the 1,600-meter run and 300-meter hurdles at the Riverfield Invitational track meet on Thursday. Tallulah’s boys team finished second in the overall standings at the meet. Story/C2.

SIDELINES Saints will raise ticket prices in 2010 NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Super Bowl champion New Orlenas Saints are raising season ticket prices for the first time since after the 2007 season. The biggest price increase will be in club sideline seats between the 20-yard lines. In 2009, a 10game package cost $2,400. In 2010, that same package will cost $2,980. The cheapest seats in the upper terrace end zone, which cost $180 in 2009 for 10 games, will cost $250 in 2010. Saints officials say the new pricing plan will mean more than half of all season ticket holders will experience per game increases of $10 or less per seat.

LOTTERY

La. Pick 3: 7-2-5 La. Pick 4: 5-7-8-2 Weekly results: C2

The upset bug continued into the early games of day two at the NCAA Tournament. After that, it was pretty much business as usual. No. 12 seed Cornell upset fifth-seeded Temple 78-65 in Friday’s first batch of games. Despite a few close calls later on it was the day’s only major upset — and even that one wasn’t entirely unexpected. Cornell (28-4) nearly won at Kansas earlier this season and is considered by many to be the best team to come out of the Ivy League in more than a decade. Cornell made

COLLEgE baSkETbaLL eight of its first 10 shots and never looked back, shooting 68 percent in the opening half and 56 percent for the game. The second day of action was a marked contrast to Thursday’s opening-round games, when five doubledigit seeds advanced. In all, eight teams seeded 10th or higher won in the first round, matching last year’s total and one off the record set in 2001. “Everyone was saying we were Cinderella or it’s an upset. Not us,” Cornell sophomore Chris Wroblewski

said. Other than Cornell’s victory, the biggest upsets — if you can call them that — came from a pair of games pitting teams from the Big 12 and ACC. No. 10 Georgia Tech beat No. 7 Oklahoma State 64-59 in the Midwest Regional, while No. 10 Missouri beat No. 7 Clemson 86-78 in the East. “We’ve had some tough nights this year, but we had a good night tonight,” said Georgia Tech’s Gani Lawal, who scored 14 points. “When we’re in the NCAA Tournament, it’s huge. It’s huge. We’re practicing all the time. We want to See NCAA, Page C3.

ThE ASSoCIATED prESS

Gonzaga’s Robert Sacre shoots against Florida State during the second half of Friday’s NCAA Tournament game in Buffalo, N.Y. Gonzaga won, 67-60.

Ole Miss rolls past Memphis in NIT By The Associated Press OXFORD — Ole Miss guard Terrico White, struggling with inconsistent shooting for most of the season, picked the best time of the year to regain his touch. White hit three 3-pointers and finished with 21 points as the Rebels defeated Memphis 90-81 Friday in the second round of the National Invitation Tournament. Ole Miss advanced to the quarterfinals and will host the Texas Tech-Jacksonville winner on Tuesday. “It feels good to see my shots going down again,” said White, who scored 27 points in an NIT openinground win over Troy. “My confidence is back up and so is the team.” A midseason slump and an SEC Tournament loss to Tennessee ended hopes of an NCAA Tournament berth. But the Rebels (2410) have won six of the last seven outings and improved to 10-1 in NIT home games. “We’re a couple of bounces away from being in the other tournament,” Ole Miss coach Andy Kennedy said. “But this team has won six of the last seven games and has an opportunity to keep playing with a lot at stake.” Leading 50-47, Ole Miss went on a 14-4 run to take a 64-51 lead with 7:23 left. White had six points, an assist and capped the run with a dunk. Memphis (24-10) never got closer than six points again as a sellout crowd cheered Ole Miss to victory. “I’m proud of this team because they stabilized this program when it could have taken a nosedive,” Memphis coach Josh Pastner said. “This team won 24 games, finished second in Conference USA and played in the postseason. They were fun to watch and overachieved.” The Tigers had five players score in double figures. Will Coleman had 15 points and

From staff reports

brucE nEwman•The associaTed press

Ole Miss’ Terrance Henry celebrates with fans following Friday’s 90-81 win over Memphis in the second round of the NIT. a game-high 14 rebounds. Angel Garcia scored 17 points, Wesley Witherspoon had 13 points, Doneal Mack had 12 and Elliot Williams added 11. Ole Miss, which led 37-33 at halftime, had five players in double figures. Zac Graham scored 19 points.

Ole Miss adavanced to play Jacksonville or Texas Tech in the quarterfinals next week.

Chris Warren had 16 points, Murphy Holloway had 11 and Trevor Gaskins added 10. The Rebels shot 50 percent from the field, blocked nine shots and forced 13 turnovers. The Tigers went 29-of-63 from the field and shot 46

percent from 3-point range to stay within striking distance. “I thought it was a highlevel, high-quality game by two really good teams,” Kennedy said. “This was a very good win and we’re excited to still be playing basketball.”

Gators make long-awaited return home By Jeff Byrd jbyrd@vicksburgpost.com For years, Vicksburg and Warren Central have spent the last weekend of the spring intercession playing in Monroe at the Ouachita and Neville Tournament. This year, the Vikings and Gators decided to do something different. They began the week in the Big Blue Tournament at Madison Central and will conclude the week with today’s triangle

Bulldogs ready for Carolina

pREp baSEbaLL match at Bazinsky Field. Warren Central (6-7) takes on Pearl at 11 a.m. The Gators (5-6) follow with a 1:30 game with the Pirates, then finish the day with a 4 p.m. matchup against Lawrence County. “We were in a situation where we needed two games and Warren Central wanted to play one, so we put this together,” VHS coach Jamie Creel said.

For the Gators it will be a welcome return to Bazinksy. They’ve played their last eight games away from home, which included two tournaments and two road games. Vicksburg was just 3-5 in the tough stretch — two of the losses came on walk-off hits — but Creel said it was still beneficial. “We’re still in a stage where we’re figuring things out. I like our progression. We just seem to have that one mental lapse that has cost us,” Creel

said. “All I can say, it’s great to be returning home.” Warren Central has had a similar run. They won three of four with wins over Vicksburg, Father Ryan out of Nashville and DeSoto Central, but closed the Big Blue Tournament with losses to Oak Grove and Brandon. The Port Gibson Blue Waves (5-2) will have a full day of action today with their Spring Break Classic. The Blue Waves face Wingfield at 11:45 a.m. and the winner of

North Carolina has played basketball more than 2,600 times in 100 years. It’s played in Final Fours, won national championships and become a name synonomous with success. It’s rare, then, when the Tar Heels get to experience a first. When North Carolina dons its baby blue jerseys this morning at Humphrey Coliseum in Starkville, it will mark the first time it has played a game in the state of Mississippi. The Tar Heels will face Mississippi State in a second-round NIT game at 11 a.m., with the winner advancing to play North Carolina State or UAB on Tuesday or Wednesday. This is the first time North Carolina and Mississippi State have played anywhere since 1965. North Carolina has won all four previous meetings in the series. “For them to be coming here, it’s a pretty important thing,” Mississippi State coach Rick Stansbury said. “We’ve got to make sure the Hump is packed.” The matchup is an opportunity for both teams to salvage something from disappointing seasons. North Carolina cruised to the national championship last season but struggled to a 17-16 record. Mississippi State (24-11), meanwhile, took Kentucky to overtime in last Sunday’s SEC tournament championship game only to be one of the last teams left out of the NCAA Tournament. The Bulldogs’ consolation prize was a No. 1 seed in the NIT. They may be down from last year, but they still have seven McDonald’s All-Americans on their team,” Stansbury said. “They’re going to be as good as anyone we’ve played.”

tournament schedule Today at Bazinsky Field 11 a.m. - Pearl vs. Warren Central 1:30 p.m. - Pearl vs. Vicksburg 4 p.m. - Lawrence County vs. Vicksburg that game meets the winner from pool B which includes Natchez, Woodville and Greenville-Weston.


Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

C3

La. Tech happy to be back in tournament By Mary Foster The Associated Press RUSTON, La. — Teresa Weatherspoon still has her game face — that look of intense concentration, the bit of belligerence, the slight swagger. Now she’s back where she honed the flash and brilliance that made her seem unstoppable and put Louisiana Tech on the top of the college pecking order. And if the court has lost some luster since back in the day, Weatherspoon is already applying the polish. “There was a time everybody wanted to be Louisiana Tech,” Weatherspoon said. “When we fell, it hurt us all so bad — the players, the coaches, the fans, everybody.” By many standards the fall has not been a big one, after all Tech has only missed three NCAAs. But when you’ve been to 25 straight and won three national titles, including two NCAA titles and the final AIAW, three years is a long time. The Lady Techsters only lost 14 games in the four years Weatherspoon played for them (1984-88), when she started all but one game. They went to the Final Four twice and won the championship in 1988. She played on gold and bronze medal-winning Olympic teams, then played overseas and in the WNBA. If it weren’t for a bad left knee and bone spurs in her left ankle, Weatherspoon, 44, still might be suiting up. Instead, she’s doing what she sees as the next best thing, teaching young women and bringing back the glory days to her alma mater. Weatherspoon became the Lady Techsters’ coach last year when Vicksburg native Chris Long was fired. “She was great,” said sports information director Malcolm Butler. “She won her first eight games, and took us to the semifinals in the WAC Tournament.” “I’m so excited for her,” said former Louisiana Tech coach Leon Barmore, who Weatherspoon calls her father, her First Round

The associated press

Louisiana Tech’s Adrienne Johnson works on her jump shot during practice earlier this week. Louisiana Tech, a No. 14 seed, faces Florida State in the first round of the NCAA Women’s Tournament today in Tallahassee, Fla.

women’s basketball mentor and her friend. “She is bringing the excitement back to Lady Techster basketball and she is going to build something really special there.” Barmore, now an assistant for another former Louisiana Tech player, Kim Mulkey, at Baylor, tries to watch Weatherspoon and her team as often as he can, he said. “She still has all that passion she had as a player,” he said. “But she’s matured. She

Second Round

1 Connecticut (33-0)

16 Southern U. (23-8)

Regionals

9 James Madison (26-6) 5 Virginia (21-9)

12 Green Bay (27-4)

National Semifinals

National Semifinals

Women’s Division I Basketball Championship

11:16 a.m.

Norfolk, Va. – March 21

8 Temple (24-8)

knows how to get on one of the kids or an official when she needs to, then go on. She’s already learned some of the big secretes of coaching.” The Lady Techsters (23-8) face heavily favored Florida State (26-5) on the Seminoles’ homecourt in Tallahassee. Seminoles coach Sue Semrau called it an honor to play a team “as storied as Louisiana Tech.” Weatherspoon would rather she saw it as a horror. “I want us to be able to play physical or play finesse,” Weatherspoon said. “I want

Regionals

30 min. following

6:21 p.m.

6:11 p.m.

Sacramento, Calif. 11:11 a.m.

Tallahassee, Fla. – March 20

30 min. following

San Antonio April 6

30 min. following

30 min. following

San Antonio

NATIONAL CHAMPION

April 4

11:16 a.m. 16 Austin Peay (15-17) Knoxville, Tenn. – March 20

7:06 p.m.

San Antonio April 4

6:06 p.m.

30 min. following

11:11 a.m.

7:21 p.m.

Berkeley, Calif. – March 20

13 Fresno St. (27-6) 6 Texas (22-10)

11 San Diego St. (21-10)

30 min. following

Memphis, Tenn

Kansas City, Mo.

6:11 p.m.

6:16 p.m.

Austin, Texas – March 21 3 West Virginia (28-5) 30 min. following7 14 Lamar (26-7) 7 LSU (20-9) 10 Hartford (27-4)

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Chattanooga (24-8) 13 Vanderbilt (22-10) DePaul (21-11) Xavier (27-3)

6 11 3

E. Tenn. St. (23-8)

14

Gonzaga (27-4)

7

North Carolina (19-11) 10 Texas A&M (25-7)

2

Portland St. (18-14) 15 Nebraska (30-1)

1

UNI (17-15)

16

UCLA (24-8)

8

Michigan St. (22-9)

5

N.C. St. (20-13)

9

Bowling Green (27-6) 12 Kentucky (25-7) Liberty (27-5)

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Georgia Tech (23-9) 6 UALR (26-6) 11

Norman, Okla. – March 21 Oklahoma (23-10) 3 S. Dakota St. (22-10) 14

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2 Duke (27-5)

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30 min. following

gan State fans exhaled. New Mexico State coach Marvin Menzies had to be restrained by his assistants from going after the officials after the wild ending. Wisconsin (24-8), the No. 4 seed in the East Regional, also survived a scare from 13th-seeded Wofford (26-9). Jon Leuer scored 20 points, including a jumper and two free throws in the final 17 seconds, as the Badgers won 53-49. They’ll play Cornell on Sunday. In Friday’s other games: • Duke, the top-seeded team in the South Regional dispatched Arkansas-Pine Bluff 73-44. Purdue wasted most of a big lead in the second half before beating Siena 72-64. Texas A&M crushed Utah State 69-53, and West Virginia rolled past Morgan State 77-50. • In the West Regional, Matt Bouldin scored 14 points in the second half to lead Gonzaga over Florida State 67-60. Xavier beat Minnesota 65-54 to advance to a second-round matchup Sunday with Pittsburgh, an 89-66 winner over Oakland. • Syracuse, the top seed in the West Region, had an easy time in a 79-56 win over Vermont. Likewise, No. 2 Ohio State beat UC-Santa Barbara 68-51. In an 8 vs. 9 seed game in the South Region, California jumped out to an 18-point lead in the opening minutes and then kept Louisville at arm’s length for much of the second half, eventually cruising home to a 77-62 victory.

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Tulane (26-6)

Minneapolis – March 21

30 min. following

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12

Seattle – March 20

1 Tennessee (30-2)

4 Baylor (23-9)

Georgia (23-8)

Cincinnati – March 21

Championship Game

Pittsburgh – March 21 2 Ohio St. (30-4) 11:06 a.m. 15 St. Francis (17-14)

5 Georgetown (25-6) 12 Marist (26-7)

Rutgers (19-14)

Tempe, Ariz. – March 20

3 Florida St. (26-5) 30 min. following 14 Louisiana Tech (23-8)

8 Dayton (24-7) 9 TCU (22-8)

Iowa (19-13)

keep playing.” Fifth-seeded Michigan State was pushed by No. 12 New Mexico State in the Midwest Regional before hanging on for a 70-67 win. Kalin Lucas scored a career-high 25 points and Raymar Morgan emerged from a quiet night by hitting key shots down the stretch to carry Michigan State (25-8) to the finish line. Morgan broke a late tie with four straight points, then made two free throws with 18.6 seconds remaining with the aid of a rare laneviolation call. Troy Gillenwater scored 17 points, including a 3-pointer with 20 seconds left that got New Mexico State (22-12) within 68-67. On the other end, Morgan made his first free throw and missed the second. But with the Spartans heading downcourt to defend an apparent two-point lead, official Ray Perone called either New Mexico State’s Wendell McKines or Gillenwater — or both — for a violation for stepping into the lane too early on the shot. Morgan converted his gift second chance to put the Spartans up 70-67. Jonathan Gibson then missed a long 3-pointer with seconds left, and Hernst Laroche missed another one that would have tied it with 0.3 seconds left. Draymond Green intercepted the final inbounds pass and slammed the ball onto the court in celebration as the buzzer sounded, the crowd booed — and Michi-

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Stanford, Calif. – March 20

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10 Middle Tenn. (25-5)

Stanford (31-1)

Continued from Page C1.

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First Round

7:16 p.m.

Dayton, Ohio

7 Miss. St. (19-12)

Second Round 30 min. following

30 min. following

Ames, Iowa – March 21 4 Iowa St. (23-7) 30 min. following 13 Lehigh (29-3) 6 St. John’s (24-6) 11 Princeton (26-2)

my players to hit back when they get hit. But better yet, hit first. You can’t be anything but tough out there.” It shows in practice where she tells them to “attack the body, play through the body, don’t you back off.” “Coach Spoon’s tough, but she knows how to bring out your talent, how to make you better,” said Shanavia Dowdell, one of two players Weatherspoon loses this year. “She tells us every game is going to be tough, we just have to be tougher.”

NCAA

Wisconsin (21-10) Vermont (26-6)

Notre Dame, Ind. – March 21

30 min. following

All times Eastern

30 min. following

Notre Dame (27-5)

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Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

Pomeranz paces Rebels to first SEC victory From staff reports

cOLLEgE basEbaLL

It didn’t take long for Drew Pomeranz to assert himself as one of the top pitchers in the Southeastern Conference. The Ole Miss left-hander had nine strikeouts in six innings of nearly perfect baseball Friday, leading the Rebels to a 9-0 rout of Kentucky in the SEC opener for both teams. Pomeranz (3-0) allowed one hit and walked two, and did not allow a run. He has 58 strikeouts in 35 1/3 innings this season and lowered his ERA to 1.02. Eric Callender finished up with three innings of one-hit ball to preserve the shutout and earn his third

save of the season. David Phillips paced the Ole Miss offense with a 3-for4, three-RBI night. He doubled in runs in the fourth and sixth innings, and singled in one more Drew in the seventh. Pomeranz Taylor Hashman hit a solo homer to put Ole Miss (14-4, 1-0 SEC) on the board in the fourth inning, and Matt Snyder was 2-for-4 with two RBIs and three runs scored. “It was a good night for us. We

On Tv

SCOREBOARD

NASCAR 11 a.m. Speed - Nationwide Series, qualifying for Scotts Turf Builder 300, at Bristol, Tenn. (tape) 1:30 p.m. ABC - Nationwide Series, Scotts Turf Builder 300 GOLF 2 p.m. NBC - PGA Tour, Transitions Championship MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 3 p.m. WGN - Chicago White Sox vs. San Diego COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ESPN - NIT, North Carolina at Mississippi State Noon CBS - NCAA Tournament, Villanova vs. Saint Mary’s, Calif. 2:35 p.m. CBS - NCAA Tournament, Ohio vs. Tennessee 5:40 p.m. CBS - NCAA Tournament, Northern Iowa vs. Kansas 7:15 p.m. CBS - NCAA Tournament, Wake Forest vs. Kentucky WOMEN’S BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ESPN2 - NCAA Tournament, LSU vs. Hartford 1 p.m. ESPN2 - NCAA Tournament, Louisiana Tech at Florida State 7 p.m. ESPN2 - NCAA Tournament, Texas A&M vs. Portland State 9 p.m. ESPN2 - NCAA Tournament, Georgia vs. Tulane NBA 6 p.m. WGN - Chicago at Philadelphia

majOR LEaguE basEbaLL

BY tHe assoCIateD Press

sidELinEs

from staff & aP rePorts

TRack and fiELd Tallulah finishes second at Riverfield Invitational Tallulah Academy got first-place performances from two athletes, and second-place efforts from two others, but it wasn’t quite enough to win Thursday’s Riverfield Invitational. The Trojans totaled 52 points, six behind meet winner Chamberlain-Hunt. Neil Watkins won the 300-meter hurdles with a time of 41.01 seconds and Tandon Baker won the shot put with a throw of 42 feet, 8 inches. Cameron Machen was second in the discus and Cody Petty was second in the 200-meter dash. In the girls’ meet, Tallulah’s Katie Book won the 1,600-meter run and the 300-meter hurdles, while Megan Givens won the 800-meter run.

PREP basEbaLL Port Gibson routs Jefferson County Silento Sayles got it done on the hill and at the plate for Port Gibson, going 2-for-3 with a triple and three RBIs while pitching a complete game in an easy 11-1 victory over Jefferson County on Friday. Sayles allowed two hits, walked none and struck out 12 in the fiveinning game. The Blue Waves (5-2) backed him with four runs in the first inning, three in the second and two in both the third and fourth innings.

fLashback

BY tHe assoCIateD Press March 20 1897 — Yale beats Penn 32-10 in New Haven, Conn., in the first men’s intercollegiate basketball game. 1965 — Gail Goodrich’s 42 points lead UCLA to a 91-80 victory over Michigan in the NCAA basketball championship game. 2005 — LeBron James, 20, becomes the youngest player to score 50 points in an NBA game, scoring 56 in the Cavaliers’ 105-98 loss to the Raptors. 2006 — Japan beats Cuba 10-6 in the title game of the inaugural World Baseball Classic.

Spring Training

Friday’s Games Florida 7, St. Louis (ss) 6 Pittsburgh 9, Boston 7 Houston 2, Toronto 0 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 6, Detroit (ss) 2 Minnesota 7, N.Y. Mets 3 Kansas City 24, Arizona 9 Cleveland (ss) 12, Texas 2 San Francisco 7, Cleveland (ss) 6 Chicago Cubs 8, Chicago White Sox 4 L.A. Angels 10, Milwaukee 5 Colorado 10, Oakland 4 Atlanta 4, Detroit (ss) 4, tie, 10 innings Tampa Bay 6, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 2 Baltimore 2, Philadelphia 0 Washington 13, St. Louis (ss) 5 Seattle vs. Cincinnati, (n) L.A. Dodgers vs. San Diego, (n) Today’s Games Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore (ss), 12:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Toronto, 12:05 p.m. Florida at Washington, 12:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Boston, 12:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Detroit, 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Houston, 12:05 p.m. Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay, 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis, 12:05 p.m. San Diego (ss) vs. Chicago White Sox, 3:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Texas, 3:05 p.m. Kansas City (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss), 3:05 p.m. Kansas City (ss) vs. Milwaukee, 3:05 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs. Cleveland, 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Seattle, 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Oakland (ss), 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. Colorado, 3:10 p.m. San Diego (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss), 9:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Baltimore vs. Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Minnesota, 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Pittsburgh, 12:05 p.m. Boston (ss) vs. Toronto, 12:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Atlanta, 12:05 p.m. Houston (ss) vs. Boston (ss), 12:05 p.m. Washington vs. Florida, 12:05 p.m. Detroit vs. N.Y. Yankees, 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets vs. Houston (ss), 12:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Arizona, 3:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Angels, 3:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Kansas City, 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Milwaukee, 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Cincinnati (ss), 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati (ss) vs. Oakland, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. L.A. Dodgers, 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. San Diego, 3:05 p.m.

cOLLEgE basEbaLL Southeastern Conference East

Team Overall SEC Florida...........................14-3................................1-0 South Carolina .............14-4................................1-0 Vanderbilt .....................15-3................................0-1 Kentucky .......................14-4................................0-1 Tennessee ....................10-8................................0-1 Georgia .........................8-10................................0-1

West

Team Overall SEC Alabama .......................15-1................................1-0 Arkansas.......................13-3................................1-0 Ole Miss ......................14-4................................1-0 Auburn ..........................12-5................................1-0 LSU...............................14-3................................0-1 Mississippi St. ............11-7................................0-1 Friday’s Games Ole Miss 9, Kentucky 0 Florida 7, Mississippi St. 2 South Carolina 4, Tennessee 2 Alabama 4, Vanderbilt 1 Arkansas 6, LSU 3 Auburn 20, Georgia 3 Today’s Games Ole Miss at Kentucky, Noon Auburn at Georgia, 2 p.m. Tennessee at South Carolina, 3 p.m. Vanderbilt at Alabama, 3 p.m. Arkansas at LSU, 3 p.m. Mississippi St. at Florida, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Games Ole Miss at Kentucky, Noon Mississippi St. at Florida, Noon Tennessee at South Carolina, 12:30 p.m. Arkansas at LSU, 1 p.m. Auburn at Georgia, 1 p.m. Vanderbilt at Alabama, 2 p.m. ———

Conference USA

Team Overall C-USA Tulane...........................13-6................................0-0 Southern Miss ............12-5................................0-0 Rice ..............................11-8................................0-0 Central Florida..............11-8................................0-0 Houston ........................9-6..................................0-0 East Carolina................9-8..................................0-0 UAB ..............................8-7..................................0-0 Marshall ........................7-7..................................0-0 Memphis .......................6-11................................0-0 Friday’s Games Lemoyne 5, Marshall 4 San Diego 6, Rice 4 Central Florida 15, Presbyterian 1 Monmouth 11, East Carolina 9 Tulane 4, Saint Mary’s 1 Louisiana Tech, 4, Southern Miss 3 UAB 10, Western Illinois 3 Tennessee Tech at Memphis, (n) Houston at Arizona St., (n) Today’s Games Lemoyne at Marshall, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Monmouth at East Carolina, 2 p.m. Saint Mary’s at Tulane, 2 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Memphis, 2 p.m. Western Illinois at UAB, 2 p.m. Presbyterian at Central Florida, 3 p.m. Rice at San Diego, 3 p.m. Southern Miss at Louisiana Tech, 3 p.m. Houston at Arizona St., 8:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Lemoyne at Marshall, 10 a.m. Monmouth at East Carolina, Noon Saint Mary’s at Tulane, 1 p.m. Southern Miss at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Memphis, 1 p.m. Western Illinois at UAB, 1 p.m. Rice at San Diego, 2 p.m. Houston at Arizona St., 3 p.m.

played well and we pitched well,” said Ole Miss coach Mike Bianco. “Drew did a good job out there and then Eric finished it off. I’m really proud of our offense tonight. Any time you can go out and score nine runs against a team’s ace, you have to feel good about your offense.”

Florida 7, MSU 2 Alex Panteliodis held Mississippi State (11-7, 0-1 SEC) to two runs while pitching into the eighth inning, and Florida scored five runs in the bottom of the sixth to beat the Bulldogs. Preston Tucker and Austin Maddox led off the sixth with back-to-back homers to give Florida (14-3, 1-0) a 4-1 lead. Two hit batters and a walk then

Mississippi college schedule

Friday’s Games Jackson St. 24, Concordia 1 Belhaven 3, Mobile 0, 1st game Belhaven 16, Mobile 6, 2nd game Mississippi College 10, UT-Dallas 6, 1st game UT-Dallas 7, Mississippi College 4, 2nd game Ole Miss 9, Kentucky 0 Florida 7, Mississippi St. 2 Louisiana Tech 4, Southern Miss 3 Loyola-N.O. 11, William Carey 6 Today’s Games Ole Miss at Kentucky, Noon Delta St. at Christian Bros., Noon and 3 p.m. UT-Dallas at Mississippi College, Noon and 3 p.m. Alabama A&M at Alcorn St., Noon and 3 p.m. Alabama St. at Miss. Valley St., 1 and 4 p.m. Millsaps at Hendrix College, 1 and 4 p.m. Loyola-N.O. at William Carey, 1 and 4 p.m. Belhaven at Mobile, 1 and 4 p.m. Mississippi St. at Florida, 6 p.m. Southern Miss at Louisiana Tech, 3 p.m. Sunday’s Games Ole Miss at Kentucky, Noon Mississippi St. at Florida, Noon Delta St. at Christian Bros., 1 p.m. Alabama St. at Miss. Valley St., 1 p.m. Alabama A&M at Alcorn St., 1 p.m. Millsaps at Hendrix College, 1 p.m. Southern Miss at Louisiana Tech, 1 p.m.

nba EASTERN CONFERENCE

W y-Cleveland...................55 x-Orlando ......................49 Atlanta ..........................44 d-Boston .......................44 Milwaukee.....................36 Charlotte .......................35 Miami ............................35 Toronto .........................33 Chicago ........................31 New York......................25 Philadelphia ..................24 Detroit ...........................23 Indiana ..........................23 Washington...................21 New Jersey ..................7

L 15 21 24 24 30 33 34 34 37 44 45 46 46 45 61

Pct .786 .700 .647 .647 .545 .515 .507 .493 .456 .362 .348 .333 .333 .318 .103

WESTERN CONFERENCE

W L Pct d-L.A. Lakers ................50 18 .735 d-Denver .......................47 22 .681 d-Dallas ........................46 22 .676 Utah ..............................44 24 .647 Oklahoma City..............42 25 .627 Phoenix.........................42 26 .618 San Antonio..................41 26 .612 Portland ........................41 28 .594 Houston ........................35 32 .522 Memphis .......................36 33 .522 New Orleans ................33 37 .471 L.A. Clippers.................26 43 .377 Sacramento ..................23 45 .338 Golden State ................19 49 .279 Minnesota .....................14 55 .203 d-division leader x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ——— Friday’s Games Indiana 106, Detroit 102 Oklahoma City 115, Toronto 89 Atlanta 93, Charlotte 92, OT New York 92, Philadelphia 88 Cleveland 92, Chicago 85 Boston 94, Houston 87 San Antonio 147, Golden State 116 Milwaukee at Sacramento, (n) Washington at Portland, (n) Utah at Phoenix, (n) Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, (n) Today’s Games Chicago at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 6:30 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Denver, 8 p.m. New Orleans at Utah, 8 p.m. Boston at Dallas, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games Houston at New York, Noon Oklahoma City at Indiana, 1:30 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 2:30 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Washington at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Portland at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m.

GB — 6 10 10 17 19 19 1/2 20 1/2 23 29 1/2 30 1/2 31 1/2 31 1/2 32 47 GB — 3 1/2 4 6 7 1/2 8 8 1/2 9 1/2 14 1/2 14 1/2 18 24 1/2 27 31 36 1/2

cOLLEgE baskETbaLL ncaa Tournament EAST REGIONAL

First Round Thursday Kentucky 100, ETSU 71 Wake Forest 81, Texas 80, OT Washington 80, Marquette 78 New Mexico 62, Montana 57 Friday West Virginia 77, Morgan State 50 Missouri 86, Clemson 78 Cornell 78, Temple 65 Wisconsin 53, Wofford 49 Second Round Today New Mexico vs. Washington, 4:50 p.m.

Tank McNamara

set the stage for Tyler Thompson, who drove in a pair of runs with a single up the middle to make it 6-1. Panteliodis allowed two runs on four hits in 7 1/3 innings. He struck out three, walked one and left after Wes Thigpen led off the eighth with a home run and Sam Frost doubled. Greg Larson relieved Panteliodis and retired five of the six batters he faced to close it out.

Louisiana Tech 4, Southern Miss 3 Devon Dageford’s infield single in the bottom of the ninth brought in the winning run as Louisiana Tech (9-9) beat Southern Miss (12-5).

Kentucky vs. Wake Forest, 7:15 p.m. Sunday West Virginia vs. Missouri, TBA Wisconsin vs. Cornell, TBA

SOUTH REGIONAL

First Round Thursday Villanova 73, Robert Morris 70, OT Saint Mary’s, Calif. 80, Richmond 71 Old Dominion 51, Notre Dame 50 Baylor 68, Sam Houston State 59 Friday Duke 73, Arkansas-Pine Bluff 44 Purdue 72, Siena 64 Texas A&M 69, Utah State 53 California vs. Louisville, (n) Second Round Today Villanova vs. Saint Mary’s, Calif., 12:05 p.m. Baylor vs. Old Dominion, 4:45 p.m. Sunday Purdue vs. Texas A&M, TBA Duke vs. California-Louisville winner, TBA

MIDWEST REGIONAL

First Round Thursday Ohio 97, Georgetown 83 Tennessee 62, San Diego State 59 Northern Iowa 69, UNLV 66 Kansas 90 Lehigh 74 Friday Georgia Tech 64, Oklahoma State 59 Michigan State 70, New Mexico State 67 Maryland vs. Houston, (n) Ohio State vs. UC Santa Barbara, (n) Second Round Today Ohio vs. Tennessee, 2:35 p.m. Kansas vs. Northern Iowa, 4:40 p.m. Sunday Ohio St.-UCSB winner vs. Georgia Tech, TBA Maryland-Houston winner vs. Michigan St., TBA

WEST REGIONAL

First Round Thursday BYU 99, Florida 92, 2OT Kansas State 82, North Texas 62 Murray State 66, Vanderbilt 65 Butler 77, UTEP 59 Friday Gonzaga 67, Florida State 60 Xavier 65, Minnesota 54 Pittsburgh 89, Oakland, Mich. 66 Syracuse vs. Vermont, (n) Second Round Today Murray State vs. Butler, 2:20 p.m. Kansas State vs. BYU, 7:10 p.m. Sunday Syracuse-Vermont winner vs. Gonzaga, TBA Pittsburgh vs. Xavier, TBA

National Invitation Tournament Second Round

Friday Ole Miss 90, Memphis 81 Today North Carolina at Mississippi St. (24-11), 11 a.m. Jacksonville (20-12) at Texas Tech (18-15), 3 p.m. N.C. State (20-15) at UAB (24-8), 4 p.m. Monday Nevada (21-12) at Rhode Island (24-9), 5 p.m. Connecticut (18-15) at Virginia Tech (24-8), 6 p.m. Kent State (24-9) at Illinois (20-14), 7 p.m. Dayton (21-12) at Cincinnati (19-15), 8 p.m.

Quarterfinals

March 23-24 Illinois-Kent State winner vs. Dayton-Cincinnati winner, TBA Jacksonville-Texas Tech winner vs. Ole Miss (23-10), TBA Virginia Tech-Connecticut winner vs. NevadaRhode Island winner, TBA Mississippi State-North Carolina winner vs. N.C. State-UAB winner, TBA ———

College Basketball Invitational Quarterfinals

Monday Coll. of Charleston (22-11) at VCU (23-9), 6 p.m. Princeton (21-8) at IUPUI (25-10), 6 p.m. Morehead St. (24-10) at Boston U. (20-13), 6 p.m. Wisc.-G.B. (22-12) at Saint Louis (21-11), 7 p.m. ———

College Insider.com Tournament Quarterfinals

Monday Appalchian St. (23-10) at Marshall (24-9), 6 p.m. Fairfield (23-10) at Creighton (17-15), 7:05 p.m. La. Tech (24-10) at Missouri St. (21-12), 7:05 p.m. Pacific (21-11) at N. Colorado (25-7), 8:05 p.m.

OLE miss 90, mEmPhis 81

MEMPHIS (24-10) Coleman 6-11 3-7 15, Witherspoon 5-9 2-3 13, Sallie 1-4 1-2 4, Kemp 3-7 1-1 9, Williams 4-11 2-4 11, Barham 0-0 0-0 0, Mack 4-10 2-2 12, Stephens 0-0 0-0 0, Garcia 6-11 2-4 17. Totals 29-63 13-23 81. OLE MISS (23-10) Henry 4-8 1-2 9, Holloway 5-11 1-5 11, Warren 3-12 9-12 16, White 6-11 6-8 21, Graham 6-7 5-6 19, Buckner 1-3 0-0 2, Halford 0-0 0-0 0, Polynice

Southern Miss rallied from an early 2-0 deficit with single runs in the sixth, seventh and eighth innings. Taylor Walker’s RBI single in the top of the eighth tied the game at 3. Southern Miss went down in order in the ninth, though, and Louisiana Tech rallied in its half. Singles by Kyle Roliard and Mark Threlkeld, and a fielder’s choice put runners at first and third with one out. Dageford then delivered his infield hit to bring in the winning run. Walker finished 2-for-4 with two RBIs for Southern Miss. Roliard had two hits and scored two runs for Louisiana Tech, and Clint Ewing was 2-for-4 with two RBIs and a run scored.

1-1 0-0 2, Gaskins 2-3 4-4 10, Riley 0-0 0-0 0, Cranston 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 28-56 26-37 90. Halftime—Ole Miss 37-33. 3-Point Goals—Memphis 10-24 (Garcia 3-5, Kemp 2-2, Mack 2-6, Witherspoon 1-2, Sallie 1-3, Williams 1-6), Ole Miss 8-18 (White 3-4, Gaskins 2-2, Graham 2-3, Warren 1-6, Buckner 0-1, Henry 0-2). Fouled Out—Sallie, Witherspoon. Rebounds— Memphis 35 (Coleman 14), Ole Miss 38 (Henry 10). Assists—Memphis 12 (Kemp, Williams 4), Ole Miss 14 (Warren 7). Total Fouls—Memphis 25, Ole Miss 18. A—8,218.

nascaR Sprint Cup Food City 500 Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Bristol Motor Speedway Bristol, Tenn. Lap length: .533 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 124.63. 2. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 123.857. 3. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 123.849. 4. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 123.818. 5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 123.698. 6. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 123.626. 7. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 123.499. 8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 123.403. 9. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 123.308. 10. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 123.269. 11. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 123.245. 12. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 123.166. 13. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 123.103. 14. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 122.929. 15. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 122.905. 16. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 122.898. 17. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 122.89. 18. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 122.89. 19. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 122.803. 20. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 122.787. 21. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 122.701. 22. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 122.631. 23. (43) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 122.537. 24. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 122.411. 25. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 122.388. 26. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 122.341. 27. (09) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 122.232. 28. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 122.209. 29. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 122.131. 30. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 121.96. 31. (26) David Stremme, Ford, 121.574. 32. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 121.551. 33. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 121.505. 34. (90) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 121.267. 35. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 121.19. 36. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 121.129. 37. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 121.106. 38. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 121.098. 39. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 121.075. 40. (46) Terry Cook, Dodge, 121.06. 41. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 120.923. 42. (37) Kevin Conway, Ford, Owner Points. 43. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevy, Past champion. Failed to Qualify 44. (36) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 120.452. 45. (13) Max Papis, Toyota, 119.82.

LOTTERY Sunday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 9-3-7 La. Pick 4: 0-2-5-4 Monday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 3-3-6 La. Pick 4: 7-7-6-1 Tuesday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 8-4-4 La. Pick 4: 6-9-8-7 Wednesday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 9-1-1 La. Pick 4: 7-5-8-2 Easy 5: 06-07-15-17-34 La. Lotto: 02-12-25-36-37-38 Powerball: 24-26-45-48-55 Powerball: 8; Power Play: 2 Thursday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 7-7-1 La. Pick 4: 1-7-5-5 Friday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 7-2-5 La. Pick 4: 5-7-8-2 Saturday’s drawing La. Pick 3: 5-5-7 La. Pick 4: 4-4-1-5 Easy 5: 9-10-12-26-32 La. Lotto: 4-12-20-21-27-40 Powerball: 6-16-20-31-36 Powerball: 8; Power play: 5


Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

C3

La. Tech happy to be back in tournament By Mary Foster The Associated Press RUSTON, La. — Teresa Weatherspoon still has her game face — that look of intense concentration, the bit of belligerence, the slight swagger. Now she’s back where she honed the flash and brilliance that made her seem unstoppable and put Louisiana Tech on the top of the college pecking order. And if the court has lost some luster since back in the day, Weatherspoon is already applying the polish. “There was a time everybody wanted to be Louisiana Tech,” Weatherspoon said. “When we fell, it hurt us all so bad — the players, the coaches, the fans, everybody.” By many standards the fall has not been a big one, after all Tech has only missed three NCAAs. But when you’ve been to 25 straight and won three national titles, including two NCAA titles and the final AIAW, three years is a long time. The Lady Techsters only lost 14 games in the four years Weatherspoon played for them (1984-88), when she started all but one game. They went to the Final Four twice and won the championship in 1988. She played on gold and bronze medal-winning Olympic teams, then played overseas and in the WNBA. If it weren’t for a bad left knee and bone spurs in her left ankle, Weatherspoon, 44, still might be suiting up. Instead, she’s doing what she sees as the next best thing, teaching young women and bringing back the glory days to her alma mater. Weatherspoon became the Lady Techsters’ coach last year when Vicksburg native Chris Long was fired. “She was great,” said sports information director Malcolm Butler. “She won her first eight games, and took us to the semifinals in the WAC Tournament.” “I’m so excited for her,” said former Louisiana Tech coach Leon Barmore, who Weatherspoon calls her father, her First Round

The associated press

Louisiana Tech’s Adrienne Johnson works on her jump shot during practice earlier this week. Louisiana Tech, a No. 14 seed, faces Florida State in the first round of the NCAA Women’s Tournament today in Tallahassee, Fla.

women’s basketball mentor and her friend. “She is bringing the excitement back to Lady Techster basketball and she is going to build something really special there.” Barmore, now an assistant for another former Louisiana Tech player, Kim Mulkey, at Baylor, tries to watch Weatherspoon and her team as often as he can, he said. “She still has all that passion she had as a player,” he said. “But she’s matured. She

Second Round

1 Connecticut (33-0)

16 Southern U. (23-8)

Regionals

9 James Madison (26-6) 5 Virginia (21-9)

12 Green Bay (27-4)

National Semifinals

National Semifinals

Women’s Division I Basketball Championship

11:16 a.m.

Norfolk, Va. – March 21

8 Temple (24-8)

knows how to get on one of the kids or an official when she needs to, then go on. She’s already learned some of the big secretes of coaching.” The Lady Techsters (23-8) face heavily favored Florida State (26-5) on the Seminoles’ homecourt in Tallahassee. Seminoles coach Sue Semrau called it an honor to play a team “as storied as Louisiana Tech.” Weatherspoon would rather she saw it as a horror. “I want us to be able to play physical or play finesse,” Weatherspoon said. “I want

Regionals

30 min. following

6:21 p.m.

6:11 p.m.

Sacramento, Calif. 11:11 a.m.

Tallahassee, Fla. – March 20

30 min. following

San Antonio April 6

30 min. following

30 min. following

San Antonio

NATIONAL CHAMPION

April 4

11:16 a.m. 16 Austin Peay (15-17) Knoxville, Tenn. – March 20

7:06 p.m.

San Antonio April 4

6:06 p.m.

30 min. following

11:11 a.m.

7:21 p.m.

Berkeley, Calif. – March 20

13 Fresno St. (27-6) 6 Texas (22-10)

11 San Diego St. (21-10)

30 min. following

Memphis, Tenn

Kansas City, Mo.

6:11 p.m.

6:16 p.m.

Austin, Texas – March 21 3 West Virginia (28-5) 30 min. following7 14 Lamar (26-7) 7 LSU (20-9) 10 Hartford (27-4)

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Chattanooga (24-8) 13 Vanderbilt (22-10) DePaul (21-11) Xavier (27-3)

6 11 3

E. Tenn. St. (23-8)

14

Gonzaga (27-4)

7

North Carolina (19-11) 10 Texas A&M (25-7)

2

Portland St. (18-14) 15 Nebraska (30-1)

1

UNI (17-15)

16

UCLA (24-8)

8

Michigan St. (22-9)

5

N.C. St. (20-13)

9

Bowling Green (27-6) 12 Kentucky (25-7) Liberty (27-5)

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Georgia Tech (23-9) 6 UALR (26-6) 11

Norman, Okla. – March 21 Oklahoma (23-10) 3 S. Dakota St. (22-10) 14

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30 min. following

gan State fans exhaled. New Mexico State coach Marvin Menzies had to be restrained by his assistants from going after the officials after the wild ending. Wisconsin (24-8), the No. 4 seed in the East Regional, also survived a scare from 13th-seeded Wofford (26-9). Jon Leuer scored 20 points, including a jumper and two free throws in the final 17 seconds, as the Badgers won 53-49. They’ll play Cornell on Sunday. In Friday’s other games: • Duke, the top-seeded team in the South Regional dispatched Arkansas-Pine Bluff 73-44. Purdue wasted most of a big lead in the second half before beating Siena 72-64. Texas A&M crushed Utah State 69-53, and West Virginia rolled past Morgan State 77-50. • In the West Regional, Matt Bouldin scored 14 points in the second half to lead Gonzaga over Florida State 67-60. Xavier beat Minnesota 65-54 to advance to a second-round matchup Sunday with Pittsburgh, an 89-66 winner over Oakland. • Syracuse, the top seed in the West Region, had an easy time in a 79-56 win over Vermont. Likewise, No. 2 Ohio State beat UC-Santa Barbara 68-51. In an 8 vs. 9 seed game in the South Region, California jumped out to an 18-point lead in the opening minutes and then kept Louisville at arm’s length for much of the second half, eventually cruising home to a 77-62 victory.

Mowers, Tractors and Equipment

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Tulane (26-6)

Minneapolis – March 21

30 min. following

1

12

Seattle – March 20

1 Tennessee (30-2)

4 Baylor (23-9)

Georgia (23-8)

Cincinnati – March 21

Championship Game

Pittsburgh – March 21 2 Ohio St. (30-4) 11:06 a.m. 15 St. Francis (17-14)

5 Georgetown (25-6) 12 Marist (26-7)

Rutgers (19-14)

Tempe, Ariz. – March 20

3 Florida St. (26-5) 30 min. following 14 Louisiana Tech (23-8)

8 Dayton (24-7) 9 TCU (22-8)

Iowa (19-13)

keep playing.” Fifth-seeded Michigan State was pushed by No. 12 New Mexico State in the Midwest Regional before hanging on for a 70-67 win. Kalin Lucas scored a career-high 25 points and Raymar Morgan emerged from a quiet night by hitting key shots down the stretch to carry Michigan State (25-8) to the finish line. Morgan broke a late tie with four straight points, then made two free throws with 18.6 seconds remaining with the aid of a rare laneviolation call. Troy Gillenwater scored 17 points, including a 3-pointer with 20 seconds left that got New Mexico State (22-12) within 68-67. On the other end, Morgan made his first free throw and missed the second. But with the Spartans heading downcourt to defend an apparent two-point lead, official Ray Perone called either New Mexico State’s Wendell McKines or Gillenwater — or both — for a violation for stepping into the lane too early on the shot. Morgan converted his gift second chance to put the Spartans up 70-67. Jonathan Gibson then missed a long 3-pointer with seconds left, and Hernst Laroche missed another one that would have tied it with 0.3 seconds left. Draymond Green intercepted the final inbounds pass and slammed the ball onto the court in celebration as the buzzer sounded, the crowd booed — and Michi-

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Stanford, Calif. – March 20

11:21 a.m.

10 Middle Tenn. (25-5)

Stanford (31-1)

Continued from Page C1.

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First Round

7:16 p.m.

Dayton, Ohio

7 Miss. St. (19-12)

Second Round 30 min. following

30 min. following

Ames, Iowa – March 21 4 Iowa St. (23-7) 30 min. following 13 Lehigh (29-3) 6 St. John’s (24-6) 11 Princeton (26-2)

my players to hit back when they get hit. But better yet, hit first. You can’t be anything but tough out there.” It shows in practice where she tells them to “attack the body, play through the body, don’t you back off.” “Coach Spoon’s tough, but she knows how to bring out your talent, how to make you better,” said Shanavia Dowdell, one of two players Weatherspoon loses this year. “She tells us every game is going to be tough, we just have to be tougher.”

NCAA

Wisconsin (21-10) Vermont (26-6)

Notre Dame, Ind. – March 21

30 min. following

All times Eastern

30 min. following

Notre Dame (27-5)

7

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Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

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The Vicksburg Post

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Saturday, March 20, 2010

01. Legals IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF WARREN COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JERRY EUGENE UZZLE, DECEASED NO. 2010-011PR NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE is hereby given that Letters Testamentary of the Estate of Jerry Eugene Uzzle, Deceased, were granted to the undersigned by the Chancery Court of Warren County, Mississippi on the 17th day of February, 2010, and all persons having claims against said estate are hereby notified and required to have the same probated and registered by the Clerk of said Court as required by law within ninety (90) days of the date of the first publication of this Notice to Creditors. Failure to so do will forever bar such claims. WITNESS my signature this the 17th day of February, 2010. /s/ D. R. Ross Dewayne R. Ross, Executor Of The Estate of Jerry Eugene Uzzle, deceased Publish: 3/13, 3/20, 3/27(3t)

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Licensed Beautician Part Time

Make your own schedule! KEEP UP WITH all the local news and sales...subscribe to The Vicksburg Post Today! Call 601-636-4545, ask for Circulation.

We offer Blue Cross/Blue Shield medical insurance, PTO & 401K-Plan for full time employees Apply in Person at:

Runaway Are you 12 to 17? Alone? Scared? Call 601-634-0640 anytime or 1-800-793-8266 We can help! One child, one day at a time.

06. Lost & Found FOUND! AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD, tan and white, with collar. Vicinity of Highway 80 and Amberleaf Drive. Call 601-638-2379 or 601400-7292 to identify.

FOUND!

BLUE HEELER with D!colLLE lar. A Rawhide in Oak CERoad N C Ridge area. Call 601-6389162 before 9pm.

FOUND! YELLOW LABRADOR. Neutered male, found in the Fonsylvania Road vicinity. 601-398-5632. LOST A DOG? Found a cat? Let The Vicksburg Post help! Run a FREE 3 day ad! 601-636-SELL or e-mail classifieds@vicksburg post.com

07. Help Wanted ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT Looking for a new challenge in Advertising Sales? Apply now- This position won't last! In this role you will have an account list to look after and manage. You will work with clients to find creative and unique advertising solutions for their businesses. You will be responsible for generating revenue and achieving your goals. You will have a selection of clients to service; you will identify their needs and build stronger relationships with them. You will also spend time building new relationships and finding new business opportunities. Ideally you will have experience selling business to business. Any advertising or marketing or sales experience that you have will also be advantageous. You must be intelligent, customer focused, and a strong team player. Must have a good driving record with dependable transportation and auto insurance. The successful candidate will be rewarded with an above industry base salary, plus commission. Send resumes to Dept. 3713, The Vicksburg Post, P.O. Box 821668, Vicksburg, MS 39182.

SHADY LAWN HEALTH AND REHABILITATION 60 Shady Lawn Place M-F 8:30am-4:30pm

EOE CONFEDERATE RIDGE APARTMENTS now accepting applications for Certified HVAC maintenance person. Experience is a must! Call 601-638-0102, for information. ESTABLISHED BUSINESS SEEKING BOOKKEEPER. Successful candidate will have experience in collection and office management. Benefits provided. Please send resume to: Dept. 3718, The Vicksburg Post, P.O. Box 821668, Vicksburg, MS 39182. FULL TIME LAWN maintenance workers. State immediately! Experience preferred. Monday- Friday (unless it rains). Mail resumes to: P.O. Box 822071, Vicksburg, MS 39182, or call 601-636-5957, leave message.

        

   !! " # $%&'$($' )*)* #     ' + " NEW DAYCARE FACILITY is looking for a qualified Director. Bachelors Degree preferred, but not required. A High School diploma or GED is required, along with (4) years of verifiable experience working in a licensed childcare facility. Call 601-636-8063, leave message. Send resumes to: Dept 3717 The Vicksburg Post P.O. Box 821668 Vicksburg, MS 39182 OUTREACH COORDINATOR in the Vicksburg area, full time. Master's degree in Social Services required. Mental health experience preferred. Crisis experience a plus. Some traveling required. Send resumes to: Brentwood Behavioral HealthCare of MS. Fax to: 601-936-7864 or email to: diana.king@psysolutions.com

CLOSET PHOBIA? Clear out the skeletons in yours with an ad in the classifieds.

601-636-SELL Call 601-636-SELL to sell your Car or Truck!

40. Cars & Trucks

07. Help Wanted PHARMACY TECHNICIAN NEEDED. Must be certified in Louisiana. Great pay and benefit package. Please send resume to: P.O. Box 672, Tallulah, LA 71284. QUALITY CONTROL. EARN up to $100 per day! Evaluate retail stores, training provided, no experience required. Call 877-6999772. RN MANAGER NEEDED for Vicksburg area hospice. Hospice experience preferred but not required. Please send resume to: Dept. 3719, The Vicksburg Post, P.O. Box 821668, Vicksburg, MS 39182.

SALES PERSONNEL NEEDED Must be familiar with the Jackson, Monroe & Vicksburg area. Apply in person only at: SHEFFIELD RENTALS 1255 Hwy. 61 South Vicksburg

TO BUY OR SELL

AVON

CALL 601-636-7535 $10 START UP KIT

Get Behind the Wheel and Drive your Career at Dominoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza!!! NOW Hiring! Drivers: Earn up to $10-$12/hour You must have A dependable car, Insurance & a Good driving record. Apply online at: www.dominos.com or Apply at 725 Hwy. 61 South Vicksburg, MS 39180 Dominoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza store. We deliver great jobs!

10. Loans And Investments â&#x20AC;&#x153;WE CAN ERASE your bad credit- 100% guaranteed.â&#x20AC;? The Federal Trade Commission says the only legitimate credit repair starts and ends with you. It takes time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Any company that claims to be able to fix your credit legally is lying. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc.gov/credit A message from The Vicksburg Post and the FTC.

11. Business Opportunities Need Additional Income? Be Your Own Boss Immediately earn $400 or more for only $99 investment Call Margie at Naleka Pewterware

14. Pets & Livestock

15. Auction LOOKING FOR A great value? Subscribe to The Vicksburg Post, 601-6364545, ask for Circulation.

AKC REGISTERED Labrador Retrievers for sale! Born February 18th, will be ready for new home on April 1st. (4) Chocolate males, (1) Black male and female. $250 each. Call 318-282-2156 if interested.

17. Wanted To Buy

AKC/ CKC REGISTERED YORKIES, Poodles and Schnauzers $200 to $700! 601-218-5533,

CASH PAID FOR COINS, war relics, antique books and collectibles. Call 601618-2727.

  

18. Miscellaneous For Sale

DOG OBEDIENCE CLASS REGISTRATION, Monday, March 22nd 7pm, City Park Pavilion. Information/ Pre-Registration, 601-634-0199 or 601-638-8952.

VICKSBURG WARREN HUMANE SOCIETY

(5) JOINED CEMETARY plots, lifetime maintenance, $1000. Call 601-825-6293 or 601-862-8942. 18 FOOT DUAL tandem dump trailer with brakes, new floor, goose neck hitch, $3500. 601-954-5429.

Highway 61 South

601-636-6631

Currently housing 84 unwanted and abandoned animals.

3216 Washington

43 dogs & puppies 41 cats & kittens

Large shipment of designer handbags & wallets.Children & adult name brand shoes. Brenda Love.

Please adopt today! Call the Shelter for more information. HAVE A HEART, SPAY OR NEUTER YOUR PETS! Look for us on www.petfinder.com

8 CEMETERY PLOTS, tjoined, in Cedar Hill Cemetery. Call 601-636-5205 for details. Coin operated pool table. $700 or best offer. 601-4156228.

Please have your pets spayed and neutered.

at DISCOUNT

www.pawsrescuepets.org

FURNITURE BARN PRICED TO SELL! 2 registered Charolais bulls, very gentle, 13 months and 14 months old. 318-341-1795 or 318-574-3470.

Horseback Birthday Parties

Silver Creek Equestrian 601-638-8988 silvercreekarena.com

601-638-7191

600 Jackson St, Vicksburg

NEW GENERATORS

               

!! "!#  $%  & ' (      #'(  Schwinn 203 Recumbent exercise bike. Hardly used, $300. 601-636-4677 SPRING IS HERE! Swings are ready. Heavy duty 5' foot swings, $135. Taylor's Woodworks. Call 601-636-2731.

THE PET SHOP â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vicksburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pet Boutiqueâ&#x20AC;? Bring Your Best Friend to our NEW LOCATION, 3508 South Washington Street Not so far, just 1 mile south of Belmont St. Same Great Pet Merchandise, Just More Room!

MOVING SALE! 122 Jennifer Drive. Friday and Saturday 8am-5pm, Sunday after noon. Refrigerator, gas stove, four window AC units, large desk, day bed, chain saw and lots of miscellaneous! What's going on in Vicksburg this weekend? Read The Vicksburg Post! For convenient home delivery call 601-636-4545, ask for circulation.

20. Hunting 1996 HONDA 300 FOURTRAX 4-wheeler. $2,000. Call 601-218-2020.

19. Garage & Yard Sales

What's going on in Vicksburg this weekend? Read The Vicksburg Post! For convenient home delivery, call 601-636-4545, ask for circulation.

110 SIGNAL HILL DRIVE, Saturday 8am-12 Noon. Furniture, clothes, miscellaneous. Rain/ shine. 1790 HIGHWAY 61 North, Lil Southern Market, Saturday, 8am-until, multifamily sale, too much to list! 220 AMBERLEAF DRIVE, Friday, 2pm-2pm, Saturday, 7am-12 noon, lamps, printer with ink, men's small- large, junior girl's, lots of miscellaneous.

3733 MERCER STREET, Saturday 6am-10am. Furniture and lots of miscellaneous!

24. Business Services

8773 FISHER FERRY, Saturday 7am-1pm. Huge Sale! Pots and pans, cookie jars, jewelery, comforters, towels, nice purses and shoes, pictures, Curio cabinet, iron skillets, quilts, baseball card collection, children to plus size clothes, dishes, sheets and more!

21. Boats, Fishing Supplies

FOR LESS THAN 45 cents per day, have The Vicksburg Post delivered to your home. Only $14 per month, 7 day delivery. Call 601-636-4545, Circulation Department.

HARD SHELL LUGGAGe carrier, top of vehicle, $100. Lumber rack, fits extra-cab GMC 2007 truck or older models, $500. 601-4153847.

19. Garage & Yard Sales

USED TIRES! LIGHT trucks and SUV's, 16's, 17's, 18's, 19's, 20's. A few matching sets! Call Archie or Lionel, 601-638-3252.

3017 INDIANA AVENUE, Saturday 7am-5pm. Dave Ramsey says â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sell Everythingâ&#x20AC;?. Many items!

FOR THE BEST prices on furniture at 7059 Fisher Ferry Road, Sandy's 3 Way Convenience Store and Deli, factory direct furniture corner of Fisher Ferry and Jeff Davis Road. 601-6368429.

24. Business Services

CONCESSION TRAILER, hot and cold water, $4000. 601-218-0414.

FARM HOUSE TABLE, 6 chairs. $200. Metal patio chaise, $75. Folding treadmill, $250. 601-415-2448.

FOR SALE! Blueberry plants. $5 each. Fruit trees. $9 each. 601-529-5150.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss a day of The Vicksburg Post! Our ePost now available! Call Circulation, 601-636-4545, for details!

18. Miscellaneous For Sale

6416 HIGHWAY 61 NORTH, in Blake Subdivision off Highway. Saturday 7am-4pm. Shoes, purses, jewelery, men, women plus clothing and more.

Classified Advertising really brings big results!

18. Miscellaneous For Sale

24. Business Services AFFORDABLE PAINTING. Quality work. Exterior/interior: Pressure washing. 20 years experience. 601-2180263.

Toni Walker Terrett Attorney At Law 601-636-1109 â&#x20AC;˘ Bankruptcy Chapter 7 and 13 â&#x20AC;˘ Social Seurity Disability â&#x20AC;˘ No-fault Divorce

D&D Tree Cutting, Trimming & Lawn Care For Free Estimates, call â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Jamesâ&#x20AC;? at 601-218-7782. Visit us online at www.vicksburgpost.com

18. Miscellaneous For Sale

WE PAY CASH! for gold, silver, diamonds & coins Scallions Jewelers 1207 Washington St. â&#x20AC;˘ 601-636-6413

601-638-2833

LOCAL TANNING SALON for sell, 10 years in business, good income. For more information call 601-218-2300.

40. Cars & Trucks

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY Score A Bullseye With One Of These Businesses! â&#x20AC;˘ Glass

â&#x20AC;˘ Construction

Barnes Glass

CONSTRUCTION

Quality Service at Competitive Prices #1 Windshield Repair & Replacement

Vans â&#x20AC;˘ Cars â&#x20AC;˘ Trucks â&#x20AC;˘Insurance Claims Welcomeâ&#x20AC;˘

Warren County Emergency Management is seeking a candidate to fill the position of Operations Officer.

AUTO â&#x20AC;˘ HOME â&#x20AC;˘ BUSINESS Jason Barnes â&#x20AC;˘ 601-661-0900

BUFORD

Dirt For Vicksburg Fred Clark Heavy Clay, 610, Clay Gravel, Fill Dirt Trackhoe, Dozer, Box Blade, Demolition Work Driveways: Repair, Form & Finish House Pads: Concrete, Clearing & Grubbing Licensed & Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Construction

Adams County Correctional Center is looking to fill the following positions! We offer competitive wages, career advancement and a comprehensive benefit package. Adams County Correctional Center 20 Hobo Fork Road Natchez, Mississippi 39121 Licensed Practical Nurse, (LPN) Warehouse Manager Academic Instructor Correctional Counselor Correctional Officer Dental Assistant Certified Medical Assistant Vocational Instructor - Computer

Qualifications: High school diploma, GED certification or equivalent. Must complete pre-service training, must be able to successfully complete a full background check. A valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license is required. Minimum age requirement: Must be at least 21 years of age. To apply for this position please complete an Online Application at www.correctionscorp.com, or at your local Mississippi Unemployment Office. CCA is a Drug Free Workplace & an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/V/D.

We accept VISA

We are General Contractors, specializing in all types of carpentry.

Jon Ross 601-638-7932

â&#x20AC;˘ Signs

PATRIOTIC â&#x20AC;˘ FLAGS â&#x20AC;˘ BANNERS â&#x20AC;˘ BUMPER STICKERS â&#x20AC;˘ YARD SIGNS

Show Your Colors! Post Plaza

601-631-0400 CABINETS, ADDITIONS, METAL ROOFS, 1601 N. Frontage Rd. VINYL SIDING, PATIO DECKS, Vicksburg, MS 39180 DOZER & EXCAVATOR WORK, SEPTIC SYSTEMS, â&#x20AC;˘ Dirt LawnServices Care LOT CLEAN UP Services LICENSED

Haul Clay, Gravel, Dirt, Rock & Sand All Types of Dozer Work Land Clearing â&#x20AC;˘ Demolition Site Development & Preparation Excavation Crane Rental â&#x20AC;˘ Mud Jacking

601-638-9233

New Homes

Framing, Remodeling, Cabinets, Flooring, Roofing & Vinyl Siding State Licensed & Bonded

RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL New Construction & Remodeling

CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. 601-636-4813 State Board of Contractors Approved & Bonded

Application packets for this position are ;available in the Chancery Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office located on the First Floor of the Warren County Court House, 1009 Cherry Street, Vicksburg, Mississippi 39183, between 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The deadline to submit Application is Friday, April 2, 2010.

ROSS

ROYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CONSTRUCTION

â&#x20AC;˘ Bulldozer & Construction

This position serves as key Staff Assistant and advisor to the Director and provides support on the formulation, development, integration and evaluation of Emergency Management policy, plans and programs.

Safety Manager- minimum 5 years experience Shift Supervisor- minimum 5 years experience Assistant Shift Supervisor Program Facilitator Medical Records Supervisor Psychologist Medical Records Clerk Vocational Instructor - Electrical Vocational Instructor - Masonry

The Vicksburg Post

â&#x20AC;˘ BONDED â&#x20AC;˘ INSURED

DWAYNE ROY 601-415-6997 JOSHUA ROY 601-831-0558

McLaughlin Construction & Remodeling Serving Vicksburg since 1989. MS State licensed. New construction, additions, custom cabinets, flooring, siding, roofing & decks. Free estimates! 601-831-2073 or 601-638-0927

WE ACCEPT MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS .

e y r 601-301-1773

403 Silver Creek Drive Vicksburg, MS 39180 bonelliconstruction@yahoo.com

â&#x20AC;˘ Printing

SPEEDIPRINT & OFFICE SUPPLY

â&#x20AC;˘ Business Cards â&#x20AC;˘ Letterhead â&#x20AC;˘ Envelopes â&#x20AC;˘ Invoices â&#x20AC;˘ Work Orders â&#x20AC;˘ Invitations (601) 638-2900 Fax (601) 636-6711 1601-C North Frontage Rd Vicksburg, MS 39180

â&#x20AC;˘ Insulation

River City Landscaping, LLC

â&#x20AC;˘ Dozer / Trackhoe Work Dump Truck â&#x20AC;˘ Bush Hogging Box Blade â&#x20AC;˘ Demolition Lawn Maintenance Deliver Dirtâ&#x20AC;˘Gravelâ&#x20AC;˘Sandâ&#x20AC;˘Rock Res. & Com. â&#x20AC;˘ Lic. & Ins. Robert Keyes, Jr. (Owner) 601-529-0894

â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn HandyMan Care Services

RIVER CITY HANDYMAN Joe Rangel - Owner 601.636.7843 â&#x20AC;˘ 601.529.5400

Beat The Heat Sale! Get a jump on summer by taking advantage of our BeatTheHeatSale. You can lower your utility bill as much as 30-35%. Call today and start saving.

601-218-2498

From small repair projects to home upgrades...Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not satisfied until You are. Call today for your Free Estimate!

Hit The Bullseye By Advertising Daily With The Business And Service Directory Aim for the coverage and receive the most for your advertising dollars in the Vicksburg area!

All Business & Service Directory Ads MUST BE PAID IN ADVANCE !

Call today about our special long term ad runs available in the Business Directory. We offer specials from 3 months to 12 months at a great price deal ! â&#x20AC;˘ CLASSIFIEDS â&#x20AC;˘ 601-636-7355 â&#x20AC;˘ www.vicksburgpost.com â&#x20AC;˘


The Vicksburg Post

Saturday, March 20, 2010

29. Unfurnished Apartments

32. Mobile Homes For Sale

BEAUTIFUL LAKESIDE LIVING

HANDYMAN SPECIAL! 1998 28x76, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room, den with fireplace, kitchen island. $15,000. Call John, 601672-5146.

Voted #1 Apartments in the 2009 Reader’s Choice

• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts. • Beautifully Landscaped • Lake Surrounds Community

• Pool • Fireplace • Spacious Floor Plans 601-629-6300

WE BUY MOBILE homes! Can't sell yours? We can! All makes and models, O.K. Please, no large payoffs! Call Darren, 228-669-3505.

501 Fairways Drive Vicksburg

WE STILL HAVE several land/ homes left in Pearl, Vicksburg and Florence. No Credit Check! Call for details, ask for Darren, 228669-3505.

CLEAN 2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath. Wood floors, appliances, $650 monthly, 3321 Drummond. 601-415-9191.

33. Commercial Property

www.thelandingsvicksburg.com

Commodore Apartments

24. Business Services DIRT AND GRAVEL hauled. 8 yard truck. 601638-6740. GOODWIN FLOOR FINISHING. Install, sand, refinish hardwood floors, 98 percent dust free, commercial equipment used. Free estimates. 601-636-4128, 601529-1457. J. JONES LAWN SERVICE. Reasonable rates. Call 601-218-7173. LaBarre Lawn Service. 10 years of service, grass cutting, blowing and edging. 601-540-4395. MC TREE TRIMMING Services, Licensed and bonded, roofing and dirt for sale. Call 601-600-9571 QUALITY PAINTING and Pressure Washing for the lowest price. Call Willie Walker at 601-638-2107. River City Lawn Care You grow it we mow it! Affordable and professional. Lawn and landscape maintenance. Cut, bag, trim, edge. 601-529-6168.

29. Unfurnished Apartments 1 bedroom apartments, $400. 2 bedroom townhouse, new paint/ carpet, $500, $300 deposit. 601-631-0805. 1, 2 AND 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS, downtown. $400 to $650 monthly, deposit required. 601-638-1746. 2 BEDROOMS, 1 BATH, NICE city location, central air/heat. $525 monthly, $300 deposit. 601-831-1728. 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS. New carpet, paint, washer/ dryer hookups. $525- $550. 601-631-0805. APARTMENTS FOR RENT. 1, 2 and 3 bedrooms available. Autumn Oaks. 601636-0447.

G REAT

FAMILY ATMOSPHERE Newly remodeled 2 and 3 bedrooms. Paid cable, water and trash.Washer, dryer and microwave included. $0 deposit. Call 601-415-8735 or 601-638-5587

1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms 605 Cain Ridge Rd. Vicksburg, MS 39180

601-638-2231 NOW LEASING! 1, 2 and 3 bedrooms. Magnolia Commons of Vicksburg, off Highway 61 South. 601-619-6821. TAKING APPLICATIONS!! 3 bedrooms. $450. Also 4 bedrooms, $500 monthly. Refrigerator and stove furnished. $200 deposit for both. Call 601-634-8290

30. Houses For Rent 3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS, Warrenton area. Available April 1st. Deposit, references and application required. Call 601-636-8889

SPRING CLEANING ON your list? Let us do the work for you! Quality Cleaning, painting, power washing. Free estimates, 601-2149805.

HELPING PEOPLE FILE UNDER THE

1998 Belmont. 16X80 will sell and set-up as is for $13,900. Needs carpet and minor repairs. Call Darren, 228-669-3505.

“BANKRUPTCY CODE” CHAPTER 7 - $600 CHAPTER 13 - $300 DOWN, THE REST IN THE PLAN

NO FAULT DIVORCE - $350

(601-924-8670)

2001 28x80. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, new carpet and linoleum, formal dining, fireplace, huge walk-ins, big tube, large bedrooms, setup with air. $39,900. Call Darren, 228-669-3505.

WE HAUL OFF old appliances, lawn mowers, hot water heaters, junk and abandoned cars, trucks, vans, etcetera. 601-940-5075, if no answer, please leave message.

32X80. 1998 PALM Harbor, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace, huge rooms, new appliances, set-up with air conditioning. $39,900. Call Darren, 228-669-3505.

SPEAK DIRECTLY TO AN ATTORNEY

TYE ASHFORD

WILL MOVE YOU easy, fast and cheaper. Just call, 601-630-9196, 601-5290809.

26. For Rent Or Lease

Vicksburg’s Most Convenient Luxury Apartments! • Cable Furnished! • High Speed Internet Access Available! 601-636-0503 2160 S. Frontage Rd. Vicksburg, MS 39180

Classifieds Really Work!

4216 1/2 HALLS FERRY Road, 2 story building, 1000 square foot. Commercial use only. Call 601-638-3211. OFFICE SUITE NEAR CORPS Museum. Kitchenette, shower, Wi-Fi, parking, 600 square feet. $495. 601-529-6093.

28. Furnished Apartments EXECUTIVE BEDROOM SUITE. Fully furnished, kitchen, washer / dryer, covered garage, alarm system, maid service, all utilities furnished. $600 monthly. Call 601-618-0264 NEWLY RENOVATED. Completely furnished corporate apartment. All utilities provided including cable and internet. Laundry room, courtyard, security entrance. Great location. $750 - $900 month. 601-415-9027, 601-638-4386. PRE-VIEW VICKSBURG'S FINEST furnished apartments on-line at www. vicksburgcorporatehousing. com 601-874-1116.

KEEP UP WITH ALL THE LOCAL NEWS AND SALES... SUBSCRIBE TO THE VICKSBURG POST TODAY! CALL 601-636-4545, ASK FOR CIRCULATION.

Spring Move-In Special • 1 & 2 Bedroom Studios & Efficiencies • Utilities Paid No Utility Deposit Required

• Downtown Convenience to Fine Restaurants, Shops, Churches, Banks & Casinos

✦ From $455.00 ✦ Secure High-Rise Building • Off Street Parking • 9 1/2 Foot Ceilings • Beautiful River Views • Senior Discounts •

Classic Elegance in Modern Surroundings

601-630-2921

801 Clay Street • Vicksburg

Classified Advertising really brings big results!

29. Unfurnished Apartments

BUILDINGS FOR SALE! Located in Fayette, MS. Please call 601-786-3943, ask for James Shannon.

1911 Mission 66 Office or Retail Suite B-Apprx. 2450 sq. ft. Great Location! Easy Access! High Visability!

Candy Francisco FHA & VA Mortgage Originator ! Conventional ! Construction Mortgage ! First-time Loans Homebuyers !

601.630.8209

Member FDIC

2150 South Frontage Road

bkbank.com

2170 S. I-20 Frontage Rd. www.ColdwellBanker.com www.homesofvicksburg.net

McMillin Real Estate 601-636-8193 VicksburgRealEstate.com

I-20 AREA, INDIVIDUAL office suites, conference room, kitchen, lobby and reception area. Starting at $300 including utilities. Call 601-218-9631.

Big River Realty

DAVID A. BREWER 601-631-0065

225 Falcon Ridge 3 BR, 2 BA. Open floor plan, fenced yard. Reduced!

34. Houses For Sale

600 Blossom Lane 3 BR, 2 BA home with inground pool & large workshop.

1104 NOTTINGHAM ROAD Move in ready, 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Features include: Walk-in closets, eat-in kitchen, open to living room. Stainless appliances, updated bathrooms, large laundry room, ceramic tile, wood laminate flooring, scored and stained back patio, spacious back yard for kids. Located on quiet cul-de-sac in Openwood Plantation. Asking $144,900. Great floor plan, must see! Call 601415-6889 or 601-618-0845.

4909 OAK RIDGE ROAD Completely rebuilt, approximately 1100 square feet, hardwood, ceramic floors, 2 car carport, all appliances included, 1 acre. Asking $110,000. 601-8312073 or 601-638-0927.

BEVERLY MCMILLIN

1803 Clay Street www.jonesandupchurch.com Judy Uzzle.................601-994-4663 Mary D. Barnes.........601-966-1665 Stacie Bowers-Griffin...601-218-9134 Rip Hoxie, Land Pro....601-260-9149 Jill Waring Upchurch....601-906-5012 Carla Watson...............601-415-4179 Andrea Upchurch.......601-831-6490 Broker, GRI

601-636-6490 Mission Park Dr. Mission 66 Commercial Lots. $50,000 Pear Orchard Offices 1,000 sq. ft. $73,500 Redwood Road, 1 acre lots, $20,000. Timberlane, 1560 sq ft. dbl wide, 5.3 acres, $110,000. Newit Vick, 6 acres, $72,500 898 National St., Duplex, $44,500 Openwood, Clubhouse Cir. & shop, 5,000 sq. ft. $69,900. Jennifer Gilliland, McMillin Real Estate 601-218-4538

Kay Odom..........601-638-2443 Kay Hobson.......601-638-8512 Jake Strait...........601-218-1258 Bob Gordon........601-831-0135 Tony Jordan........601-630-6461 Alex Monsour.....601-415-7274 Jay Hobson..........601-456-1318 Kai Mason...........601-218-5623 Daryl Hollingsworth..601-415-5549

Rely on over 19 years of experience in Real Estate.

Bigriverhomes.com Move-In Ready-1 mile from Warren Central, 4 BR/2BA, fresh paint, updated throughout, new wood laminate floors, new carpet, new ceramic floors and countertops in kitchen & baths, 12x20 wired workshop, 1 acre lot on cul-de-sac. For appointment, 601-415-3022. HOME FOR SALE. Cary, Ms, adorable 3 bedroom, 2 bath home, 1200 square feet, front/ back porches. 662-907-0619.

CALL 601-636-SELL AND PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TODAY.

29. Unfurnished Apartments

39. Motorcycles, Bicycles 2002 HONDA GL1800 Gold Wing. Illusion blue, new tires, 4 helmets, cover. $10,500. 601-634-0644, 601-415-8682.

Jones & Upchurch Real Estate Agency

Brian Moore Realty Connie - Owner/ Agent

318-322-4000

34. Houses For Sale Licensed in MS and LA

✰✰FOR LEASE✰✰

Sybil Caraway....601-218-2869 Catherine Roy....601-831-5790 Rick McAllister..601-218-1150 Mincer Minor.....601-529-0893 Jim Hobson.........601-415-0211

V

ARNER

REAL ESTATE, INC

JIM HOBSON

40. Cars & Trucks 1980 MERCEDES 450SL. Convertible/hardtop, great condition. See at 717 Clay Street. 601-638-7484. 1989 FORD F600 Diesel, Steel 12 foot bed, new tires, 47,000 miles. $4000. International 1600 Diesel, 10 foot bed, goose neck hitch, air bags, disc brakes, $4000. 601-954-5429. 1992 FORD 350 Diesel U-Haul, $1500. 1997 Dodge Ram Van, Custom, burgundy, 2500. 318-574-1949, 318-341-9723. 1995 DODGE CARAVAN. Fair condition. $800 willing to negotiate. 601456-4369. 1996 GMC SIERRA C2500 SLT. Good condition, 231,000. $4500. 601618-0962, 2000 FORD EXPEDITION XLT. 3rd row seat, leather, 4 wheel drive. $5000. 601-218-7356.

SAYING “SAYONARA” TO your sound system? Let the classifieds give the lowdown on your hi-fi; like make, model, wattage, and when to call. Classified... fast-action results. 601-636-SELL.

29. Unfurnished Apartments

40. Cars & Trucks 2000 VOLVO S-40. $6,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601-636-2855. 2002 FORD TAURUS SES. Estate Sale! Always garaged with only 23,331 miles. Show room condition and leather interior. $6,300 or best offer. 601-831-1955. 2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA. 98,000 miles, very nice car! $5200. 601-2187356. 2008 HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE. $13,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601-636-2855. 2008 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Coupe. $20,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601636-2855. 2008 TOYOTA AVALON Limited. 25,000 miles, Pearl white. $26,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601-6362855. 2009 CHEVROLET COBALT LT. $13,995. Call Vicksburg Toyota at 601636-2855. BOTTOM LINE AUTO SALES We finance! Corner of Fisher Ferry Road and Jeff Davis Road. 601-529-1195.

GOOD Credit BAD Credit NO Credit Gary has cars, Trucks SUV's for everyone Regardless of Credit Gary's Cars For Less 3524 Hwy 61 S 601-636-8883 Get Pre-Approved www.garyscfl.com

29. Unfurnished Apartments

REALTOR®•BUILDER•APPRAISER

601-636-0502 Eagle Lake 16665 Hwy 465 3/2, large lot, metal roof, waterfront, updated, $165,000 16853 Hwy 465 2 bedrooms u/s, apartment d/s, pier, deck, $165,000. Call Bette Paul Warner, 601 218 1800. www.lakehouse.com McMillin Real Estate

36. Farms & Acreage THINKING OF BUYING LAND? Check out OUR listings! investorsrealtyinc.net Danny Rice/ Broker 601-529-2847, 601-638-2236, Charlie Donald, 601-668-8027, Investors Realty Group, Inc.

29. Unfurnished Apartments

Realtor

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29. Unfurnished Apartments

AUDUBON PLACE For those adults who like a safe community setting with the best neighbors in Vicksburg. Discount for Senior Citizens available

415-3333 • 638-1102 • 636-1455

SHAMROCK A PA RT M E N T S Be the first to live in one of our New Apartments! Available January 1st 2010 SUPERIOR QUALITY, CUSTOM OAK CABINETS, EXTRA LARGE MASTER BEDROOM, & WASHER / DRYER HOOKUPS SAFE!!! ALL UNITS HAVE AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEM

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4 BEDROOMS, 3 BATHS, nice 2 story home. 109 Colonial Drive. $1400 monthly. Call 601-831-4505.

32. Mobile Homes For Sale

34. Houses For Sale

Open Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:30pm

3/ 4 BEDROOMSRent $1,100 and Up! • 721 National. 732-768-5743.

LOS COLINAS. SMALL 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Cottage. Close in, nice. $795 monthly. 601-831-4506.

C7

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LOOKING FOR YOUR DREAM HOME? Check the real estate listings in the classifieds daily.

The Car Store CARS • CARS • CARS• CARS $

00 BUICK CENTURY LIMITED V1976 ........24 Months @ 260 per month .. 1435*down 99 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS GS V1913 ....23 Months @ 270 per month ..$1465*down 02 NISSAN SENTRA GXE V1915 ........24 Months @ 280 per month ..$1585*down 01 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT V1844 ..24 Months @ 270 per month ....$1615*down 01 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE SLE V1979 24 Months @ 290 per month ..$1870*down 06 CHEVY COLBALT LS V1973 ..............24 Months @ 310 per month ....$1915*down 06 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX V1926 ..........23 Months @ 340 per month ..$2375*down 04 NISSAN ALTIMA SE V1969 ..............23 Months @ 360 per month ..$2545*down $

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01STO OYOTA LDTUNDRA V1832R ..................12 Months D per month ....$1315 SO*LdownD SO@L250 01 FORD RANGER XLT EXT CAB V1892 ....24 Months @ 280 per month ..$1585*down $ D 02 FORD LDF150 XLT EXT CAB V1965 ....23 Months SO SO*Ldown SOL@ D340 per month .. 2270 00 FORD F150 XLT EXT CAB V1910 ....24 Months @ 340 per month ..$2455*down $

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VICKSBURGS NEWEST, AND A WELL MAINTAINED FAVORTIE. EACH WITH SPACIOUS FLOOR PLANS AND SOPHISTICATED AMENITIES.

FOR LEASING INFO, CALL 601-636-1752 www.parkresidences.com • www.bienvilleapartments.com

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601-638-6015 • 2800 Clay Street • Vicksburg, MS


C8

Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

GMC TRUCK MONTH

*

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2009 GMC Sierra 2500

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$

32,240 $ Sale Price - 30,495 $ Rebates - 3,500 M.S.R.P. -

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*

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2010 GMC Terrain

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Equipped with V8 engine, 1 year OnStar Safe and Sound, SL package and more. #41205

Crew Cab

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2010 GMC Sierra

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2010 GMC Sierra

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ON EVERY 2010 GMC ACADIA Herb Caldwell Clyde McKinney An experienced sales staff to Kevin Watson Curtis Dixon Bobby Bryan Baxter Morris meet all of your automotive needs. Salesman of the Tim Moody Preston Balthrop Month of February Come to George Carr, Mike Francisco Kevin Watson Zachary Balthrop Debbie Berry You’ll Be Glad You Did. For a complete listing of our used vehicles visit our website at www.georgecarr.com

GeorgeCarr BU IC K • PON T IAC • CADI LL AC • GMC

www.georgecarr.com • 601-636-7777 • 1-800-669-3620 • 2950 S. Frontage Road • Vicksburg, MS Special finance rates with GMAC approved credit. GMAC financing with approved credit. All rebates assigned to dealer. See dealer for complete details. Art for illustration purposes only, actual vehicle may vary.


THE VICKSBURG POST

TOPIC SATURDAY, mARch 20, 2010 • SE C TI O N D

Karen Gamble, managing editor | E-mail: newsreleases@vicksburgpost.com | Tel: 601.636.4545 ext 137

2010 Heritage Festival

MUSIC

Port Gibson fun starts next Saturday Blake Shelton Miranda Lambert

and

Shelton chats about love, music, life after Twitter By The Associated Press NASHVILLE — Blake Shelton seems to be coping well after his recent breakup. The country star ended his committed relationship with Twitter about a month ago by deleting it from his phone. “After I guess almost a year of being on Twitter, about three weeks ago I woke up one morning, and I was looking at it like I did every morning, and I said, ‘Man, I’ve got to move on with my life. I’m addicted to this stuff.’ I can’t think in the morning because all I can do is get on there and think, ‘All right, I’ve got to think of something funny to say to start this day,”’ he said in a recent interview. Shelton, 33, significantly raised his profile over the past year through his colorful tweets. The day he deleted the mobile app, he had over 76,000 followers. “I think people are so used to country artists, celebrities, just kind of playing the middle and really not being themselves out of fear, that it was refreshing to them to get on Twitter and see how well Blake Shelton wrote, ‘Oh my god, I got so drunk last night I think my liver exploded ...,”’ he said. “They’re going, ‘This guy is crazy.’” Shelton has found himself in the post-breakup gray area. He still tweets, but it’s not as convenient or as often without the mobile application. Since the release of his “Hillbilly Bone” album this month, his followers have actually increased to over 80,000, thanks, in part, to the success of the album’s title track. The “Hillbilly Bone” duet with longtime friend Trace Adkins is currently a top 5 country hit, and it’s nominated for the Academy of Country Music Awards’ vocal event of the year. Shelton couldn’t be happier with the direction his life is going right now. “Hillbilly Bone” album debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200, his relationship with girlfriend and fellow country star Miranda Lambert is solid, and after getting a divorce in 2006, he’s finally open to the idea of marriage again. “Miranda and I have been together, it’s getting close to five years now,” he said. “We’ve had our good years and our bad years and our really bad years. But I think right now, she and I have a stronger relationship than we’ve ever had.”

By Manivanh Chanprasith mchan@vicksburgpost.com Port Gibson’s Main Street Program will celebrate the town’s heritage with an 18th festival that will feature a new twist this year. For the first time, the organization is participating in “Give a Day, Get a Disney Day,” which encourages people to volunteer in their community in exchange for a free pass to a Disney park. “We would love to have people volunteer,” said Cathi Dodgen of Port Gibson’s Main Street Program. She estimates the festival, set for March 27, next Saturday, would need around 300 volunteers to man vendor stations or pick up trash. Those who help out Saturday can visit www.disneyparks.com to get a park voucher. Another new activity is the High School Step Show, created to attract teens. Cash prizes will be awarded to first-, second- and thirdplace winners. “We try to make this a family-fun event,” Dodgen said. “It’s hard to find something for the teenagers.” The festival will kick off at 8 a.m. with the 5K Dilla Dash, a Mississippi Track Club Grand Prix event. T-shirts will be given to each participant, and prizes will be awarded to winners. The race will begin at Georgia’s at the Depot Restaurant, 1202 Market St., and will end at the water department on the south end of Market Street. Visit www.mstrackclub.com for more information and registration. Meanwhile, Market Street will be filled with vendors from across the Southeast peddling children’s items, birdhouses and plants, as well as artwork from the Mississippi Craftsman’s Guild. The children’s area will be filled with jumps, games and animals. During the second annual Little Miss Heritage Festival, girls ages

mErEdiTh spEncEr•The Vicksburg PosT

Eddie Cotton Jr. performs at Port Gibson’s 2009 Heritage Festival. 5 to 10 will compete for savings bonds. Live entertainment by three R&B groups — MS Jody, Floyd Taylor and The Homemade Jamz Blues Band — will take the stage in the afternoon. Also, the Port Gibson

Lions Club will host a poker run. Cost is $10 per hand, and cars are invited to participate. “We encourage people to come down,” Dodgen said. “Everything will be a draw to town. It’s a beautiful town.”

If you go The 18th annual Port Gibson Main Street Heritage Festival will be from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. next Saturday, March 27, downtown, on Market Street. Admission is free, but items will be for sale. Call 601-437-4500 or visit www.portgibsonmainstreet.com. Also, the 5K Dilla Dash will begin at 8. For more, visit www.mstrackclub.com.

Old South favorites continue spring dazzles Visitors and residents are often captivated by the abundance of spring-blooming shrubs, trees and bulbs in older Vicksburg neighborhoods. Many were planted by homeowners many years ago but bloom today as lovely as they did when first planted. The old favorites make good sense for modern gardens just as they did when grandmother chose to plant them in her garden. The founding of Vicksburg and the construction of some of its oldest homes occurred in the latter part of the era known as the golden age of plant introduction. Between 1750 and 1850, tens of thousands of new plants were brought into this country from all over the world. Collectors were particularly successful in finding exqui-

IN THE GARDEN MIRIAM

JABOUR

site horticultural specimens in China and Japan. At the same time many American native plants were collected and transported to European gardens where they were hybridized and returned in later years as improved hybrid forms. The mainstay plants found in Southern gardens have changed relatively little in the past 150 years, according to Dr. Neil Odenwald and John Feltwell in their book “Live Oak Splendor.” Some of the most significant Chi-

nese imports introduced in that golden age are roses, bridal wreathe spirea, crepe myrtle, gardenia, privet and tea olive, a plant used by the Chinese to perfume tea that we know today as sweet olive. Camellias, azaleas, flowering almond, cryptomeria, boxwood and kerria were popular Japanese imports. These excelled in our climate and their numbers grew fast as gardeners propagated them and shared cuttings and divisions with family and neighbors. These were not the only introductions that found a home in Southern gardens. Chinese wisteria, introduced into Europe in 1816, became a major hit when it found its way into Southern American gardens around 1860. Popular for arbors or as a

trimmed-up small tree, the purple flowers that appear before the leaflets make it a magnificent addition to a spring landscape. A relative of kudzu, it requires a strong support and can get out of control if not pruned frequently after the blooms fade away. Modern cultivars are available now that are more easily controlled in a landscape. Scottish plant collector Robert Fortune, quite famous in the mid-19th century, brought back scores of plants including weigela, a member of the honeysuckle family. It is a prolific, colorful spring bloomer more frequently seen in years past but just as dazzling in the modern landscape. The funnel shaped flowers are borne in vivid clusters in shades of pink,

white or wine tones on graceful arching branches. Quince, the multi-trunk shrub or small tree, was a fixture in gardens of the late 1800s notably because it blooms so early. Long before the other flowering shrubs bear blooms, the bare branches of the quince shrub come alive with tiny salmon-pink, white or lightpink blooms. Tree quince, known as Chinese quince, has a single trunk and produces an abundance of tart fruits that was quite popular for jellies. According to William Welch in his book “The Southern Heirloom Garden” the tree type used to be listed in every nursery catalog in the South but is surprisingly rare today due to fire blight and other diseases. See Garden, Page D2.


D2

Saturday, March 20, 2010

TONIGHT ON TV n MOVIE “Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” — Spirits of jilted lovers take a photographer, Matthew McConaughey, on an odyssey through his many failed relationships to find out what made him such a cad, and if there is any hope for true love./7 on HBO n SPORTS College basketball — North Carolina makes a rare trip to Starkville to take on top-seeded Mississippi State in the second Matthew McConaughey round of the NIT./11 a.m. on ESPN n PRIMETIME “Law & Order” — The revelation of a murder victim’s true identity leads detectives to a suspicious web site with threatening posts./8 on NBC

THIS WEEK’S LINEUP n EXPANDED LISTINGS TV TIMES — Network, cable and satellite programs appear in Sunday’s TV Times magazine and online at www.vicksburgpost. com

MILESTONES n BIRTHDAYS Carl Reiner, producer-director-comedian, 88; Hal Linden, actor, 79; Don Edwards, country singer, 71; Paul Junger Witt, TV producer, 67; William Hurt, actor, 60; Spike Lee, movie director, 53; Holly Hunter, actress, 52; Michael Rapaport, actor, 40.

Carl Reiner

PEOPLE

Court: Anna Nicole gets none of fortune A federal appeals court ruled Friday that Anna Nicole Smith’s estate will get none of the more than $300 million the late Playboy model claimed a Texas billionaire to whom she was briefly married meant to leave her after he died. The ruling came in a 15-year legal battle that started in a sleepy Houston probate court and stretched all the way to the U.S Supreme Court. Anna Nicole It initially pitted Smith against the son of J. Smith Howard Marshall over the $1.6 billion estate the oil tycoon left after his 1995 death at age 90. J. Howard Marshall had wed Smith the year before when she was 26. Marshall’s son E. Pierce Marshall died in 2006 and Smith perished after a drug overdose in 2008. Their heirs and lawyers kept up the legal fight that included one ruling awarding Smith $474 million. Kent Richland, who represents the Smith estate, said he would appeal the latest ruling but hasn’t decided whether to ask the appeals court for another hearing or take the case back the U.S. Supreme Court regarding different issues. Eric Brunstad, a lawyer for Marshall family members, said they hoped the legal fight was over. “Our only wish would be that Pierce were here to see his vindication,” the family said in a prepared statement. The three-judge appeals court panel ruled unanimously that a 2001 jury verdict in Houston in favor of the Marshall family should be honored over two federal court rulings in Smith’s favor. The appeals court said the federal bankruptcy court award of about $447 million and a subsequent federal trial court ruling that lowered the amount to $89 million should be ignored. The appeals court said the Houston jury heard from all the parties, including Smith, during a five-month trial in which she accused E. Pierce Marshall of illegally coercing his father to keep Smith out of his will.

Sci-fi writer convicted in border case A Canadian science fiction writer has been convicted of assaulting, obstructing and resisting a police officer during an inspection in Michigan last year by U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers. A St. Clair County jury convicted 52-year-old Peter Watts of Toronto Friday. He faces up to two years in prison when he is sentenced on April 26. Watts was trying to cross into Canada on Dec. 8 at the Blue Water Bridge when his vehicle was selected for inspection. Authorities say he was detained after becoming noncompliant. Watts testified that he was trying to comply. A message seeking comment left Friday for his lawyer, Douglas Mullkoff, wasn’t immediately returned. Watts’ books include “Starfish,”“Maelstrom” and “Behemoth,” known as the “Rifters Trilogy.”

AND ONE MORE

Topless gardener creating stir In response to neighborhood reports of a topless gardener, the housing authority in a Colorado town plans to amend its rules so that tenants cover up when they’re outside. Robert Pierce, of Boulder, said he’ll fight changes that would keep his wife from gardening outside topless, which is legal under state and city law. “They’re making a big mistake,” he said. Boulder Housing Partners Executive Director Betsey Martens didn’t return a phone call Friday. She told the Daily Camera newspaper that people have complained for years about the couple often going outside wearing only thong underwear. Several passersby called Boulder police Wednesday when Catharine Pierce, 52, tended to her yard wearing only a yellow thong and pink gloves. Police decided she wasn’t breaking any laws. Robert Pierce said the new rules wouldn’t discourage the couple. “We’ll stay the way we have to stay,” he said. The City Council is scheduled in April to consider expanding the city’s anti-nudity ordinance, but a draft proposal to make it an offense for women to go topless in public was removed. City spokesman Patrick von Keyserling said the housing authority is a separate entity and that the city can’t dictate the agency’s rules.

The Vicksburg Post

Ellen presents $30,000 to lesbian in prom flap JaCKSon (aP) — A lesbian high school student embroiled in a legal flap over her school’s prom policy has received a $30,000 scholarship on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.” Constance McMillen was speechless Friday when the talk show host pulled out an oversized check from the Web site Tonic.Com, a digital media company. DeGeneres says she admires McMillen for challenging Itawamba County School District rules that would prevent her from escorting her girlfriend to the prom. The school district canceled the April 2 prom after McMillen’s request. A hearing is scheduled Monday in federal court in The associaTed press Aberdeen on American Civil Liberties Union efforts to Ellen DeGeneres talks to Constance McMillen on “The Ellen DeGeforce the district to hold the prom.

neres Show” Friday.

Beautiful Day in the neighBorhooD

Volunteer day pushed to honor Mister Rogers PittSBurgh (aP) — Mister Rogers cared deeply about his neighbors and his neighborhood, both in the Neighborhood of Make-Believe and in real life. Now, friends and colleagues of late television icon Fred Rogers want to honor his legacy with a national day of volunteering on his birthday. Rogers, who died in 2003 after battling stomach cancer, would have been 82 today. David Newell, who played Mr. McFeely on “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” said volunteering meant a lot to Rogers. As a boy, Rogers volunteered at his hometown hospital in Latrobe, Pa., rolling bandages for soldiers during WWII. And, Newell said, public television, where Rogers’ series began, relies on volunteers. The idea for the Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Day grew out of Sweater Day, which Family Communications Inc. of Pittsburgh has promoted over the past several years to honor Rogers. Rogers created the company to produce his show and other family friendly educational fare. Of course, people still are encouraged to wear sweaters in Rogers’ honor. “The sweater is the touchstone to Fred,” Newell said. The volunteer day is beginning this year in partnership with the United Way of Allegheny County, the county in which Pittsburgh is located and where the show was made. “We’re trying to establish this as a national event, but you’ve got to start small,” Newell said. “It’s really what Fred would want to happen. He wanted to help others.” Suggested volunteer ideas are simple acts, such as lending an ear to someone, offering to return a shopping cart or volunteering at a senior center. Around Pittsburgh, various museums and other institutions are offering free or reduced admissions to

The associaTed press

Brad Burmeister, left, and Michael Dubois move a figure of the late Fred Rogers at the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh Friday. mark the day. While there always are opportunities to volunteer, a dedicated day helps reinvigorate volunteerism, said Tracey Reed Armant, manager of community outcomes for United Way of Allegheny County. The United Way also sees Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Day as a way of recognizing people who volunteer. Rogers’ legacy also extends beyond cardigans and kindness: He’s recognized as a pioneer in children’s’ educational television, and that work is still being carried on. “I think that the really important thing about Fred Rogers is he took the cutting edge technology of his day, television, and he applied to it this wonderful philosophy and this strong set of wonderful educational values and created something that reached million of families all over the

Garden Continued from Page D1. No discussion of old favorites is complete without mentioning the narcissus family and other spring bulbs. They abound around old homesites throughout the South. The older daffodils are not the large modern bulbs we buy from nurseries today but a mix of small jonquils and daffodils that were brought over from Central Europe and the Mediterranean region in the 1700s. Thomas Jefferson grew many of them as did gardeners throughout the South, so much so that they have naturalized in many settings. I just returned from Texas where they are using thousands of the older variety in naturalized plantings along Interstate 20. William Welch says these low growing types are a natural hybrid known affectionately as “Texas star” jonquils and they are much easier to grow along the highways than are wildflowers. They finish blooming before the highway department starts cutting, never die and just get better each year according to Welch. Leucojum or Snow Drop is another old-fashion bulb that still shines in a garden. It naturalizes as well as old

world and uplifted their lives,” said Maxwell King, executive director of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at St. Vincent College in Latrobe. On Monday and Tuesday, the center is hosting the inaugural Fred Forward Conference, which will look at how emerging technologies and new media can be used in developmentally appropriate and educational ways for children. “Now, there is so much technology and people are struggling to figure how to use it to uplift children,” King said. “And Fred is a wonderful, powerful example that this can be done.” While the day will come when children don’t know who Mister Rogers was, King said the important thing is “that

Miriam Jabour, a Master Gardener and Master Flower Show judge, has been active in the Openwood Plantation Garden Club for more than 35 years. Write to her at 1114 Windy Lake Drive, Vicksburg, MS 39183.

ALL YOU CAN EAT

CRAWFISH

CORN & POTATOES Every Friday & Saturday 5:30 - 9:00

TONEY’S RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE

1903 MISSION 66 Vicksburg, MS • 601-636-0024

ENJOY CHINESE FOOD &

THE NEW

daffodils and are quite fragrant. Clumps can remain untouched for years without sacrificing their tiny bell-like blooms but they are very easy to divide and share with others. French Roman hyacinths also graced many old home gardens. These are not what we see called hyacinths in modern Dutch catalogs that have to be replanted yearly. This is a small flowered fragrant bulb native to France introduced to Southern gardens in the early 1900s. They come in several shades of blue, ranging from a light to almost purple blue, pink and white. Mrs. Shelby Farris’ garden was the first place that I saw these delightful blue bulbs many years ago. Becky and Brent Heath are one of several commercial sources now specializing in the old bulbs and new gardeners are finding them as delightful as those a generation ago. •

they understand and benefit from Fred’s values and Fred’s approach.”

HIBACHI GRILL Lunch & Dinner Open Mon. - Sat.

SUN KOON RESTAURANT 601-638-4941

3041 N. Frontage Rd.

Presents:

“GOLD IN THE HILLS”

Friday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. & Saturday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m. at Parkside Playhouse 101 Iowa Avenue Tickets: $10 Adult, 5 children under 12

$

601-636-0471 www.e-vtg.com

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REAL ESTATE ALL TYPES OF LISTINGS AVAILABLE TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS.

Andrea Lewis, REALTOR® ASSOCIATE Multi-Million Producer 2005, 2006 & 2007 601-218-0644 • FAX 601-634-0946 andrealewis@cablelynx.com


Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

D3

Girlfriend balks at dinner with both sets of parents DEAR ABBY ABIGAIL

VAN BUREN

meet. And after eight months, I would think both sets of parents would be interested in meeting each other. Dear Abby: I have a close friend, “Darlene,” whom I have known for 30 years. She has never once in all that time invited me into her home. Darlene never has anyone inside except for immediate family. If you go there to take

TOMORROW’S HOROSCOPE

BY BERNICE BEDE OSOL • NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION If tomorrow is your birthday: Try to find some time to get involved in the types of interests you find pleasurable, because it will attract the type of people who like the same things. Aries (March 21-April 19) — It’s vital to have good relationships with coworkers, if you hope to achieve an ambitious objective. You need their cooperation more than you think. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Do what you can to avoid getting into an arrangement at work that would put all the responsibility for defeat on you. All should partake in either case. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — All talk but no action will put you in a bad light. Do something positive about your intentions. If you succeed, you’ll really have something to crow about. If you fail, at least you tried. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Usually you’re smart enough to be tactful when working with others, but today these marvelous qualities are likely to be absent. You’ll discover quickly that you won’t attract any bees using vinegar. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Walk around with a chip on your shoulder, and there’s a strong chance that someone bigger and moodier will knock it off. Don’t learn this lesson the hard way. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Keep in mind that brilliant motto: “Don’t invest without first investigating.” Many deals that come off looking good to the naked eye won’t look so hot when examined under a microscope. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Forming an alliance for convenience and/or to save time is likely to turn out to be anything but what you need or desire. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Be sure any objective you go after at this point is a worthy one. In order to advance your personal ambition, it might become necessary for you to make some personal sacrifices. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Don’t include a particular troublemaker in your social group. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Household frustrations can be kept at a minimum if you finish projects you already have under way before taking on starting anything new. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — If progress in your particular field of work is being slowed down because of a lack of knowledge about what’s new on the market, you better start boning up real fast before things get worse. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) — You could run across something that looks like it has profitable potential, but don’t act on it until you check everything out first.

TWEEN 12 & 20

BY DR. ROBERT WALLACE • NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION Dr. Wallace: I am not writing to ask for advice. I am writing to help other girls who may be making the same mistake I made. Maybe if I had seen a letter like this a few years ago, my life might be different now. I had a reputation of being easy when I was in high school. It started when I was 16, because my boyfriend and I thought we needed to prove our love. After we broke up, he told all his friends we had sex. Word got around, and I had a lot of guys calling me. At first, it didn’t bother me because I very much wanted a boyfriend, so I would give these boys what they wanted — sex. I was WRONG! I didn’t have real dates like other girls. Other girls got asked to movies and school dances and got to meet their boyfriend’s family. I was asked to go for rides down dark, lonely roads. I was never asked out for a romantic evening. All these boys wanted was sex. No boy asked me to the prom. Guys were embarrassed to be seen with me in public. I wish I knew then what I know now. My self-respect should have been much more important than having a boyfriend. It was a hard lesson to learn. I missed a lot of good times in high school. I just hope that all of the girls who read this will learn from my mistake. — Nameless, Cleveland. Nameless: Thank you for having the courage to write this letter and reach out to other young women. Your story shows vividly how sad, lonely and frightening it can be to suddenly have a reputation as sexually easy. Even more, it demonstrates the cruel mindset of too many guys who will blithely ignore a female’s feelings en route to sexual conquest. Dr. Wallace: Our school club held an initiation breakfast in one of the nicer restaurants in our area. During the ceremony, one of the girls damaged a small painting that was hanging in the eating area. She slashed it with a knife. The owner of the restaurant sent a letter to the principal of our school demanding payment for the painting ($75) and informed him that our school functions will no longer be allowed without a $100 deposit. This incident has hurt our club’s reputation (everyone in school was talking about it). As the club’s president, I am asking you for the best solution in this mess. — Nameless, San Francisco. Nameless: Call a meeting of your club immediately and have the secretary draft a letter of apology. Mail it to the restaurant owner. And in the letter inform the owner that the money will be paid. Send a copy to your principal. Then have a fast fundraising event to reimburse the restaurant owner — teens know how to raise funds. Once you have the money, stop by the restaurant, give it to the owner and apologize again. Case closed. • Dr. Robert Wallace writes for Copley News Service. E-mail him at rwallace@Copley News Service.

her something, she greets you outside if she knows you’re coming. If she doesn’t, she won’t answer the door. She goes to other people’s homes but never reciprocates. In groups that go from house to house, she will not take her turn. Even when her motherin-law died she wouldn’t receive people in her home. I find Darlene’s behavior insulting. It has become a frequent topic of conversation. I don’t know what her home life was growing up, but her husband’s family had an opendoor policy in their home. Please advise me why someone would never welcome anyone into her home. — Shut

Out in Charlottesville Dear Shut Out: Darlene may be ashamed of the way her house looks inside, or she may be a hoarder. If you really need an explanation, you should be asking her. In light of your 30-year friendship, please stop personalizing this because it appears her hangup is long-standing and deepseated. And to gossip about it behind her back seems cruel and won’t help the situation.

• Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.Dear Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Reader’s vitamin D deficiency could cause cold symptoms Dear Dr. Gott: I have been sick with cold and flu symptoms (on average) about 12 to 14 days each month for the past year. My family doctor referred me to a rheumatologist because she thought it might be autoimmune. The rheumatologist believes that a low vitamin D level and allergies are causing my symptoms. She has put me on 50,000 IU of vitamin D for the next eight weeks and daily Claritin. Can you tell me what could be causing my low vitamin D level? Do you believe that this is the issue, or are the low levels caused by something else? Dear Reader: Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that is essential for promoting calcium absorption, maintaining adequate serum calcium and phosphate levels, bone growth and remodeling, reduction of inflammation, and neuromuscular and immune function. If your levels are low, you are at risk of developing weak, brittle and/or deformed bones. This could also affect your immune system, making you more susceptible to infection, allergens and more. Your low vitamin D level may indeed be the cause of your allergies, which are causing your cold and flu-like symptoms; however, this does not explain why you have a low D level to begin with. In healthy people, vitamin D deficiency can typically be avoided by adequate sun exposure and a well-balanced diet. Because there are very few foods that naturally contain D, fortified cereals and dairy products are the best way to achieve sufficient dietary amounts. Older adults, breastfed infants and those with limited sun exposure, dark skin or fat malabsorption are at increased risk of developing deficiency. Obese individuals may have difficulty absorbing vitamin D from sun exposure because the subcutaneous fat essentially blocks part of the D from entering the bloodstream. Those who have undergone gastric bypass may also have difficulty because most forms of this surgery bypass the upper small intestine where D is absorbed. Symptoms of vitamin D deficiency typically go unnoticed. The most common consequence is weakened bones, also known as rickets in children, osteomalacia in premenopausal women and men, and osteoporosis in post-menopausal women. There may be an increased risk of developing cancer, especially that of the digestive tract. There is also research suggesting deficiency may play a role in the prevention and treatment of diabetes types 1 and 2, hypertension, glucose intolerance, multiple sclerosis and more. However, because these studies have not been randomized clinical trials, the implications will continue to be debated until definitive proof is found. According to the Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, adequate intakes for healthy people between birth and age 50 should be 200 IU of vitamin D daily. Those aged 51 and over should double that. Recently, the

ASK THE DOCTOR Dr. PETEr

GOTT

American Academy of Pediatrics issued its own recommended intakes that exceed those of the FNB. This led to an expert committee formation by the FNB, which decided that recommended intakes be re-evaluated. To the best of my knowledge, the decision of this committee should be made public later in 2010. Tolerable upper-intake levels for those between birth and 12 months is 1,000 IUs; age 1 and older is 2,000 IUs daily. This, too, was challenged and is currently under review. I suggest that you speak to your physician to request that the underlying cause be found.

• Write to Dr. Peter Gott in care of United Media, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 440920167.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

BOYHB ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

WARLD TENJUK YOLFEN Answer: Yesterday’s

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

Dear Abby: I’ve been dating “Amanda” for eight months and everything is going great. I’ve met her parents, and she has met mine. Two days ago, I mentioned that we should plan a dinner with both sets of parents since they have not met yet. Amanda told me that our parents shouldn’t meet until we move in together or are engaged. I felt offended. When do you think is the right time for our parents to meet? — It’s Only Dinner! Dear Only Dinner: I disagree with your girlfriend. There are no hard and fast rules these days about when the parents of couples should

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

AND

(Answers Monday) Jumbles: LOFTY BIPED DROWSY BARREN Answer: When service was slow, the hungry diners became — “WAITERS”

RELEASE DATE– Saturday, March 20, 2010

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS 1 “The West Wing” creator 12 1947 Oscar winner for Best Original Song 14 1988 Michelle Pfeiffer comedy 16 Record holder? 17 Battery alternative 18 Neural transmitter 19 Cat murmurs 21 Charmer who “walks like a woman and talks like a man,” in a 1970 hit 22 John of London 23 Old postal divisions 24 Pachelbel work 25 Oct. 1975 NBC debut 26 Cost to get in on the deal 27 Cunning 28 First queen of Carthage 29 For whom the bell tolls 30 Catkin bearers 33 Fast-growing pet 34 Half of CDX 37 Ad preceder? 38 Frighten 39 Last word of Shelley’s “Adonais” 40 Amplify 41 Smart-mouthed 42 Silly rabbit’s desire, in ads 43 Campus figure 45 One in a class by herself? 46 Without anything on 49 Most buses 50 ’80s NBC medical drama DOWN 1 Use a fan on

38 Places for 2 Kitchen protector 29 Consequently 3 Delay cause, 30 Pro pitcher? roasters and maybe 31 Pioneer 35mm toasters? 4 Dedicated work cameras 41 Picayune 5 Neighbor of 32 Loser to Bush in 42 Yam, for one Homer 1988 44 Competitive 6 Emancipated 33 Cataract advantage 7 Sussex scents 34 Bridgestone 45 Trike rider 8 Dull drills product 47 Saul or 9 Cleopatra’s 35 Old yellers Solomon eyeliner 36 In a snit 48 “Oh!” to Ohm 10 “My stars!” 11 “Give me a ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE: for-instance!” 12 Fighter craft game released by Sega in 1982 13 Empty 14 Board 15 Hardly spicy 19 Koi habitats 20 Golden rule word 23 Site of the 1974 fight known as “The Rumble in the Jungle” 24 Play badly? 27 Newly polished 28 Will writer, at a 03/20/10 xwordeditor@aol.com will reading

By Will Nediger (c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

03/20/10


D4

Saturday, March 20, 2010

The Vicksburg Post

Visit Your House of Worship

The sponsors of this feature do so with the hope that more people will attend a church or synagogue of their choice on a weekly basis. Investors Realty Group, Inc.

Danny Rice / Broker “Land is our Business” 601-638-2236 • cell: 601-529-2847 www.investorsrealtyinc.net

Philip Jones Electric Co.

Squeaky Clean

Commercial • Residential • Industrial Family owned for Over 40 years 601-636-5199

The Caruthers Family Sales • Service • Installation Residential • Commercial • Industrial 3300 Washington Street 601-636-9433

Open Thursday-Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3 1901 N. Frontage Road 601-638-7001

Thorne’s Collision Center

Taco Casa

Randy Thorne, owner 4075 Pemberton Square Boulevard 601-636-8604 www.Thornescc@gmail.com

Two Locations To Serve You! Drive-In • Drive-Thru • Takeout Pemberton Blvd. 601-638-4026 Delchamps Plaza 601-638-6895 Catering 601-638-9408

This’ n’ That Gifts & More Doris Brown, owner Gifts for All Occasions 1640 Highway 61 N. 601-619-4432

Barnes Auto Glass & Windshield Repair Jason Barnes Mobile Service to Your Home or Office 1900 S. I-20 Frontage Road 601-661-0900

Stacia Johnson Alfa Insurance Co.

“Let’s Talk About Tomorrow” Auto • Home • Life 1640 Highway 61 N. 601-636-3433 J. M. Tidwell, Jr. 1490 Highway 61 N. 1095 Oak Ridge Road 4300 Nailor Road

Jackson Auto & Towing Michael & Sandy Jackson 97 Sammy Young Road 601-636-1328 601-218-1831

Collins Eye Clinic and Optical Boutique

We Have Our Eyes On You 1206 Mission 66 601-638-2081

Heard Electric Company, Inc. In Business Since 1952 Commercial • Industrial 601-636-4711

S&S Automotive & Transmission 3660 Hwy. 61 South 601-661-0039

BancorpSouth

820 South Street • 601-636-3752 1240 Hwy. 61 N • 601-634-4347 3312 Pemberton Blvd. • 601-634-6750 3134 Indiana Avenue • 601-634-4340 www.bancorpsouth.com

Sanders-Hollingsworth Builders, LLC

Remodeling • New Homes • Additions Drainage Improvements 601-629-7808

Bob Bell Insurance, Inc.

Life, Health & Employee Benefits Quality Plans, Personal Service at Great Rates 100 Pear Orchard, Suite F 601-638-7781 Bob Bell, CLU & Michele Bell - Agents

Vicksburg Toyota

4105 East Clay Street Vicksburg MS 39180 601-636-2855 1-800-499-5926

Porter Paints & Decorating Center Johnny Means & Staff 1882 South Frontage Road 601-630-9090

Superior Heating & Cooling Larry Ray, Owner Sales • Service • Installation Commercial • Residential 601-638-9225

Automatic Transmission Service Donnie Remore, Owner 560 Highway 80 601-638-4441

Hill City Radiator

New & Used Radiators Truck & Farm Equipment 1717 Washington Street 601-636-0162

Miller’s Tire Mart

“Your Goodyear Dealer” 1709 Clay Street 601-636-7551 Robert & Marion Murphy

Residential • Commercial 50’ Bucket Trucks 6611 Paxton Road 601-636-9591 Fax: 601-636-9413

Caruthers HVACR, LLC

Captain Jack’s

Super Jr’s Grocery & Meats

Wesley B. Jones Electrical Co.

Magnolia Lawn & Tractor, Inc.

Bath time is quite an event - the water temperature has to be just right, all the toys lined up, soap, shampoo and towel ready. All this for the actual bath that doesn’t take that long! But isn’t it worth it? How sweet is a freshly bathed baby! As he becomes older, just as much care must be taken to keep not only his body clean, but his spirit as well. We can begin early to teach a child right from wrong. Psalm 24:3-4 says, “Who may ascend the hill of the Lord? … He who has clean hands and a pure heart….” All of us, not just our children, need to learn God’s instructions for living a clean life. Won’t you worship together as a family this and every week? © istockphoto.com/NiDerLander

Sunday 1 Kings 8.54-66

Monday Ezra 9.1-15

Tuesday Nehemiah 1.1-11

Wednesday Nehemiah 8.1-18

Thursday Nehemiah 9.1-14

Friday Nehemiah 9.15-37

Saturday Esther 4.1-17

Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com

Atwood Chevrolet

2339 N. Frontage Road 601-638-1252 Parts: 601-638-4131 Body Shop: 601-638-4445 www.atwoodchevrolet.com

Helping Hand Family Pharmacy Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., Sun. Closed 1670 Highway 61 North 601-631-6837

The County Market

2101 Clay Street Jerry Stuckey, Manager

Warfield’s Service Center

Carl Smith & Employees Your Full Service Center Tune Up • A/C Service Brake Service • General Repairs 2610 1/2 Clay Street 601-638-1752

Blackburn Motor Company

www.blackburnmotor.com • Blackburn Nissan 2135 N. Frontage Road 601-636-2766 • Blackburn Chrysler Dodge Jeep 2195 N. Frontage Road 601-661-7565

Neill Gas, Inc.

No. 4 Port Terminal Circle Industrial Harbour 601-636-0924

Dave’s Custom Meats

We process deer meat Specializing in Smoked Sausage 1580 Highway 80 601-636-0342

Shipley Do-Nuts

1405 Clay Street, 601-638-3024 3424 Halls Ferry Road, 601-638-6675 885 Hwy. 61 N. Frontage Road, 601-630-9244

Foam Packaging, Inc.

Manufacturers of Extruded Polystyrene Foam Sheets, Egg Cartons & Containers 35 Stennis Drive • Vicksburg, MS 39180 P. O. Box 1075 • Vicksburg, MS 39181 601-638-4871 • 601-636-2655 (fax) www.foam-packaging.com

Breithaupt Real Estate, LLC 2735 Washington Street 601-638-6243

Griffith Florist

When The Occasion Calls For Flowers 1019 Jackson Street 601-636-9461

Cook Tractor Company

“Your Kubota Dealer” 680 Hwy. 80 601-636-4641 Steve & William Cook & Family

New Health Chiropractic Center Thomas W. Houseal, Doctor of Chiropractic 1825 N. Frontage Road, Suite D 601-634-1600

RiverHills Bank

Be A Big Fish.SM 1400 Hwy 61 North 601.636.1445 2125 North Frontage Rd 601.661.7312 702 Market St, Port Gibson, Ms 601.437.4271 www.riverhillsbank.com Member FDIC

Firearms Outfitters

Jimmy Bagby Sales & Repair • Firearms & Accessories Inside Hadad’s Outdoor World 940 Hwy. 61 North 601-638-7621

McAlister’s Deli

Sandwiches • Soups • Spuds • Salads Lunch • Dinner • Take Out & Catering 4200 Clay St. 601-619-8222

Billy Shinn 1029 Hwy. 61 North 601-636-3461

Heritage House Nursing and Retirement Center Robert Greer, Administrator, and Staff 3103 Wisconsin Avenue 601-638-1514

Corner Drug Store Joe A. Gerache, Sr. & Joe A. Gerache, Jr. 1123 Washington Street 601-636-2756

Taylor’s Audit & Tax Service Carlis Abney & Staff 4402 Halls Ferry Road 601-636-7268 or 601-636-1661

River City Body & Wrecker Service David Vanderberry & Staff Foreign and Domestic 2005 Highway 61 South 601-636-1493

Ricky’s Welding & Machine Shop 1721 Levee Street 601-638-8238 Rick Lowery & Employees

Leech Real Estate of Vicksburg Vanessa Leech, Broker/Owner www.VanessaLeech.com 601-636-5947 Easterling Enterprises, Inc. dba

T.D.’s Tires & Accessories 2704 Clay Street Vicksburg, MS 39183-3131 601-638-3252

George Carr Buick • Pontiac • Cadillac • GMC 2950 S. Frontage Road 601-636-7777 • 1-800-669-3620 www.georgecarr.com

Vicksburg Telephone Systems, Inc. Robert Henley & Staff 955 Hwy. 61 N. Bypass 601-634-1838 www.vicksburgtelephone.com

Battlefield Discount Drugs John Storey 3040A Indiana Avenue 601-636-3374

Kinder Morgan Bulk Terminals, Inc. Port of Vicksburg Vicksburg, Mississippi 601-636-6643

Speediprint & Office Supplies More than just printing 1601 N. Frontage Road Post Plaza 601-638-2900 Fax 601-636-6711

Signs First Banners • Real Estate Signs Vehicle Lettering 1601 North Frontage Road Post Plaza 601-631-0400 Fax 601-638-9849

“In God I have put my trust; I will not be afraid. ” – Psalm 56 : 11


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