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EDUCATIONAL KIT

BASED ON CHILD ABUSE

VICKY HUANG Senior Thesis 1 | Paul Carlos | Fall 2012


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS

Flip Cards Based on Child Abuse Target Audience: Parents | Caretakers To understand their actions and whether it is considered Child Abuse and may cause long-term consequences. To encourage them to listen to their child.


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS

Poor physical health : Adults who experienced abuse or neglect are more likely to suf fer from physical ailments such as allergies, arthritis, asthma, b ronchitis, high blood pressure, and ulcers.

My skin is peeling off... I look so ugly...

I still remember the night... It’s so scary and frightening. Who can I talk to...

I am useless... This is frustratinig...


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS

Manuals Based on Child Abuse Target Audience: Parents | Caretakers To educate them how to be a good parents. To educate them ways to control their tempers, cope with stress, and prevent Child Abuse.

Target Audience: Teachers | Nighbors To alert them about the seriousness of Child Abuse and provoke them to pay more attentions to each child. To raise their awareness of Child Abuse and learn to observe different signs of abuse from both children and parents.


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS

PARENTS’ QUICK TIPS

Ways to cont rol your tempe r

Twelve Alternatives to Lashing Out at Your Chil d

3. Press your l ips together and count to 10... or better yet, to 20 .

The next time everyday pressures build up to a point where you feel like lashing out -- STOP!

1..2..3..4..5..6..7..8..9..10. .

Try any of these simple alter natives. You'll feel better... and so will your child.

4. Put your c hild i n a time-out c hair (remember this r ule: o ne t ime-out minute for each year of ag e.)

8.

Take a hot bath or splash cold water on your fac e.

9.

Hug a pillo w.

10. Turn o n some m usic . Maybe even s ing along .

1.

Take a deep breath.. . and anothe r. Then remember you are the adult.

5. Put yourself in a time-out chair or go to another room. Think about why you are angry. Is it your c hild, o r is y our child simply a c onvenient target f or y our anger ?

11. Pick u p a pen and write down a s many helpful words as y ou c an t hink o f. S ave the list .

6. Phone a fr iend. 2. Close your e yes and imagine you're hear ing what your child is about to hea r.

7.

If s omeone c an w atch t he c hildren, g o outside and take a walk .

12. Call for pre vention info rmation: 1-800-CHILDREN

Lear n more @ www .preventchildabuse.o rg/


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS

PARENTS’ QUICK TIPS

What kind of par ents you want to be?

Advices for new Moms and Dads

6. Visitors can be helpful, but don't let them interrupt your rest or your family time together.

Being a parent is the most difficult, yet most important and satisfying work you will ever do. During the busy and exciting days that make up the first weeks of parenting, remember to take good care of yourself as well as the new baby. Here are some tips on how to survive the early weeks with the new baby:

7. Dads -- don't let mothers have all the fun. Spend lots of time caring for and playing with baby. The rewards are great!

1. Get as much rest as possible. Sleep when the baby sleeps, and moms and dads take turns sleeping late on weekend mornings.

9. If you have older children, be sure to let them know every day that you love them.

2. Eat nutritious meals. If a neighbor or friend offers to help, ask him or her to bring you dinner or do your grocery shopping. 3. Join a parenting group. You will learn about caring for your baby, and you will meet other parents who share your interests and concerns. 4. Don't expect too much from yourself. Housework won't always get done, but eventually you will get back to a routine. 5. Call your doctor or clinic with any questions or concerns you may have. This will save you from needless worry.

8. Be sure your infant receives necessary immunizations and visits to the doctor as required.

10. If you find yourself getting frustrated and angry with your baby, call for help. Ask a friend, neighbor or relative to take care of the baby while you take a break. Teaching Children Discipline:

1. Remember the purpose of discipline. It is to teach your child socially acceptable ways of expressing natural desires and drives. Discipline guides your child into adulthood. 2. Successful discipline is geared to the child’s de velopmental stage. Don’t expect a child of any age to perform something he or she is not ready for.

1. Children need positive reinforcement. Reward you child for doing right with smiles, hugs, attention, praise and thanks. Rewards do not need to be toys or candy. 2. Never hit or shake a child. Hitting is not a useful discipline tool for your children. Hitting and other physical punishment are not effective because they teach a child that it is okay to hit people, make children much too angry to be sorry for what they’ve done and can hur t a child physically. 3. Discipline is best taught by example. The lessons you teach your child come from what your child sees you do – not what you say. 4. If what you are doing is not working, change it! Your best efforts, even those that worked in the past, may break down. Try to keep sight of your basic principles and always cherish your relationship with your child. The important thing is not whether your child behaves in the next few minutes or today or this week. The really important thing is how your child turns out 5, 10, or 20 years from now. Learn more @ www.preventchildabuse.org/


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS

TIPS FOR ALL ADUL TS

Observing the signs of abuse s

Recognizing the Signs of Child Abuse and Neglect Many people fear that reporting child abuse or neglect will destroy a family. The truth, however, is that getting help can protect children from further harm and assist the family in facing and overcoming its problems. We can all help end child abuse by becoming aware of the signs and reporting suspected cases of child abuse and neglect. Signs of child maltreatment include:

2. Signs of Neglect: Physical: Lack of adequate supervision, nutrition, or shelter Poor hygiene Inappropriate dress

How You Can Help: Studies have shown that neighbors can reduce violence and crime in a community simply by increasing their awareness and working together. Similarly, neighbors can help stop child abuse and neglect. 1.

UNDERSTAND the causes and effects of abuse and neglect. If you know a parent who is under stress, encourage them to seek help. To locate a parenting program that can provide guidance and support, call the Prevention Information and Parent Helpline at 1-800-342-7472.

2.

LEARN to identify the warning signs of child abuse and neglect. Abuse can include physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Neglect is the failure by a caretaker to provide a child with adequate food, clothing, shelter, medical care, supervision, or emotional support.

3.

REPORT any known or suspected case that you observe. Reporting abuse can protect children from further harm and help a family address its problems. All reports are confidential and may be made anonymously.

4.

CALL the NYS Central Register Child Abuse & Maltreatment Hotline to Report Child Abuse and Neglect:

Educational: Infrequent attendance in school Medical:

1. Signs of Abuse: Physical: Bruses, welts, or swelling Sprains or fractures Burns Lacerations or abrasions Sexual: Difficulty in walking or sitting Torn, stained, or bloody clothing Pain or itching in the genital area; bruises or bleeding in the external genital area Sexually transmitted diseases Pregnancy

Unattended medical or dental needs

3. Signs of Emotional Neglect or Abuse Speech disorders Delayed physical development Substance abuse

4. Signs of Behavioral Abuse or Neglect Uncomfortable with physical contact Low self-esteem Behavior extremes, such as appearing overly compliant and passive or very demanding and aggressive Frequently at home with no caretaker Lags in physical, emotional, or intellectual development

General Public: 1-800-342-3720 Mandated Reporters: 1-800-635-1522 Learn more @ www.nyc.gov/html/acs


PREVIOUS EXPLORATIONS

TIPS FOR ALL ADUL TS

Observing the signs of abuse s

Recognizing the Signs of Child Abuse and Neglect

You notice that a child or young person has serious difficulties relating to peers and/or adults.

The effects of child abuse and neglect are not always easy to identify and people who abuse can go to great lengths to hide it. Many of the common signs of child abuse can be confused with normal, everyday happenings. Adults need to be aware that a change in a child’s behaviour may be caused by child abuse.

You see a child or young person who is always angry or aggressive. You find out that a child or young person has difficulty sleeping and experiences nightmares. You notice a child or young person experience a change in eating patterns.

Recognizing the signs in Children: A child or young person tells you that he or she is being abused or hurt. You notice sudden or unexplained changes in mood or behaviour of a child or young person. You notice frequent or unexplained bruises or injuries on a child or young person. You see a child or young person with low self-esteem. You see a child or young person with poor hygiene. You notice that a child or young person becomes withdrawn or unresponsive. You notice a child or young person with a lot of exaggerated fears. You notice that a child or young person seems to lack trust in familiar adults.

Recognizing the signs in Parents: You notice that a parent seems unconcerned about the child's welfare at home or school. You notice that there is domestic violence between adults in a household. You notice that a parent feels constantly stressed and tells you they have hurt his/her child. You see that a parent seems secretive or tries to isolate the child from other children. You notice that a parent constantly talks about the child in negative ways. You notice that a parent frequently blames, belittles or insults the child. You notice that a parent avoids talking about the childi's injuries or gives conflicting explanations for them.

You notice that a parent is suffering from depression or other serious mental illness that may be impacting on their ability to care for their children. You notice that a parent is drinking alcohol excessively or abusing prescription medication and is not able to take care of his/her children properly. You see or hear that a parent is using illegal drugs and is not able to take care of his/her children properly.

Recognizing the signs in Yourself: As parents, we can relate to sometimes feeling tested to the limits of our parenting ability. Sometimes we can feel out of control. In other situations, we can have personal problems that stop us from caring for our children. It is your responsibility is to recognize when you need help before the harm happens. If you feel you may hurt, or have hurt your child, it is important that you seek immediate assistance. STOP what you are doing. THINK about how you and your child are affected by what is happening. DO something to change things. GET SUPPORT to make the changes. Seeking support and assistance can take courage. Taking this step, however, is critical for you and your child. Learn more @ www.stopchildabusenow.com.au


DESIGN PROCESS

BOARD GAME: We will explore different appropriate and inappropriate acts / disciplines in three different themes - Home, School, and Neighborhood.

HOME

SCHOOL

NEIGHBORHOOD

HOME

SCHOOL

NEIGHBORHOOD


DESIGN PROCESS

CHARACTERS: It is designed based on different age of children that might be facing some of the scenarios in the game.

7 AGE: 0 - 1

AGE: 2 - 5

AGE: 5 - 9


DESIGN PROCESS

BUILDING BLOCKS OF EARLIER STAGES THAT STRENGTH FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS IN LATER STAGES.

• Middle Years Respect for feelings

Seeking information

Non-violent conflict resolution

Independence

• Preschool

• Toddlerhood

Respectful Communication Skills • Late infancy Attachment • Earyly infancy

Trust


DESIGN PROCESS

POSSIBLE BOARD GAME & RULES: • It accommodates 2 to 6 players. • Adult assembly required. 1. The players will be moving around the board and facing different scenarios based on different colors. Each color corresponds to a theme (Home, School, Neighborhood and Others) The goal is to collect 5 “Happy faces”, which indicates a good scenario / a good discipline. Yet, a “Sad face”, which indicaes a bad scenario / a child abuse, will deduct a “Happy face”. The first person who gets 5 “Happy faces” wins the game.


DESIGN PROCESS

HOME SENARIOS:

Daddy hits me with his belt because I pooped on my pants.

Mommy beats me because I spilled my milk.

Daddy hits me whenever he is drunk.

Physical punishment is not a discipline.

Physical punishment is not a discipline.

A failure role model

Daddy beats me whenever I cry.

Mommy yells at me when I do not finish the meal.

Daddy beats me when I hit other kids.

Physical punishment is not a discipline.

Verbal punishment is not a discipline.

A failure role model

Mommy says that she loves me everyday.

Mommy reads a bedtime story every night.

Daddy encourages me to try new things.

Building strong parent-child connection.

Building strong parent-child connection.

Gaining trust.

Mommy hugs me every night.

Mommy teaches me about the effects of my actions on other people.

Daddy tells me that he believes me.

Building strong parent-child connection.

Gaining trust.

Gaining trust.


SCHOOL SENARIOS:

DESIGN PROCESS

My teacher punishes me with a stick when I get below 80% on the test.

My teacher calls me stupid when I fail the test.

My teacher embarrasses me in front of the class.

Physical punishment is not a discipline.

Verbal punishment is not a discipline.

Verbal punishment is not a discipline.

My teacher punishes me when I make a mistake.

My teacher tells me that I will never be able to learn and understand.

My teacher criticizes me.

Physical punishment is not a discipline.

Verbal punishment is not a discipline.

Verbal punishment is not a discipline.

My teacher appreciates my attempts, even if I make a mistake.

My teacher never says I am stupid.

My teacher will listen and help me when I have problems with other students.

Gaining trust.

Gaining trust.

Gaining trust.

My teacher shows me how to improve.

My teacher tells me that I am capable of learning new languages.

My teacher listens to my opinions.

Gaining trust.

Gaining trust.

Gaining trust.


DESIGN PROCESS

NEIGHBORHOOD SENARIOS:

Neighbor hits me whenever I step into his yard.

Neighbor touches me inappropriately.

Neighbor touches my private body parts and tells me to keep it secret.

Inappropriate action.

Inappropriate action.

Inappropriate action.

Neighbor laughs at me for being dumb.

Neighbor threatens me to stay away from his daughter.

Neighbor laughs at me for my appearance.

Disrespectful action.

Disrespectful action.

Disrespectful action.

Neighbor calls Child Protective Service when she always hears slamming on walls and crying from my house.

Neighbor calls Child Protective Service when he sees me being kicked out of the house and crying.

Neighbor brings her kids to play with me.

Action is necessary.

Action is necessary.

Develop closer relationship.

Neighbor calls my parents when she sees me play in the street unsuper vised.

Neighbor calls the police when she frequently sees bruises and cuts on my body.

Neighbor always greets and smiles to me.

Action is necessary.

Action is necessary.

Build respectful communication skills.


TO BE CONTINUE...

Thesis1 _Deliverable 2  

Educational Kit based on Child Abuse