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A conversation with

Kerr Vernon


A conversation with

Kerr Vernon

KERR VERNON KVGD is Kerr Vernon, an independent Glasgow based Graphic Designer with over 15 years experience. He works with local, national and international clients in the arts, education, finance, retail, FMCG, healthcare, music and charitable organisations. Working in partnership with only the best web developers, photographers and writers in the industry Kerr Vernon delivers creatively-led, engaging and memorable design for print and the web.


A conversation with

Kerr Vernon

On blogs and articles on the Internet there are many discussions to whether print is/ is not dead? What is your stance?

It’s not dead. It’s not even resting. The majority of my output is about 80% print projects. Clients love all the different techniques too. Foiling and embossing and quality paper adds a real pick me up tactile element. projects vary from marketing collateral through to stationery and everything in between. Its often stuff i refer to as ‘leave behinds’. This is the printed material a client leaves behind after a meeting. The printed piece that speaks for their company. If its any good it should help sell their company and project their values and goals in their absence.

With the invention of the Ipad and Ebooks, do you think digital sales will cannibalize print sales? May the printed book become scarce and more valuable? Perhaps to a small scale. Time will tell. Vinyl is still regarded highly?


A conversation with

Kerr Vernon

How important is print to you as a designer?

It’s really important. It’s what drives me as a designer and it’s what I studied to do. It’s about creating something tangible. Some thing that exists in the real world and not the digital world. You can hold it and engage with it, photograph it and put it on your website and say i did that. Its a great feeling of achievement and very satisfying, especially if you have a happy client too.

Historically what print based designers/ephemera do you draw inspiration from? For me it can be anything from 1940’s English café posters to iconic designers such as Alan Fletcher. Indeed. Inspiration can come from anywhere really. I love Stuff with a hand crafted look. So stuff with a mix of illustration and typography always goes down well. My all time favourkite is the heads of state in Philadelphia. Their posters are amazing.


A conversation with

Kerr Vernon

Emerging from the graphic design industry today, there is a huge pressure to have web skills and print knowledge does not seem to be enough. With rapidly evolving technologies, is it now enough just to be a print based designer? It would be pretty tricky surviving on printrojects alone. It’s hard to fight progress sometimes and you have to keep learning new skills to keep up. I recently started using fireworks for digital design and it’s really helped with the way I design websites now.

I collect a lot of printed ephemera from cigar tins to postcards and I have a growing collection of typewriters. Do you collect any printed matter?

I buy design books every now and then but I’m not too much of hoarder.


A conversation with

Kerr Vernon


A conversation with

Kerr Vernon


A conversation with

Kerr Vernon

I know it is a tricky and generalised question but

I hope its going to be ok. People will always

what do you think the future of print may be?

appreciate craft. Mass digital printing of junk mail is everywhere and just gets cheaper and cheaper to produce. On the flip side there’s un upsurge in screen printing and letter press across the design community so hopefully people will still a bit extra for something nice.

What would you hope the future would be?

I hope it smells of uncoated paper.

kerr vernon  

Kerr VernonAconversationwith Kerr VernonAconversationwith KVGD is Kerr Vernon, an independent Glasgow based Graphic Designer with over 15 ye...

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