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THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO PRIDE 2018 IN THIS ISSUE: GRAND MARSHALS AWARDEES + GUESTS ELDERS AS LEADERS VISIBILITY IN SCHOOLS DYKE SPACES

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PRIDE STAFF + INTERNS THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO PRIDE

TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome from the Board President................................... 3 Welcome from the Executive Director................................7 Welcome from the Mayor of San Francisco.....................11 Welcome from LGBT Elected Officials..............................13 Event Information................................................................... 20 2018 Community Partners....................................................29 2018 Pride Members..............................................................33 2018 Grand Marshals + Guests

Our Lady J................................................................................. 34 Jose Gutierez + Luis Camacho............................................ 35 Gavin Grimm............................................................................. 36 Silas Howard............................................................................. 37 San Francisco Lesbian/Gay Freedom Band..................... 39 Brian “Chickpea” Busta.......................................................... 40 Billy Curtis................................................................................... 41 Kin Folkz..................................................................................... 42 Jewelle Gomez......................................................................... 43 Soni Wolf.................................................................................... 44 FAIR Education Act Implementation Coalition................. 45 Kate Kendell.............................................................................. 46 Ali Marrero-Calderon.............................................................. 47 Pamela Peniston...................................................................... 48 Shaun Haines............................................................................ 49 Jen Orthwein............................................................................50 Aria Sa’id..................................................................................... 51 Carolyn Wysinger.................................................................... 53

Kehlani.........................................................................................55 Main Stage Emcees................................................................57 Main Stage Speakers.............................................................59 Main Stage Entertainers....................................................... 60 Community Stages..................................................................65 “Space as Visibility”.................................................................71 “Sometimes Beautiful, Always Authentic”......................72 “Mr. David Glamamore”.........................................................75 “Toward Abolition”..................................................................78 “On The Shoulders of Our Ancestors”.............................81 “Looking Back, Thinking Forward”...................................83 “Making History in California’s Schools”.........................85 “Aging Brings a Powerful Perspective”............................86 The Pink Triangle.................................................................... 90 “We Are”......................................................................................91 All content contributed/compiled by SF Pride staff, contractors, honorees and other participants unless specifically credited. Opinions expressed by guest authors, contributors and commentators do not necessarily reflect the views of SF Pride or VIA MEDIA. All photos are provided by SF Pride or are courtesy of the subjects. Photo credits are included as provided.

INSIDE PRIDE is published by VIA MEDIA 415.552.8040 • advertise@via.media © Copyright 2018 VIA MEDIA, a division of Caselli Partners LLC • All Rights Reserved

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 1

George F. Ridgely, Jr. executive director Alvaro Gonzalez manager, sponsorship fulfillment and special projects Fred Lopez manager, communications Marsha Levine manager, community relations and facilities Anooshka Gupta administrative and fulfillment intern Jiahao “Jerry” Lu administrative and production intern

SF PRIDE

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2018 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

MICHELLE MEOW

NIKKI CALMA

MANUEL PEREZ

ANIETIE EKANEM

DJ GRAY

AMY SUEYOSHI

JACQUELENE BISHOP

ELIZABETH LANYON

JUSTIN TAYLOR

NGUYEN PHAM

JAKE LITTLE

WILLIAM WALKER

President

Vice President

Treasurer

Secretary

2 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT Welcome to San Francisco! On June 26th, 2015, the US Supreme Court voted 5-4 on the case of Obergefell vs. Hodges, ruling that same-sex marriage is a constitutional right. Thus, marriage equality was extended to all same-sex couples in all fifty states. That Pride weekend in San Francisco was revolutionary. People filled the streets hugging, crying, smiling, and tying the knot. The love was infectious and it truly felt like all of San Francisco was in love. For many of us, it was a measurable step towards full equality as well as optimism for the future. On November 8th, 2016, Donald J. Trump was declared winner of a grueling and controversial presidential campaign. On January 17th, 2017, Americans watched his inauguration as the 45th President of the United States. On January 20th, 2017, the President signed an executive order to begin his plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The President then signed executive orders impacting immigration and travel policies with plans to “build a wall” and ban travelers from specific Muslim countries. This was just the beginning of many executive orders that rolled back on the progress that many activists had spent years fighting for. Since then we’ve seen the fueling of hateful attitudes especially directed at immigrants, people of color, and LGBTQ individuals. In just a few short years following the greatest progress in modern American LGBTQ history, we’ve experienced drastic setbacks on many aspects of our lives. It truly gives us some perspective on how much we have to fight for our rights, and how much we have to fight to keep them. We fought the government’s silence on HIV/AIDS. We fought to repeal a discriminatory policy banning us from serving openly in the military. We have changed state laws allowing us to grow our families. We fought against bills purposely meant to discriminate against us in our ability to teach, use the restroom that corresponds to our identity, or to be out at our workplace. We also fought for and won our right to marry. The community has weathered some of the toughest times and some of our strongest heroes continue to fight. San Francisco Pride’s theme, Generations of Strength, could not be any more perfect for this year. Although these setbacks are very real, we are very fortunate to be a part of an even bigger movement that is focused on equal rights for all of us. As you step out onto the streets of San Francisco, take a look around and notice the people next to you. Maybe you recognize someone you marched alongside during the Women’s March or the March for our Lives. Maybe you’re standing next to one of our city leaders who have worked to ensure we remain a sanctuary city, protecting immigrants despite the federal attacks. Perhaps you’re walking with your company for the first time, a company who has spoken up against so called “religious freedom” bills that attempt to discriminate against the LGBTQ community under the guise of religious beliefs. Most importantly, maybe you’re walking next to someone who has protested, fought back, and spoken up for what they believe. For those joining the fight today, get ready to fill the pages of your journal with notes from those who came before you and notes you’ll leave for someone after you. This is my last and final year serving as board president of this very important organization and cause. It’s time for a fresh new leader to step in and continue to sustain the mission of the organization. Silence equals death. Invisibility equals death. The differences that separate us can also be the similarities that bring us together. Compassion is key, especially for the most marginalized and vulnerable of our communities. It’s not full equality, if it’s not equality with equity. Think of someone else today, someone who doesn’t share your privileges. Pride is about evolution as much as it is about reflection. Don’t forget anyone and always be mindful of those around you, next to you, below you, and above you. We will always fight for our rights and fight to keep them. In love and service to you, thank you all for supporting San Francisco Pride.

Michelle Meow president, board of directors

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 3


COMMUNITY STAGES PRODUCERS + STAFF

CONTRACTORS

Accessibility Information & Assistance................................................. Father River Sims Asian & Pacific Islander Community Pride Stage & Pavilion.........................Nikki Calma Castro Country Club Sober Stage......................... Carlos Perea Cheer San Francisco Stage............................Anthony Chavira Club Papi + Club 21 + Beaux SF + Club BnB present The Don Julio Latin Stage @ Steamworks Pavilion.......................................... Jamie Awad Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing Gathering Space........... Serena Smith Faerie Freedom Village.............................................. A.J. Cook Urban Global Village ............................................ Lisa Williams Joshua Smith Chaim Homo Hip Hop Stage...........................................Ronnie Jones Indie Oasis.....................................................Starr Piwowarski The Latino Wellness Pavilion..............................Jorge Zepeda Leather Alley.......................................................... Rover Spots The OFC LGBTQ Family Garden.............................. Yusni Bakar Queer Youth Space..................Larkin Street Youth Services Seniors Tell All.......................................... Larry “Lare” Nelson Soul of Pride, African Diaspora Stage & Village...................................................... Lisa Williams Sonia Porter Sundance Country-Western Dance Corral..........John Hoffman Tantra Trance................................................Brandon Picardal Women’s Stage................................................. Christie James

Natalie Case gate donations manager

VOLUNTEER STAFF

Scott Shuemake executive producer

Dykes on Bikes.........................................................Kate Brown Hospitality............................................................. Davace Chin Jay Gresham

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Legal............................................................... Sheppard Mullin

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 5

Andy Amaya main stage production coordinator

Andy Copperhall beverage manager Colleen Curlin main stage production manager Jayson DelRosario transcription Jacob Dornan exhibitor relations manager Jim Gong bookkeeper Jennifer Holmes vip party producer Arielle McKee parade safety & route manager Nikki Nolan parade assembly manager Diana Rubio production coordinator Matthew Shambroom beverage manager Eddie Shapiro celebrity/vip manager

Jacob Sperber main stage production manager Jenn Stokes main stage producer Mike Taft parade manager Lisa Williams sponsorship sales manager


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FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Welcome to the 48th Annual San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Pride Celebration and Parade.

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This year our theme is Generations of Strength. We are at a critical juncture in our movement. Fifty-two years ago, the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot erupted in the Tenderloin. Forty years ago, the rainbow flag, now a universal symbol of community, was unfurled for the first time at the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade. That same year, Supervisor Harvey Milk rode triumphantly in our Parade along with a critical mass of activists marching in protest over what would ultimately become the defeated Briggs Initiative. 1978 also saw a large contingent of disability rights advocates marching prominently at the beginning of the Parade, along with the birth of the San Francisco Lesbian/Gay Freedom Band and the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus. Next year cities around the globe will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York City, and SF Pride will celebrate its own golden anniversary in 2020. In addition to our many triumphs we have also suffered great losses, from an entire generation of voices lost to the AIDS epidemic, to the tragic events at Pulse nightclub, to the alarming and reprehensible rise in the murder of our transgender sisters and brothers. In the past year we have also lost many of our SF Pride and Bay Area family members. Soni Wolf, a founding member of Dykes on Bikes and a former SF Pride board member, was selected to be a grand marshal before her untimely passing in April. Julius Turman, another former grand marshal and past SF Pride board member, died unexpectedly in May. Julius was a former Police Commission president, co-chair of the Alice B. Toklas Democratic Club, an attorney, and a fierce advocate for SF Pride. Other key figures in our local movement we lost this past year include author and former Pride Committee organizer Celeste Newbrough and cannabis rights advocate Denis Peron. We cannot afford to take the contributions and sacrifices of our previous leaders for granted. The most significant way we can repay them for their leadership is to fulfill our obligation to teach, empower, and inspire the next generation. Pride is a time when we gather to do just that: carry the torch, amplify our voices, and reinforce our visibility. Strength is found in numbers, so please join us in the streets! We have a spectacular event planned for you. Our enormous Parade and March, one of the largest in the world, will include over 270 contingents. Here, in the pages of Inside Pride, you will find more information on our Community Grand Marshals and Awardees – all local heroes who have made tremendous contributions to our LGBTQ communities – as well as performer and speaker information and other resources to help you enjoy our two-day Celebration and Rally at Civic Center. We have something for everyone, with over twenty stages and community gathering spaces. Join us and enjoy all that we have gathered to entertain and inspire you. With pride,

George F. Ridgely, Jr. executive director

Please consider making a generous donation when you visit the Celebration or go to sfpride.org to give today. A world-class event like SF Pride does not happen every day, and costs over $3 million to produce. We need everyone’s support. SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 7


2018 SPONSORS

SAN FRANCISCO PRIDE IS SUPPORTED IN LARGE PART BY THE GENEROSITY OF OUR SPONSORS.

PRINCIPAL SPONSORS

GRAND SPONSORS

MAJOR SPONSORS

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

ASSOCIATE SPONSORS

8 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


ASSOCIATE SPONSORS [ CONTINUED ]

ADVOCATE SPONSORS

MEDIA PARTNERS

TRAVEL PARTNERS

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 9


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With warmest regards, Mark Farrell Mayor

Mark Farrell Mayor Mark Farrell

Mayor

1 DR. CARLTON B. GOODLETT PLACE, ROOM 200 SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102-4681 TELEPHONE: (415) 554-6141

1 DR. CARLTON B. GOODLETT PLACE, ROOM 200 SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102-4681 1 DR. CARLTON B. G: OODLETT PLACE, ROOM 200 (415) 554-6141 TELEPHONE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102-4681 TELEPHONE: (415) 554-6141

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 11


WIENER

CISNEROS

SHEEHY

MANDELMAN

RANDOLPH

TEMPRANO

GREETINGS FROM YOUR ELECTED LGBT OFFICIALS SCOTT WIENER

STATE SENATOR, CALIFORNIA SENATE DISTRICT 11 “I’m excited to welcome everyone to the 48th Annual Pride Celebration. Our community is truly built on Generations of Strength – both the pioneers of the LGBT movement that fought for the rights we have today, and the current and future generations continuing the work to achieve equality for everyone. As the representative of San Francisco in the California Senate, it’s my honor to fight every day to expand civil rights for the LGBT community, strengthen public health policies to help end new HIV infections in California, and fight for housing so that our LGBT community can afford to live here. Though we have a lot of work to do, Pride is a time to celebrate our community and everything we have accomplished together. Happy Pride!”

JOSÉ CISNEROS

TREASURER, CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO “Welcome to SF Pride 2018. As your Treasurer and an openly gay elected official, I am proud to represent a City which stands so strong for equity, fairness and respect. I will continue the fight for financial justice and economic empowerment. On this day of celebrating diversity, let us stand PROUD together for justice for all.”

JEFF SHEEHY

SUPERVISOR, CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO - DISTRICT 8 “Welcome to San Francisco’s fabulous Pride Celebration! The theme this year is Generations of Strength and I want to thank our LGBTQ community here and LGBTQ communities around the country for our united strength, resilience and determined resistance to the Trump Administration’s hate-filled policies. I also want to thank longtime activist Larry ‘Lare’ Nelson for coming up with this year’s theme. He was remembering the holocaust and that gay men and lesbians were among the first to be targeted. His realization that we have been fighting for our rights across generations is not only profound, but a reminder in these troubled times that we can never take our rights for granted. We must never forget the horrors members of our community have endured and continue to endure, and we must also remember and recognize the contributions of our aging activists who struggle to survive and flourish in our rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods. Let us show our love for everyone in our community and have a fun-filled Pride.”

RAFAEL MANDELMAN

MEMBER, BOARD OF TRUSTEES, CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO “Growing up in San Francisco, I was only vaguely aware that I was living at the epicenter of a social revolution and even less aware that I would be one of the beneficiaries of the queer community’s long struggle for equality and justice. By the time I came out as a college student in the mid-nineties the pathway out of the closet had been cleared for me, the fight against AIDS was well underway, and the prospect of full civil equality for queer people was coming into view. I wish you a joyful Pride 2018 as we honor those generations of queer people who passed onto us the ability to live honest and authentic lives. There’s still much work to be done, but this month let's give special thanks and recognition to the Generations of Strength that have brought us this far. A fabulous Pride 2018 to all!” SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 13


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DUFTY

SANCHEZ

ALEX RANDOLPH

MEMBER, BOARD OF TRUSTEES, CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO “Welcome to San Francisco as we celebrate 48 years of pride and community! Pride Month is one of my favorite times of the year. It allows me to pause for a moment and reflect on our history. This year’s theme Generations of Strength is an important reminder of how far we have come and the agents of change, both known and unknown, that fought for our rights. Pride has always been about building community, being visible, and making our voices heard. At the same time, we have a President that continues to attack the LGBTQ community and calls other human beings ‘animals.’ We have been there before, yet we persisted, we prevailed, and grew only stronger together. So this year, let's learn from our past, resist in the present, and continue to fight for a more inclusive future. Happy Pride everyone!”

TOM TEMPRANO

MEMBER, BOARD OF TRUSTEES, CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO “As San Francisco’s youngest elected official, I want to give you some inside info on what to do during Pride. San Francisco is the gay mecca of the world and our LGBT history dates back to the gold rush! While you’re here I encourage you to explore our rich trans, lesbian and queer neighborhoods and historic spots. Here’s where I’ll be: the Tenderloin Compton’s Historic District, SoMa Leather District, and the Mission – the home of Dolores Park, where you can go for the Trans and Dyke Marches. You can also find me in the Castro. The neighborhood’s historic past as the heart of the 1970s gay movement is on display at places like the GLBT Historical Society and Harvey Milk’s Camera shop, but it’s also a great place to have fun today with plenty of bartenders serving up tasty cocktails with a wink and smile. l see you out there!”

SHANELL WILLIAMS

MEMBER, BOARD OF TRUSTEES, CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO

BEVAN DUFTY

MEMBER, BART BOARD OF DIRECTORS, DISTRICT 9 “Ride with Pride! I’m so honored to serve as a BART Director for San Francisco. This year, we were honored by Equality California as a trailblazing Transit agency in valuing and supporting our LGBTQ riders and employees. BART was among the first to recognize domestic partnerships back in 1994! This year, we became only the 2nd transit agency in the nation to add LGBT Businesses as part of our local and small business preference program. So please ride with Pride!”

MARK SANCHEZ

COMMISSIONER, SAN FRANCISCO BOARD OF EDUCATION

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 15


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EVENT INFORMATION PARADE + MARCH

SUNDAY, JUNE 24 | STARTS AT 10:30 AM MARKET STREET | EMBARCADERO TO CIVIC CENTER

GRANDSTAND TICKETS + ACCESSIBILITY SEATING

The grandstands, located at United Nations Plaza, are the perfect place to enjoy the parade. The Civic Center Muni/BART station is right next to the entrance to the grandstands. Tickets are $40 in advance at sfpride.org or $45 at the entrance on the morning of the parade. Tickets are provided on a sliding scale to those with accessibility needs and their partners. Accessibility seating is also provided for the deaf and hard-of-hearing and the differently-abled at the grandstands. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis and begins at 9:30 a.m.

CELEBRATION + RALLY

SATURDAY, JUNE 23 | 12:00 TO 6:00 PM SUNDAY, JUNE 24 | 11:00 AM TO 6:00 PM CIVIC CENTER PLAZA + SURROUNDING AREA

DONATIONS AT THE GATE

San Francisco Pride is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. We are asking everyone to make a $1.00 to $5.00 donation at the entry gates. We are able to produce this annual event thanks to the generosity of our sponsors and partners along with donations from the general public and the investment of our membership. We partially fund over twenty community-produced stages and venues at the celebration and we partner with more than sixty local nonprofits to whom we have given back nearly $3 million in direct grants in the last twenty years.

ENTRY SCREENING

Everyone entering the celebration will be subject to screening. The following items are prohibited: • any bag or container over 18" x 18" • alcohol, coolers, or glass bottles • illegal drugs or substances • hazardous or toxic materials • firearms, fireworks, explosives • drones • weapons • knives, impact or electric pulse weapons • stunning devices • radios, walkie-talkies, jammers, scanners • portable speakers • any item deemed inappropriate or hazardous by law enforcement or security

INFORMATION BOOTH

The Information Booth is located on Civic Center Plaza at Fulton Street. Here you can pick up a copy of Pocket Pride which contains a map of the celebration showing the locations of stages, venues and amenities.

FIRST AID

Our primary first aid center is located inside Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, via the Grove/Polk entrance. There are also medical foot patrol teams roaming throughout the event. A satellite first aid station is located at the intersection of Hyde and Golden Gate on Sunday.

EXHIBITORS + FOOD

Over 200 exhibitor booths feature a wide variety of artists, local and national businesses, nonprofits, artisans, and food and beverage vendors. 20 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


BEVERAGES

Throughout the celebration site, you’ll find a variety of official beverage booths featuring water, soda, beer, wine and cocktails. Alcohol not purchased from our official beverage booths is not permitted at the celebration. Please drink responsibly and remember to stay hydrated. The Castro Country Club Sober Stage, located on United Nations Plaza, offers a drug and alcohol free zone.

CHILDCARE + ACCESSIBILITY

Free childcare and accessibility services are available; more information is available at the information booth. Accessibility seating and ASL interpretation are provided at the main stage and other stages throughout the event.

KEEP IT CLEAN, KEEP IT GREEN

We are striving to reduce our impact on the environment. Waste collection stations are provided throughout the celebration with clearly marked receptacles for recycling, compost, and landfill. Please help by disposing of your waste in a thoughtful manner.

TOILETS

Portable toilets are clearly identified and available in numerous locations throughout the celebration.

SMOKE-FREE EVENT

The San Francisco LGBT Pride Celebration and Parade is a smoke-free event per San Francisco Health Code, Article 19L.

TRANSPORTATION

We strongly recommend that you take advantage of the Bay Area’s robust public transit system when coming to our event. The Embarcadero, Montgomery, Powell, and Civic Center Muni/ BART stations all serve the parade route. Use Civic Center station for closest access to the grandstands. Use the Civic Center Muni/BART stop to access the celebration. Bicycle valet is also available at McAllister and Hyde.

WELLNESS TIPS

• If you see something, say something. Pay attention to your surroundings and report suspicious activity or unattended packages to the nearest police officer or security personnel. • Bring a friend with you when traveling to new and unfamiliar places. • Keep yourself hydrated and drink plenty of water. Water is available at all official beverage booths. • Do not leave valuables or personal items unattended. • Be good to one another, look out for one another, and speak up for one another.

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 21


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What is TRUVADA for PrEP?

 Get information and support to help reduce risky sexual behavior, such as having fewer TRUVADA for PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) sex partners. is a prescription medicine that is used together  Do not miss any doses of TRUVADA. Missing with safer sex practices to help reduce the risk doses may increase your risk of getting HIV-1 of getting HIV-1 through sex. This use is only for infection. HIV-negative adults who are at high risk of getting  If you do become HIV-1 positive, you need HIV-1. To help determine your risk of getting HIV-1, more medicine than TRUVADA alone to treat talk openly with your healthcare provider about HIV-1. TRUVADA by itself is not a complete your sexual health. treatment for HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take Ask your healthcare provider if you have questions only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to about how to prevent getting HIV. Always practice treat over time. safer sex and use condoms to lower the chance of sexual contact with body fluids. Never reuse or TRUVADA can cause serious side effects: share needles or other items that have body fluids  Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. on them. TRUVADA is not approved to treat HBV. If you have HBV and stop taking TRUVADA, your HBV may IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION suddenly get worse. Do not stop taking TRUVADA What is the most important information I without first talking to your healthcare provider, should know about TRUVADA for PrEP? as they will need to monitor your health. Who should not take TRUVADA for PrEP? Before taking TRUVADA for PrEP:  You must be HIV-negative before you start Do not take TRUVADA for PrEP if you: taking TRUVADA for PrEP. You must get  Already have HIV-1 infection or if you do tested to make sure that you do not already not know your HIV-1 status. If you are HIV-1 have HIV-1. Do not take TRUVADA to reduce the positive, you need to take other medicines with risk of getting HIV-1 unless you are confirmed TRUVADA to treat HIV-1. TRUVADA by itself is not to be HIV-negative. a complete treatment for HIV-1. If you have HIV-1  Many HIV-1 tests can miss HIV-1 infection and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become in a person who has recently become harder to treat over time. infected. If you have flu-like symptoms, you  Also take certain medicines to treat hepatitis B could have recently become infected with infection. HIV-1. Tell your healthcare provider if you had What are the other possible side effects of a flu-like illness within the last month before TRUVADA for PrEP? starting or at any time while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Symptoms of new HIV-1 infection Serious side effects of TRUVADA may also include: include tiredness, fever, joint or muscle aches, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash,  Kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to night sweats, and/or enlarged lymph nodes in check your kidneys before and during treatment the neck or groin. with TRUVADA. If you develop kidney problems, While taking TRUVADA for PrEP: your healthcare provider may tell you to stop taking TRUVADA.  You must continue to use safer sex practices. Just taking TRUVADA for PrEP  Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic may not keep you from getting HIV-1. acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your  You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking healthcare provider right away if you get these TRUVADA for PrEP: symptoms: weakness or being more tired than  Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months. usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath  If you think you were exposed to HIV-1, tell or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and your healthcare provider right away. vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or  To further help reduce your risk of getting lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. HIV-1:  Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can  Know your HIV status and the HIV status of lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right your partners. away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored”  Get tested for other sexually transmitted urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for infections. Other infections make it easier several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area for HIV to infect you. pain. Please see Important Facts about TRUVADA for PrEP including important warnings on the following pages.


We’re adventurous, not reckless.

We know who we are. And we make choices that fit our lives. TRUVADA for PrEP™ is a once-daily prescription medicine that can help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 when taken every day and used together with safer sex practices.  TRUVADA for PrEP is only for adults who are at high risk of getting HIV through sex.  You must be HIV-negative before you start taking TRUVADA for PrEP.

Ask your doctor about your risk of getting HIV-1 infection and if TRUVADA for PrEP may be right for you.  Bone problems, including bone pain, softening, or thinning, which may lead to fractures. Your healthcare provider may do tests to check your bones. Common side effects in people taking TRUVADA for PrEP are stomach-area (abdomen) pain, headache, and decreased weight. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or do not go away. What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking TRUVADA for PrEP?  All your health problems. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider if you have or have had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis.  If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if TRUVADA can harm your unborn baby. If you become pregnant while taking TRUVADA for PrEP, talk to your healthcare provider to decide if you should keep taking TRUVADA.

Learn more at truvada.com

 If you are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. If you become HIV-positive, HIV can be passed to the baby in breast milk.  All the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. TRUVADA may interact with other medicines. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.  If you take certain other medicines with TRUVADA, your healthcare provider may need to check you more often or change your dose. These medicines include certain medicines to treat hepatitis C (HCV) infection. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


IMPORTANT FACTS

(tru-VAH-dah)

This is only a brief summary of important information about taking TRUVADA for PrEPTM (pre-exposure prophylaxis) to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 infection. This does not replace talking to your healthcare provider about your medicine.

MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT TRUVADA FOR PrEP Before starting TRUVADA for PrEP: • You must be HIV-1 negative. You must get tested to make sure that you do not already have HIV-1. Do not take TRUVADA for PrEP to reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 unless you are confirmed to be HIV-1 negative. • Many HIV-1 tests can miss HIV-1 infection in a person who has recently become infected. Symptoms of new HIV-1 infection include flu-like symptoms, tiredness, fever, joint or muscle aches, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, night sweats, and/or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck or groin. Tell your healthcare provider if you have had a flu-like illness within the last month before starting TRUVADA for PrEP. While taking TRUVADA for PrEP: • You must continue to use safer sex practices. Just taking TRUVADA for PrEP may not keep you from getting HIV-1.

• You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you think you were exposed to HIV-1 or have a flu-like illness while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. • If you do become HIV-1 positive, you need more medicine than TRUVADA alone to treat HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to treat over time. • See the “How to Further Reduce Your Risk” section for more information. w

TRUVADA may cause serious side effects, including: • Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. TRUVADA is not approved to treat HBV. If you have HBV, your HBV may suddenly get worse if you stop taking TRUVADA. Do not stop taking TRUVADA without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to check your health regularly for several months.

ABOUT TRUVADA FOR PrEP TRUVADA for PrEP is a prescription medicine used together with safer sex practices to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 through sex. This use is only for HIV-negative adults who are at high risk of getting HIV-1. • To help determine your risk of getting HIV-1, talk openly with your healthcare provider about your sexual health.

Do NOT take TRUVADA for PrEP if you: • Already have HIV-1 infection or if you do not know your HIV-1 status. • Take certain medicines to treat hepatitis B infection.

HOW TO TAKE TRUVADA FOR PrEP • Take 1 tablet once a day, every day, not just when you think you have been exposed to HIV-1. • Do not miss any doses. Missing doses may increase your risk of getting HIV-1 infection. • Use TRUVADA for PrEP together with condoms and safer sex practices.

• Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months. You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP.


POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF TRUVADA FOR PrEP TRUVADA can cause serious side effects, including: • Those in the “Most Important Information About TRUVADA for PrEP" section. • New or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure. • Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat.

• Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain. • Bone problems. Common side effects in people taking TRUVADA for PrEP include stomach-area (abdomen) pain, headache, and decreased weight. These are not all the possible side effects of TRUVADA. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any new symptoms while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Your healthcare provider will need to do tests to monitor your health before and during treatment with TRUVADA for PrEP.

BEFORE TAKING TRUVADA FOR PrEP Tell your healthcare provider if you: • Have or have had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis. • Have any other medical conditions. • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. • Are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. If you become HIV-positive, HIV can pass to the baby in breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take: • Keep a list that includes all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements, and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist. • Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about medicines that should not be taken with TRUVADA for PrEP.

HOW TO FURTHER REDUCE YOUR RISK • Know your HIV status and the HIV status of your partners. • Get tested for other sexually transmitted infections. Other infections make it easier for HIV to infect you.

• Get information and support to help reduce risky sexual behavior, such as having fewer sex partners. • Do not share needles or personal items that can have blood or body fluids on them.

GET MORE INFORMATION • This is only a brief summary of important information about TRUVADA for PrEP. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist to learn more, including how to prevent HIV infection.

• Go to start.truvada.com or call 1-800-GILEAD-5 • If you need help paying for your medicine, visit start.truvada.com for program information.

TRUVADA FOR PREP, the TRUVADA FOR PREP Logo, the TRUVADA Blue Pill Design, TRUVADA, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. All other marks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners. Version date: April 2017 © 2017 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. TVDC0136 08/17


2018 COMMUNITY PARTNERS

The San Francisco Pride Community Partner Program is a beneficiary program that exemplifies SF Pride’s commitment to community investment. Since 1997, SF Pride has been able to grant nearly $3M to our community partners thanks to donations made at our event gates and purchases made at our beverage booths. Community partners provide SF Pride with volunteers the weekend of the event and, in return, SF Pride awards the organizations with a grant based on patron support. When you donate at the gate or purchase a beverage at one of our official beverage booths, you provide critical support to local charities, including LGBTQIA organizations and those organizations working on issues related to HIV/AIDS, cancer, homelessness and animal welfare. For nearly twenty years, SF Pride’s Community Partner Program has been a primary source of funding that serves to strengthen our communities and build a strong future for the celebration and parade.

2018 COMMUNITY PARTNERS Alameda County Leather Corps American Legion, Post 315 Bay Area Derby Bayard Rustin LGBT Coalition Berkeley All Blues Rugby Berkeley Community Health Project Berkeley Humane California Men's Gatherings - Bay Area California Prostitute Education Project Castro Country Club Center for Lao Studies Cheer for Life City of Refuge UCC Court of the Great Northwest Imperial Empire Deaf Counseling, Advocacy & Referral Agency Foggy City Dancers Folsom Street Events Freedom In Christ Church Grand Ducal Council of San Francisco Healing Waters Wilderness Adventures Imperial Council of San Francisco, Inc Imperial San Joaquin Delta Empire Imperial Star Empire Inc. Inferno Softball (program of Pass, Inc) Lesbian Gay Chorus of San Francisco

Metropolitan Community Church San Francisco Northern California Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Oakland LGBTQ Community Center Oakland Pride Outward Bound California Pagan Alliance Parable of the Sower Intentional Community Cooperative San Francisco Gay Basketball Association San Francisco Gay Softball League San Francisco Impact Partners San Francisco Lesbian/Gay Freedom Band San Francisco Spikes Soccer Club San Francisco Tsunami Water Polo San Francisco Sex Information SF Mix DNA Silicon Valley Softball League Success Center San Francisco Temenos Catholic Worker Tenderloin Tessie Holiday Dinners The Discovery Community, Inc. TurnOut Veterans For Peace, Chapter 69 - List as of May 31, 2018

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 29


AFTER

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(415) 931-9881 Celebrate! Have Dr. Rosanelli perform your hair restoration procedure and receive a 2-night stay in the Castro.

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BEFORE


col·um·bar·i·um / käl m’berē m / e

e

Meet Your Neighbors

NOUN a room or building with niches for funeral urns to be stored.

san francisco

Columbariu M Funeral Home

You’re invited to mix and mingle with the people who will one day share your permanent San Francisco address. and formerly the Neptune Society Wine & Cheese Open House

Friday,Call JulyRobert 19, 2013 2—5pm Hasty

RSVP Required: (415) 752-8791 (415) 771-0717

FD1306

One Loraine Court 1 Loraine Court—San Francisco, CA 94118 between Stanyan & Arguello

COA 660

San Francisco’s only full service funeral home & cemetery


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BECOME A MEMBER OF SF PRIDE! San Francisco Pride, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, is a pioneer in the global Pride movement. Every year we welcome nearly one million attendees to our Celebration and Parade, which form the heart of Pride-month festivities in San Francisco. Not only do we use these moments to educate, celebrate, commemorate, and continue our struggle for true liberation, but we also raise funds for fellow nonprofits. The budget to produce the Celebration and Parade is nearly $3M annually. At our core, we believe the festival and parade should be affordable and accessible for everyone in our diverse communities. Your membership helps us to attain all of these goals, and also gives you the opportunity to participate in our annual decision making. Please consider becoming a member today, visit sfpride.org for more information.

2018 MEMBERS: Marion Abdullah • Thomas Alfieri • Francis Almanzor • Sophia Andr • Jay Austin

Mariva Aviram • Jamie Awad • Jon Baltycki • Kevin Bard • Adam Baumgartner • Bruce Beaudette Lyle Beckman • Alan Beckstead • Gene Bidwell • Lori Bilella • Uli Bilke • Jacquelene Bishop • Jennifer Bishop • Nikolas Blanchet • Michael Blum • Bernadette Bohan • Stephen Bown • Michael Boylan Tab Buckner • Bob Burnside • Sophia Buser • Brian Busta • Joey Cain • Nikki Calma • Krystle Cansino Patrick Carney • Shannon Carroll • Orawan Chanpanya • Anthony Chavira • Jeff Chun • Debra Cleaver Afik Cohen • Kelly Condon • Michael Cooper • Larry Crickenberger • Gemma Cunanan David Currie • Mai Dam • Nhung Dam • Alexander Damalas • Jayson Del Rosario • Mamadou Diallo Bob Dockendorff • Jennifer Dowdy • Austin Efurd • Anietie Ekanem • Susan Englander • Louise Fischer • Kin Folkz • Suzanne Ford • Hunter Fox • Daniel Freeman • Jeffrey Fried • Terry Frye Christopher G • Peter Gallotta • Rick Gerharter • Fabien Gestas • Andrew Gibbons • James Gillis Danielle Goodman-Shaver • Steven Gourlay • Samantha Grant • Samuel Gray Hinojosa • Mariia Gribacheva • Steven Guilliams • Jose Gutierrez • Juan Raul Gutierrez • Shaun Haines • Douglas Hanlin • James Harrison • Rick Hauptman • Michael Hemes • Kenneth Henderson • Rosa Hernandez David Herrera • James Hobson • Perry Hoffman • Han Ming How • Joyde M. Hu • Monique Isom Harry Jacobs • Carlin Jacoby • Jayson Jaynes • Joseph Jelincic • Miguel Jimenez • Nicholas Jiminez Bruce Johnson • Reggie Johnson • Marcus Jung • Ken Katen • Gregory Keech • Nicole Kim • Elinor Knechel • Robert Krout • William Ktsanes • Yuliia Kubalska • Richard Kurylo • Jennifer Lane • Elizabeth Lanyon • William Todd Leachman • Benjamin Leong • Kaleb Lewis • Larry Ligouri • Alicia Linsangan Justin Lippi • William Lipsky • Jacob Little • Kim Edison Manapat • Marissa Marez • Justin Matthews Sean Maulding • Mitch Mayne • KirkLin Mayr • David Mcbroome • Frank McGinness • Leatha McGirt Arielle McKee • Kyle McMillen • Richard Mendoza • Michelle Meow • Brian Metzler • Joseph Metzler Joseph Mills • Dena Murr • Donald Myers • Arzo Nalamy • Melanie Nathan • Lawrence Nelson Michael Nulty • James Oerther • Jonathan Ojinaga • Brooke Oliver • Amy Ongiri • Meredith Orthwein Ronda Pacheco • Michael Padgett • Gil Padia • Scott Pando • Bryan Pangilinan • Timothy Parenteau Benjamin Patterson • Jeffrey Pekrul • Josi Perez • Manuel Alejandro Perez • Jim Peros • Joan Pettijohn • Nguyen 'Win' Pham • Ren Phoenix • Brian Probst • David Puzey • Roman Ralovets Marjorie RankinGoppert • Martin Rawlings-Fein • Jason Red • Chandra Redack • Lindsey Reimlinger Nina Roberts • Robert Roberts • Rich Russo • Donna Sachet • Jesse Sanford • Mark Sanford Arup Sarkar • Nattawod Satee • Venus Savage • lloyd Schofield • Matthew Shambroom • Austin Shelton • Lawrence Shine • Grant Shreiner • Shawn Silva-Salinas • John R Silverman • Bruce Sinor Joshua Smith • Serena Smith • Reggie Snowden • Robert Sokol • David Spiciarich • Katherine Staats Jarrod Stanley • Jeff Stiarwalt • Cameron Stiehl • John Stover • Amy Sueyoshi • Jon Sugar Jack Sugrue • Betty Sullivan • Matthew Sullivan • Bebe Sweetbriar • Thom Taft • Atefeh Taheri Susan + Glynis Takalo • Tina Takemoto • Adam Taylor • Justin Taylor • Frederick Teti • Desiree Thompson Mitcho Thompson • Yuki Togawa • Brittany Uno • Christopher Vasquez • Johnoscar Villa • Gary Virginia John Vlahides • Saysamone Vongkoth • Christopher Waddling • Donald Wagda • Joe Wagenhofer Eric Wagner • William Walker • Raoni Washburn • Bill Weber • John Weber • Lisa Williams • Patrice Williams • Robert H Williams • Ronnie Willis • Ashleigh Wilson • Jokie X Wilson • Kristen Wong Ronald Wong • Suhai Yehuza • List as of May 31, 2018 SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 33


image: troy pes

OUR LADY J

CELEBRITY GRAND MARSHAL Our Lady J is a writer and producer on Ryan Murphy's dancemusical television series Pose. After a career of making music in both the pop and classical worlds (Sia, American Ballet Theatre, Mark Morris Dance Group), Our Lady J transitioned to writing and producing on the Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning series Transparent. Our Lady J holds the honor of being the first out trans woman to perform at Carnegie Hall, as well as the first out trans writer to be nominated for a Writers Guild Award. She has been featured on Out magazine's “Out 100” and the Huffington Post list of “transgender icons.” After her appearance in the Parade and March, Our Lady J will perform a selection of songs on the Main Stage, at the steps of majestic City Hall.

34 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


JOSE & LUIS

CELEBRITY GRAND MARSHALS Jose Gutierez and Luis Camacho, of The Legendary House of Xtravaganza, choreographed the video for worldwide number one hit “Vogue,” which earned them a nomination for Best Choreography in a Video at the 1990 MTV Video Music Awards. They were both dancers in Madonna’s “Blonde Ambition” World Tour. Shortly after their appearances in the film Madonna: Truth or Dare, the duo was signed to a record deal as “Jose & Luis.” Their single “Queen’s English” was widely known on dance floors and on the Billboard dance charts. Gutierez and Camacho were featured in the 2016 film Strike a Pose, which followed up on the dancers of Truth or Dare. The critically-acclaimed documentary is a dramatic tale about overcoming shame and finding the courage to be who you are. Jose Gutierez, artistically known as Jose Xtravaganza, began perfecting the craft of vogue as a member of The Legendary House of Xtravaganza. As a choreographer, Jose has worked with such artists as Madonna, Aretha Franklin, and the Rolling Stones. Jose is the current Father of The Legendary House of Xtravaganza, which he rules with an iron fist under a soft glove. Luis Camacho made a name for himself in the NYC ballroom scene, where he won several trophies at vogue balls in the 1980s. As a member of The Legendary House of Xtravaganza, he was in the pulse of dance, music, visual arts, nightlife, and fashion way before he caught the eye of superstar Madonna. Luis uses his talents to give back to the community, and was the recipient of the 2017 Entertainment AIDS Alliance Vanguard Award.

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SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 35

Amazon is an Equal Opportunity Employer


image: aclu/scout tufankjian

GAVIN GRIMM

SPECIAL GUEST Gavin Grimm is a 19-year-old recent high school graduate from Gloucester, Virginia. He is transgender. Gavin and his mother notified administrators of his male gender identity at the beginning of his sophomore year so that he could socially transition in all aspects of his life. With permission from school administrators, Gavin used the boys’ restroom for almost two months without any incident. But after receiving complaints from some parents and residents of Gloucester County, the school board adopted a new policy banning Gavin from using the boys’ restrooms on December 9, 2014, by a vote of 6-1, despite warnings from the ACLU. The ACLU filed a federal lawsuit on Gavin’s behalf. The lawsuit argues the bathroom policy is unconstitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment and violates Title IX of the US Education Amendments of 1972, a federal law prohibiting sex discrimination by schools. After a series of progressive court appearances, Gavin’s case was set to be heard by the Supreme Court. But the Supreme Court announced that it is sending Gavin's case back to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals to be reconsidered. Gavin graduated high school in June 2017 – still unable to use the same restroom as other boys. On May 22, 2018, the US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia denied the school district's request to dismiss the case, agreed with the ACLU that the school violated the rights of transgender students under Title IX, and ordered a settlement conference. Gavin is now waiting to find out whether the school will try to appeal or settle the case. Gavin Grimm will be speaking about his experiences from the Main Stage on Sunday, June 24.

36 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


SILAS HOWARD

SPECIAL GUEST Silas Howard is an award-winning director and writer, with a longtime focus in telling honest, boundary-shattering narratives filled with groundbreaking characters, as evident in his recent work directing episodes of Amazon’s Emmy award-winning Transparent, NBC’s Emmy award-winning This Is Us, Freeform’s The Fosters, MTV’s Faking It, and FX's upcoming POSE. Howard began his career crafting stories that challenged society’s conventional boundaries. His first feature film, By Hook or By Crook, was a Sundance Film Festival premiere and five-time Best Feature winner. After this success, Howard diversified into directing documentaries, music videos, web series, and television. His documentary, What I Love About Dying, premiered at Sundance. His second feature, Sunset Stories, was awarded best ensemble cast by the LA Asian Pacific Film Festival and best director at CAAM Festival. Sticks & Stones, based on the legendary San Francisco transgender chanteuse Bambi Lake, was a recipient of the Horizon Completion grant and is currently playing film festivals internationally. The San Francisco Film Society, in partnership with the Kenneth Rainin Foundation, awarded Howard their 2015 Filmmaking Grant to produce his upcoming feature, The Lusty, about the world’s first exotic dancers’ union. Silas Howard received his MFA at UCLA in directing and is a Film Independent Directors Lab Fellow, Nantucket Screenwriting Colony Fellow, the 2014-2015 Arthur Levitt Fellow at Williams College and a 2015 Guggenheim Fellow.

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 37


SAN FRANCISCO LESBIAN/GAY FREEDOM BAND

Let’s COMMUNITY GRAND MARSHAL | ORGANIZATION Selected by Public Vote

The San Francisco Lesbian/Gay Freedom Band is the first openly gay musical organization in the world, inspiring the formation of all other LGBTQ bands, choruses, and other groups around the globe. Locally, SFLGFB is the Official Band of San Francisco, having been given that honor by two different mayors. Founded in 1978 by Jon Sims at the height of Anita Bryant’s anti-gay crusade, the Band first appeared when it marched up Market Street behind Harvey Milk’s car in that year’s San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade, a scene later recreated in the Oscar-winning film Milk. The Band continues to be active in the community, performing regularly at community concerts and in parades throughout the Bay Area. The Band’s annual Dance-Along Nutcracker®, first performed in 1985, remains a holiday favorite. For forty years, the Band has been committed to community service. Their mission statement is to provide “for the education and musical development of its members, promote visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities, and with its allies, foster understanding among diverse communities through public performance.” The Band meets their mission through over forty performances a year, ranging from LGBT Pride events at elementary schools, to civic events around the Bay Area and beyond. “With the newest generation of activists, whether they are the youngest members of the Band or from the community at large, there is a huge energy to preserve the advances that our community has achieved, while at the same time fighting the newest fights for gender identity and intersectionality that are the newest battlegrounds for LGBT rights”

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 39

Embrace Zero Waste


BRIAN “CHICKPEA” BUSTA

1220 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO (415) 626-8590 RESERVATIONS: (415) 626 - 1592 1220SAMS@GMAIL.COM

ntitled-11 1

5/30/18

40 th

G NNG

LEEBBRRAATT I CCEEL O OU URR I

Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner! YYE EA ARR

3991-A 17 TH STREET MARKET @ CASTRO

415.864.9795

COMMUNITY GRAND MARSHAL

Selected by the San Francisco Pride Membership

Brian “Chickpea” Busta has been bringing light, laughter, art, and music to San Francisco’s LGBTQ community since 1989. Brian has helped to raise tens of thousands of dollars for the community, brought levity during some of its darkest hours, and nurtured generations of young queer artists. A few examples of Brian’s 12:20 PM most impactful work follow below: Gay Glow Street Theater started in 1989 with a spare black light and a day-glo cutout in an apartment window above 18th and Castro. It soon evolved into a series of public theater shows satirizing current events. The guerrilla shows were at times so large that Castro Street would shut down during performances. The Temple Whores grew out of Radical Faerie gatherings at Wolf Creek. They brought a weekly drumming circle to the Castro, and music to the ACT-UP rallies and demos from 1989 to 1995. The Temple Whores’ energy made the pain more bearable. Brian also performs as a zany drag clown named Amber Alert. She is a study in contradiction, known both for being shockingly ugly and exceptionally kind. In 2007, Brian was asked to bring new energy to the Ducal Court, a local queer social and 501(c)(3) organization that’s been active since before Stonewall. Brian became The Disco Diamond Duke, and organized events that attracted a new generation of participants. Brian is the past president and current art director for Comfort & Joy and he created their signature day-glo look. Brian creates new installations for every Comfort & Joy dance party and for Burning Man, inspiring thousands. In fact, the Comfort & Joy camp is visible from space, something that makes Brian proud. The City of San Francisco declared “Brian ‘Chickpea’ Busta Day” on June 22, 2013. 40 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


BILLY CURTIS

Selected by the SF Pride Board of Directors

Billy Curtis is a committed community activist and advocate. He has lived in San Francisco for over 25 years. In 1999, Billy was hired as UC Berkeley’s first full time Director for LGBT Resources. He is currently the director of the university’s Gender Equity Resource Center. Among his accomplishments at Berkeley are the implementation of the annual Lavender Graduation, advocacy for Trans inclusive health benefits, facilities, athletic policies, and creating a more trans inclusive workplace at Cal. In 2005, Billy co-authored the pioneering article “Transgender Issues on College Campuses,” which provided universities a blueprint for creating Trans inclusive spaces. He provides training on gender identity inclusion to campus departments and to agencies and businesses across the nation. In 2012, he received the East Bay Stonewall Democratic Club Trailblazer Award. He has volunteered his time on a number of boards of directors, including Vitality, a network of LGBT business professionals, and the SF LGBT Center. He also served on the LGBT Advisory Committee of the SF Human Rights Commission, volunteered with Project Open Hand, and is a past AIDS Lifecycle Rider. In recent years, Billy has acted in an advisory role to the DMARCO Foundation which serves to advance LGBTIQSA rights in the Bahamas and across the Caribbean. He also appears in the ground-breaking documentary The Underneath: Transgender in the Bahamas. “In spite of threats of violence, attacks on liberty, and lies told about us, more and more LGBTQ folks are coming out and speaking up.”

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SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 41

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KIN FOLKZ

GENERATIONS OF

STRENGTH

COMMUNITY GRAND MARSHAL PLAY WITHIN YOUR LIMITS. IF YOU THINK YOU HAVE A GAMBLING PROBLEM, CALL 1-800-GAMBLER FOR HELP. ROHNERT PARK, CA. © 2018 GRATON RESORT & CASINO

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Selected by Public Vote

Kin Folkz is an award-winning educator, human rights artivist, author, community catalyst, founder of the Oakland Pride Creative Arts & Film Fest, the founder of the Oakland Queer +Trans Open Mic, a BiNet USA National Board Member, a member of Black Lives Matter Bay Area and Queer Black Lives Matter. With a MA in Ethnic Studies (SFSU) and both a MA and PhD in Education (Stanford), Kin's work has been presented within and outside of the US including Japan, South Africa, and Jamaica. Kin is the CEO and co-founder of SpectrumQueerMedia.com (SQM) - an internationally recognized LGBTQIA rights, media and creative arts advocacy organization. SQM promotes social justice, visibility and voice for all marginalized LGBTQIA people and allies in the areas of INTERSECTIONAL JUSTICE, RACIAL EQUITY, IMMIGRANT RIGHTS and HOLISTIC WELLNESS. Kin has led TLGBQ+ Rights and Equity workshops in schools, colleges, universities and conferences, taught at Stanford, and consulted with SFUSD. Kin leads mindfulness workshops for businesses and organizations, including NASA and The Oakland LGBTQ Center. Kin coordinates direct actions as a BLM and a Black Queer Rights (TLGBQ+ POC) Bay Area organizer, such as Vigil for Black Lives (in Oakland) and Black Out (in the Castro). In addition to grassroots work, Kin cofounded REVOLVE Creative Arts + Film Fest, The Oakland Pride Run, and facilitates the weekly Oakland LGBTQ+ Open Mic - an internationally recognized collective self-care circle. “I ask that our community advocate for the health, housing, justice and employment rights of marginalized and targeted LGBTQIA+ people - especially transitional aged youth, elders and Black and Indigenous Trans Women as the highest priority.”

42 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


image: irene young

JEWELLE GOMEZ

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT GRAND MARSHAL Selected by the SF Pride Board of Directors

Jewelle Gomez was born in Boston where she was raised by her great grandmother. She graduated from Northeastern University, and then from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She is the author of seven books, including the double Lambda Literary Award winning vampire novel, The Gilda Stories, whose 25th anniversary edition was recently published by City Lights Books. She’s written for numerous publications including the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Village Voice, Ms. magazine, Black Scholar, Advocate, and San Francisco Bay Times. She’s playwright in residence at New Conservatory Theatre Center, where her next play, Unpacking in Ptown, will open the 40th anniversary season in 2021. She was the recipient of a NEA Fellowship in Literature and two California Arts Council Artist in Residence grants. In 2017 she received the Barbary Coast Trailblazer Award from LitQuake. She was on the founding boards of GLAAD, the Astraea Lesbian Foundation, and the Open Meadows Foundation. She was previously the director of grants at the San Francisco Arts Commission and Horizons Foundation. Until recently she was the president of the San Francisco Public Library Commission. “I’m thrilled that younger people have been sparked to activism over the past decade, both in the Queer community and in the broader-based political scene. Seeing their new approaches and ideas makes the future feel brighter.”

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 43

©2018 Ménage à Trois Winery, St. Helena, CA 94574


SONI WOLF

On Wednesday, April 25, 2018, Soni S.H.S. Wolf died peacefully of natural causes. She lived to be 69 years old. Soni is survived by Dykes on Bikes around the world who follow in her footsteps. Soni was a fierce advocate and challenged us all to live as loud as the motorcycles that lead our Pride Parade every year. Upon learning that the Board of Directors for San Francisco Pride selected Soni as a Community Grand Marshal, she was deeply touched and honored. Kate Brown, spokesperson for San Francisco Dykes on Bikes had this to say: “Soni leaves an indelible mark on history and especially on those who shared her daily life. Soni steadfastly refused to accept ‘Dyke’ as an epithet. She blazed the trail for the rest of us in courage and LGBTQ pride.” Dykes on Bikes announced: “Soni will be represented in this year’s Parade by her closest friends carrying the historic and beautifully painted gas tank from the motorcycle Soni rode in San Francisco in the late 1970s.” In addition, Soni’s contributions will be celebrated on the Main Stage on Sunday, June 24. We hope you will join us in honoring Soni’s memory.

image: jack ottaway

IN MEMORIAM

COMMUNITY GRAND MARSHAL Selected by the SF Pride Board of Directors

Soni Wolf is an inspiring mother of the movement for lesbian pride and dignity. Soni steadfastly helped define a unique part of the LGBTQ community, never backing down from the word “Dyke,” transforming an epithet to a symbol of power. As a founding member of Dykes on Bikes®, Soni began riding with her sisters in the SF Pride Parade in the late 1970s, shortly after the movement for women’s empowerment and visibility brought Dykes on Bikes to the parade’s front. The window-rattling rumble of hundreds of motorcycles carrying decked-out dykes down Market Street exploded globally, with Dykes on Bikes chapters now leading LGBTQ parades around the world. During the forty-plus years that Soni was with Dykes on Bikes, she helped the organization evolve into a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, spearheading the group’s mission to create a national and international community of women motorcyclists supporting philanthropic endeavors in LGBTQ communities. She’s mentored many Dykes on Bikes, been a continuous leader in the community, and was sainted by The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence® in 2016. Over fourteen years, Soni guided a team of lawyers led by Brooke Oliver at 50 Balmy Law, who worked pro bono to successfully argue, all the way to the US Supreme Court twice, that the trademark “Dykes on Bikes” signifies pride within our community and is protected as political speech. The Dykes on Bikes legal strategy helped overturn an unconstitutional law. Soni was a proud veteran of the United States Air Force and moved here in the 1970s, never imagining she would find herself an advocate and leader in an historic movement for equality. The iconic imagery, words, and legacy of Dykes on Bikes would not be what they are today without Soni Wolf. 44 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


FAIR EDUCATION ACT IMPLEMENTATION COALITION

COMMEMORATION AWARD JOSÉ JULIO SARRIA HISTORY MAKER AWARD

LOVE IS HERE TO STAY.

Awarded to Bay Area people who make extraordinary changes in the way society views the LGBTQ community.

Convened in 2014 by Our Family Coalition, over half a dozen organizations comprise the FAIR Education Act Implementation Coalition, and work to see this historic education reform thoroughly implemented across California; from its status in legislation, to curricular framework approval and textbook adoption, to district-by-school and classroom-by-classroom implementation. The FAIR Education Act, SB 48 (Leno), was signed into law on July 14, 2011, and went into effect on January 1, 2012. It amends California Education Code to include the Fair, Accurate, Inclusive and Respectful reference to contributions by people with disabilities and members of the LGBT community in history and social studies curriculum. California is the only state in the nation to have such LGBT-inclusive legislation in place. Main agencies involved with the Implementation Coalition are Our Family Coalition, The GSA Network, The Committee on LGBT History, the LA LGBT Center, NCLR, Equality California, and the Safe Schools Coalition. “What inspires us most about the young folks making change in our communities is that their vision extends so far beyond our own. They’re transforming hope about the future into conviction, and turning the possible into what’s happening right now. They’re working from a presumption that our struggles are intertwined, that all queer folks have multiple, intersectional identities, and that none of us are free until we all are. That’s inspiring.”

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KATE KENDELL

Everyone deserves to be seen, heard, and included. Salesforce is proud to support the LGBTQ community.

#EqualityForAlL Salesforce.com/Equality

COMMEMORATION AWARD TEDDY WITHERINGTON AWARD

Recognizing those individuals who have contributed a longstanding, large body of work to the LGBTQ community.

Kate Kendell leads the National Center for Lesbian Rights, a national legal organization committed to advancing the civil and human rights of LGBTQ people and their families through litigation, public policy advocacy, and public education. Kate grew up Mormon in Utah and received her J.D. degree from the University of Utah College of Law in 1988. After a few years as a corporate attorney she was named the first staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Utah. In 1994 she accepted the position as Legal Director with the National Center for Lesbian Rights and made the move to San Francisco. In 1996 Kate was named as NCLR’s Executive Director. Under Kate’s leadership, NCLR won the California marriage equality case in 2008 and was later part of the team of attorneys to secure national marriage equality in the 2015 US Supreme Court case Obergefell v. Hodges. During Kate’s 24-year career, NCLR’s budget has grown from $500,000 to more than $5M, the number of staff members has increased by five, and the organization now has both West Coast and East Coast offices in San Francisco and Washington, D.C. Kate recently announced that she will be stepping down from her role as Executive Director at the end of this year. “My work has been the honor of my life. The entire NCLR team has really bent that arch of the moral universe to justice. More LGBTQ people in this nation are able to live better and fuller lives, free from stigma because of NCLR’s work over the past two decades.”

46 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


ALI MARRERO-CALDERON SAN FRANCISCOʼS BEST DESIGNER CONSIGNMENT

WOMENʼS 2147 UNION ST COW HOLLOW

COMMEMORATION AWARD GILBERT BAKER PRIDE FOUNDER’S AWARD

MENʼS 2231 MARKET ST THE CASTRO

For those who have made a significant and historical impact on the LGBTQ community and the movement for LGBTQ rights.

Ali Marrero-Calderon was born in Puerto Rico in 1948. Her father was in the US military so she lived most of her life in the US. Ali was aware of her queerness at the age of eight. She came to the Oakland side of the Bay at fifteen and went back to Puerto Rico after high school. After the Stonewall riots of 1969, when she saw Puerto Rican drag queens, lesbians, and men beaten by the New York City police on the news, she came back to the Bay Area. When Ali arrived, she was desperate to find women like her. After meeting Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, Ali became involved with the Gay Rights movement, attending gay rap groups with other lesbians and gay men, but she found no other ‘Rican “gays” around. She started going to the bars, cuz that was where we could go. In 1974, Ali joined GENTE, the first Lesbian of Color Organization in California. GENTE met with a lot of resistance from the lesbian bar owners at the time, which began the work of fighting racism wherever GENTE went. From the mid-70s onward, Ali has spoken out against any and all anti-gay initiatives. Ali has belonged to Dykes on Bikes since 1976 and was their first Emeritus member. Today, as part of the National Steering Committee of OLOC (Old Lesbians Organizing for Change), Ali fights for the rights of Old Lesbians, especially Old Lesbians of Color. “My dream is to see a National Lesbian of Color Gathering – with our music, spoken word, workshops, and a safe space to grow.” SUIGENERISCONSIGNMENT.COM

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 47


PAMELA PENISTON

COMMEMORATION AWARD THE AUDREY JOSEPH LGBTQ ENTERTAINMENT AWARD

For those who have made a significant and historical impact or left an indelible impression on the LGBTQ community and the movement for LGBTQ rights, through their artistic expression, or through their contribution within the entertainment industry.

It’s our differences that make us great. No matter what you value, we’re here to help protect it with respect and professionalism. Here to help life go right. CONTACT AN AGENT TODAY. ®

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Pamela Peniston is a Founding Member and Artistic Director of the Queer Cultural Center (Qcc). She was an initial member of Mayor Agnos’ Cultural Affairs Task Force in 1989, which helped to establish the guidelines for the Cultural Equity Grants Program at the San Francisco Arts Commission. Prior to Qcc, Pamela designed sets for National and Bay Area theatrical and dance companies. She was nominated for an OBIE award and received Critic’s Circle Awards for her set designs. She received gold medals from the Broadcast Design Association for Art Direction at The Weather Channel. Since 1998, Pamela has provided visionary leadership for Qcc’s iconic program, the National Queer Arts Festival – now celebrating its 21st year – commissioned generations of LGBTQI artists and artists of color, and provided opportunities for them to discover their voices and connect with their communities. Pamela and Qcc have mentored and inspired queer artists who have become leaders and changed the cultural landscape of queer arts across the nation. “Encouraging artists to pursue their vision and shape it into something new has been a great gift to me.”

48 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


SHAUN HAINES

Celebrate love Happy Pride from your allies at Oath

HERITAGE OF PRIDE PRIDE COMMUNITY AWARD

For outstanding service to LGBTQ communities.

Shaun Haines is a native of San Francisco and the founder of San Francisco Impact Partners. Shaun knows our people need our support, and he is here to see that we get it. He knows the experience of being a homeless youth and adult. He knows the difficulty and the challenges associated with getting a job because of discrimination our most vulnerable communities often experience. He knows what it is to feel unsafe. Shaun works to produce events to support and provide resources for our community. He serves on the San Francisco LGBT Cultural Heritage Strategy Equity and Economic Development Committee, to ensure that we always have a place in our city. Serving on the San Francisco Police Chief’s LGBT Forum and Castro Community on Patrol, Shaun works to address our safety concerns. Supporting the Stop the Violence Campaign, he is working to identify Safe Zones for LGBTQ people. He is supporting our Trans, Leather, and Castro cultural districts to commemorate the heritage of our people. In concert with LGBT leaders, Shaun has been a voice and leader developing anti-racism resources. Working together to fight injustices, our efforts will preserve our city’s vibrant LGBT heritage, culture, diversity, and spaces. Shaun is committed to bringing you into the efforts that respond to our needs. “The most significant challenge now facing our LGBT community is the preservation of our community and spaces. Our heritage and history must be secured for future generations to understand best how our past and present will impact our future together.”

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 49


JEN ORTHWEIN

HERITAGE OF PRIDE PRIDE FREEDOM AWARD

For outstanding contributions to advancing civil rights and freedom for LGBTQ people

Jen began her career in San Francisco in the late 1990s as a case manager serving people living with HIV. Most of her clients were LGBTQ, and many were stuck in the revolving door between jail and community mental health systems. Her frustration with working within these dysfunctional systems led her to pursue a law degree and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology. After completing her degrees, Jen practiced as a psychologist in the California prison and state hospital systems, and opened a private forensic consulting practice. However, she found her skill set was more effective in the civil rights arena. She changed course and began working as a civil rights attorney on legal and policy issues related to transgender and gender variant individuals, particularly those impacted by the criminal justice system. She helped launch, and served as Senior Counsel for, the Detention Project at Transgender Law Center. Among other advocacy, she assisted in the representation of two California prisoners whose cases were the impetus for access to gender affirming surgery and gender expression for transgender people in California prisons. This past year, Jen and her law partner Felicia Medina launched Medina Orthwein LLP, a queer owned, public interest civil rights law firm that focuses on fighting employment discrimination and LGBTQ civil rights violations in the criminal justice system. “I’m deeply moved by the way the generations before us led with love. Love builds resilience and community.”

50 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


ARIA SA’ID

HERITAGE OF PRIDE 10 YEARS OF SERVICE AWARD

For those organizations, individuals, or other entities that have contributed at least ten years of consecutive service to the LGBTQ community.

Aria Sa’id is a writer, cultural icon, policy strategist, and the Founder/Director of the Kween Culture Initiative. As an awardwinning public policy advocate, she co-founded the world’s first transgender cultural district, the Compton’s Cultural District. She was a co-sponsor of SB 310: Name and Dignity Act for Incarcerated Transgender People, and served as lobbyist for SB 179: Gender Recognition Act - both laws being authored by Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins. In addition, she was a lead advocate for the “Prioritizing Safety for Sex Workers” bulletin with the San Francisco Police Department and continuing in the 2018 state legislation cycle (AB 2243, ASM Friedman). She is a 2016-2017 Policy Fellow Alum of the Women’s Foundation of California’s Women’s Policy Institute; and Sojourner Truth Fellow Alum of Auburn Theological Seminary in New York. She is featured in numerous media platforms for her advocacy including SF Weekly, Buzzfeed, The Huffington Post, Vice, the San Francisco Examiner, and The Advocate for her advocacy efforts. She currently serves as the LGBT Policy Advisor for the San Francisco Human Rights Commission. “I am proud of starting a nonprofit project, Kween Culture Initiative, that focuses on truly exciting work - the cultural equity of transgender women of color. Black and Latinx trans women have contributed so greatly to popular culture and social justice, and many of those experiences go unacknowledged or dismissed. This effort is to build social empowerment for queer and trans people of color, and to increase cultural dialogue and artistic engagement with trans women of color.” SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 51


the official sf pride vip party at city hall

UNDER THE ROTUNDA hosted bar || catering by whole foods market

SUNDAY | JUNE 24

2:00 to 5:00

Three fantastic rooms of non-stop entertainment, featuring the South Light Court Drag Cabaret, curated by VivvyAnne ForeverMORE!

TICKETS: $85 at sfpride.org/vip-party

SAN FRANCISCO PRIDE 2018 Official Merchandise

www.wethepeopleclothing.com


CAROLYN WYSINGER

TAKE

PRIDE

IN YOUR

BRAIN

HERITAGE OF PRIDE PRIDE CREATIVITY AWARD

For outstanding artistic contribution to the LGBTQ community.

Carolyn Wysinger has worked fiercely in the LGBTQ community in a plethora of capacities. As a blogger, she has written timely and insightful articles for blogs such as Autostraddle and Black Girl Dangerous. Carolyn published her first book, Knockturnal Emissions, which has been listed on LGBTQ essential reading lists at several universities. As a Masculine of Center model, Carolyn walked the runway for Queer Fashion Week and is featured in Meg Allen’s photo book, BUTCH. Carolyn has worked with various organizations to create queer spaces. She worked with Black Lesbians United and the NIA Gathering for Same Gender Loving Women of African Descent, and currently sits on the board for the BUTCHVoices National Conference. In the area of politics, she is the former commissioner of Human Rights & Relations for the City of Richmond. She is a former board member of the Long Beach Lambda Democratic Club, where she helped elect Long Beach’s first out Mayor Robert Garcia. She is one of the founding members of the Black Dems of Contra Costa County. As an educator, Carolyn is a faculty member at Richmond High School, where she teaches English and African-American Literature, while advising the Black Student Union, Majorette Squad, and LGBTQ Student Club. Many people know her as a very vocal LGBTQ social media personality and the host of The C-Dubb Show, a black queer podcast. “What inspires me about this generation is that they are very clear about who they are, and are intentional about creating spaces where they feel safe to be themselves.”

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 53

Steven Krzanowski, Alzheimer’s Association Events Manager (left) and Jaime McElmon, RN at Sutter Health and Alzheimer’s Association Volunteer (right)

Everyone with a brain is at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. During Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month in June, learn the facts about brain health.

LEARN MORE AT ALZ.ORG/ABAM


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KEHLANI PRESENTED BY ALASKA AIRLINES SUNDAY, JUNE 24 @ 5:30PM MAIN STAGE, CIVIC CENTER PLAZA Kehlani tells it like it is. Whether in conversation or on stage, the Oakland-born R&B singer and songwriter gives the straight truth about her life, pain, passion, love, triumph, and everything in between with collected calm and confidence. It’s that type of honesty that makes her music resonate with the depth of classic Motown and a vividly confessional lyricism reminiscent of Neo Soul. Her mixtape, You Should Be Here, tells a story that distinctly belongs to her. Upon its release Billboard immediately called this project “The year’s first great R&B album.” Aside from being the top R&B debut of the week, it also came in at #1 on the iTunes R&B/Soul chart and #2 on both the Overall R&B Albums and Current R&B Albums chart. kehlanimusic.com

PRESENTED BY

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 55


MAIN STAGE EMCEES The Main Stage brings you two exciting days of programming featuring the best of Bay Area, national and international touring acts, community organizations, and important thought leaders. Join us for the largest LGBT gathering in the US as we band together to promote justice through the power of arts and entertainment.

SATURDAY HOSTS: Persia Yves Saint Croissant SPEAKERS:

The Tenderloin Museum’s

Compton’s Cafeteria Riot Children’s After School Arts (CASA) Rafiki Coalition Equality California PERFORMERS: Hector Fonseca + Natascha Bessez The Stud + DJ Siobhan Aluvalot Femme Deadly Venoms Ms. Nzuri Soul JMxJM CHEER SF Trangela Lansbury ieuan SUMif Noctuary SF

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

PERSIA

HONEY MAHOGANY

Persia was born from the burgeoning creative mind of a child in South Central Los Angeles, and she has been revolutionizing the drag community ever since. When not teaching 2nd grade at CASA, Persia can be found performing and doing standup throughout California and Mexico, including a few quinceañeras!

YVES SAINT CROISSANT

Contrary to her picture perfect persona, Yves Saint Croissant is a rebel heart who prefers romps around the world with weirdos, club kidz, punks, and queers to the bourgeoisie. She’s made it a priority to immerse herself in a boundarypushing group of Bay Area artists both past and present, and is most passionate about sharing her knowledge with the children who are ready for a more accepting future.

Honey Mahogany is a social worker, community advocate, and known for her role on Season 5 of RuPaul's Drag Race. Named San Francisco’s Best Drag Queen by the B.A.R. and SF Weekly, Honey performs across the globe. Honey is also co-founder of the Compton's Transgender Cultural District, co-President of the Harvey Milk LGBTQ Democratic Club, a member of the San Francisco Democratic Central County Committee, and co-owner of the Stud.

SISTER ROMA

“The Most Photographed Nun in the World” 2018 marks Sister Roma’s 31st year as one of the most outspoken and globally recognized members of San Francisco’s Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. An activist, fundraiser, actor, public speaker, and emcee, Roma travels the globe as an LGBTQ ambassador and event host.

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 57

SUNDAY HOSTS: Sister Roma Honey Mahogany SPEAKERS: Dr. Karyn Skultety, Openhouse Kate Kendell, NCLR Ivy B, HeadCount Gavin Grimm Dr. Cynthia Gomez, Planned Parenthood

Bay Area American Indian Two-Spirits (BAAIT-S) Annie Steinberg, MCC A Tribute to Soni Wolf PERFORMERS: Kehlani

Presented by Alaska Airlines

Yaeji Le1f Evelyn “Champagne” King Our Lady J Shopping Ada Vox Presented by Salesforce

Alphabet Rockers CHEER SF Midtown Social Glamamore House of PRIDE BOIGRL Thrillhammer


MAIN STAGE SPEAKERS BAY AREA AMERICAN INDIAN TWO-SPIRITS (BAAIT-S)

BAAIT-S is a community-based volunteer organization offering culturally relevant activities for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Native Americans, their families, and friends. Two-Spirit refers to the commonly shared notion among many Native American tribes that some individuals naturally possessed and manifested both masculine and feminine spiritual qualities. American society commonly identifies Two-Spirit People as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual or Transgender.

IVY BRYAN, HEADCOUNT

Ivy Bryan is a native New Yorker. After working at a record company and working the polls in November 2016, Ivy became obsessed with democracy, music, and the intersection of the two fields. In the last year at HeadCount, Ivy has been an integral part of the artist relations team overseeing voter registration drives at dozens of events including Lollapalooza, RuPaul’s DragCon, and Global Citizen Festival.

CHILDREN'S AFTER SCHOOL ARTS (CASA)

CASA is a radical nonprofit after school program that has an emphasis on art, social justice, and social emotional wellness. CASA has a special outreach to LGBTQ families and gender expansive youth. Their diverse team of artisteducators are dedicated to guiding youth toward open expression, expansive hearts, and questioning minds.

COMPTON'S CAFETERIA RIOT

The Compton’s Cafeteria Riot is an original, interactive theater piece directly inspired by the

historic riots that launched transgender activism in San Francisco. It offers a singular opportunity for audiences to celebrate the individuals whose tenacious spirit spawned a movement against the long history of discrimination and violence. In the summer of 1966, a drag queen patron of the Tenderloin’s Compton’s Cafeteria threw her cup of hot coffee in the face of a police officer as he made an unwarranted attempt to arrest her. The riot that followed would come to be known as the first recorded act of militant queer resistance against social oppression and police harassment in the US Three years before the famous gay riot at New York’s Stonewall Inn, the neighborhood’s drag queens and allies banded together against their ongoing discrimination, beating the cops with their high heels and throwing furniture through the cafeteria windows. comptonscafeteriariot.com tenderloinmuseum.org

DR. CYNTHIA GOMEZ, PLANNED PARENTHOOD

Planned Parenthood Northern California is a steadfast force for sexual health and is proud to care for people of all genders and sexual orientations across 20 Northern California counties. They provide education, advocacy, and healthcare services including birth control, HIV testing, PrEP, cancer screenings, and genderaffirming hormones. Dr. Cynthia Gomez has served on the PPNorCal Board since 2011 and terming off on June 30.

GAVIN GRIMM

Gavin Grimm is an 19-year-old who grew up in Gloucester, Virginia. He is the plaintiff in a federal transgender rights lawsuit that was headed to the

US Supreme Court but was sent back to the lower courts. The lawsuit argues the bathroom policy is unconstitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment and violates Title IX of the US Education Amendments of 1972, a federal law prohibiting sex discrimination by schools.

DR. KARYN SKULTETY, OPENHOUSE

Dr. Karyn Skultety is the Executive Director of Openhouse, a nonprofit that provides housing, services, and community for LGBTQ seniors. Karyn has a geropsychology degree and has dedicated her career to serving older people. She believes LGBTQ seniors should be central in our lives, community, and fight for social justice.

ANNIE STEINBERG,

METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH

Rev. Annie Steinberg-Behrman has been in ministry for 25 years. She has been charged twice with heresy for standing up for LGBTQ rights, and in 2017 was called as Senior Pastor of the Metropolitan Community Church of San Francisco. MCC SF has been providing the queer community with a spiritual home for fifty years. A TRIBUTE TO SONI WOLF

San Francisco Pride mourns the passing of one of our sisters, Soni Wolf. Soni was a fierce advocate for Dykes on Bikes and we admire the passion that Soni brought to her lifelong work. Dykes on Bikes have inspired generations around the globe, and they continue to bring joy to hundreds of thousands of spectators each year on Market Street. Join us at the Main Stage for a special celebration of Soni's life.

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 59


MAIN STAGE ENTERTAINERS ALPHABET ROCKERS

MS. NZURI SOUL

The Grammy-nominated Alphabet Rockers make music that makes change. Their album Rise Shine # Wo ke h a s i n s p i r e d a generation of children to be proud of their identities, to speak out against injustice, and to stand up for people who don't look like them. Presented by Young Audiences of Northern California.

NATASCHA BESSEZ

IEUAN

FEMME DEADLY VENOMS

HECTOR FONSECA

Natascha Bessez has traveled the world sharing her voice. As a former Miss New York Teen USA and model, she is a proud gay rights and women's rights activist. She has written many songs with world class DJs and producers. Her biggest performance to date was at the worldwide Eurovision Song Contest, performing her song “Wanna Be Loved” for over two million people on live television. She toured the world with famed circuit DJ Hector Fonseca, performing with him at Madrid World P r i d e f o r o v e r 5 0, 0 0 0 people! Their song “Deeper Love” is a dance smash.

BOIGRL

BOIGRL is the merging of two music soulmates, Ms. Jackson and Skylar Love, fueled by UK house, bass house, Jersey, Baltimore, and underground club music. Together, they bring their high energy and queer club vibes to parties where old-school rhythms meet future sounds on the dance floor. Strong advocates for female and queer artists

in their communities, they’re using their activism to create dance floor magic.

CHEER SF

The CHEER For Life Foundation is a California 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of at-risk individuals in the communities we serve. For over thirty-five years, our programs have entertained, inspired, and motivated individuals around the globe, powering our grant-making efforts that support organizations providing critical services to at-risk members of our communities.

DUSEROCK

Duserock has been bringing heat to dance floors for two decades, opening for the likes of Sting and Sheryl Crow. His ability to blend genres and keep the crowd dancing have made him a popular DJ worldwide. He's shared bills with Photek, Mark Farina, Marques Wyatt, Dubtribe, Hardkiss, Nickodemus, Tal M. Klein, and many more.

FEMME DEADLY VENOMS

Bay Area-based Femme D e a d l y Ve n o m s ( F D V ) includes DJ, turntablist, producer, and vocalist Lady Fingaz, and emcees and vocalists Aima the Dreamer and Dakini Star. Bringing a tasty gumbo of trip hip hop/funk/soul/electronica, FDV invites the world to experience their music as a journey, not a destination.

60 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


Their EP Femmenomenon is dropping later this year. DJ/PRODUCER

HECTOR FONSECA

Hector Fonseca is an internationally renowned DJ and producer with over 20 official Billboard #1 remixes including songs by Beyonce, Rihanna, Sia, Katy Perry, and Lady Gaga. He also is the owner of the indie label audio4play Records.

IEUAN

ieuan is a 19-year-old, gay singer-songwriter from Walnut Creek, California.

JMXJM

JMxJM = John Major x Josette Melchor, a collaborative DJ project developed out of a shared taste in techno, house, and the Jacksons. They both DJ separately representing Polyglamorous or Gray Area while jointly contributing to Burning Man art projects including BAAAHS and the secretive Pyramid Scheme collective.

TRANGELA LANSBURY (DIEGO GOMEZ)

Trangela Lansbury is a granddaughter of the Cockettes, Queer Comics creator of The Hard-Femme Ex-Men, 1963 Is Not An End, But A Beginning: A Graphic History, and the upcoming Daddy Issues magazine. Currently, they teach fashion illustration at City College San Francisco.

MR. DAVID GLAMAMORE

Mr. David Glamamore has

been a costumer-couturier and drag performer for nearly four decades. Starting off in NYC, he made his way to San Francisco in the early '90s, where he continues to happily perform and create. Look forward to the upcoming book and biopic soon, The Mr. David Glamamore Project!

NATASCHA BESSEZ

HOUSE OF PRIDE

House of PRIDE is a collective of LGBTQI artists from the Bay Area Ballroom Alliance led by Sir JoQ and Shea Mizrahi. House of PRIDE will dazzle the Main Stage with a mini-ball showcasing categories typical of a Ball in New York City. House of PRIDE is going to take you on a FABULOUS ride into the underground world of VOGUE and Ballroom Performance so get your edges, your looks, and your LIFE ready.

LE1F

KEHLANI

Turn to Page 55 for more about our Sunday headliner. Presented by Alaska Airlines

EVELYN “CHAMPAGNE” KING

“You have to live life to know life,” says vocalist-supreme Evelyn “Champagne” King. They called her “Bubbles” because of her effervescent personality and sense of humor. Over Evelyn’s tenalbum career beginning in 1977 with Smooth Talk, fans and critics have continued to watch and applaud the artist grow and expand creatively without ever losing touch with who she is. “One thing that

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 61

TRANGELA LANSBURY

DUSEROCK


MAIN STAGE ENTERTAINERS

MIDTOWN SOCIAL

YAEJI

was engraved early, something my family always taught, was to remember who you are and keep in mind that it was important to be true to your self first,” King says. Evelyn has received a Dance Music Hall of Fame Award in 2004, Living Legend Award in 2007, and countless outstanding achievement awards for the work she continues to do in the music world.

and classical worlds (Sia, American Ballet Theatre, Mark Morris Dance Group), Our Lady J also wrote andv produced on the awardwinning series Transparent. She holds the honor as the first out trans woman to perform at Carnegie Hall and the first out trans writer to be nominated for a Writers Guild Award.

LE1F

Shopping pulls from a well of ’70s post-punk, though as Pitchfork reminds, “they never sound dated or like a carbon-copy, a testament to the group’s songwriting abilities.” Extensive touring earned them main support for ESG and Gang Of Four. Their newest album, The Official Body, was released in February via FatCat. As the Quietus puts it, “live, the band emanates a self-assuredness and a commitment to contributing maximum joy to their audience,” encouraging dance as a shared cathartic release!

Since his debut mixtape Dark York in 2012, Le1f, the Manhattan-raised rapper, has been pushing boundaries lyrically with his flow and beat choices. With his first full-length release, Riot Boi (Terrible/XL), he finalizes the vision. The album is a celebration of marginalized identities without slipping into the divisive territory of “conscious rap.” In his own words, he’s “somewhere between an activist and an antagonist.”

MIDTOWN SOCIAL

SHOPPING

It’s time to stretch, hydrate, and double-knot your dancing shoes, because Midtown Social is here! Their freshly squeezed blend of soul, funk, and dance is downright irresistible. Midtown Social is a tour de force that serves up food for hungry souls – a message of solidarity and hope.

OUR LADY J

Our Lady J is a writer/ producer on dance-musical TV series Pose. Making music for both the pop CHEERSF

SHOPPING

MS. NZURI SOUL

Electrifying stage presence, personality, and a whole lot of soul describes powerhouse singer Nzuri Soul. She is Northern California's Music Award Entertainer of the Year 2018 and R&B Band of the Year 2017 winner. She performs at Yoshi's Jazz Club, Oakland's F ox T h e a t r e, H o u s e o f Blues in Los Angeles and La s Veg a s , F enix L iv e, Empress Theater, Bay Area Juneteenth Festival, 1st

62 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


Fridays All White Party 2017, and Shine Lounge, to name a few.

Join ThrillHammer at the Main Stage for a special tribute to our beloved, Bubbles.

THE STUD

ADA VOX

WITH SPECIAL DJ SET BY SIOBHAN ALUVALOT

Featuring drag queens and DJs, the Stud, a queer bar in SOMA, has been around since 1966. Sylvester, Etta James, and Bjork are some of the legends who’ve performed there. In 2016, sixteen crazy queers united to save the historic bar from closing and carry it into the future.

THRILLHAMMER

Presented by Salesforce

SUMIF

SUMif is the electro-pop project of Steph Wells, a musical “journey-woman” who has spent the last decade refining her style across a spectrum of genres, hitting her stride in the indietronica community.

THRILLHAMMER

Ada Vox is a 25-year-old San Antonio drag queen a n d s i n g e r. A t o p t e n contestant on ABC's 2018 reboot of American Idol, her appearance marked a first for the TV competition show. Notably, Ada earned a standing ovation from judges with her rendition of the Etta James hit “I’d Rather Go Blind.”

ThrillHammer is a musical hybrid created by Silk Road Truckers frontman Coltorious and DJ-producer Duserock.

YAEJI

Born in Queens, New York to South Korean parents, Yaeji’s self-titled Yaeji EP found her merging club influences with songwriting and hazy raps, flitting between Korean and English. Most recently, Yaeji’s EP2 – featuring singles “Drink I’m Sippin On” and “Raingurl” – marks Yaeji’s ascendance as a singular and leading voice in dance, hiphop, and avant-pop music.

Visit our website SFPRIDE.ORG for updates and additions to the artist line-up. SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 63

EVELYN “CHAMPAGNE” KING

BOIGRL

SUMIF


2018 COMMUNITY STAGES SATURDAY

ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION & ASSISTANCE SAT | SUN > POLK @ GROVE, OR INFORMATION BOOTH (CIVIC CENTER PLAZA @ FULTON)

CHEER SAN FRANCISCO STAGE SAT | SUN > FULTON @ HYDE

Celebrate with us!

CLUB PAPI + CLUB 21 + BEAUX SF + CLUB BNB PRESENT THE DON JULIO LATIN STAGE @ STEAMWORKS PAVILION SAT | SUN > MCALLISTER @ VAN NESS

DEAF & HARD-OF-HEARING GATHERING SPACE SAT | SUN > POLK @ GROVE

FAERIE FREEDOM VILLAGE

SAT | SUN > UNITED NATIONS PLAZA, NORTH

URBAN GLOBAL VILLAGE

SATURDAY ONLY > GROVE AND MCALLISTER

SENIORS TELL ALL

SAT ONLY > CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, SW

QUEER YOUTH SPACE

SAT | SUN > CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, NE

SUNDAY

ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE SAT | SUN > POLK @ GROVE, OR INFORMATION BOOTH (CIVIC CENTER PLAZA @ FULTON)

ASIAN & PACIFIC ISLANDER COMMUNITY PRIDE STAGE & PAVILION SUNDAY ONLY > POLK @ TURK

CASTRO COUNTRY CLUB SOBER STAGE

SUNDAY ONLY > UNITED NATIONS PLAZA, SOUTH

CHEER SAN FRANCISCO STAGE SAT | SUN > FULTON @ HYDE

CLUB PAPI + CLUB 21 + BEAUX SF + CLUB BNB PRESENT THE DON JULIO LATIN STAGE @ STEAMWORKS PAVILION SAT | SUN > MCALLISTER @ VAN NESS

DEAF & HARD-OF-HEARING GATHERING SPACE SAT | SUN > POLK @ GROVE

FAERIE FREEDOM VILLAGE

SAT | SUN > UNITED NATIONS PLAZA, NORTH

HOMO HIP HOP STAGE

SUNDAY ONLY > GOLDEN GATE @ LEAVENWORTH

INDIE OASIS

SUNDAY ONLY > LARKIN @ TURK

THE LATINO WELLNESS PAVILION

SUNDAY ONLY > POLK BETWEEN MCALLISTER AND REDWOOD

LEATHER ALLEY

SUNDAY ONLY > HYDE BETWEEN MCALLISTER AND GOLDEN GATE

THE OFC LGBTQ FAMILY GARDEN

SUNDAY ONLY > CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, NW

QUEER YOUTH SPACE

SAT | SUN > CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, NE

SOUL OF PRIDE, AFRICAN DIASPORA STAGE AND VILLAGE SUNDAY ONLY > GROVE AND MCALLISTER

SUNDANCE COUNTRY-WESTERN DANCE CORRAL

SUNDAY ONLY > GOLDEN GATE BETWEEN LARKIN AND POLK

TANTRA TRANCE

SUNDAY ONLY > GOLDEN GATE @ VAN NESS

WOMEN’S STAGE

SUNDAY ONLY > MCALLISTER @ LEAVENWORTH SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 65

Win a trip for two from San Francisco to Manchester, England. visitmanchester.com/pride


COMMUNITY STAGE DESCRIPTIONS ACCESSIBILITY INFORMATION & ASSISTANCE

Father River Sims, producer Accessibility information and assistance will be available at the Information Booth located on Civic Center Plaza at Fulton Street. Additionally, accessibility information will be available at the Deaf and Hardof-Hearing Gathering Space on Polk at Grove.

ASIAN & PACIFIC ISLANDER COMMUNITY PRIDE STAGE & PAVILION Nikki Calma, producer for

San Francisco Community Health Center (formerly API Wellness)

The A&PI Pride Stage is now on its 18th year of presenting the best A&PI LGBTQI and other performers on one dynamic stage. Over twenty amazing performers, DJs, artists, and lots of dancing on the street! Spearheaded by community icon, Tita Aida and other API LGBTQI celebrities and personalities. Visit our SF Community Health Center programs and wellness clinic at the Pavilion for HIV testing and other services. apiwellness.org

CASTRO COUNTRY CLUB SOBER STAGE

Carlos Perea, producer The Castro Country Club’s Sober Stage is a drug-and-alcoholfree zone with entertainment and fun for all. Bring a blanket, picnic, and settle in for a day of celebration with live music, DJs, and Mascara: A Drag Show.

CHEER SAN FRANCISCO STAGE

Anthony Chavira, producer CHEER San Francisco and friends will be performing high-flying acrobatic stunts and dance routines to raise money for those living with HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, and other life-challenging conditions.

DEAF & HARD-OF-HEARING GATHERING SPACE

Serena Smith, producer We offer deaf, late-deafened, deaf-blind, and hard-of-hearing attendees a chance to celebrate Pride. Our space provides a place to socialize and exchange information regarding accessibility for deaf and hard-of-hearing people.

CLUB PAPI + CLUB 21 + BEAUX SF + CLUB BNB PRESENT THE DON JULIO LATIN STAGE @ STEAMWORKS PAVILION

Jamie Awad, producer We are pleased to welcome Don Julio Tequila as the naming sponsor of the Latin Stage and excited to announce that Ana Barbara will headline on Sunday along with American Idol top 10 singer Ada Vox, superstar international DJ Alex Acosta of Mexico, and the sexy Papi dancers!

FAERIE FREEDOM VILLAGE

A.J. Cook, producer Join the Faerie Freedom Village from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM on Saturday and Sunday for a variety of DJs, performances, lounging, co mmu nin g, snacki ng, and fabulosity! We welcome monetary donations, which benefit Calamus Fellowship’s programs throughout the year, but no one is turned away for lack of funds.

URBAN GLOBAL VILLAGE

Lisa Williams, producer Joshua Smith + Chaim The Global Village stage mission is to provide a welcoming and affirming space for people of color and youth at the San Francisco LGBT Pride festival. To that end, over the course of the afternoon, the audience is taken on a musical journey around the world. Each hour is dedicated to a different part of the world: Latin, Asian-South Asian, Middle Eastern, African-African American, and reggae. Look out for live

performances, dances, and Bay Area DJs including Luna, Shell Heart, Corruption, and KMEL.

HOMO HIP HOP STAGE

Ronnie Jones, producer The Homo Hip Hop Stage is produced by DJ Rapture and Get Ur Life Productions and is excited to join the celebration, providing an exciting event that showcases the incredible talent in the community and provides an unforgettable party experience for our patrons, all while promoting peace, unity, and safety.

INDIE OASIS

Starr Piwowarski, producer Indie Oasis invites you to join us for another year as your indie and dance music destination! We've partnered with local favorite indie events Hotline (voted “Best New Dance Party” by SF Weekly), Fringe, Harder Better Faster Stronger, Boy Division, and The Queen is Dead. We've got something for everyone from indie, electro, and pop remixes to hard dance!

THE LATINO WELLNESS PAVILION

Jorge Zepeda, producer The Latino Wellness Pavilion provides the Latinx community opportunities to connect with organizations such as the San Francisco AIDS Foundation – Latino Programs, Instituto Familiar de la Raza, and Mission Neighborhood Health Centers. HIV screening will be available, as well as information about health and social services.

LEATHER ALLEY

Rover Spots, producer Do you think leather is hot? Curious about S&M? Got a fetish? Over 21? Meet experienced players to learn more about leather and clubs in the Bay Area, attend hands-on

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 67


PROUDLY PRESENTING FREE EVENTS FOR ALL AGES IN JUNE TO CELEBRATE SAN FRANCISCO PRIDE. Whether you walk with us in the parade, stop by for a kick-off happy hour, or bring the kids to a family-friendly drag show, we hope to see you at one of these fabulous events!

SATURDAYS UNPLUGGED: FAMILY PRIDE FESTIVAL 6/16 TEEN PRIDE PROM 6/16

CELEBRATE

PRIDE AT THE JCCSF!

RAINBOW TUESDAY HAPPY HOUR 6/19 LILLIAN FADERMAN & MICHELLE TEA 6/21 SF PRIDE PARADE 6/24 JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF SAN FRANCISCO 3200 CALIFORNIA ST•415.292.1200

jccsf.org/pride

23RD ANNUAL

KATE WOLF MUSIC FESTIVAL

JUNE 28-JULY 1

OVER 40 ACTS on MULTIPLE STAGES featuring:

Los Lobos • Indigo Girls • Keb’ Mo’ • Ani DiFranco Martha Reeves & The Vandellas • Joan Osborne Mandolin Orange • Tom Paxton • Red Molly DuoQuartet (Chris Webster, Nina Gerber, Pam Delgado, Jeri Jones) • Hills To Hollers (Linda Tillery, Barbara Higbie, Laurie Lewis) • MaMuse • Eilen Jewell Rainbow Girls • Crys Matthews, and many more… BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE, CA • KateWolfMusicFestival.com


demonstrations, leather, and visit leather vendors. Leather Alley is a project of the San Francisco Bay Area Leather Alliance.

THE OFC LGBTQ FAMILY GARDEN

Yusni Bakar, producer Our Family Coalition is thrilled to offer the LGBTQ Family Garden once again as a safe, fun space for children, youth, and their LGBTQ parents and caregivers during the Pride celebration. Arts and crafts, games, face painting, and other resources will be offered to LGBTQ families. Come see old friends and meet new ones. The Garden is a smoke-and-alcohol-free space. Questions? Contact: jeannette@ourfamily.org

QUEER YOUTH SPACE

Larkin Street Youth Services Located in Civic Center Plaza, the Queer Youth Space is a safe environment for youth ages 12-24 to chill with snacks, and activities. We will have a community art project, crafts, lawn games, prizes, and more!

SENIORS TELL ALL

Larry “Lare” Nelson, producer Seniors Tell All is a concept and a secure space for LGBTQ+ seniors and youth to sit and talk to each other about anything. The goal is to also further intergenerational conversations so our LGBTQ+ youth know about their rich history, which will empower them to continue the movement.

SOUL OF PRIDE, AFRICAN DIASPORA STAGE + VILLAGE CO-SPONSORED BY COMCAST

Lisa Williams, producer Sonia Porter This year the Soul of Pride experience will kick off with an awards event and culminate with our dynamic Sunday stage featuring live bands and DJs.

Our stage will host many amazing artists and feature a Mario B. Productions fashion show with a Black Panther theme. The grand finale will include a special tribute to the Pam the Funkstress (also named “Purple Pam” by Prince), legendary DJs, dancers, emcees, and local vendors to help us celebrate eighteen years of Pride! Don't forget to look for our awardwinning float in the parade. soulofpride.com

SUNDANCE COUNTRYWESTERN DANCE CORRAL

John Hoffman, producer Sundance Saloon presents two-stepping and line dancing at the Sundance CountryWestern Dance Corral located at Golden Gate between Larkin and Polk. Drop by from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM and soak up the festive vibe. Kick up your heels with easy line dance lessons at 2:00, 3:00, and 4:00. If you have two left feet, bring those, too! sundancesaloon.org

TANTRA TRANCE

Brandon Picardal, producer The Tantra Trance stage is a showcase of San Francisco underground electronic dance music brought to you by the same crew who has rocked Pink Saturday, Castro Halloween, and Lovefest SF. The stage will take dancers through an afternoon of NRG and break-beats, building up to a peak of high energy trance.

WOMEN’S STAGE

Christie James, producer Rise up and be inspired at the Women’s Stage on the corner of Leavenworth and McAllister from 12:00 to 6:00 PM on Sunday as thousands of women from all over the globe celebrate Pride. This year’s stage will feature performing artists, leaders, queer female DJs, and more!

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 69


SONDHEIM’S

BEST MUSICAL! - SUNDAY TIMES

MUSIC AND LYRICS BY

STEPHEN SONDHEIM BOOK BY

JAMES LAPINE DIRECTED BY

BILL ENGLISH JULY 5 - SEPT. 8


SPACE AS VISIBILITY

IS THE SCARCITY OF SF DYKE SPACES AN OPPORTUNITY IN DISGUISE? BY ELIZABETH LANYON WITH MARILYN FERNANDO AND JOLENE LINSANGAN

The Dyke community is in a unique position where we have no permanent physical space that is exclusively OURS in San Francisco. This started in the late 1990s and most recently became apparent with the closing of the Lexington Club in 2015. Many considered The Lex to be this city's last surviving dyke bar. Jolene Linsangan, producer of UHAUL SF, said of the Lex, “It was a major turning point when the Lexington Club closed. It was a real eye opener how important it was having that space.” “Firmly planted in the in literal and symbolic epicenter of Valencia Street’s queer past, The Lexington created and claimed space,” said Marilyn Fernando, an organizer of the Dyke March. “[The Lex was] a safe haven for queer women and folks who were being washed away in San Francisco’s rapidly changing cultural scenery.” Indeed, many members of the dyke community have moved out of San Francisco, due to several factors: rent increases, gentrification, housing scarcity, desire for more space for families, and losing a sense of community. Combined with the wage gap faced by LGBTQ people and women, this made for a quick exodus of dykes out of San Francisco. Spaces centered around women are important: when we have our own spaces, we cultivate our own power and support one another; we have the skeleton for intentional community and women bring the heart and mind to that. Marilyn agrees: “These spaces and events are where I’m reminded of the Queerness that still exists in San Francisco. Before moving here, I dreamed about finding queer friends and a chosen family who would accept and empower me to be who I am. In these spaces, I found my community, my friends, a sense of empowerment and a megaphone to speak my truth.” In San Francisco, having our own space in the larger LGBTQ movement has always been important and a challenge. The gay community has the Castro; the Trans community has a historical district in the Tenderloin dedicated to the warriors of the Compton Cafeteria Riots. “Spaces like El Rio, The Wild Side West, Virgil’s, the White Horse Inn and the Stud have continued to create inclusive spaces for us to hold our communities close,” says Marilyn. As a dyke who lives in San Francisco, I am constantly hungry for lesbian community and seek it out in these spaces. “Weekly events like VICE in the Castro remind us to claim space and celebrate community,” said Marilyn, “and monthly events like Mango, Uptown Homos, Swagger Like Us, UHAUL, Bad Habits and Ships in the Night, Unleash! and Soulovely in the East Bay represent the heart, soul and diversity of queer spaces and queer folks in the Bay Area.” For the most part, however, these spaces become ours for one night a week or month, then return to their regularly scheduled programming. Having a physical space for us throughout the year would mean we would have a place to land, a place to gather and discuss issues affecting our community. For me, I would be thrilled to have a dyke owned tea shop or book store, someplace I could meet my friends, mentors and mentees; a place that we could call our own. I’m not alone. Marilyn says, “While I understand the significance of queer bars and appreciate their abundance, I would like to see more spaces that can accommodate our sober community. I would be thrilled to see an influx of queer women/lesbian/dyke cannabis clubs, bakeries, restaurants, yoga studios, cafes, bookstores and work spaces.” As we continue to face threats under an administration that has no regard for LGBTQ people, let alone women, it’s important to know that we are still here and still fighting. The community of dyke organizers and leaders that I consider my closest friends make it work - we take up space when and where we can. Some of us, like Jolene, are confidently optimistic: “The women's rights movement is opening up more opportunities for us. I'm excited to see our community and spaces continue to grow. There will be a safe space for women opening soon. I can feel it.” Our visibility is our survival, that never changes. Elizabeth Lanyon, in addition to her role on the SF Pride Board of Directors, is the Individual Giving Manager at the National Center for Lesbian Rights. She also serves on the board for the Alice B. Toklas Democratic Club. From 2013 to 2017, she served as co-chair of the San Francisco Dyke March. Marilyn Fernando is the current co-chair of fundraising for the San Francisco Dyke March, and a recent SFSU graduate in Women and Gender Studies. You can typically find Marilyn at karaoke lovingly paying tribute to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs or Hole, at home obsessively answering emails, or cooking. Jolene Linsangan is the founder and producer of UHAUL SF, and cultivator of safe dyke spaces. SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 71


SOMETIMES BEAUTIFUL, ALWAYS AUTHENTIC… A CONVERSATION ABOUT GENERATIONS OF LGBTQ ART AND ARTISTS BY BRIAN “CHICKPEA” BUSTA AND PAMELA PENISTON

San Francisco Pride invited Brian “Chickpea” Busta, Community Grand Marshal, and Pamela Peniston, recipient of the Audrey Joseph LGBTQ Entertainment Award, to a conversation about LGBTQ arts in San Francisco. These two colorful people bring a wealth of experience in San Francisco and the Bay Area. Chickpea is known for his work with Gay Glow Theater and the Burning Man collective Comfort & Joy, and Pam has been fostering queer arts and artists for years with the Queer Cultural Center and the National Queer Arts Festival. Here are some snippets of their conversation, on May 14, 2018: BRIAN: I am so nervous! PAM: Oh, me too! [Laughs] BRIAN: I’m more of a street artist… I’m kinda shy, I do so much art but it’s usually just… I’m just doing it. I was thinking today, “Why do I do art?” I think I was born with some kind of thing… My energy went towards art and it didn’t go anywhere else. And then when you inspire people, it just snowballs. PAM: I know! My initial career was as a set designer. My background was always working with a group of people. What I learned was how that community surrounds you and supports you. That’s what I wanted, to make sure artists feel they are getting a community around them to support them that holds them that will not let them fail. I am one of the founders for Queer Cultural Center. We knew what we wanted to do, we didn’t want art for art’s sake. Yes, there is a lot of beautiful art and a lot of people are doing it, but let’s us queers express the other side... BRIAN: YES! PAM: …the sometimes beautiful, s o m e t i m e s s l o p p y, s o m e t i m e s interesting, but always socially relevant, culturally authentic. It was all about cultural equity, it was about social justice (I think we were still calling it multiculturalism back then.) [Laughs] But we wanted people to understand that we were really going to do this and be legit, so we wrote into our by-laws that we would always be governed on our board by a majority of people of color. And that we would have parity among the genders. BRIAN: Wow. What year did that all start? BRIAN BUSTA + PAMELA PENISTON PAM: We incorporated in ‘94. We cosponsored stuff, lots of little things. The first San Francisco LGBTQ arts festival was in ‘98, and then it turned into the National Queer Arts Festival. We started having people like Bill T. Jones and Lou Harrison and, you know, suddenly all those big organizations – you know, the symphony, the opera – were calling us, saying “would you like to come sponsor this?” BRIAN: Really! PAM: “I think so… What will you give us?” [Laughs] So we started doing some really intense programs with an amazing array of artists in every discipline. I actually remember some of the early Gay Glows. BRIAN: You do!! Oh, Yay! Good! PAM: It was one of those things that my friend said, “Oh, you gotta see this!” [Laughs] Wow! 72 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


BRIAN: Yeah, it was pretty cute. It was fun. Gay Glow started right after the first earthquake, what, 89? It started with putting a [cardboard] dick in the window [of my apartment at 18th and Castro] for Pride. I brought a black light from New Hampshire when I moved here in ‘88 and so that Pride I put a dick in the window, lit it with black light. Then we were drunk one night on tequila, and I said to my roommate, why don’t you dance with the dick and I’ll go across the street and tell everyone it’s a show. [Laughs] But then, we were political, so we made shows about what was happening. We’d do a little show that was like 10 minutes long. We would put a little sign up that said, show tonight at 7! And after we did it three times, it blocked off Castro Street. PAM: Yeah! I mean, we came up via MUNI from work, and it was standing room only, outside! BRIAN: It got really popular. But we did them short because the cops would come into the building before long. It was like guerrilla theater. PAM: Usually people don’t believe how old I am, which is always pleasant. [Laughs] And I think it’s because I work with so many twenty- to forty- year olds. BRIAN: Yes! You feel like you’re their age. [Laughs] PAM: They are so original, and they have a whole new set of priorities. We didn’t know they were going to be able to be priorities when we were coming up. So, all of these issues that they are taking on are so immediate… [Their art is] going to be the most interesting take on these issues that you’ve ever seen. BRIAN: That’s so fun. PAM: It is! They’re teaching me ten times more than I could ever bring to them. BRIAN: And in reverse, I was taught when I first got here by the people who were elders of me. For instance, Gilbert [Baker]… He took a liking towards me because I was young and artsy-fartsy. [Laughs] I was just in awe of what he would do. He was kind of my mentor. Especially when he [helped produce] Pink Saturday, I was like, you can do that? You can put a big disco ball in the middle of the street? [Laughs] It just really opened up my mind. To see people do big things like that, it’s just great. That community part of building art, I love that, and that’s what Burning Man represents to me. And then, being gay on top of it, and all the queers working together, it’s just something special. I love when gays make art. PAM: Oh my god, me too. [Laughs] Like the crowd that just decided on the Dyke March. And that was it, it was decided upon. And It just took the street, you know. Just, so spectacular and so earnest, and you know, dyke power. It was so energizing. BRIAN: Everything seems a little looser now, people coming out earlier, people feeling more secure, so I think there’s more freedom. And maybe freedom will show in the art. Some of the young kids at Comfort & Joy, they’re just like, they don’t have any walls or borders, it’s like whoa. They’re just going for it and they’re doing amazing stuff. That excites me, how the older generation opened up so many doors for these young kids to just go for it. I hope they don’t get all beige… PAM: Oh, I know! BRIAN: I want them to be free! Pam: There was that whole thing when marriage equality started, I was like… Uh oh, are we going to be subsumed by the dominant paradigm?! But of course, no, we queered that. But you’re right, [in the past] there was frenzy, or tightness, or so much anger. That’s why Comfort & Joy and Gay Glow were like these remarkable moments of joy – like, remember who we are??! BRIAN: Exactly! PAM: Like, we’re queer! And we have fun! And we have fun better than almost anybody in the world. Brian “Chickpea” Busta founded Gay Glow Street Theater, the Temple Whores drumming troupe, was Grand Duke of the Ducal Court, inspires audiences as the comic figure ‘Amber Alert,’ and is the current Creative Director of Comfort & Joy. For more information on Brian “Chickpea” Busta, turn to Page 40. Pamela Peniston is a founding member and Artistic Director of the Queer Cultural Center (Qcc). Since 1998, Pamela has provided visionary leadership for Queer Cultural Center’s iconic program, the National Queer Arts Festival – now celebrating its 21st year. For more information on Pamela Peniston, turn to Page 48. SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 73


MR. DAVID GLAMAMORE SHOWCASING THE IDEAL SELF BY JH PHYRDAS

JH Phrydas is a writer, editor, and independent researcher. Raised by his birth family in Atlanta and queer family in San Francisco, Phrydas began The Mr. David Glamamore Project, documenting the life and work of a living legend in 2015. Mr. David is renowned for his expertise in garment design and construction. As Glamamore, she is the grandmother of the House of More! and has acted as a mentor for countless freaks, artists, and queer kids in San Francisco. Through interviews with Mr. David Glamamore and over 120 queer and trans artists and performers, Phrydas is weaving together a biography that celebrates hope and love through art, fashion, and drag. The following are excerpts of conversations between JH and David.

Honey Mahogany in Mr. David

JH: So, you started making clothes when you were a kid, right? DAVID: I started sewing when I was three, making dolls and stuffed animals. When I was five, I wanted my mother to teach me how to knit. She was like, “It’s too much, I can’t have my son doing this!” So, when she was out of the house, I would sneak into her old knitting books and taught myself. I started making clothing for people when I was 8 – but I sewed everything together by hand. Which was actually great because I really understand how you make a garment.

Alotta Boutte in Mr. David

In high school, I asked my mother for a sewing machine, and she was still hesitant about it. So I sewed a three-piece suit – by hand! She was finally like, “OK, fine! You can sew!” DAVID: I went to the Fashion Institute of Technology when I was fourteen, but I didn’t stay there for long. There was one teacher who took me to the side one day and told me, “You know, your stuff is just a little too avant-garde for Seventh Avenue. I think you should give this up, because only one out of a million people becomes a costume designer, and I just don’t think that you should pursue that avenue.” I dropped out shortly after. [Laughs] And then, four years later, I had a working portfolio with clients who were rock stars. I went back to show her at one point, and she had died. I was like, “Fuck! I wanted to show you what I’ve done!” I wanted to thank her because she got me out of four more years of school that I did not need.

image: paul burks

JH: Were you completely self-taught?

JH Phrydas wearing Mr. David

JH: It seems like there was a big push in New York City’s nightlife in the 1980s to be rich and famous. Was that on your mind when you were designing back then? DAVID: Well, I begrudge nobody their money nor their fame. I say, “You want it? Go for it!” But that was just never something I wanted. If I had wanted to be rich – and that’s not wealthy, mind you. Had I wanted to be rich, there’s a lot of different choices that I would have made. SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 75

vivvyanne forevermore in Mr David


There was a quote by David Bowie several years back ago. Some interviewer said, “Oh, you’re a very wealthy man.” And he said, “I’m not wealthy. I’m rich. When you’re wealthy, you have no idea how much money you have. When you’re rich, you know every single penny.” I’ve always preferred to be wealthy. [Laughs] And I am wealthy – not in money, but in relationships. To me, losing a relationship is like losing a million or a billion dollars to somebody else. JH: Living in LA, I see a lot of people running around with fame in their cross-hairs, and there’s a tendency to view someone they meet as a means to an end rather than a living, breathing entity. DAVID: Oh totally! People like that couldn’t care less about how your day is going or if your bowel movements have been regular lately. I saw that in New York before I left, when everyone expected me to become famous and pull them up with me.

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So, it was easy for me to move to San Francisco because people were more interested in who I was rather than what I might do for them. Although it might be moving in that direction now as some people try to push San Francisco to be this bigger city. But I think San Francisco is fighting back, which gives me great hope. SF feels homey, still. On top of all this change and upheaval and rising rents, it still is the closest thing to home that I’ve ever found on this planet. JH: I’m very happy that a queer, artistic nightlife is still here – and actually not just holding on but thriving, even as all these new skyscrapers go up. Does the city still inspire you? DAVID: Oh, constantly. To be inspired is to be egged on – to do something else or something more or something different. And every person I’ve ever sewn for inspires me in that way. My favorite outfit to make for anybody is their fantasy outfit – the one they always wanted as a kid but never thought they’d have. I’m just not interested in making clothes for the typical, tall, skinny model type. I’m more interested in the uniqueness of each human being. I tell people: “We have two ways of approaching this issue of your body” – because everybody has some issue with their body that they don’t like or never got used to – “Either we are going to cover it completely and make you look beautiful. Or we’re going to flaunt the shit out of it, and make you look beautiful. You have two choices.” I tend to go with the flaunting it. [Laughs] JH: I feel there’s a tendency to think that the fashion designer uses the body of the “perfect” model as a blank canvas for “his art,” which is problematic for many reasons. DAVID: Yes. There’s the whole “You got to be a perfect size two or zero or whatever the current standard is for perfection and build off that” thing. No. I never had that. And maybe that’s because when I was young, I was making clothes for 76 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


my mom and grandmother and other people that I knew. And I got used to making various sizes and shapes and heights. So, I never thought that you had to be seven feet tall and weigh 113 pounds. I never saw that as any high ideal of beauty. It wasn’t mine! Some people look like that, and that’s beautiful, and I don’t mind dressing them. But for them – because that’s what they want – not because they’re just a stick figure to use as a prop. And there’s a difference. I’ve dressed models. And I think they feel like they’ve never been quite paid attention to before. Or not objectified, at least. JH: And I think that’s a really profound difference between a designer who creates clothing for a mannequin versus a designer who makes clothes for a specific body… DAVID: Because everybody’s different! JH: …and accentuating their beauty and bringing that out. So, it’s not just about the clothes. DAVID: I want everybody to feel like themselves in a really good way. And it doesn’t matter if they’re short or tall or fat or skinny or too big on top or too small on top or missing a part of their body. It doesn’t matter to me. It’s like, “How do you feel the most like your ideal self?” I was thinking about this the other day. There are designers whose clothing and work I think are exceptional, and I find everything they do exquisite. Like, a YSL or a Christian Dior or a Givenchy. But funnily enough, none of them are in my absolute pantheon of designers. Because, for me, it’s not just about making a pretty garment. The designers in my pantheon were all philosophers in one way or another. Fashion was a part of their whole world-view. They wanted to free people’s bodies.

Mr. David gown

JH: That reminds me of my Catholic school uniform growing up in Atlanta. I’d get put in detention for wearing a red sweater to school because it was the wrong color. DAVID: I think that we’re specifically raised in this culture to believe that we’re supposed to be punished for some reason. I definitely felt that way, growing up. I felt guilty my entire childhood. Guilt is one of the biggest killers on our entire plane. It can kill anybody. And guilt for what? We’re raised with people telling us that we should feel guilty simply because we were born. How is that reasonable?

Mr. David Glamamore

In addition to his work with the Mr. David Glamamore Project, JH Phrydas has published short stories and essays in numerous publications, a book of poetry called Levitations (Timeless, Infinite Light, 2015), and a chapbook entitled Empire in Shade (Essay Press, 2017). You can find more information about JH Phrydas and The Mr. David Glamamore Project at jhphrydas.com, where you can also purchase merchandise to help fund his project.

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 77

Lady Miss Kier in Mr. David


TOWARD ABOLITION, UNCAGING OUR COMMUNITIES ADDRESSING THE PLIGHT OF TGI PEOPLE IN STATE INSTITUTIONS BY JEN ORTHWEIN

In prisons, jails, state hospitals, and immigration detention facilities, transgender, gender variant, and intersex (TGI) people are struggling to survive. TGI bodies are raped, tortured, and exploited, often by, or with the encouragement of, those who are charged with ensuring their safety. Discrimination against TGI people in medical and mental health care often leads to severe pain and suffering. These dangerous conditions are justified under the guise of maintaining safety and security. Using safety and security as sword and shield, officials can and do consider gender variation a threat and torture those who fail to conform to gender norms. Surprisingly, nearly all prisoners are housed based on the sex they were assigned at birth: transgender women are housed in facilities designated for men and transgender men in facilities designated for women. Years of research under the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) illuminated the dangerous reality for TGI people inside, which led to federal reforms implemented during the Obama Administration. The Federal Bureau of Prisons also recently took significant steps to implement improved housing classification standards. Sadly, in early May, the Trump administration dismantled these efforts, reverting to the unsafe practice of housing prisoners solely based on their assigned sex at birth.

“The walls of these institutions make it easy for the rest of us to turn a blind eye to the realities of those caged among us.”

The walls of these institutions make it easy for the rest of us to turn a blind eye to the realities of those caged among us. Moreover, due to legal and logistical obstacles, it is difficult to hold these systems and institutions accountable. These impediments are designed to prevent prisoners from obtaining legal representation and bringing claims to hold institutions and officials accountable. The Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA), in particular, creates many barriers that impede prisoners’ access to the courts.

C Jay Smith, a Black transgender woman in San Quentin State Prison, is an inspiring example of someone who spent years advocating for herself to gain access to attorneys and the courts. C Jay was subjected to demeaning comments regarding her gender and denied adequate medical treatment for gender dysphoria by her primary care physician. She exhausted the internal complaint process required under the PLRA and filed her own federal lawsuit. When my firm, Medina Orthwein LLP, and the TGI Justice Project began representing her, we were horrified by the bias and violence she has endured throughout 17 years of incarceration. We were able to secure a settlement, which included monetary compensation for C Jay, amendments to her medical files correcting biased entries, and a new physician. We are grateful for our lasting relationship with C Jay and, despite these successes, are aware of the support she needs as she approaches her first parole hearing. In the jail and immigration contexts, the most effective and powerful advocacy I have witnessed combines coalition building and publicity campaigns to illuminate the conditions for TGI people inside. The most prominent example of these successes, which are rare but have lasting impact, is the case of MichelleLael Norsworthy. Michelle-Lael bravely filed her own lawsuit without counsel and was fortunate to be assigned a judge who felt her case was worthy of pro bono counsel. Transgender Law Center’s Detention Project, where I served as Pro Bono Counsel, and a team of attorneys from Morgan Lewis were then appointed to represent her. We won a precedent-setting preliminary injunction on her behalf, which would have given her immediate access to medically necessary surgery to treat her gender dysphoria. The State appealed the decision and, the day before the appeals court was to hear Michelle-Lael’s case, she was suspiciously released early from custody, mooting her claims. Nevertheless, Michelle-Lael’s courageous decision to advocate 78 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


for herself, combined with skilled legal advocacy, led to a court decision on which other TGI prisoners can rely to advocate for their own medically necessary treatment. The cruelty extends beyond prisoners to the LGBTQI folks employed by these systems. Last year Medina Orthwein filed a case against the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on behalf of a queer psychologist, Dr. Lori Jespersen, after prison officials retaliated against her for reporting harassment, violence, and privacy violations against LGBTQI prisoners. In retaliation for her advocacy, correctional staff locked Dr. Jespersen alone on units with sexually violent prisoners and incited prisoners to commit violence against her. Prison officials also attempted to silence her by relegating her to a desk job, preventing her from advocating for prisoners. Dr. Jespersen’s case recently settled, and we were proud of the result for our client and the awareness of these issues her case raised. These examples make it clear that there is still much work to do. The entanglement of policing, imprisonment, and the production/reinforcement of gender normativity are among the most severe threats to our community. The movement for LGBTQI rights must not ignore the realities of TGI members of our community on the inside. To do so would be to allow the most powerful and destructive tools of oppression against our communities to continue to exist and thrive unabated. In the end, the best way to address the plight of TGI people in institutions is not merely to change the conditions of confinement; rather, it is to address the systemic oppression that results from caging targeted and vulnerable individuals and, ultimately, to abolish cages altogether. Public awareness and inclusion within our civil rights movements must be part of the solution. It is sometimes difficult to feel proud when there remains so much work to be done, but I am proud that the voices of courageous members of our community have been amplified through our work. This work is far from finished, and I hope that this Pride more members of our community will make the decision to join the fight. Jen Orthwein is a fierce advocate for racial and gender justice. Jen co-founded Medina Orthwein LLP, a queer-owned, civil rights law firm that focuses on employment discrimination and transgender prisoner rights. For more about Jen, turn to page 43.

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image: philbondphoto.com

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ON THE SHOULDERS OF OUR ANCESTORS BY KIN FOLKZ

I am a differently-abled, 2-Spirit, Bi/Omnisexual, Autistic, GNC (Gender Non-Conforming) artivist living with Lupus, born of a Black Native mother and Jamaican immigrant father. My multiple intersectional identities expose me daily to the depths of human cruelty. My experience of combating layered marginalization has also allowed me to witness the best of humanity, and gifted me with both an invaluable skillset and blessed opportunity: the capacity to bridge understanding and the chance to reaffirm our interconnected liberation. My lifetime of centering TBLGQIA+ rights through equity-seeking activism directly owes its clarity to the genius of our guiding Black TBLGQIA+ Ancestors. Ancestors like Mary Jones, a Black trans sex worker who, in 1836, stood up against the slavery-supporting court “We find system and refused to have her gender erased. These generations of strength demonstrated by our most oppressed Ancestors' resolve has yielded a priceless storehouse of time-tested strategies with which to secure equity for us all. Their stories of struggle, challenge, and triumph teach us that our liberation requires a multigenerational, multiethnic, multinational network of freedom seekers who prioritize the perspective of marginalized activists. We find strength by embracing the leadership of folks who have created sustainable spaces for effective resistance - while living within the tightening folds of multiple oppressions.

strength by embracing the leadership of folks who have created sustainable spaces for effective resistance.”

The documented disparate status of Black and Indigenous TBLGQIA+ folks in the United States is disheartening. Our life expectancies are aggressively shortened by disproportionate economic insecurity; violence and harassment; HIV + health inequity; religious intolerance and criminal injustice. In the Bay Area, where the income gap is among the widest in the nation, our Black TBLGQIA+ community - already battling persistent discrimination - is particularly hardest hit. It is from within this beleaguered TBLGQIA+ group that leaders with a history of creating equitable spaces for our entire TBLGQIA+ community emerge. Black TBLGQIA+ organizers have developed profound leadership skills and effective strategies to achieve equity in environments heavily impacted by Anti-Blackness, Gender Based Oppression, Capitalism, and state-sanctioned violence. Community leaders like Miss Major, Robbie Clark, Blackberri, Joe Hawkins, and Jeffrey Myers. Community leaders like Fresh White, Angela Davis, Alicia Garza, Malkia Devich Cyril, and Janetta Johnson. Community leaders like Jewelle Gomez, myself, and others all activate freedom for all of us. An activation guided by our multiperspective lenses and fueled by the persistent freedom fighter energy of all our TBLGQIA+ Ancestors. Through Spectrum Queer Media, my work centers on the maintenance of accessible, sustainable TBLGQIA+ and Ally community-healing programs that bolster marginalized voices, encourage community stakeholding and support an authentic practice of equity-sharing. Demystifying the creative process and giving honor to the beauty of collective self-care forms the basis of my organization's projects. Our recognized work includes deep collaborations with other TBLGQIA+ social justice and wellness organizations serving all ages and ethnicities around the globe. The strength of character and fairness exhibited among millennial freedom seekers inspires awe. As Elders, we should revel in the wisdom displayed by youth who are demanding that people with intersectional identities be given decision-making positions of power. I yield to and encourage them to continue to use their privilege to provide a platform to amplify the voices of silenced TBLGQIA+ community members. We each proudly honor the strengths that our most formidable Ancestors lovingly entrusted to us when we empower our oppressed TBLGQIA+ community. In doing so, we are actively securing liberation for us all. Kin Folkz is an award-winning educator, human rights artivist, author, community catalyst, and the CEO and co-founder of Spectrum Queer Media, an internationally recognized LGBTQIA rights, media and creative arts advocacy organization. For more about Kin, turn to Page 48. SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 81


“THE BEST LESBIAN COMEDY IN YEARS” — IndieWire

MOLLY SHANNON

as Emily Dickinson in

Wild Nights with Emily

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 6:30 PM (Q&A/Party to follow)

Castro Theatre | Tickets: www.frameline.org | www.wildnightswithemily.com


LOOKING BACK, THINKING FORWARD

A REFLECTION ON WORKING TOGETHER FOR A BETTER TOMORROW BY SHAUN HAINES

As a Heritage of Pride Award recipient for 2018, my platform is safety, dignity, and opportunity for those experiencing poverty and homelessness. We are organizing and I am here to recruit you! This year, we are pleased to celebrate Generations of Strength. As I think about our theme this year, I am remembering the first articles I composed when I was 15. I wrote for San Francisco Teen Newspaper. I remember writing about guns in schools 25 years ago, in 1994. I remember interviewing the editor of the first gay youth magazine I ever purchased. I wasn’t even out yet. I remember writing about a bus driver, an African American woman, who saw a spark within my spirit and fanned its flames by inviting me to participate in her Black women’s investment group. They were preparing to invest in a documentary by the first Black male film director I’d ever met. I wrote that people are people and that you can only find out who they are by getting to know them beyond their cover. I wouldn’t pen another piece for twenty years until I was invited to contribute to the San Francisco Bay Times. I wrote about “the changing face of San Francisco.” I wrote about my deep connection to all communities across the city as a witness to rampant inequality, social injustice, violence, poverty, and displacement. I wrote about my experiences growing up during the height of the AIDS epidemic and the uncertainty that clouded my future – not knowing I was meant to become an HIV activist, and later promote PrEP in underserved communities of color.

“We need to close the widening gaps between the impoverished, the rich, and the diminishing middle class.”

Growing up, I never conceived that I would become an associate member of the San Francisco Democratic Party. I didn’t know I would become a founder and president of San Francisco Black Community Matters, or that I would serve on the LGBT Advisory Committee of the San Francisco Human Rights Commission. I didn’t know I would become a commissioner on the Sunshine Ordinance Task Force dealing with issues of open government. I didn’t know I would help to organize community events and demonstrations against the alt-right, the KKK, or that I would help create anti-racism workshops. Because of these experiences, I have grown to understand how public policy can benefit or impact communities that are experiencing hardship. Every step on my journey has allowed me to develop a keen and critical eye on public policy, community affairs, social justice. My experience helps me to draw in our community to work together. Today, I’m doing much more than just writing about issues facing our society. I organize people to help develop community-centered solutions to social and political problems. With a seat at the table, I’m working on your behalf by taking action. Join me in writing, organizing and serving to affect change - we need to close the widening gaps between the impoverished, the rich, and the diminishing middle class. I recognize that I will forever be a part of the fabric of our wonderful LGBTQ community. Remember that Generations of Strength is about how our past informs our present and prepares us for what’s to come in the future - a future that by working together will be brighter than today. Shaun Haines is the founder and director of San Francisco Impact Partners. For more information about Shaun, turn to page 49. Visit bit.ly/joinshaunatpride or scan the code at left to learn more.

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 83


Together for one goal.

Let’s help stop the virus together. Gilead proudly supports San Francisco Pride. For videos and more information, visit YouTube.com/GileadHIV GILEAD and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Š 2018 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. UNBC5374 01/18


MAKING HISTORY IN CALIFORNIA’S SCHOOLS FAIR, ACCURATE, INCLUSIVE, AND RESPECTFUL

BY POLLY PAGENHART, POLICY & COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR, OUR FAMILY COALITION In 2011, California made history: we were the very first state in the nation to end the silence about LGBTQ people in our public schools’ history and social science curriculum. The FAIR Education Act – authored by Senator Mark Leno, passed by the legislature, and signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown – amended California Education Code to include Fair, Accurate, Inclusive, and Respectful reference to contributions by members of the LGBTQ community in our history and social studies instruction. But passage of the bill was just the beginning. The FAIR Education Act Implementation Coalition, convened and led by Our Family Coalition, has been working for half a dozen years to ensure this historic legislation has its intended effect. With no funding for implementation and no penalty for ignoring it, in order for the FAIR Ed Act to have an impact it needed to be baked into the state’s grade-level subject matter standards. Revision of those standards, or “frameworks,” comes just once a decade, and 2016 brought our first opportunity. FAIR Education Act advocates – led by historians and educators, with the support of LGBTQ rights organizations and community members – worked vigilantly, and succeeded in integrating LGBTQ content into the new standards. It would be at the next step – appearance in textbooks – that the proverbial rubber would hit the road. In 2017, over a dozen textbook companies vied for State Board of Education approval. We reviewed them and found, with few exceptions, that the LGBTQ content in them was insufficient, inaccurate, or both. Yet the initial review by the State Board of Education caught none of this. Had these textbooks been approved as is, the impact of this historic legislation would have been blunted or even erased. If they wished, school districts could easily select those textbooks which continued to omit LGBTQ people from California and American history, prioritizing their discomfort over students’ rights to receive a fair and complete education. Months of dialog with publishers ensued. We offered line-by-line content revisions on hundreds and hundreds of pages of textbooks. Finally, we provided the State Board of Education with detailed recommendations: which textbooks we found finally to be compliant with the FAIR Education Act, and which could be, provided they made additional amendments. In the end, the State Board of Education voted unanimously to follow our recommendations, approving only those textbooks that provided sufficient and accurate inclusion of LGBTQ people, even rejecting two that did not. The Department of Education’s Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction recognized the import of this as much as we did, hailing it as “One of the greatest reforms in the history of education in California!” So what does this all mean? This means that beginning this fall, school kids across the state – over six million, to put a number on it – can begin to learn that LGBTQ people have contributed to our shared history. As we continue to advocate for full implementation across the state, they’ll learn about LGBTQ families when they study families; they’ll learn about two spirit people when they study indigenous cultures in the Americas; they’ll learn that towering figures of American letters and civil rights and discovery – from the Harlem Renaissance to the March on Washington to the first woman in space – included people who were LGBTQ. The impact on young LGBTQ people – seeing themselves and their families represented, seeing queer and trans role models – will no doubt be incalculable. But so will the impact on the whole generation of kids around them: they will be empowered with understanding, more able to grow into allies than antagonists. Bias will be sapped of the ignorance that can amplify it. What was once invisible or distorted will become visible: fairly, accurately, inclusively, and respectfully. And that will change everything. Much work remains in 2018 and beyond: we need to support the textbook adoption process at the school district level, we need to be ready to respond to push-back in the multiple forms it will take, and we need to ensure the effective treatment of LGBTQ content in the classroom in the years to come. But 2017 was a banner year. And California’s future will be far brighter as a result. The FAIR Education Act Implementation Coalition is a statewide alliance of organizations – convened and led by Our Family Coalition, and including the GSA Network, the Committee on LGBT History, the Los Angeles LGBT Center, the Safe Schools Project of Santa Cruz County, Equality California and ACLU – which advocates for full implementation of the 2011 FAIR Education Act and the 2016 History-Social Science Frameworks which reflect it. More on the FAIR Act on Page 45. SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 85


AGING BRINGS A POWERFUL PERSPECTIVE OUR HISTORY MAKES US STRONGER AS A COMMUNITY BY DR. KARYN SKULTETY, OPENHOUSE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

San Francisco is the birth place of the LGBTQ movement. These are the streets where the leaders of our community were made and where our march towards justice and Pride began. On a warm night in August of 1966, the Compton Cafeteria riots marked the moment our community came together and said “no more”. Drag queens and transgender women, tired of being harassed by the police and neighbors, rose up to proclaim they would no longer tolerate daily abuse and discrimination. In the days, weeks and years that followed, our community as we know it was born. In 1977, we elected Harvey Milk. In 1978, we defeated the Briggs Initiative. Throughout the ’80s and ’90s, our Attendees at the 2017 Openhouse LGBTQ Senior Prom. community led the response to the AIDS crisis - the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, the AIDS Memorial Quilt, the National AIDS Memorial Grove. Protesting, Acting Up and shutting down the Golden Gate Bridge. In 2004, when some said it wasn’t the time, Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin stood in City Hall and were announced spouses for life. In 2008, they did it again legally, as the rest of the country watched. These are, of course, only snapshots of the decades of activism and heroism that make up our shared history. So, do we believe our history makes us richer, stronger, more able to fight today for our community? Think of what we lose if those moments, lessons and leaders are allowed to disappear. Now contrast that to who we can be as a community if those experiences, stories, and leaders are central in our lives and our fight for social justice. At Openhouse, we believe aging brings a powerful perspective. We can and should harness that power to strengthen our community and ensure this city remains a leader in our LGBTQ movement. But we have our work cut out for us. A lack of affordable and safe housing, the threat of eviction, and profound income inequality are stripping this community of its heroes. Over 30% of seniors in San Francisco are living in poverty- a number that has dramatically increased in the past four years (and is higher for LGBT people.) Even more tragic, we know health disparities, violence, discrimination and income inequality are amplified for many in our community. When seniors are forced to move out of our city, they lose their families of choice. We lose our leaders. When transgender people and people of color are not aging alongside the rest of us, we lose our power, our richness, our collective force. Are we a community without lived history? How do we imagine a future without connections to the past? At Openhouse, we aren’t just fighting for places for people to live, we are fighting for high quality care, and for older people to be seen and central in our lives. Ageism, the idea that older people are less valuable than youth, is a powerful force. It is the force that keeps us scared of using the word senior. It is the force that keeps younger people from talking to or learning from those older than them. When we realize that LGBT seniors are more likely to live alone and less likely to have children, ageism is the force that allows us to simply accept their loneliness and isolation as inevitable. We must be a community that fights ageism. We must decide that isolation is unacceptable for anyone in our families of choice. At Openhouse, we are actively ending isolation by engaging older people into a community of support. Community can start with one connection – a Friendly Visitor who comes into your home twice a month and reminds you that you are not alone. We currently have a wait list of individuals 86 • INSIDE PRIDE | GENERATIONS OF STRENGTH


asking for Friendly Visitors. Even a single visit carries tremendous power. Over half of those served by our Friendly Visitor program move from relative isolation to regularly engaging in Openhouse community groups and events. In fact, many of our engagement programs are led by community members and volunteers, rather than staff. When people begin feeling a “We must be part of something bigger, a community leadership flourishes and others come out looking that fights for places to connect. ageism. We can build a place Community where community awaits people of all ages with can start open arms. We have with one watched the power connection can have – connection.” Openhouse large events (Fall Feast, Pride parties and more!) have become intergenerational celebrations. Seniors are central to the party, cheered on by those who look up to them and learn from them. Imagine a community fueled by the power of intergenerational perspectives. Your support and belief in community allowed Openhouse to complete the first LGBT-welcoming senior affordable housing in San Francisco. It is your support now that will ensure we finish our dream by building a senior center integrated into 79 more affordable apartments. But beyond building homes and beyond building our new center, we all need to work to ensure we aren’t building yet another closet. If our housing and our program space becomes a place only for seniors, we have again sent a message that it’s best for our seniors, our heroes, to stay separate from the rest of us. Instead, we think of Openhouse as a beacon calling individuals of all ages to come together, to celebrate our history, and to fully realize the power of perspective from aging. If we make this a reality, then we have built a true community center. We can be a community where older people are central in our lives and in our fight for social justice. But we can’t do it alone. Join us in building a community we can be proud of – Pride at every age. Dr. Karyn Skultety is the Executive Director of Openhouse. Openhouse is a nonprofit dedicated to serving and celebrating LGBTQ seniors in San Francisco and the Bay Area with housing, support and community building. Openhouse will lead a contingent of LGBTQ elders at the top of our 2018 parade, in celebration of our theme, Generations of Strength.

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 87

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Dine in the stylish Sutro’s or the casual Bistro restaurant. Enjoy Sundays in our famous Champagne Brunch Buffet in the Terrace Room.

Visit the iconic Cliff House where awesome views, historic ambience, and warm hospitality are a San Francisco tradition!

Watch amazing sunsets with live jazz Friday nights in the Balcony Lounge.

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THE PINK TRIANGLE A San Francisco tradition, the Pink Triangle on Twin Peaks, is almost 200 feet across, one acre in size, and can be seen for twenty miles. The community has embraced the pink triangle as a symbol of pride, though it was once used in an attempt to label and persecute. We must remind people of the hatred and prejudice of the past to help educate others to prevent such hatred from happening again. What happened in the Holocaust must not be forgotten and must not be repeated. The Pink Triangle doesn’t just magically float up onto Twin Peaks each year! Many hardworking individuals volunteer to make the display possible every year by climbing the hill and installing over 175 bright pink canvasses and thousands of steel spikes. See below are three options to volunteer! Visit thepinktriangle.com for more information. OUTLINE INSTALL: (Friday, June 22 | 1:30 to 5:00 PM) The Pink “V” is set up today so volunteers can fill in between the lines Saturday. MAIN INSTALLATION: (Saturday, June 23 | 7:00 to 10:00 AM) Coffee, pastries and Pink Triangle t-shirts for all who volunteer for the installation. The commemoration ceremony follows with various dignitaries including elected officials, some of the Grand Marshals and honorees, plus the SF Lesbian Gay Freedom Band at 10:30 a.m. DE-INSTALLATION: (Sunday, June 24 | 4:30 to 8:00 PM) With traditionally the fewest volunteers, this is the day with the greatest need. Even an hour is a big help!

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We are the voice of Love That dares to speak its name. We will not, can not be silenced. We are a wave of Love That ripples around the world. We’re every creed, colour and religion. We are a beacon of Love Dazzling in our style and diversity. We’re trendsetters, go-getters, creatives. We are the spectrum of Love Shape-shifters, Gender-benders…fluid. We’re dreamers, magicians, groundbreakers. We are a celebration of Love People who hang on to hope. We’re L.G.B.T.Q. The real deal. WE ARE

image: christie james

by Trudy Howson - inaugural UK LGBT Poet Laureate (2016-19) Trudy writes poetry that illuminates and explores our community’s diverse landscape. Her work is widely performed and publicized in the UK. SF Pride is grateful for her contribution to InsidePride. lgbtpoetlaureate.org.uk

SFPRIDE.ORG | INSIDE PRIDE • 91


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INSIDE PRIDE • 2018  

The official guide to the 2018 San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration.

INSIDE PRIDE • 2018  

The official guide to the 2018 San Francisco Pride Parade and Celebration.