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Coastal Virginia MAGAZINE

{The City & Lifestyle Magazine of Hampton Roads} TM

November | December 2013

New Name

Same Great Content

Hampton Roads Magazine is now Coastal Virginia Magazine

$

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Sensational Singles n Andy Vakos

Fruit cakes you’ll love, lights on the beach, champagne cocktails, specialty chocolates, model trains and more. www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com $4.95 2013

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Holidays Are Here:

DEC

Giving Back Issue

{Plus}

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20 Sensational Singles

Get In The Dating Game With These Great Catches

Giving Back The Real CW Awards

Honoring The Region’s Top Non-Profits

Historians Uncover A New View Of Colonial Williamsburg's Architecture

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Michael M. Gleason, Site Manager (757) 329-4713 (direct)

JoAnn Wood, Resale Consultant (757) 641-3678 (direct)

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2013

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Contents Features

page

52

20 Sensational Singles Get into the dating game! You’re not likely to strike out with some of these fun and fabulous catches. Compiled by Melissa M. Stewart and Pamela Hopkins. Photography by Veronica Dana

65 Reading The Buildings The Chesapeake House uncovers the true art of fieldwork done by Colonial Williamsburg historians and provides a new view of early American architecture. By Don Harrison 92 Giving Back Awards 2013 Honoring the region’s outstanding non-profits. PLUS: First-hand experiences at the top three charities. By Angela Blue, Patti Hinson, My Nguyen and Melissa M. Stewart

Sensational Single, Adela Mitchell

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2013

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Contents online contents

Departments 7

Publisher’s Note

9

Editor’s Note

13

Around the Region A look at how much local communities give to charity. By Ben Swenson

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15

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Left Side The charge that the local media have a “liberal bias” is ludicrous. They are ruled by the profit motive, pure and simple. By Tom Robotham Right Side Quit the national news coverage and start focusing on compelling local stories. By Dave Parker

The Current

Current Close Up—Beach Brightener. PLUS: 18 Current Conditions— Charity Check; Base Security; Keep Those Corks; A New Suit; 20 Current Bites—Crab & Corn Crush; Sassy Spread; Coastal Grill’s Gorgeous Gourds; 22 Current Scene—Thanksgiving Dinner Spots; Virginia’s Finest Chocolates; Current Culture—Cooking, Colonial-style; Parading in Plaid; 24 Current Events— Fall Engagement Party.

Datebook

27 Coastal Virginia comes alive during the months of November and December with spectacular holiday performances, wintry museum exhibits, several parades and many other reasons to fight the chill and explore the galleries, venues and stages that make our culture so grand.

Life

39 Weekends—48 hours of urban and rural hiking in Richmond and Williamsburg provides walks to remember close to home. PLUS: 41 In Store—Dale’s Train Station is right on track to delight hobbyists and spur holiday nostalgia this season;

42 Success—Speaking with Fred J. Whyte, a popular president with a penchant for power equipment; 44 Advice On Eldercare—It’s important to seek support, near and far, when providing for an aging adult.

Dish

113 To Dine For—Colonial Crabcakes. PLUS: 114 Fruitcake Fever— Holiday treats you’ll love—honest—as local bakers re-imagine the much-aligned dessert; 125 Local Flavor—Whether with a capital “C” or not, this special imbibe celebrates the season; 128 Nosh News—A smorgasbord of Coastal Virginia food happenings. 130 Back Talk 13 reasons I can celebrate 2013. By Kristen De Deyn Kirk

Special Sections 46 HRM Health Shoulder Work Ahead—A reverse replacement could provide some much-needed relief. PLUS: 48 Screen Savers—Computer glasses can help with headaches and eyestrain. 69 Super Lawyers The area’s top attorneys. 76 History For The Holidays Celebrate the joy of the season in Jamestown, Yorktown and Williamsburg. 108 Do Your Homework How to prepare for and what to expect from a private school open house. PLUS: Listings for area schools. 110 Financing Your Future Part one of a twopart series on the best retirement decisions you can make.

HamptonRoads Magazine (ISSN 1533-8599) is published by VistaGraphics, Inc., 1264 Perimeter Parkway, Virginia Beach, VA 23454. Issues are published 8 times per year: bimonthly except monthly in January, April, July, & October. The annual subscription rate is $19.95. For subscription orders & changes of address, please call (757) 422-8979 x 106. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to HamptonRoads Magazine, 1264 Perimeter Parkway, Virginia Beach, VA 23454. Periodical postage paid at Virginia Beach, VA and additional mailing offices.

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.com CoastalVirginiaMag

Don’t Miss the Bus! Voting for our Top Teachers Search begins Nov. 3 and runs through Dec. 6. Remember, the 10 individuals receiving the most votes will be profiled in our February 2014 Education issue, so be sure to show your school and teacher pride today! Visit CoastalVirginiaMag.com under ‘Contests.’

It All Starts With a Date …so don’t miss this one. Join us for our annual Sensational Singles Date Auction with music, food, libations, (and yes, a mechanical bull) and your very own shot at love! Purchase tickets at CoastalVirginiaMag.com. PLUS: Once you’ve read up on our Singles, vote for the readers’ choice favorite in our Single’d Out Poll.

More Bang for your Buck! If you love scouring for bargains on the best businesses and services in Hampton Roads, then we’ve got great news for you. THE HRM 50/50 Marketplace has gone completely digital and is now easier than ever to use! Now, whenever you take advantage of our frequently-updated deals, you’ll be e-mailed a voucher to redeem your purchase instead HAMPTON ROADS MAGAZINE’S of having to wait to receive your certificate in the mail. Hurry over to our ‘Store’ tab on CoastalVirginiaMag.com to discover the countless MARKETPLACE quality, local businesses that want Half-Price Shopping to save you money.

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Share Your Good News Sharing the good news about your engagement or wedding is now easier than ever! You can now post your electronic engagement or wedding announcements on our web site and share your milestone with family and friends from all over the world. This is an affordable and easy way to commemorate your special day! Each announcement comes with a complimentary slideshow. Head to CoastalVirginiaMag.com under ‘Weddings’ to get started.

Let’s Socialize

“Like” us on Facebook at Coastal Virginia Mag and follow us on Twitter @covamag to enter exclusive contests, get a sneak peak of photo shoots, events and more, and be the first to know what’s coming up in future issues.

2013

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NoteS Publisher

askthe Pros Series

More Than A Great Place

Y

ou know, Hampton Roads Magazine was launched (as HR Monthly) 13 years ago. This Nov. 1 marks the beginning of our 14th year publishing this region’s city and lifestyle magazine. And, as you now know, we have begun a new era with our transition to Coastal Virginia Magazine, effective with the issue you are holding. What you may not know is what preceded this brief history. My start in publishing began with my purchase of the distributorship rights to the local market for a national magazine that was intended for weekly distribution into area hotel rooms. The name of the magazine was Travel Host, and it was advertised with my purchase in 1985 as the “Norfolk” market. With a more regional perspective, I quickly named my local market Travel Host of Tidewater. Within the first few weeks of being in business, I was contacted by a group of gentlemen who quickly impressed upon me the identity crisis our region was dealing with along with a lot of good reasons why “Tidewater” should not be part of my publication’s name and why Hampton Roads should. So, it was nearly 29 years ago when I first became a proponent of regionalism and the name Hampton Roads, reflected in my new publication’s name, Travel Host of Hampton Roads. Hampton Roads served Hampton Roads Magazine well as a name that identifies a collection of individual cities, towns and counties, primarily in southeast Virginia. As an MSA, we all know it even ropes in a piece of northeast North Carolina. I love living in Hampton Roads. I love what all the cities and towns contribute to making this area so special. I believe in this region. I recognized the benefit of regional initiatives and regional solutions 29 years ago. Quite simply, Hampton Roads is a great place. But Coastal Virginia is more than a great place. It is a great lifestyle. With this transition, our commitment to our readers, advertisers and advocates only grows stronger. Our mission statement, put forth 14 years ago with our initial launch, remains the same today: “ ... to supply our consumers with quality content and superior design that informs, entertains and celebrates life in ... Coastal Virginia.” I hope you enjoy the changes you’ll find in store. Besides the name change, you’ll find some new sections and a slick new design. Please do write us with your thoughts, suggestions and comments. You are what makes us tick.

Randy Thompson Randy@VGNet.com

Get Ready For that

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T

he first date is an important step in the dating world, and an unsuccessful first date can inhibit you from connecting with your true love. Mimi advises all her clients to put the first date into perspective. “What is the end game here?” Mimi says.“ The only thing my clients need to establish on the first date is to know whether there is enough interest to follow up with a second date. What is not important is an instant romantic connection.” Mimi explains that an instant romance is an unsafe way to proceed on a first date, and restraint is far more effective than passionate advances.

GettinG Ready foR the fiRst date

For men, grooming and presentation go a long way. Mimi suggests her male clients visit the barber to have a clean haircut and to trim or shave their facial hair. Sometimes clients need a little help picking out the right outfit, especially one that conveys the right message. The perfectly dressed man appears in a casual navy or dark suit with a pressed white button-down shirt with just one button undone at the top. The perfectly dressed woman accentuates the feature

FIRst date success tIps From hampton roads Gold Winning Matchmaker Mimi

she finds most attractive about herself. And she displays confidence by maintaining eye contact with her date.

how to act on the fiRst date

Mimi recommends that the man always arrive five minutes early to a date and never leave his date waiting. Men are encouraged to pay for dinner and tip generously at 20 percent. Mimi advises her women to go into thefirst date with an open mind and optimism.“Go into your date with your glass half full, not all men are bad and not all men just want one thing,” Mimi says. “When you meet a man through my organization, you understand he has invested himself in meeting you and that he has passed stringent qualifying tests.” And clients should never consume more than two alcoholic drinks.

the Key to successful MatchMaKinG

“The key to your success is understanding that using a quality matchmaker is like havinga quality attorney,” Mimi says. “They both know how to ‘represent,’ how to ‘advocate,’ how to ‘mediate’ issues, and both are results oriented. “Using a Matchmaker, such as myself, or one of my trained Top Matchmakers, provides an invisible third wheel to your date, and can facilitate lasting foundations upon which you can consider building a future with that special someone,” Mimi says. “I’m Mimi, or M.I.M.I.: Match, Introduce, Manage and Improve.” Contact Mimi now, or any of her personally trained Matchmakers, for a free consultation!

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The power is simple. of community banking

Good things happen when people come together and share a common vision. Together, we can help our community thrive. When you bank with TowneBank, you keep your money working for our local economy. Every local deposit and loan helps move our community forward. Toward our recovery. Toward our future.

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Bank local. Hire local. Grow local. townebank.com TowneBank is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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NoteS

ClosE-uP p.17

Conditions p.18

BitEs p.20

sCEnE p.22

CulturE p.23

EvEnts p.24

Current

The

Editor

» Close-UP

Beach Brightener

E

ach year around this time, families bundle up in winter coats and scarves, load their kids in the car and head to the Virginia Beach Oceanfront to embark on an activity that would be completely illegal during any other time of the year: driving their cars on the boardwalk. Of course they have a good reason; they’re giddy with the anticipation of seeing the hundreds of thousands of lights at McDonald’s Holiday Lights at the Beach.

The Name Game

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‘‘

I just liked working with metal.

‘‘

P h oto by J i m P i l e

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New nomenclature:

“Roads Report” is now “The Current,” representing all areas of Coastal Virginia and featuring short, news-worthy reads.

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NoN-

prof

iTs

Number of votes: 635 Established: The LCpl. Cody S. Childers Memorial Fund was established in August 2010 by Wendy Childers, the mother of Cody Childers, a 19-year-old Marine who was killed in action in Marjah, Afghanistan on Aug. 20, 2010 while on foot patrol. Mission: To honor Cody’s memory and share his story by continuing to support his Marine brothers by shipping care packages filled with snacks, blankets, magazines, electronics, socks and more to make their deployment more comfortable. To ensure that all Marines know that someone at home is thinking of them and appreciates all they do for the United States of America. Key people: The Childers Family: Wendy, Randy, Ryan and Cassidy, along with dedicated volunteers. Jeff Stewart and Chris Levins present the annual car show, and the Voorhees family presents the annual golf tournament at Broad Bay Country Club. Derrick Ward and Patty Brackett, with the Edinburgh Chick-Fil-A, hold numerous spirit fundraisers throughout the year. Tammi McAffee is responsible for creating all graphics and, in addition, mails all of the care packages through the Edinburgh Goin Postal, the official donation drop-off center.

Coastal Virginia Magazine is pleased to present the second annual Giving Back Awards winners. After a nomination period and a total of 19,264 online votes cast, the following 25 charities receive the highest honors. If you volunteer or support one of these organizations, or any of the wonderful non-profits in Coastal Virginia, we applaud you. Please read more about their amazing efforts on the following pages. PLUS: Our staff experiences the top three first-hand. —The Editors

Scan here for video that provides an inside look into the top three charities and the work they do.

5

P.O. Box 16576, Chesapeake • 757-536-0496 • www.WeCareMarines.com

By Sponsored

2013

Honoring THE rEgion’s ouTsTanding non-ProfiTs

Top

LCPL. CODY S. CHILDERS MEMORIAL FUND

Volunteer opportunities: Various fundraisers throughout the year to fund filling and shipping the care packages, including an annual car show and golf tournament, spirit nights and other events. All events are listed online at WeCareMarines.com. What are the biggest struggles your organization faces? “Our packages are 100 percent paid for through fundraisers that we hold throughout the year. We have our annual events but are always trying to develop new, fun events for our supporters to attend. Raffles are huge for us, and we rely on donations for the prizes. We also reach out to local and national companies for donations to include in our care packages.”

>

What is the most rewarding part about what your non-profit does? “Believing that Cody would be proud of the support that we have continued in his honor and knowing that the Marines who open our boxes feel that someone at home cares and is appreciative of all they do for our country.”

—My Nguyen 92

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Room for more:

We have the space to share our stories and content with you. This allows the eye to breathe as you enjoy the articles, photos and illustrations.

November

editors’ picks Sunday

Monday

28

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

20

29

sensational

CVM

am intimately familiar with the difficulty of coming up with just the right name. After months of stress, compromise, searching the internet and scouring our family trees, my husband I finally agreed to what we think is a perfect choice for our second daughter, due to arrive this month. Our months-long naming process took several things into account—ability to be shortened, complements our other little girl’s name, not on any Top 100 list (being one of at least 15 Melissas in my elementary school makes me snub anything trendy), and something that just sounded right. After all, one can never underestimate the importance of a name. A chapter in the popular book Freakonomics even notes that there is some evidence that a name can influence how a child performs in school and can affect career opportunities. So, you can imagine another crucial consideration for myself and our magazine’s staff in the past few months has been contemplating and ultimately choosing a new name for our publication—Coastal Virginia Magazine. After spending 13 years as Hampton Roads Magazine, this was no doubt a risky decision, but one we are very confident in and excited about. We feel our new, descriptive name more accurately represents our coverage area and brand. While Hampton Roads is a place, Coastal Virginia depicts a lifestyle, with many pleasant connotations coming to mind when hearing the name (not to mention the ability to easily place it on a map). Along with our improved name, you also may notice our slightly larger size and fresh, new design, including updated fonts, section openers and an overall more open and airy feel with larger photos that allow us to better showcase the beauty of our region. Our revamped front-of-the-book section, The Current, highlights short reads on pages dedicated to popular topics—news, trends, food, culture and more. This issue includes everything from military member opinions on base security (in Current Conditions) to the lowdown on popular eatery Coastal Grill’s signature squash side dish (in Current Bites). While this transition certainly marks a new beginning and the next phase for our city and lifestyle publication, our commitment to our original mission remains unchanged. That includes quality content that influences, informs, entertains and celebrates life in our region. We celebrate this month with our popular Sensational Singles feature, highlighting 20 of the best catches in the area, and our second annual Giving Back Awards, which includes first-person accounts of working with the top three non-profits written by myself and fellow staff members. Don Harrison’s piece “Reading the Buildings” provides some enlightening information about what the real Colonial Williamsburg looked like. And be sure to check out our columnists’ commentary on the role of the local media, as well as seasonal stories on a shop selling thousands of model trains (pg. 41), a close-up with a man who shapes metal into displays for Holiday Lights at the Beach (pg. 17), and must-try recipes for fruit cake (yes, really) put together by local bakers (pg. 114). I hope our changes bring us new readers as well as delight our current and committed audience. Please do write and let me know what you think of the new name. As for what I’ll be calling my baby girl, I’m keeping that one a secret ... at least for a few more weeks. Congratulations on being a reader of the premiere issue of a trusted favorite.

As excited as the families are over gazing at the colorful displays along the boardwalk, there’s one man who is perhaps more thrilled. His name is Andy Vakos, and he’s the creator of many of these tremendous light formations. During his high school days when all his friends were out surfing, Vakos was learning how to weld. “I just liked working with metal,” he says. This hobby stuck with him for years, and after 1995, when the city produced its first Holiday Lights at the Beach, Vakos stared up at a light display and said, “You know what? I could make one of those.” So he did. Since then, he’s created nine displays, along with helping to repair and revamp other displays throughout the years. Vakos starts working on a display for the holiday season three to four months ahead. However, since his full-time job as general manager of the Oceanfront Inn requires a great amount of time and dedication, he often doesn’t begin working on the light displays until 8 p.m., usually staying up until 2 a.m. Sleep? “It’s overrated,” he says with a laugh. To create a display, Vakos first draws a design on graph paper to scale it. This year, the first step is already taken care of because Beach Events held an art contest where students from local high schools could submit drawings, and the two designs that were chosen will have their drawings turned into a light display. Next he cuts the steel, bends it piece by piece and welds it together. Once the display part is finished he creates the frame and sends it all off to be painted and powder coated to protect the design from outdoor elements. Finally, he strings the lights, which he says is the most tedious part. On a recent display, Vakos got some help from his family screwing in the hundreds of light bulbs. “I had my kids, my wife and my inlaws helping me put the bulbs in because there’s so many, but when it lit up—and it worked—it was CoVa the best thing in the world.” —Angela Blue n

singles

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3 Color Me Rad 5K

Virginia beach Sportsplex, Virginia beach. www. colormerad.com

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11 Hungarian State Folk Ensemble

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Ferguson center for the Arts, Newport News. www. Ferguson.org

{Through Dec. 1} Crawl, Climb and Fly with Amazing Butterflies

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ewell recital Hall, Williamsburg. www.Wm.edu

{8–10} Bodacious Bazaar & Art Festival

Hampton roads convention center, Hampton. www. bodacious bazaar.com

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Portsmouth Naval Shipyard museum and Lightship Portsmouth. www. PortsNaval museums.com

Founder’s Inn, Virginia beach. www.cFF.org

Honoring our Veterans

25

26

Cirque Dreams Holidaze

chesapeake conference center, chesapeake. www.cityOf chesapeake.net

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Foundation’s Finest to benefit Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

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Awww Shucks Oyster Roast Virginia Living museum, Newport News. www. TheVLm.org

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Bill Cosby

29th Annual Grand Illumination Parade

Downtown Norfolk. www. DowntownNorfolk. org/Holidays InThecity

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Thanksgiving Day

Ferguson center for the Arts, Newport News. www. Ferguson.org

Saturday

Yoonie Han, Pianist

Sandler center for the Performing Arts, Virginia beach. www.Sandler center.org

Virginia Aquarium, Virginia beach. www.Virginia Aquarium.com

{23–24} Holiday Craft Show

Coastal Virginia Magazine’s Sensational Singles Soiree

eagle’s Nest rockin’ country bar, chesapeake. www. coastalVirginiamag. com

chrysler Hall, Norfolk. www. SevenVenues.com

Kevin James

7

Friday

1

Virginia Symphony Orchestra: Beethoven’s Fifth

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Sandler center for the Performing Arts, Virginia beach. www. Sandlercenter.org

Hanukkah Begins 28

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2013

To submit your event for the Datebook, email angela@coastalvirginiamag.com

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A fresh visual vocabulary: After months of research and review, we found a new set of typefaces and colors that will carry our message to you for years to come.

Melissa M. Stewart Melissa@CoastalVirginiaMag.com Photo by Glenn Fajota

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Coastal Virginia MagaZinE

{The City & Lifestyle Magazine of Hampton Roads}

{The City & Lifestyle Magazine of Hampton Roads} TM

Giving Back Awards Honoring The Region’s Top Non-Profits

New Name

Same Great Content

20

Sensational Singles Get In The Dating Game With These Great Catches

The Real CW Historians Uncover A New View Of Colonial Williamsburg's Architecture

Coastal Virginia Magazine's

Premiere Issue

NoVeMber | DeCeMber 2013

Holidays Are Here: Fruit cakes you’ll love, lights on the beach, champagne cocktails, specialty chocolates, model trains and more.

New Name

www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com

$4.95

N OV 2013

{Plus}

Photographer Eileen Dalby

Same Great Content

hampton roads magazine is now coastal virginia magazine

$

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{The City & Lifestyle Magazine of Hampton Roads}

New Name

20

www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com $4.95

sensational sinGles

get in the dating game With these great catches

Same Great Content

GivinG Back The Real CW awards

honoring the region’s top non-proFits

COVA MAG COVER 12_13 FINAL3.indd 4

20

Sensational Singles Get In The Dating Game With These Great Catches

Coastal Virginia Magazine's

Premiere Issue

historians uncover a neW vieW oF colonial Williamsburg's architecture

Winner: Photographer Matt Haddaway

Giving Back Awards Honoring The Region’s Top Non-Profits

{Plus} Holidays Are Here: Fruit cakes you’ll love, lights on the beach, champagne cocktails, specialty chocolates, model trains and more.

10/16/13 12:51 PM

The Real CW Historians Uncover A New View Of Colonial Williamsburg's Architecture www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com

$4.95

NOV 2013

sensational sinGles n andy vakos

Fruit cakes you’ll love, lights on the beach, champagne cocktails, specialty chocolates, model trains and more. 2013

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Holidays Are Here:

DEC

GivinG Back issue

{Plus}

Photographer James Miller

Coastal Camera Crew

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{The City & Lifestyle Magazine of Hampton Roads}

{The City & Lifestyle Magazine of Hampton Roads}

Giving Back Awards Honoring The Region’s Top Non-Profits

New Name

Same Great Content Coastal Virginia Magazine's

Premiere Issue

20

Sensational Singles Get In The Dating Game With These Great Catches

New Name

Same Great Content

Giving Back Awards Honoring The Region’s Top Non-Profits

20

Coastal Virginia Magazine's

Premiere Issue

Sensational Singles

The Real CW Historians Uncover A New View Of Colonial Williamsburg's Architecture

Get In The Dating Game With These Great Catches

The Real CW

Holidays Are Here: Fruit cakes you’ll love, lights on the beach, champagne cocktails, specialty chocolates, model trains and more.

Photographer Matt Haddaway

$4.95

{Plus} Holidays Are Here: Fruit cakes you’ll love, lights on the beach, champagne cocktails, specialty chocolates, model trains and more.

Historians Uncover A New View Of Colonial Williamsburg's Architecture www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com

$4.95

N OV 2013

{Plus}

www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com N OV 2013

For our premiere issue of Coastal Virginia Magazine, we wanted to allow an opportunity to showcase one of our talented staff shutterbugs. We held an inner-office photo contest and asked for imagery that would represent our publication for years to come. When we saw the entries coming in and all the beautiful photos, we had a hard decision to make. Though we picked one winner for our cover (above), we are certainly going to share more photographic work from our staff on the pages to come. Here are samples of some of the runner-ups. We found this process to be a real eye opener and hope to extend contests in the future to other shutterbugs out there in Coastal Virginia. So keep an eye out for any announcements in issues to come. Click!

Photographer Mike Mercker

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10/16/13 12:55 PM


About Us VOLUME 14

ISSUE 1

$739,000

TM

Magazine 1264 Perimeter Parkway Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454 757-422-8979 • www.HamptonRoadsMag.com Publisher Randy Thompson Editor-in-Chief Melissa M. Stewart Senior Editor, Food and Wine/Culinary Events Manager Patrick Evans-Hylton Associate Editor, Web Angela Blue Contributing Writers Barrett Baker, Bill Glose, Betsy DiJulio, Don Harrison, Patti Hinson, Michael Jon Khandelwal, Kristen De Deyn Kirk, Dave Parker, Karen Queen, Tom Robotham, Ben Swenson Intern Derek Page

BOATABLE WATERFRONT Secluded 2 acre wooded, waterfront peninsula, with 600’ feet of protected shoreline and abundant wildlife! 10 minutes from Bay with custom 3-level dock with 2 lifts. Deck with gazebo.

$550,000

Corporate Art Director Holly Watters Creative Director David Uhrin Associate Art Director Matt Haddaway Production Director Stacy Graef Contributing Designers Chris Meligonis, Stephanie Martinec, Don Spencer, Brian Woelfel Web Design and Development Web Creative Director Chris Murphy Web Developer Kristi Cogdill Web Marketing & Promotions Manager My Nguyen

STILLWATER LANDING Waterfront Peninsula on Stillwater Pond. The premium lot in the neighborhood sitting up on knoll overlooking the beautiful pond. Custom cape cod with stone fireplace, exposed beams.

$475,000

Director of Photography Jim Pile Photographer Mike Mercker Contributing Photographers Patrick Evans-Hylton, Veronica Dana, Glenn Fajota, Jeff Moore, David Uhrin, Holly Watters Photo Editor James Miller Vice President of Sales & Distribution Paul Brannock Account Executives Christie Berry, Sandy Godwin, Kevin Rose, Kathy Talmage, Brenda Whitlow Associate Account Executive Felicia Ruffin Outer Banks Area

Celeste Donohue, Jeff Donohue, Charlie Huff

CARROLLTON 22 acres. Waterfront on Ballard Creek with view of the James River. 3 garages: 2 car attached, 6 car detached, 2 car detached with living area above it and bathroom.

Sales Coordinator Tracy Thompson Circulation Manager George Carter Special Events & Style Coordinator Pamela Hopkins

$444,000

Coastal Virginia Magazine is published by VistaGraphics Staff Production Manager Robin Cather Accounts Receivable Margaret Hawkins Controller Anita Burns Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content without permission is prohibited. Opinions in the magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent management views. Contributing photography supplied by Thinkstock.com

memberships: Ghent Business Assoc., Olde Towne Business Assoc., tidewater builders assoc., virginia peninsula housing & builders Assoc., Hampton roads realtors assoc., Virginia Beach Restaurant Assoc., RETAIL ALLIANCE, Hampton roads chamber, Virginia Peninsula chamber, Eastern shore of virginia chamber, Franklin/southhampton area chamber, isle of wight/ smithfield/windsor chamber, williamsburg area chamber, glouCEster county chamber, york county chamber, williamsburg area association of realtors

91 ACRE FARM Nice one level home. Just on the outskirts of Waverly in Sussex County. Separate old farmhouse to convey “AS IS”.

(757) 879-0000 1-800-GARRETT

Greg Garrett

The City & Lifestyle Magazine for Coastal Virginia Mag.com W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m

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nd s o e r f u E s a e l r i z a T b e e t s h i d C a r it y a P presents

Paradise Wonderland

Donations benefit Arts of the Albemarle

FREE Admission

Starting SATuRDAy, NOVEMBER 16 • Show times: Tuesday-Sunday 11am, 2pm, and 5pm 115 South Water St., Elizabeth City next to Cypress Creek Grill

Area students have written stories about Paradise Wonderland featuring a talking reindeer, elaborate life size animals and a magical mother tree with elaborate carved roots. The best story will be awarded a $500 Grand Prize! Special thanks to the students, school superintendent Linwood Williams, Sheriff Randy Cartwright, and Deputies Tommy S. Wooten and Adrianne Williams. Brighton • Spartina • EScapada MultiplES • city girl • aMy howard paint rEady MadE curtainS • hoME accEntS

Paradise Treasures

Now with TWO locations in Elizabeth City, NC: 1775 Weeksville Rd. 115 South Water St. (252) 331-1430 (252) 621-1097

of t he

Arts Albemarle 516 East Main St., Elizabeth City, NC • (252) 338-6455 • www.artsaoa.com

501 South Water St., Elizabeth City, NC • (252) 335-1453 • museumofthealbemarle.com

Salute to the Tony AwArds

Join us for an evening of song and dance as we honor four outstanding Broadway Musicals; Pippin, Mary Poppins, Cinderella and Motown! The Center Players bring to life your favorite Broadway Show Tunes. Friday, November 15th at 7pm Saturday, November 16th at 3pm & 7pm Sunday, November 17th at 3pm

Virginia Symphony orcheStra

Holiday Brass Ensemble Concert December 18th at 7:30pm

Ring in the holiday season with a blast! Enjoy a concert filled with wit, virtuosity and the glorious music of the holiday season. Call for more information and tickets. 12

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Go behind the scenes of one of the most famous films in Hollywood history through December 31, 2013. This exhibit showcases authentic movie memorabilia— costumes, screen tests, scene props, a script, Vivien Leigh’s Academy Award and more. Special admission required.

Polar ExPrEss advEnturE

Experience a Polar Express O Scale Train Village provided by the Albemarle Railroad Club November 26 through January 4. View the The Polar Express movie, visit with Santa and make a bell keepsake ornament during the Holiday Open House December 7.

2013

10/15/13 3:01 PM


Around

By Ben Swenson

The

Region

Contributions By City A Look At How Much Local Communities Give To Charity

H

ow deep are Coastal Virginia’s pockets? That depends on who is wearing the pants. The Chronicle of Philanthropy, a Washington D.C.-based newspaper that explores nonprofits, regularly measures charitable giving. The figures below show how Coastal Virginia’s cities and counties stack up. Beside each locality is the percentage of discretionary income that households donate to charity each year. This number is calculated by dividing the median amount of money residents have left over after the mortgage, food and other required payments by the median amount of money they give to nonprofits. There are a few limitations with these numbers, but they nevertheless provide a general gauge of communities’ largesse.

Percentage of Discretionary Income Given to Charity: United States 4.7% Virginia 4.8 Biggest givers in Coastal Virginia: 1. Williamsburg 7.4 2. Portsmouth 6.6 3. Hampton 6.1 4. Surry County 6.0 5. (Three-way tie):    Franklin 5.7    Newport News 5.7    Suffolk 5.7 All of Coastal Virginia: 1. Accomack County 4.8 2. Chesapeake 5.4 3. Franklin 5.7 4. Gloucester County 3.9 5. Hampton 6.1 6. Isle of Wight County 5.1 7. James City County 4.9 8. Mathews County 4.5 9. Newport News 5.7 10. Norfolk 5.6 11. Northampton County 4.8 12. Poquoson 4.1 13. Portsmouth 6.6 14. Southampton County 5.0 15. Suffolk 5.7 16. Surry County 6.0 17. Virginia Beach 4.6 18. Williamsburg 7.4 19. York County 5.0 CoVa n

Source: The Chronicle of Philanthropy. Figures derived from income tax returns for 2008, the latest year available.

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10/16/13 12:38 PM


Left side

By Tom Robotham

Media Mistakes The Charge That The Local Media Have A “Liberal Bias” Is Ludicrous. They Are Ruled By The Profit Motive, Pure And Simple.

A

number of years ago, The Virginian-Pilot ran a relatively brief article about the efforts of religious conservatives to insert creationism into school curricula, alongside the teaching of the theory of evolution. In an attempt to appear balanced, the reporter gave equal space to both sides. The trouble is, this approach wasn’t balanced at all. It was a distortion. A truly accurate article would have acknowledged that virtually all scientists take evolution as fact and regard “creation science” as an oxymoron—religion masquerading as science. But I wasn’t surprised by this distortion. Had the Pilot pointed out that most scientists dismiss creationism and devoted the article to an explanation of why this is so, conservative readers would have accused the paper of showing its “liberal bias.” The charge is absurd. The mainstream media don’t have a liberal bias. They have a money bias; they are driven by one motive: ratings—or in the case of the print media, readership—which they can use as a selling point when pitching advertisers. It’s as simple as that. This explains why local news casts have devolved into little more than an amalgam of sensational crime stories, with a few yuk-yuk “human interest” stories, sports reports and weather forecasts thrown into the mix. Local newspapers are a bit tamer in this regard but not far behind. Indeed, as I was sitting down to write this column, I checked The Virginian-Pilot website. The top headline was, “D.C. Gunman Identified; at least 12 dead, officials say.” OK, so this was the big news of the day. But what followed this one? “Va. Beach man gets 16 months for making fake ID’s”; “Hampton man charged with several burglaries”; “Police charge man in sex assault at Hampton school”; “Norfolk police ID man who died after shooting.” There were a couple of other top headlines. I learned, for example, that “Chocolate [was] going on [the] next space station delivery.” But is this really reflective of the most important news of the day? Of course not. Where, I’ve often wondered, is the serious reporting? Where are the investigations? Where is the literary journalism that the Pilot used to publish back in the 1980s and early 90s? Don’t get me wrong. I think the Pilot still does some good stuff on occasion. But over the years, both its page count and proportionate news hole—the space allocated for articles as opposed to advertising—have shrunk dramatically. A lot of people excuse this as unavoidable because “print is dying.” But there are all kinds of possible business models that would allow newspapers like the Pilot—mid-size papers in mid-size metro areas—to pour resources into reporting. It’s just a matter of accepting lower profit expectations and jettisoning highly-paid executives so that more money could be devoted to salaries for reporters and editors. And imagine what local television news could be if its executives saw themselves as cultural stewards rather than ratings hounds. Why not produce serious documentaries that take us inside the schools, for example, and help us understand why so many of them are failing to earn accreditation, as WAVY recently

editor’s note 14

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reported? Why not have serious interviews and more coverage of the arts? The answer, again, is that local news stations here and across the country operate on the old “if it bleeds, it leads” model rather than trying to come up with a whole new vision that would realize the extraordinary potential of the medium. It’s worthwhile to consider the underdeveloped potential of radio as well. One mainstream media organization that does have a clear political bias—a conservative one—is WNIS. At the very least, it would be nice if the station managers had enough sense of cultural responsibility to program even one show with a distinct left-wing bias as a way of balancing Limbaugh, Hannity and Savage. Better still to offer a show that’s inherently balanced, like NPR’s “Left, Right and Center.” WHRO, our local PBS/NPR affiliate, remains the one local broadcasting operation that still does do quality programming. Although it, too, could do a lot more local news. They would like to, its executives have told me, but they just don’t have the money. I don’t mean to dismiss the magnitude of this problem. Producing quality print journalism is expensive; quality broadcast programming far more so. What these executives of both our print and electronic media won’t tell you, though, is that they have a choice. With the exception of WHRO, they all choose to devote an absurd amount of space and time to crime at the expense of other topics. This not only displaces more important stories, it keeps communities on edge by giving the impression that crime is more rampant than it is. It is culturally toxic. But it’s been the standard model for longer than I’ve been alive, and at the risk of sounding cynical, I don’t think it will ever change. The best thing we consumers of news and commentary can do is look to alternative media and let the mainstream operations continue to fade into irrelevance. Tom Robotham is an award-winning writer and an adjunct professor of American studies at Old Dominion University. He was born and raised in New York City but has lived in Norfolk for the past 21 years. He can be reached at tomrobotham@gmail.com or at the CoVa Taphouse Grill in Ghent.  n

Left Side/Right Side is an ongoing CoVa column debating both local and national issues important to Coastal Virginia residents. The opinions expressed by our writers do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints of the Coastal Virginia Magazine staff. To suggest a topic or share your comments, e-mail Melissa Stewart at Melissa@CoastalVirginiaMag.com.

2013

10/16/13 12:38 PM


Right side

By Dave Parker

O

Quit The National News Coverage And Start Focusing On Compelling Local Stories

nce upon a time there was a baseball announcer for the local little league teams. He knew all the players, all their parents, the history of the league, the dimensions of all the fields, and how much those giant ring pops cost at the concession stand. We’ll call him Mr. Stat. Unfortunately, Mr. Stat started to spend a bit too much time talking about the Big Leagues instead of Junior’s batting average. That was a problem, because there were already people talking about the Big Leagues. They were called Nationally Watched Broadcasters who were on nationally watched television stations. Poor Mr. Stat forgot his place. Such is the predicament in which we find our local media. They’re so wrapped up in filling the sausage casing, while working with less, that they often don’t realize the grass is pretty green here in Hampton Roads. How did they get to this diluted state? Easy. 1) they made the traditional 30-minute 6 p.m. newscast start about 2 hours too early, 2) the low hanging, easy pickings for the radio music jocks are the national stories because that’s what’s in the station-bought show prep, and 3) newspapers keep laying off reporters. Which brings us to this nonstartling fact: the national news media covers national stories far better than local media outlets do. They have the resources, the experience, and the talent (barring Nancy Grace). Further, we can almost always get the big, national stories online anytime we want. It doesn’t mean the locals shouldn’t bring you up to speed on the news of the day. But the real reason to watch a local television station, or listen to a local radio station is because, well, they’re LOCAL. You live here, they live here—seems pretty basic to me.

‘‘

So, here are some demands you should make from the three local t.v. news stations, your poorly dressed radio people, and all the print geeks. First, remind them that their business model is in the cross hairs. Young people (those who suckled a cell phone instead of a pacifier) are not watching the local t.v. newscasts, and they’re not reading newspapers. They’re still listening to local radio stations but not as much, courtesy of car makers who keep putting that insidious mp3 jack right by the tuner button (which is really baffling since dealers depend heavily on the local radio stations to help sell their cars). The survivability of local t.v., radio and print will rely on compelling stories that people can’t find elsewhere, and that impact them. That content will need to be delivered in a way that reaches beyond the medium itself (social media, apps), and, get ready, tailors to the graying of America. Forget the kids. Focus on keeping the people who got you here in the first place. Second, tell t.v. stations to stop hiring kids who have no idea how to pronounce Kecoughtan. With few exceptions they don’t know the history of the area, which means they can’t bring local context to the story. I’d rather watch a frumpy newspaper reporter on t.v. who knows the ins and outs, than Skippy or Barbie. Third, demand they get a grip on reality when it comes to weather coverage. I was a t.v. meteorologist for 18 years (voted Hampton Roads’ Favorite!), and I can tell you that t.v. weather coverage is catnip for bosses. Peter’s crying wolf was peanuts compared to the bombardment of the DEFCON 1 histrionics we get from the Live Team Coverage Crew. Please, some measure of perspective. Finally, let your voice be heard when you don’t like content. It’s one of the beauties of local media. As a talk radio host, I get it every day. It’s a good thing. If you find something to be mindless babble, let them know. Their livelihood and your patience are depending on it. Dave Parker hosts The Dave Parker Show on AM 790 WNIS weekdays from 10 a.m.–noon. He can also be heard each afternoon on US1061 and reached at dparker@wnis.com. He lives in Virginia Beach with his wife CoVa and two daughters. n

It doesn’t mean the locals shouldn’t bring you up to speed on th news of the day. But the real reason to watch a local television station, or listen to a local radio staion is because, well, they’re LOCAL.

’’

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2013

10/16/13 10:59 AM


Close-UP p.17

Conditions p.18

Bites p.20

Scene p.22

Culture p.23

Events p.24

Current

The

» Close-UP

E

Beach Brightener

ach year around this time, families bundle up in winter coats and scarves, load their kids in the car and head to the Virginia Beach Oceanfront to embark on an activity that would be completely illegal during any other time of the year: driving their cars on the boardwalk. Of course they have a good reason; they’re giddy with the anticipation of seeing the hundreds of thousands of lights at McDonald’s Holiday Lights at the Beach.

‘‘

As excited as the families are over gazing at the colorful displays along the boardwalk, there’s one man who is perhaps more thrilled. His name is Andy Vakos, and he’s the creator of many of these tremendous light formations. During his high school days when all his friends were out surfing, Vakos was learning how to weld. “I just liked working with metal,” he says. This hobby stuck with him for years, and after 1995, when the city produced its first Holiday Lights at the Beach, Vakos stared up at a light display and said, “You know what? I could make one of those.” So he did. Since then, he’s created nine displays, along with helping to repair and revamp other displays throughout the years. Vakos starts working on a display for the holiday season three to four months ahead. However, since his full-time job as general manager of the Oceanfront Inn requires a great amount of time and dedication, he often doesn’t begin working on the light displays until 8 p.m., usually staying up until 2 a.m. Sleep? “It’s overrated,” he says with a laugh. To create a display, Vakos first draws a design on graph paper to scale it. This year, the first step is already taken care of because Beach Events held an art contest where students from local high schools could submit drawings, and the two designs that were chosen will have their drawings turned into a light display. Next he cuts the steel, bends it piece by piece and welds it together. Once the display part is finished he creates the frame and sends it all off to be painted and powder coated to protect the design from outdoor elements. Finally, he strings the lights, which he says is the most tedious part. On a recent display, Vakos got some help from his family screwing in the hundreds of light bulbs. “I had my kids, my wife and my inlaws helping me put the bulbs in because there’s so many, but when it lit up—and it worked—it was CoVa the best thing in the world.” —Angela Blue n

I just liked working with metal.

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‘‘

P h oto by J i m P i l e

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10/15/13 5:42 PM


The

Current Conditions

» By » Green

Charity Check

Scene

Keep Those Corks

In an online reader survey, we asked you (the readers) to answer some questions concerning charity to accompany this year’s Giving Back Awards. Here are the results.

A

7

fter you pop a bottle of bubbly during your holiday celebrations, don’t let that cork fly too far. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is collecting champagne corks for use as cabinet and drawer knobs at The Brock Environmental Center at Pleasure House Point in Virginia Beach. Construction of the Center, which is scheduled by be completed in 2014, began this fall. When it’s done, it will be the greenest, most sustainable building in Virginia and among the greenest structures in the world. It is designed to meet the strictest LEED Platinum guidelines and the Living Building Challenge, a set of strict environmental standards that requires the facility to have no impact on the environment. One requirement is to use as many recycled or salvaged construction materials as possible. So help them out by toasting to family, friends and the environment this season. For a list of local places to drop off your corks, visit www.CBF.org/How-We-Save-The-Bay/Programs-Initiatives/ Pleasure-House-Point-Virginia/Brock-Environmental-Center/ Champagne-Cork-Collection. For more information, contact CoVa Christy Everett at 757-622-1964 or ceverett@cbf.org. n

2-5 42 21

Out

—David Chernicky

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for a more in-depth interview with Suit on his transition to chief in an upcoming issue.

/ December

1-3

Percentage of you who said you donate to the collection jar at a cash register once in awhile.

Percentage of you who said you tend to donate to causes that support education the most.

Hampton’s new police chief, Terry L. Suit, was sworn in Oct. 7, his first day on the job. The former chief and public safety director of Sandy Springs, Ga., Suit is the first chief the City of Hampton has hired from outside the Hampton Police Division due to his focus on community-based policing. “I believe in bottom-up leadership. I believe in empowering people to make decisions. The organization needs to do know not just that we are going to do something but why we are doing it. Even more importantly is that we should be valuing the opinion of those folks on the street,” says Suit when asked about his manCoVa agement style. n

18

Average number of times a year you give to charity.

Average number of years you have been donating.

A New Suit

look

37

Number on a scale of 1–10 that you ranked the importance of charity.

Percentage of you who said you most often donate time to charities.

—MMS

» Speak

the numbers

23

Percentage of you who said you give because of a sense of obligation to your community.

Percentage of you who say you’re influenced to donate by the mission of the organization.

65

69

Percentage of you who say you research charities before donating to make sure your money is going to good use.

Percentage of you who most often give to local charities.

55

62

Percentage of you who follow the progress of the charities you donate to.

Number on a scale from 1–10 that represents how satisfied you are with how the organization that you donate to uses the donations.

35

7

Percentage of you who say you play an active role in the charities you give to.

Percentage of you who aren’t bothered by people asking for CoVa donations. n

74

Survey compiled by Derek Page. Answers compiled by Angela Blue.

2013

10/16/13 11:08 AM


The

Current Conditions

» Wa d i n g

In

Base Security We asked a few military citizens about safety on the local bases. Here’s what they had to say:

FAMILY

HOLIDAY

“In light of the recent Washington Navy Yard shooting, how do you feel about the security of our bases?” “Are you confident or not confident?”

MEMORIES

“I have no fear whatsoever. I have confidence in our system and our military to do what needs to be done to protect our military institutions and federal buildings.”

MACARTHUR CENTER

—Jose Roman, 40, Navy Veteran

“I’m not too confident. It’s starting to become a trend now [violent attacks]. Perhaps they need to increase security. I really feel it’d be smarter.” —Andrew Lopez, 22, Logistics Specialist

“I’ve always felt really secure on base. Maybe too secure because traffic is crazy. I think it’s pretty safe. I know I’ve had enough random vehicle checks before, so I’m pretty confident that if they check me they check suspicious people.”

CELEBRATE THE BEST OF THE SEASON NOVEMBER 7 - JANUARY 20 MacArthur On Ice • Winter Carnival • Photos With Santa • The Ice Palace • Breakfast With Santa • Pet Photos With Santa •

—Victoria Depuydt, 24, Machinist Mate “I haven’t seen a difference in security. Maybe it has gotten a little tighter but not significantly. I don’t see any specific threat to this [Norfolk Naval] installation.” —Hector Moncibais, 33, Naval Administration

For complete details on each of the above visit us online.

“I have full confidence in our military and personnel. I would be more fearful of walking about ODU.” —Marc Loi, 30, Veteran Military Journalist 

NORDSTROM

CoVa n

—Derek Page

DILLARD’S

140 S TOR ES • 20 EATER IE S • 1 8 SC R E E N T H E AT E R DOWN TOWN N OR FOLK • SH O P M A C A R T H U R . C O M

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The

Current Bites

F

olks mark the fall season around here when acorn squash first appears as a side to the remarkable dishes coming from the venerable Coastal Grill restaurant in Virginia Beach; for almost a quartercentury, the gorgeous gourd has been a staple. Here are some stats about the famous squash: 24 years acorn squash has appeared as the seasonal side 30 minutes needed to roast an acorn squash in the oven 50 cases of squash delivered from Florida at a time 100 halves of acorn squash served nightly 360 squash consumed weekly

2 ounces of melted butter and a heaping tablespoon of brown sugar fill squash cavities 8 months; acorn squash is served from September until late May 18 cases of squash are used during the week, and 4 on the weekends 20 acorn squash come in the case delivered to Coastal Grill

Coastal Grill’s Gorgeous Gourds

Recipe: Coastal Grill’s Signature Acorn Squash

Preheat oven to 400F. Split squash from stem to tip; with spoon scoop out seeds. On a sheet pan or pie tin place squash hallowed side down. Add a half-inch water and place in hot oven for 35–45 minutes or until you can prick the skin easily with a knife, careful not to punch too large a hole in the squash or it will not hold the butter. Invert squash and add a pat of sweet butter and a tablespoon of brown sugar. Yields 2 servings. Coastal Grill is at 1427 N. Great Neck Rd., Virginia Beach. CoVa Call 757-496-3348 or visit www.CoastalGrill.com n

—PEH

Sassy Spread

I

f you are in need of a simple spread for a bagel or want to add some jazz to your peanut butter and jelly, reach for Mango Mango Preserves. The sassy spread has other uses, as well— everything from a vinaigrette to grilled and glazed shrimp. We love the story, too, of three fabulous women from Hampton who make the preserves by hand in small batches with nothing but mango, sugar, lime juice and vanilla. For the holidays, shake things up at your parties with a Mangolicious Martini; here’s the recipe: Add a teaspoon or two of mango preserves with mango-flavored vodka and a squeeze of fresh lime juice along with ice in a cocktail shaker. Shake well and strain into a chilled martini or cocktail glass. Top off with a splash of champagne, if desired. Mango Mango Preserves are sold online and at area farmers markets and grocery stores, like Whole Foods. For more inforCoVa mation, visit www.AMangoParty.com n

—PEH

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Crab & Corn

Crush

T

wo fabulous flavors, blue crab and corn, come together in one dish that grabs our tastebuds’ attention. Crab & Corn Fritters are golden brown and delicious orbs of goodness from Flip Flops Grill & Chill in Virginia Beach. These bountiful balls are packed with crab meat and corn, delicately fried, and served hot. The sweetness from both the crab and corn meet with just a touch of seasoning in the batter for an incredible flavor profile. Served as an appetizer, there are more than enough to share. A spicy mango remoulade comes along side for dipping. Flip Flops Grill & Chill is at 2217 Upton Dr., Virginia Beach. Call 757-427-3547 or visit www.FlipFlopsVB.com CoVa —PEH n

2013

10/15/13 2:21 PM


Made In The USA

So Many Options... Just Change the Clasp!

2165 General Booth Blvd., Virginia Beach • Extended Holiday Hours - See Store for Details 757-430-8116 • www.EitherOreStrawbridge.com

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The

Current Scene

»5

Best

Thanksgiving Dinner Spots The Smithfield Inn 112 Main St., Smithfield www.SmithfieldInn.com Why we like it: This Victorian-era home turned restaurant and tavern has a quaint, inviting atmosphere that is perfect for Thanksgiving dinner and will be serving a pre-set menu of traditional Thanksgiving fare at $35.95 a person. Freemason Abbey 209 W. Freemason St., Norfolk www.FreemasonAbbey.com

» Testing

Why we like it: Originally constructed as a church in 1873, this dining delight became such in 1988 after serving as the First Church of Christ Scientists from 1902 until 1948 and as a meeting hall for the Independent Order of Odd Fellows from 1948 until 1987. The two-floor refurbished church will be serving traditional Thanksgiving fare as well as its famous crab cakes from noon to 4 p.m. Dining is $30 a plate. Reservations required. Swan Terrace at The Founders Inn and Spa 5641 Indian River Rd., Virginia Beach www.FoundersInn.com Why we like it: Enjoy a tantalizing menu in the Virginia Ballroom and the Swan Terrace Restaurant to celebrate Thanksgiving from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feast on turkey, seafood, pork and aged prime rib, locally grown fruit and vegetables and tempting desserts. Reservations required. Adults $47.95. Children 5–12 $22.95. Children under 4 free. Opus 9 Steakhouse 5143 Main St., Williamsburg www.Opus9Steakhouse.com Why we like it: Williamsburg’s premier chophouse will be offering a cornucopia of scrumptious Thanksgiving items in sophisticated buffet style, featuring a carving station with turkey, prime rib and ham, 10 different side items and 15 to 20 desserts. Reservations required. Adults $34.95. Half off for children. Whole Foods Market 1800 Laskin Rd., Virginia Beach www.wholefoodsmarket.com/ stores/virginiabeach Why we like it: Stay cozy and watch football or the Rockettes at home without the endless cooking and messy kitchen. Catering from Whole Foods Market allows you to select from ready-to-cook turkeys, fully prepared holiday meals, pies, sides and more, including vegan and gluten-free options. Online and in-store CoVa —Derek Page ordering begins Nov. 1. n 22

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it Out

Virginia’s Finest Chocolates

or years, the gift-giving season was a reason for me to fret. Always stuck for adult gift ideas, I gave the same thing year after year: neckties and decorative coasters. But then I discovered a chocolatier in Williamsburg who would create specialty chocolates of whatever design I chose. I contacted Virginia’s Finest Chocolates and asked the owner, Mary, if she could make something for my doctor sister. She asked about my preferences—the creaminess of milk chocolate, the bite of dark chocolate, or the rich, smooth taste of white chocolate—and in a snap she molded chocolate pill bottles, Band-Aids, and aspirin the size of cookies. She also had gift baskets that I could order, such as a decorative sleigh basket spilling over with sparkling cider and chocolate in the shapes of snowmen, candy canes, and much more. For once, my presents were the big hit of the day instead of the cause of awkward silence. For 20 years, Virginia’s Finest Chocolates has been creating similar moments for individuals from every walk of life. Does your dad like to fish? Peruse the nauticalthemed chocolates in the shapes of lighthouses, crabs, sailboats, and seashells. Have a sports fan in the family? Try chocolates in the shape of basketballs, baseball gloves, and football helmets. Whatever your desire, there’s a good chance Mary can fulfill it. She has been collecting the themed molds she uses to bake her chocolates since she was a teenager, and now has hundreds, if not thousands, of them. Mary launched her business in 1993 and received the trademarked Virginia’s Finest checkmark logo, which identifies Virginia-made products that meet or exceed quality standards set by the state-run program. Since then, Virginia’s Finest Chocolates has been enriching celebrations with Mary’s delicious morsels, and not just during the holidays. She also hosts chocolate camps for kids, corporate events featuring logo-themed chocolate, and chocolatemaking parties for adults where, among other things, you can experiment with different types of chocolate and learn how to properly pair various chocolates with wine. Whatever the occasion, you can’t go wrong with chocolate. For more information, visit www.chocolategifts.com or contact Mary at CoVa —Bill Glose 757-258-5465 or maryg@chocolategifts.com. n

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magine what Thanksgiving would be like if you didn’t have an oven (or a deep fryer) to cook your turkey, a fridge to keep the whipped cream for the pumpkin pie at just the right temperature or, most importantly, a microwave to enjoy leftovers the next day. At “Foods & Feasts of Colonial Virginia” (Nov. 28–30 at Jamestown Settlement & Yorktown Victory Center), you can explore foodways of 17thand 18-century Virginia by discovering how food was gathered, preserved and prepared on land and at sea by Virginia’s English colonists and Powhatan Indians. In the re-created Powhatan Indian Village, you’ll see venison, turkey and other game roast over an open fire while stews of corn, beans and squash cook in clay pots. We guarantee you’ll never take your handy kitchen appliances for granted again. www.HistoryIsFun.org

Cooking, Colonial-Style

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f your New Year’s resolution is to expand your horizon and learn some of the traditions of other cultures, you can start a day before the new year by attending the 16th Annual Olde Towne Scottish Walk (Dec. 31 in Olde Towne Portsmouth). The event is modeled after Scotland’s Hogmany Festival, a day when townspeople honor their community and merchants, wishing all the best of luck and prosperity in the coming year. A procession of local family, friends and visitors will be led by bagpipeand-drum music down Queen and Washington streets to High Street Landing for a flag raising ceremony that honors George Washington’s raising of the first flag, the Grand Union. It’s a great way to get in touch with your Scottish heritage (or at least pretend for the day). www.PortsVaEvents.com

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rides-to-be and their guests were treated to a relaxing Fall Engagement Party thrown by Coastal Virginia Magazine on Sunday, Sept. 22 at the beautiful Wyndham Virginia Beach Oceanfront. While enjoying Chesapeake crabcakes served over parmesan risotto and seasonal vegetables or balsamic vinaigrette-marinated portabellas on a bed of mesclun greens, guests sipped mimosas and watched an elegant fashion show with gowns and tuxedos from Pure English, Maya Couture, The Inspired Bride and Men’s Wearhouse. Colonial DJs entertained all with door prize giveaways, a scavenger hunt, and guest participation in the latest dances. With lighting and dÊcor provided by Premier Events and Stage Right Lighting, brides-to-be could leave with endless ideas CoVa for their special day. n

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Coastal Virginia Magazine Presents the

January 25-26, 2014 Virginia Beach Convention Center

Celebrate good times and fine Virginia wines.

Local vendors, lectures and seminars including wine fundamentals, all-American pairings, sweet temptations and more. Entertainment through the weekend with music by Charles Darden Saturday and Sunday. Limited VIP Ticket with private tastings, special seating and catered hors d’ oeuvres. Hotel packages available. For tickets and more information, visit coastalvirginiawinefest.com. For vendor info call Pam Hopkins at 757.422.8979 x104 or email pam@vgnet.com. Sponsors:

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editor’s picks p.28

listings p.30

datebook

Nov. 29

Get lost in the magic of one of the most celebrated holiday ballets of all time for one performance of Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. The company of 40 returns to Virginia Beach to perform Olympic-worthy leaps, lifts and pirouettes while bringing humor, charm, athletic prowess and Russian flair to Tchaikovsky’s timeless score. Tickets start at $28. 7:30 p.m. Sandler Center for the Performing Arts, Virginia Beach. 757-385-2787. www.SandlerCenter.org Photo courtesy of Moscow Ballet

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November

editors’ picks Monday

28

Tuesday

29

Wednesday

Thursday

20 singles

sensational 6

3 Color Me Rad 5K

Virginia Beach Sportsplex, Virginia Beach. www. ColorMeRad.com

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Chrysler Hall, Norfolk. www. SevenVenues.com

Hungarian State Folk Ensemble

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Coastal Virginia Magazine’s Sensational Singles Soiree

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Honoring our Veterans

Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum and Lightship Portsmouth. www. PortsNaval Museums.com

Ferguson Center for the Arts, Newport News. www. Ferguson.org

{Through Dec. 1} Crawl, Climb and Fly with Amazing Butterflies

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Friday

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Cirque Dreams Holidaze

Chesapeake Conference Center, Chesapeake. www.CityOf Chesapeake.net

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Yoonie Han, Pianist

Ewell Recital Hall, Williamsburg. www.WM.edu

{8–10} Bodacious Bazaar & Art Festival

Hampton Roads Convention Center, Hampton. www. Bodacious Bazaar.com

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Foundation’s Finest to benefit Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Founder’s Inn, Virginia Beach. www.CFF.org

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Thanksgiving Day

Ferguson Center for the Arts, Newport News. www. Ferguson.org

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Awww Shucks Oyster Roast Virginia Living Museum, Newport News. www. TheVLM.org

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Bill Cosby

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Saturday

1

29th Annual Grand Illumination Parade

Sandler Center for the Performing Arts, Virginia Beach. www.Sandler Center.org

Virginia Aquarium, Virginia Beach. www.Virginia Aquarium.com

{23–24} Holiday Craft Show

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Eagle’s Nest Rockin’ Country Bar, Chesapeake. www. CoastalVirginiaMag. com

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Kevin James

CVM

Sunday

Downtown Norfolk. www. DowntownNorfolk. org/Holidays InTheCity

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30 Virginia Symphony

Orchestra: Beethoven’s Fifth

Sandler Center for the Performing Arts, Virginia Beach. www. SandlerCenter.org

Hanukkah Begins 28

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To submit your event for the Datebook, email angela@coastalvirginiamag.com

10/15/13 2:45 PM


December

editors’ picks Sunday

1

Celtic Woman: Home for Christmas, The Symphony Tour

Monday

2

Tuesday

Wednesday

5

3

Grissom Library Tree Trimming Grissom Library, Newport News. www.NNPLS. LibGuides.com/ Events Pictured: Raamir Sanders-Williams, age 9

Ferguson Center for the Arts, Newport News. www. Ferguson.org

{6–8} The Nutcracker Chrysler Hall, Norfolk. www. SevenVenues.com

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{Through Dec. 9} Remainders by Manuela Mourão

Winter Meltdown

Neil Britton Gallery at Virginia Wesleyan College, Virginia Beach. www.VWC.edu Pictured: Mourao Burnt Book on Blue mixed media 18x24 2011

Mythbusters

Chrysler Hall, Norfolk. www. SevenVenues.com

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Willoughby-Baylor House, Norfolk. www.Chrysler.org Pictured: Helen M. Turner, Lilies, Lanterns, and Sunshine

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6

d’ARTini Night

d’ART Center, Norfolk. www.d-ART Center.org

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16th Annual Olde Towne Scottish Walk Olde Towne Portsmouth

{Nov. 23– Jan. 5} 44th Annual Art Faculty Exhibition

{6–8} Virginia Musical Theatre: Little Women Sandler Center for the Performing Arts, Virginia Beach. www. Sandler Center.org

Downtown Hampton. www. Hampton.gov/Parks

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Virginia Symphony: Handel’s Messiah

Hampton History Museum, Hampton. www.Hampton HistoryMuseum.org

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Saturday

Days 14 Holly Parade

{Ongoing} Toward Freedom: Hampton and the Contraband

Christmas Day

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Friday

Ted Constant Convocation Center, Norfolk. www. ConstantCenter.com

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{Through Dec. 29} American Treasures

Thursday

Harrison Opera House, Norfolk. www. SevenVenues.com

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{Nov. 29– Dec. 31} Winter Wonderland

Portsmouth Art & Cultural Center, Portsmouth. www.PortsmouthArt Center.com

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Visual Arts Center, Portsmouth. www. TCC.edu/VAC Pictured: Nancy Mansfield

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datebook SPECIAL EVENTS FIRST WEEKEND IN OLDE TOWNE PORTSMOUTH Nov. 1–3, Dec. 6–8: Arts to Antiques Flea Market, exhibit openings and art afternoons. Olde Towne Portsmouth. www.OldeTownePortsmouth.com OLDE TOWNE FARMER’S MARKET Saturdays Nov. 2 through Dec. 21: Locally and organically grown produce, meats, seafood, artisanal breads, desserts and more! Free. 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Portsmouth Art & Cultural Center, Portsmouth. www.PortsmouthOldeTowneFarmersMarket.com

OLDE FASHIONED HOLIDAY WINDOW PAINTING Nov. 16–Dec. 31: Historic High Street shop windows display Portsmouth students’ artwork. Free. High Street Corridor, Portsmouth. 757-405-3500

SENSATIONAL SINGLES SOIREE Nov. 7: Bid on Coastal Virginia Magazine’s 20 Sensational Singles and win a date! Proceeds benefit the Foodbank of Southeastern Virginia. $20 online. $30 at the door. 7–11 p.m. Eagle’s Nest, Chesapeake. www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com

LOOSELY KNIT CRAFT SALE Nov. 22–23: Shoppers can help their library by purchasing locally handmade craft items. Grissom Library, Newport News. Free. 9 a.m.–2p.m. 757-369-3190

THE ICE PALACE Nov. 7–Dec. 24: Enjoy an ice dome with falling snow, light show and a visit with Santa. MacArthur Center, Norfolk. 757-628-6000. www.ShopMacarthur.com

13TH ANNUAL PAGODA AND GARDEN LIGHTFEST Beginning Nov. 23: Hosted by Friends of the Pagoda and the Oriental Garden Foundation. Free. 5 p.m.–midnight. Downtown Norfolk. 757-623-1949. www.DowntownNorfolk.org/HolidaysInTheCity

BODACIOUS BAZAAR & ART FESTIVAL Nov. 8–10: Enjoy items by 300 quality crafters, vendors, artists and local businesses. One day $7. Two days $10. Children $4. Hampton Roads Convention Center, Hampton. 10 a.m.–7 p.m. 757-727-8311

HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW Nov. 23–24: Artisans sell their crafts at this opening of the holiday shopping season. Free. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Chesapeake Conference Center. 757-382-6411

LYRICS BY THE LAKE Nov. 9: Enjoy an oyster roast, drinks and local music by the lake. Lake Ballard, Portsmouth. 757-393-8759

CYPRESS POINT CIRCLE OF THE KING’S DAUGHTERS HOLIDAY BAZAAR Nov. 3: Enjoy a day of shopping and celebration. $2. Quality Suites & Sleep Inn at Lake Wright, Norfolk. 757-497-4719. www.KingsDaughters.org/HolidayBazaar

MACARTHUR ON ICE Beginning Nov. 23: MacArthur Center’s outdoor ice rink is the perfect place for good times this winter. Admission $6. Skate rental $6. 757-627-6000

YORKTOWN HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND Nov. 9–10: Special events, decorations, sales, door prizes and strolling entertainment. Free. Yorktown. www.YorkCounty.gov

WINTER CARNIVAL Beginning Nov. 23: The carnival will feature familyfriendly rides. MacArthur Center, Norfolk. 757-627-6000. www.DowntownNorfolk.org/HolidaysInTheCity

VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF JEWISH BOOKS Nov. 3–17: Hundreds of titles on sale. Free. Simon Family JCC, Virginia Beach. 757-321-2338. www.SimonFamilyJCC.org

VETERANS DAY CEREMONY Nov. 11: “Letters from War” is the theme of this annual event in which all veterans are honored. Free. Noon. York Hall, Yorktown. 767-890-3500

OLDE TOWNE ARTS & ANTIQUES OPEN HOUSE Nov. 29: This kickoff to the winter holiday season features art, music and entertainment. Free. 5–10 p.m. Portsmouth. 757-405-3500

A CHRISTMAS CAROL Nov. 3, 11, 28–30, Dec. 1, 6–8, 14–15, 21–22, 24–25: Outdoor theater performance. Free. Merchants Square, Williamsburg. 757-229-6511. www.MerchantsSquare.org/Events

FOUNDATION’S FINEST Nov. 15: Benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation with dancing, heavy hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction and a raffle to win two American Airline tickets. $75. 7–10 p.m. Founder’s Inn, Virginia Beach. 757-446-9267. www.CFF.org

PORT NORFOLK HOLIDAY LIGHT SHOW Dec. 1–31: “There Glows the Neighborhood” self-guided tour of the totally decorated neighborhood. Free. Portsmouth. www.portnorfolk.org

COAST GUARD CELEBRATION Nov. 2: Celebrate the service of the Coast Guard with food, music, games and barbecue. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. 757-393-5111. www.PortsVaEvents.com HOMEARAMA 2013 Through Nov. 3: Come out to Edinburgh in Chesapeake for the 16-day, single-site display of furnished and landscaped custom showcase homes. www.Homearama.tv

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GIRL SCOUTS FAMOUS FORMERS LUNCHEON Nov. 6: The Girls Scouts of the Colonial Coast is hosting its annual luncheon. $40. 11:30 a.m–1:30 p.m. Holiday Inn Virginia Beach-Norfolk Hotel and Conference Center. 757-549-0747

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datebook HOLIDAYS IN THE CITY TRAIN EXHIBIT Dec. 4–21: Presented and staffed by the Atlantic Coast “S” Gaugers. Free. Norfolk. www.DowntownNorfolk.org/ HolidaysInTheCity

HERE COMES SANTA CLAUS Dec. 13: Santa arrives by boat at the Onancock wharf to listen to the wishes of children seated on the Liar’s Bench. Free. 4 p.m. www.onancock.org

BIZARRE BAZAAR Dec. 5–8: Browse the 38th Christmas collection marketplace for your holiday favorites in one of Virginia’s most anticipated holiday events. $7. 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Richmond Raceway Complex. 804-673-7015. www.TheBizarreBazaar.com

16TH ANNUAL OLDE TOWNE HOLIDAY MUSIC FESTIVAL Dec. 14: Enjoy performances, children’s activities, reenactors and carolers. Free. Noon– 6 p.m. Portsmouth. 757-393-8481 www.PortsVaEvents.com

CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING Dec. 6: A performance by the Fifes and Drums of York Town, festive music at Riverwalk Landing, the procession of lights through the village and the arrival of Santa and Mrs. Claus. Free. 7:30 p.m. Yorktown. 757-890-3500 ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARADE Dec. 7: Organized by the Greater Williamsburg Chamber & Tourism Alliance. Free. Williamsburg. 757-229-6511. www.WilliamsburgCC.com/Parade/ CHRISTMAS MARKET ON MAIN Dec. 7: Arts and crafts, roasted chestnuts, hot cider, entertainment and historical interpreters. Free. 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Historic Main Street, Yorktown. 757-890-3500 YORKTOWN LIGHTED BOAT PARADE Dec. 7: A parade of lights, caroling around a roaring beach bonfire, musical performances and hot cider. Free. 7 p.m. Yorktown waterfront. 757-890-4970 BATTLE OF GREAT BRIDGE Dec. 7–8: Re-enactments of the Battle at Kemps Landing and the Battle of Great Bridge. Free. 10 a.m–4p.m. Battlefield Park South, Chesapeake. 757-382-6411. www.CityofChesapeake.net/PRevents. GHENT HOLIDAY STACHE BASH Dec. 8: Jake’s Place and Hope House host a facial hair battle. Suggested donation $5. 4–7 p.m. Belmont House of Smoke, Norfolk. www.Hope-House.org

ONANCOCK CHRISTMAS HOMES TOUR AND MUSIC FESTIVAL Dec. 14: Explore the historic charms of six historic homes. $20. 2–6 p.m. 757-990-2042. www.Onancock.org

HOLLY DAYS PARADE Dec. 14: Enjoy the Peninsula’s largest illuminated “Joy to the World”-themed holiday parade. Free. 7 p.m. Downtown Hampton. 757-727-8311. www.Hampton.gov/Parks SMITHFIELD CHRISTMAS PARADE Dec. 14: A wonderful old-fashioned parade that sums up the heart of Smithfield. Free. 11 a.m. Smithfield. 757-357-2214. www.VisitSmithfieldIsleofWight.com

PORT NORFOLK HISTORIC HOME TOUR Dec. 15: One of Portsmouth’s most anticipated holiday events features a unique selection of homes decorated in holiday finery. www.portnorfolk.org A CEREMONY OF CAROLS Dec. 19: Features the Governor’s School for the Arts Chorus with Barbara Chapman on the harp. $15. First Presbyterian Church, Norfolk. www.GSArts.net

THE BARON AND ELLIN GORDON ART GALLERIES 4509 Monarch Way, Norfolk. 757-683-6271. www.ODU.edu/Art/Gallery Through Nov. 17: Kindred Spirits. Dec. 6–15: Fall Senior Show. Ongoing: The Big Story. BLUE SKIES GALLERY 26 South King St., Hampton. 757-727-0028. www.BlueSkiesArt.com Nov. 15–17: Annual Holiday Open House. Free. 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

EDENTON-CHOWAN CHRISTMAS PARADE Dec. 14: Come and enjoy the floats, boats, horses and holiday cheer! Free. 11 a.m. North and South Broad streets, Edenton. 252-482-3400

TOYLAND PARADE Dec. 14: Decorate a stroller, wagon, yourself or even a pet and join in the parade. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown. Free. 1 p.m. 757-890-3500

ART

CHRYSLER MUSEUM OF ART 245 W. Olney Rd., Norfolk. 757-664-6200. www.Chrysler.org Ongoing: Chrysler Museum Glass Studio. Ongoing: Moses Myers, Maritime Merchant and Barton Myers: Norfolk Visionary. Nov. 20: Glass by Matt Szosz and music by Ice Cream. $5. 7–10 p.m. Through Dec. 1: American Treasures at the WilloughbyBaylor House. Free. Through Dec. 1: Classical Traditions at the Moses Myers House. Free. Dec. 6–8: Visiting Artist Series: Fritz Dreisbach. Dec. 14: Glass Studio Sale. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Dec. 18: Glass by Deborah Czeresko and music by DJP and MrT. $5. 7–10 p.m. D’ART CENTER 208 East Main St., Norfolk. 757-625-4211. www.d-ARTCenter.org Nov. 16, Dec. 21: Paint & Wine Workshop. $49. 5:30–8 p.m. Dec. 6: d’ARTini Night—A Holiday Shopping Party. Free. Cash bar. 6–9 p.m.

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datebook

THE BIZARRE BAZAAR® presents...

The 38 th Christmas Collection December 5 - 8, 2013

Ther e Only ’s One Biza rre B RICHMOND RACEWAY COMPLEX azaa ® r ! 600 E. Laburnum Avenue, Richmond, VA 23222

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area’s most popular show, The Bizarre Bazaar® is a unique shopping experience. Gather your friends and make a day of it!” -Christmas in Williamsburg

THE BIZARRE BAZAAR® ADVANCE TICKETS & OUTLETS

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GALLERY AT YORK HALL 301 Main St., Yorktown. 757-890-4490. www.VisitYorktown.org Dec. 8: Cookies with Santa. Free. 1– 4 p.m. Through December: Christmas in Yorktown. PENINSULA FINE ARTS CENTER 101 Museum Dr., Newport News. 757-596-8175. www.PFAC-Va.org Ongoing: Nature Revealed. Nov. 15: Artini, the third annual celebration of the art of beverages. $40. 7–10 p.m. Nov. 21, Dec. 19: Art After 5. 5:30–7:30 p.m. Beginning Nov. 29: Artful Giving Launch. PORTSMOUTH ART AND CULTURAL CENTER 400 High St., Portsmouth. 757-393-8543. www.PortsmouthArtCenter.com Nov. 29–30: Ornament and tile workshop. $8–$10. 1–4 p.m. Nov. 29– Dec. 31: Winter Wonderland. $3. Dec. 5: Ladies can design and decorate a “gingerbling” house. $30. 6–8 p.m. Dec. 28: Take a Dip into Chocolate. $3. Dec. 31: Noon Year’s Eve Bash: Countdown to noon. $3. 11 a.m. SELDEN ARCADE 208 East Main St., Norfolk. 757-664-6880. www.Norfolk.gov Ongoing: TIME. Nov. 7: Art Brew and Open Reception. Free. 6–8 p.m. Nov. 9, Dec. 14: Family Day. Dec. 6–7: Selden Handmade Fair. Friday 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Beginning Dec. 14: Ephemeral/Eternal. STRAVITZ SCULPTURE & FINE ART GALLERY 1217 Laskin Rd., Virginia Beach. 757-305-9411. www.Sculpture-Bronze.com Nov. 14: Heloise “Giner” Levit shares French Paintings with Provenance. VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART 2200 Parks Ave., Virginia Beach. 757-425-0000. www.VirginiaMOCA.org Through Dec. 29: Matt Eich—The Seven Cities. Through Dec. 29: Block Party Exhibition. Through Dec. 29: Barnaby Barford. VISUAL ARTS CENTER 340 High St., Portsmouth. 757-822-1878. www.TCC.edu/VisArts Through Nov. 5: Art that Asks the Big Questions. Beginning Nov. 23: 44th Annual Art Faculty Exhibition.

MUSEUM

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF VIRGINIA 400 High St., Portsmouth. 757-393-5258. www.ChildrensMuseumVa.com Nov. 10, Dec. 7–8: Tidewater “O” Gauge Association (TOGA) will have a modular display. Nov. 29–30: Sights and Sounds of a Winter Wonderland. Nov. 29, Dec. 7, 14, 21: Celebrate your child’s birthday with story time and photo opportunities. Dec. 1: The Rainbow Puppets present The Night Before Christmas. 2 p.m., 3 p.m. Dec. 6, 7, 15: Family gingerbread workshops. $20–$45. GLOUCESTER MUSEUM OF HISTORY 6539 Main St., Gloucester. 804-693-1234. www.GloucesterVa.info/Museum Through Nov.: 20th century Gloucester County voting memorabilia is on display. HAMPTON HISTORY MUSEUM 120 Old Hampton Lane, Hampton. 757-727-1610. www.Hampton.gov/History_Museum Ongoing: Toward Freedom: Hampton and the Contraband. $5. HAMPTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 11 Frissell Ave., Hampton. 757-727-5308. www.Museum.HamptonU.edu Through Dec 7: The Dianne Whitfield-Locke & Carnell Locke Collection: Building on Tradition. Free. continued on page 34>>

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BRyanT & STRaTTon CoLLEgE FaLL FESTIVaL Saturday, October 26, 10 AM – 2 PM Town Square & Participating Stores

Join Bryant & Stratton College for their Fall Festival in Town Square. Be sure to come in costume for a contest. Participating stores will also hand out candy. For more information call 757-838-1505.

annuaL TREE LIgHTIng CEREMony Saturday, November 16, 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

Join Peninsula Town Center for the Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony in Town Square as we honor those that serve in our military forces. Enjoy holiday entertainment and witness the lighting of our 45 foot tree by our Holiday VIP Family! Military families will also get an exclusive special visit from our friend from the North Pole!

CoLISEuM CEnTRaL’S 15TH annuaL HoLIday PaRadE & CELEBRaTIonS Saturday, November 23, 2012 Parade 9:30 AM – 11:00 AM

JAMESTOWN SETTLEMENT & YORKTOWN VICTORY CENTER www.HistoryIsFun.org Ongoing: Jamestown’s Legacy to the American Revolution. Nov. 28–30: Foods and feasts of Colonial Virginia. Beginning Dec. 1: A Colonial Christmas. Dec. 26–31: Musical entertainment of the period. PORTSMOUTH NAVAL SHIPYARD MUSEUM AND LIGHTSHIP PORTSMOUTH 2 High St., Portsmouth. 757-393-8591. www.PortsmouthNavalShipyardMuseum.com Nov. 2: Portsmouth’s First People. Nov. 9: Honoring our Veterans. Dec. 7: In Winter Quarters. Dec. 14, 21: Make your own nautical themed holiday ornaments. VIRGINIA AIR & SPACE CENTER 600 Settlers Landing Rd., Hampton. 757-727-0900. www.VASC.org Nov. 8–11: The VASC honors military veterans with free exhibit admission. Through Dec. 21: Robotics Saturdays. Dec. 7: Enjoy breakfast with ‘Ole Saint Nick! VIRGINIA AQUARIUM & MARINE SCIENCE MUSEUM 717 General Booth Blvd., Virginia Beach. 757-385-3474. www.VirginiaAquarium.com Through Dec. 1: Amazing Butterflies. VIRGINIA LIVING MUSEUM 524 J. Clyde Morris Blvd., Newport News. 757-595-1900. www.TheVLM.org Nov. 1– Dec. 23: “Wild Gifts for the Holidays.” Nov. 9: Frogs and Friends—See rare and exotic amphibians. Nov. 12: Learn about and taste teas from around the world. Nov. 16: Awww Shucks Oyster Roast. $40–$45. 3–7 p.m. Nov. 27–Dec. 31: Star of Wonder: Mystery of the Christmas Star. Nov. 27– Dec. 31: Laser Holidays. Dec. 31: High Noon Year’s Eve. $10–$12. 11 a.m.–1 p.m.

This year marks the 15th annual Coliseum Central Holiday Parade that comes through Peninsula Town Center! Join us for great views of the entire parade as it passes through our center. Santa will also visit after his carriage ride and will be in Marys Park. Enjoy carriage rides around Peninsula Town Center from 1 PM – 5 PM. Cash donations will be accepted for Operation Homefront.

VIRGINIA SPORTS HALL OF FAME 206 High St., Portsmouth. 757-393-8031. www.VSHFM.com Through Dec. 29: Amateur and professional sports photography on display. Dec. 7: Field Day-themed arts and crafts as well as contests for the whole family.

BLaCk FRIday MIdnIgHT MadnESS

ATTUCKS CULTURAL CENTER 1010 Church St., Norfolk. 757-622-4763. www.AttucksTheatre.org Nov. 1: The Piano Guys. $40 plus applicable fees. 7:30 p.m.

Thanksgiving Weekend Sale Savings November 29 – December 1

The first 400 in line at midnight that are eligible to register will receive a FREE movie ticket to CineBistro. iPAD Giveaways Every Hour Win one of 12 iPAD giveaways every hour 12 AM – 12 PM. First drawing at 1 AM in Town Square. Must register every hour. More information will be available soon at www.peninsultowncenter.com

STAGE

CHRYSLER HALL 201 Brambleton Ave., Norfolk. 757-664-6464. www.SevenVenues.com Nov. 16: “Beethoven’s Fifth.” $46–$105. 8 p.m. Nov. 22–23: West Side Story. Nov. 24: Comedian Ron “Tater Salad” White. $45–55. Dec. 6–8: The Nutcracker. Friday 7 p.m., Saturday– Sunday 2 p.m. Dec. 14: Holiday Pops! $22–90. 8 p.m. Dec. 20–21: Mamma Mia! DONK’S THEATER 8259 Buckley Hall Rd., Hudgins. 804-725-7760. www.DonksTheater.com Nov. 23: Donna Ulisse’s Christmas. $15. Dec. 7: Smith Family and Friends Christmas Show. Adults $12. Children $5.

Town Center Regular Hours: Individual Location Hours May Vary Monday-Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Sundays 12:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. For more information visit www.peninsulatowncenter.com and click on “Events”. 34

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FERGUSON CENTER FOR THE ARTS 1 Avenue of the Arts, Newport News. 757-594-8752. www.FergusonCenter.CNU.edu Nov. 1: Irish Chamber Orchestra. 8 p.m. Nov. 2: The Capitol Steps. 8 p.m. Nov. 10: Steve Miller Band. 7 p.m. Nov. 11: Hungarian State Folk Ensemble. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 12: Buddy Valastro: The Cake Boss. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 14: On Screen/In Person: Mr. Cao Goes to Washington. Nov. 14: World Blues featuring Taj Mahal. 7:30 p.m.

Nov. 15–16: Hello, Dolly! with Sally Struthers. Nov. 21: Shanghai Ballet, “The Butterfly Lovers.” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 22: Bela Fleck & Brooklyn Rider. 8 p.m. Nov. 26: Cirque Dreams Holidaze. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 1: Celtic Woman: Home for Christmas. 7 p.m. Dec. 2: American Big Band “Home for the Holidays.” Dec. 4: Dave Koz & Friends Christmas Tour 2013. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 7: Kenny Rogers, Christmas & Hits Through the Years. Dec. 9: The Darlene Love Holiday Show with The Shirelles. Dec. 16: Vienna Boys Choir, Christmas in Vienna. 7:30 p.m. GENERIC THEATER 215 St. Pauls Blvd., Norfolk. 757-441-2160. www.GenericTheater.org Nov. 1–3, 7–10: Carrie: The Musical. HARRISON OPERA HOUSE 160 E Virginia Beach Blvd., Norfolk. 757-623-1223. www.VaOpera.org Nov. 8–12: The Magic Flute. KIMBALL THEATRE 428 West Duke of Gloucester, Williamsburg. 757-565-8588. www.ColonialWilliamsburg.com Dec. 21: Lorna Luft sings her favorite Christmas songs. $40. 7:30 p.m. SANDLER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 201 Market St., Virginia Beach. 757-385-2787. www.SandlerCenter.org Nov. 15–16: “The Magic Flute.” $110–$327. Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 2:30 p.m. Nov. 23: Mahler Symphony No. 1. $15. 8 p.m. Nov. 24: Symphonicity: Bohemian Delights. 3 p.m. Nov. 30: Virginia Symphony Orchestra: Beethoven’s Fifth. 8 p.m. Dec. 13: Natalie Cole—Holiday & Hits. 8 p.m. Dec. 14: Holiday Pops! $22–105. 8 p.m. Dec. 20–22: The Nutcracker with Symphonicity. SCOPE ARENA 201 E. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk. 757-664-6464. www.SevenVenues.com Nov. 16: India Fest 2013. Free. 11 a.m. Dec. 12: The Story Tour. $22–$75. 7 p.m. Dec. 26–28: Norfolk Scope Holiday Invitational Basketball Tournament. TED CONSTANT CONVOCATION CENTER 4320 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk. 757-683-4444. www.ConstantCenter.com Nov. 10: Jeff Dunham. $45.50. 3 p.m. TCC ROPER THEATER 340 Granby St., Norfolk. 757-822-1450. www.TCCRoperCenter.org Nov. 8–10: Trojan Barbie. Friday, Saturday 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE 1584 Wesleyan Dr., Norfolk 757-455-3200. www.VWC.edu Nov. 6–10: Big River. Nov. 7: VWC Center for Sacred Music’s Sound & Symbol Lecture Series. Nov. 11: Innovation joins tradition in The Amara Piano Quartet. Nov. 21: Anthony Hailey in “The Sounds of Africa.” Nov. 22: “A Place for Us.” Dec. 6–7: A Wesleyan Christmas, traditional sounds of the holiday season. Through Dec. 9: Remainders by Manuela Mourão. WELLS THEATRE 108 E. Tazewell St., Norfolk. 757-627-6988. www.VaStage.com Nov. 1–3, 5–9: The Woman in Black, based on the novel by Susan Hill. $33–$50.

MUSIC CHESAPEAKE CONFERENCE CENTER 900 Greenbrier Circle., Chesapeake. 757-382-2500. www.ChesapeakeConferenceCenter.com Dec. 19: Virginia Symphony Orchestra Holiday Brass Concert. Free. 7 p.m.

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datebook COLLEGE OF WILLIAM & MARY 102 Richmond Rd., Williamsburg. 757-221-4000. www.WM.edu Nov. 1: Yoonie Han. Free. 7:30 p.m. Ewell Recital Hall. Nov. 22: Eya. Free. 7:30 p.m. Great Hall, Wren Building. FRANKTOWN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 7551 Bayside Rd., Franktown. 757-302-0366. www.ACESVa.org Nov. 23: Virginia Handbell Consort. $5–22. 8 p.m. NORVA 317 Monticello Ave., Norfolk. 757-627-4547. www.TheNorVa.com Nov. 1: Anberlin and The Maine. $20–$23. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2: GWAR. $20–$25. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 3: Passion Pit. $30–$35. 8 p.m. Nov. 5: Taking Back Sunday. $27.50–$30. 7 p.m. Nov. 9: Streetlight Manifesto. $17.50–20. 8 p.m. Nov. 14: Suicide Girls: Blackheart Burlesque Tour. $20–$25. 8 p.m. Nov. 27: CHVRCHES. $20–$23. 8 p.m. Dec. 11: Misfits. $16–$19. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 19: Thirty Seconds to Mars. $30–$35. 8 p.m. Dec. 20: Major & The Monbacks. $12.50. 7:30 p.m. OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY 5115 Hampton Blvd., Norfolk. 757-683-4061. www.ODU.edu Nov. 3: James Kosnik organ recital. St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Norfolk. Nov. 20–23: University Dance Theatre Fall Concert. University Theatre. Nov. 25: Percussion Ensemble. 7:30 p.m. Chandler Recital Hall. Dec. 3: Jazz Choir and Jazz Ensemble. 7:30 p.m. Chandler CoVa Recital Hall. n

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Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holi

A Different Touch, Inc. Authorized BERNINA Sewing Center

Where Creativity Begins!

Quality Products, Technical and Customer Service, and Ongoing Education in the art of sewing.

1107 S. Military Highway Chesapeake, Va. • 757- 366-8830 www.adifferenttouch.com

Ti Sento Milano Sterling Silver Necklace This Ti Sento Milano sterling silver necklace features a blue cubic zirconia center stone, which is surrounded by tiny hand set cubic zirconia crystals. The inspiration for Ti Sento's La Bella Vita collection comes from the beautiful and romantic architecture of the buildings and bridges of Florence, Italy. This Must-Have necklace is sure to make you sparkle! Hi-Ho Silver Newport News • Williamsburg Norfolk • Virginia Beach www.hihosilveronline.com

Southern Gates Handmade Tree of Life Straight from Charleston, SC, this Southern Gates handmade tree of life design is a tribute to the skills of artisans of the past who wrought beauty from metals. The oak tree is considered a symbol of wisdom embodied within its towering strength. Its style is of the highest quality as it has a connection with traditions and cultures of the South. The jewelry is crafted of fine quality .925 sterling silver for a lifetime of wear. Don't forget to ask about the matching earrings and bracelet to complete your look. Hi-Ho Silver Newport News • Williamsburg Norfolk • Virginia Beach www.hihosilveronline.com Jewelry Diamond In A Pearl and 14kt yellow gold pendant suspended on an 18” 14kt yellow gold chain, retails for $1175.00; Diamond In A Pearl and 14kt yellow gold earrings, retail for $850.00. Either Ore Jewelers Strawbridge 2165 General Booth Blvd. #160, Virginia Beach, VA, 23454 757-430-8116 www.EitherOreStrawbridge.com

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UIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE • Holiday gift GUIDE Ornament Let us Personalize your glass Christmas tree ornament while you wait!! Great gift for teachers, family members, kids and those hard to gift professionals in our lives! All specialty ornaments come boxed Snacks The Serious Snacker includes Lightly Salted Jumbo Cashews, 10.5 oz, Beach Crunch Snack Mix, 10.5 oz and Signature Virginia Peanuts, 20 oz. $41.

and tied with a coordinating ribbon making them the perfect gift for anyone. $21. worththewait, 3157 Virginia Beach Blvd, Virginia Beach. 757-498-9051. www.worththewait.com Custom Embroidery & Sewing

Available at six TASTE locations across Hampton Roads in Virginia Beach, Norfolk, Chesapeake and Newport News. www.taste unlimited.com.

Supplies Your authorized Bernina Sewing Center for sales and service. 100% Quality Fabrics for Quilts and Embroidery sewing notions, books and patterns and prices to meet all needs. A Different Touch, 1107-B S. Military Highway Chesapeake, Va., 757-366-8830, adifferenttouch.com

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Drive through 2-miles of dazzling lights November 28 - December 31, 2013 5:30 - 8:30 pm nightly • • • •

New Tinsel Trams tours Private small group tours Holiday Café lunch & dinner package New family programs

norfolkbotanicalgarden.org 6700 Azalea Garden Rd., Norfolk, VA 23518 • (757) 441-5830

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Weekends p.39

InStore p.41

Success p.42

Advice on elder Car p.44

Life

Day 1: Getting There 3 p.m.

Departed Virginia Beach bound for Richmond International Airport to meet Earl. The easy, 1:45 drive presented nothing more challenging than some slowing on the HRBT.

Rocky switchbacks define the Buttermilk Heights Trail.

5 p.m.

Claimed Earl curbside and made the short, painless rush hour drive to the Museum District bed and breakfast, a charming, 1920s two-story home in the Fan District directly across Grove Avenue from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) with private off-street parking. We were graciously welcomed by proprietor Anna Currence and shown to our spacious suite: two tastefully decorated bedrooms, a half-bath, full-bath, and day room (all for only $75 each/night). With a dining table full of convivial guests, and sensitive to our unspoken desire to unplug and reconnect, she asked if we would prefer happy hour on our private balcony. Yes, please! After a half-hour or so of catching up, we changed clothes and set off on an hour-long walk along stately Monument Avenue.

Lush foliage shades the North Bank Trail.

Kayaking on the James River.

» Weekends

Cross-town Trek 48 Hours Of Urban And Rural Hiking In Richmond And Williamsburg Provides Walks To Remember Close To Home By Betsy DiJulio

T

Betsy and Chihuly at the VMFA.

hough the mountains always beckon, for our third annual hike, my cousin Earl and I chose to spend less time in the car and more doing what we love. As the host, my solution was a hybrid urban hiking-state park experience that took us to the James River Park in Richmond—one of the great river cities, as it turns out—and back to Virginia Beach by way of the York River State Park in Williamsburg.

Earl on bridge to Belle Isle.

Above: Lovely accommodations at the Museum District B&B. Below: Happy hour on our private balcony.

8 p.m.

Drove to nearby Pasture, now one of my favorite dining venues. Vintage-modern, spare and nonchalantly hip, it serves up some of the most appealing small—and a few large—plates of Southern/local food (including vegan), beverages and hospitality around (think rice grits with smoked tomatoes and black eyed peas).

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Earl on one of many overlooks at York River State Park.

Life Weekends

Day 2: James River Park 9:30 a.m.

Following coffee on our private balcony at 8:30, Earl and I joined fellow guests in the sunny dining room for a leisurely breakfast of thoughtfully selected and prepared basics. Afterwards, we packed up our hiking necessities and headed for the Reedy Creek park entrance (the other Riverside Drive entrance is closed weekdays) on the south bank of the James. Be sure to have 70 cents for the toll.

11:00 a.m.

After studying the map and questioning fellow hikers (in addition to advance research), we set off east along the river on a trail parallel to the service road, crossing the picturesque wooden footbridge to the aptly named Belle Isle. After making the enjoyable wooded mile loop with spectacular views of the rocks and rapids, we crossed the hanging footbridge beneath the Lee Bridge to the north river bank at Tredegar Iron Works. The wellmaintained James River trails are not especially well-marked, and we came to rely, in part, on the kindness of strangers such as the hospitable resident who helped us locate the head of the North Bank Trail, which we followed west along the river, passing famous Hollywood Cemetery and lovely Maymont, as well as traversing lush kudzu meadows, deep woods, and a short section through a residential neighborhood. A walk across the fairly long and sunny Boulevard Bridge, with impressive views of the rocky river in both directions, brought us back to the south bank and the shaded (at least in summer) Buttermilk Heights Trail, notable for its hills, switchbacks, rocky outcroppings, and verdant ivy and moss. Total hike: about 9 miles.

3:00 p.m.

Ravenous and thirsty—“urban hiking” doesn’t necessarily mean you will pass a convenience store— we tailgated in the parking lot, inhaling our late picnic lunch. The short drive back to the B&B left us just enough time to shower and dress before enjoying happy hour, once again, on our private balcony. Afterwards, we strolled over to Cary Street, wandering in and out of inviting shops.

7:30 p.m.

Remembering a tasty lunch in a funky setting enjoyed years ago, I chose Millie’s Diner for dinner. The restaurant was packed and doesn’t accept reservations for small parties, but we were seated almost immediately near the closet-sized open kitchen where we became engrossed in the pas de deux performed by two somewhat unlikely-looking, but immensely talented, chefs as they produced plate after generous plate of beautiful, hardy, rich and deeply flavorful food. Back at the B&B, we once again found ourselves on the balcony with a glass of wine, engaged in conversation until fairly late.

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Day 3: VMFA and York River State Park, Williamsburg 8 a.m.

After coffee on our balcony and the lovely breakfast and engaging company we had come to expect, we packed our bags so that we could visit the VMFA and still check out by the gracious hour of noon.

10 a.m.

Browsed the pristine and beautifully re-installed modern, contemporary and Indian miniatures collections at the VMFA, with a nip into the gift shop.

12 noon

Loaded the car and wistfully bid farewell to our B&B, making our way to the University of Richmond, Earl’s father’s alma mater (class of ’49), for a photo and picnic by the serene lake.

2:30 p.m.

Arrived at York River State Park in Williamsburg to find a tiny, but surprisingly well-stocked, ranger’s station where we inquired about favorite trails. We were directed to three loops made up of the Mattaponi, Woodstock Pond, Beaver, Backbone and Taskinas Creek trails, which together afforded about 5.5 miles of well-maintained paths through forests and along river and marsh shoreline, including beautiful Fossil Beach.

4:30 p.m.

Departed the park en route to Virginia Beach, running into a half-hour back-up at the HRBT and arriving home at about 6 p.m. This trip proved that, like the “Go RVing” commerCoVa cial asserts, “Away is closer than you think.” n James River Park 2301 Riverside Dr., Richmond www.jamesriverpark.org Millie’s Diner 2603 E. Main St., Richmond 804-643-5512, www.milliesdiner.com Museum District Bed & Breakfast 2811 Grove Ave., Richmond 804-359-2332, www.museumdistrict bb.com

Pasture 416 E. Grace St., Richmond 804-780-0416, www.pastureva.com Virginia Museum of Fine Arts 200 North Blvd., Richmond 804-340-1400, www.vmfa.state.va.us York River State Park 5526 Riverview Rd., Williamsburg www.dcr.virginia.gov/ state_parks/yor.shtml

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Life In Store

Whistle Stop Dale’s Train Station Is On Track To Delight Hobbyists And Spur Holiday Nostalgia This Season

D

By Michael Jon Khandelwal

uring the holidays, childhood memories blaze with images of shiny, new train sets whirring around tracks and over trestle bridges. For those who wish to rekindle their love for model trains— or for those who never lost that love—Dale’s Train Station on Poplar Hall Drive near Military Circle in Norfolk is an oasis of all things locomotive. The thousands of square feet of rooms filled with engines, boxcars and accessories in all sizes and scales had its beginning at a Wilco department store in the early ’70s when Dale Stocks was shopping for bargains. “They had all these toy trains there for 50 and 75 percent off,” says Stocks. He was intrigued with the idea of getting back to his childhood hobby, so he filled his cart and went home to set them up. “I put them on the carpet, but you can’t run the HO trains on a thick carpet.” Stocks’ neighbor soon came over, wondering what he was doing. “He had his old toy trains—American Flyer—in storage, and he liked mine better. So, we traded,” says Stocks. “I took his trains to my garage and taught myself how to get them going again.” Stocks soon started working out of his garage, fixing other people’s trains, too. “I went around to hobby shops,” says Stocks. “They had all these people who would come in with a broken train, and they would turn them away because they didn’t have anyone who could fix them. Before too long I had a busy weekend, because I still had a full-time job.” What started out as an opportunity to make some extra money snowballed from there. After a first store in Chesapeake, Stocks opened a store on Virginia Beach Boulevard. “The Virginian-Pilot took a picture of Virginia Beach Boulevard, talking about the excess of commercial signage on the road, and my billboard was right dead center in the picture,” he says. “The next day my phones blew up.” Shortly after that, Stocks quit his other job and went into the train business full time.

Nearly 40 years after Dale Stocks visited the Wilco department store, his current store, Dale’s Train Station, is a haven for people of all walks of life. “The younger generation is getting back into it now,” says Stocks. “The hobby industry might have skipped a generation, but now it’s back. We have a lot of people from the ages of the early ’30s and up, but now we have a lot of juveniles that come in. It’s like anything. If you have a child, and you’re interested in something, the child will be, too. You have something to bond over.” Stocks sells trains to enthusiasts and also to architecture firms, Norfolk Southern and Norfolk Southern’s employees. “We have a lot of people who are into current day transportation—the trains of today. But then again, we have a lot of people who just like old steam engines.” While the store is filled with N-, HO-, O- and G-scale trains of all eras for sale, in the back of the store, Stocks’ service department makes the trains people take out of storage run like new. “We have a lot of people who want to pass along their older trains to their children,” he says. “We will take on any project, based upon the availability of parts. After 40 years, I’ve got a good idea of what parts I can get and what parts I probably can’t get.” As the holiday season approaches, Stocks’ gets busier, as nearly a third of his sales and service business is in November and December. But no matter what time of year someone walks in the door, Stocks treats them all like long time friends. “We all have a common interest,” he says. “We give everyone the same attention regardless of what they want; they might want a screw to hold something together, or they might want a whole layout. You never know. If they have something that’s not worth fixing, I’m going to tell them. And if they have something that’s worth a lot of money, I’m going to CoVa tell them that, too.” n

Dale’s Train Station 5880 Poplar Hall Dr., Norfolk, 757-461-3636 Closed Sunday– Tuesday. Open daily beginning in midNovember

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Life Photo Courtesy of Stihl

Success

The Heart Of STIHL Speaking With Fred J. Whyte, A Popular President With A Penchant For Power Equipment By Barrett Baker

B

orn in Vancouver, British Columbia, working in the United States for a German-based company and boasting Scottish blood (yes, he plays the bagpipes), you might say that Fred J. Whyte is an international man of mystery. But there’s no mystery behind his success with STIHL for more than 40 years, serving as president of STIHL Incorporated in Virginia Beach for the last 21. He believes in honesty and integrity, and his employees seem to both like and respect him for it. In fact, according to Glass Door employee surveys, he carries a 100 percent approval rating. Of course, there’s more to good business than just being a well-liked individual. Under Fred’s leadership at STIHL Limited in Canada, the company achieved increases in sales each year for the 10 years he was there. Under his tenure here at STIHL Inc., he achieved 21 years of annual increases (the only exception being in 2009 during the recession) and also helped STIHL become the number one selling brand of gasolinepowered handheld outdoor power equipment in the United States.

Coastal Virginia: Originally you hadn’t intended to join the STIHL team, but you somewhat followed in your father’s footsteps. Fred J. Whyte: That’s true. I had worked during the summers for Homelite in the parts, shipping and technical department. While I was at the University of Iowa, my dad called me and told me about a job coming up as a factory rep for STIHL, covering a territory from eastern Montana to Louisiana. I was working for Datsun (now Nissan) and was headed to Chicago with them, but I went for the interview, and, as they say, the rest is history. When STIHL opened their U.S. headquarters in Virginia Beach, I came here as a product manager and then later became national sales manager. CoVa: You were then repatriated to Canada at the age of 34 to start the Canadian subsidiary of STIHL. FJW: Yes. The joke was that they didn’t need me, they needed my passport [laughs]. The majority of the directors had to be Canadian, so that was certainly in my favor. I didn’t even have a chair to sit in when I got there, but it was a tremendous learning experience, I can assure you. CoVa: You must have done a great job since they promoted you to president of STIHL Inc. at the age of 44. FJW: It was a bittersweet experience, because I was the first employee in Canada and built the company there from the ground up. I picked my own team, and we had a lot of momentum going. However, at the time, the company here was, shall we say, languishing. But I knew what my responsibility

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was, and I had a lot of loyalty to the Stihl family. But I certainly have loved the challenge of being here at the U.S. headquarters in Virginia Beach. CoVa: Any words of advice for future business leaders? FJW: It’s really a world market now. I think it’s really important for young people coming up in the business world to think globally. Learn other languages, keep up to date with what’s going on everywhere, not just in your back yard, and continue to learn new skills. Think about it. If you have a serious disease and you need to see a specialist, would you rather go see someone who graduated from medical school several years ago or someone who has kept their education current and goes to seminars to keep their knowledge level high? CoVa: Any thoughts on retirement? FJW: I will be retiring in December of 2014. CoVa: Plans? FJW: My wife and I both enjoy golf, but she’s much better at it than I am, and there’s a certain indignity to that [laughs]. But I also enjoy bird hunting, and we have two Golden Retrievers that are a big part of my hobby. CoVa: So you’re going to remain in Hampton Roads? FJW: Yes. We really enjoy Virginia, and we have a home up in the Blue Ridge Mountains. We attend a lot of UVA football games. I’m also currently the rector (head of the Board of Visitors) of Old Dominion University, so we’re big ODU fans, too. And I serve on the Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters Children’s Health Foundation board of directors. There’s a wonderful quality of life here in Hampton Roads. We have all the goods and services that you would CoVa find in a much bigger metropolitan area, without all the big city problems. n

2013

10/15/13 3:16 PM


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Todd Pleasants 757-848-3542 Todd Pleasants 757-848-3542 1020 Cypress Creek Parkway, Smithfield, VA $534,900 The Delaney: Investments. This 1020 CypressSmart CreekMoves Parkway, Smithfield, VAtraditional $534,900ranch will leave its guests in admiration by its architectural The home is richly windowed and features vaulted a large bonus The Delaney:beauty. Smart Moves Investments. This traditional ranch awill leavesunroom its guestsand in admiration by its room located beauty. over theThe garage that is builtwindowed for a multitude of uses.aThe master suite features a large architectural home is richly and features vaulted sunroom and a large bonus walk-in closet with a luxurious bath. This is an entertainers dream home with a spacious living area. room located over the garage that is built for a multitude of uses. The master suite features a large Guests that tour thisa home are sure fall is inan love with it. MLS #1334222 walk-in closet with luxurious bath.toThis entertainers dream home with a spacious living area. Guests that tour this home are sure to fall in love with it. MLS #1334222

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HORSE PROPERTY 15 acre private horse retreat including executive home, 5 horse stable, office, 2 bedroom in-law apartment, indoor solar heated pool, 4 car garage, riding ring, 3 pastures, within walking distance of Church Street!

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Becki Pilgrim 757-303-3512 Becki Pilgrim becki@abbitt.com 757-303-3512 Becki Pilgrim becki@abbitt.com 757-303-3512 Becki Pilgrim becki@abbitt.com 757-303-3512 becki@abbitt.com

60 Columbia Ave, Hampton, VA 23669 $585,000 5 Bedrooms, Bathrooms, 3,600 ft. Built$585,000 in the early 1900’s this beautiful Victorian home has 60 Columbia3Ave, Hampton, VAsq23669 been modernized with sensitivity theBuilt period of the home. It this boasts a waterVictorian view, hugehome wraphas around 560 Bedrooms, 3Ave, Bathrooms, 3,600 ft. in the early 1900’s beautiful Columbia Hampton, VAsqto23669 $585,000 2nd floor sleeping porch, sunroom & in even has a widow’s walk. just ahuge block from been modernized with sensitivity to23669 theBuilt period of the home. It boasts aLocated water Victorian view, wrap around 5porch, Bedrooms, 3Ave, Bathrooms, 3,600 ft. the early 1900’s this beautiful home has 60 Columbia Hampton, VAsq $585,000 the Hampton Yacht Club. MLS# to 1332772 2nd floor sleeping porch, & in even has a widow’s walk. just ahuge block from been modernized with sensitivity theBuilt period of the home. It boasts aLocated waterVictorian view, wrap around 5porch, Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 3,600sunroom sq ft. the early 1900’s this beautiful home has the Hampton Yacht Club. MLS#sunroom 1332772 porch, 2nd floor sleeping porch, & even has home. a widow’s walk. aLocated just ahuge blockwrap fromaround been modernized with sensitivity to the period of the It boasts water view, the Hampton Yacht Club.porch, MLS#sunroom 1332772& even has a widow’s walk. Located just a block from porch, 2nd floor sleeping the Hampton Yacht Club. MLS# 1332772 Deana Renn 757-287-2143 Deana Renn deanarenn@gmail.com 757-287-2143 Deana Renn www.cypresscreekhomes.com deanarenn@gmail.com 757-287-2143 Deana Renn www.cypresscreekhomes.com deanarenn@gmail.com 353 Pagan Ridge, Smithfield, VA 23430 (Waterfront) $2,349,000 757-287-2143 www.cypresscreekhomes.com 6 Bedrooms, 5 ½ Bathrooms, square feet. Words cannot describe the attention to detail. This home 353 Pagan Ridge, Smithfield,6308 VA 23430 (Waterfront) $2,349,000 deanarenn@gmail.com will leave Honed reclaimed floors, 3 custom masonry fireplaces 6353 Bedrooms, 5 speechless! ½ Bathrooms, 6308 square Wordswood cannot describe the attention to detail. and Thiscustom home Paganyou Ridge, Smithfield, VAgranite, 23430feet. (Waterfront) $2,349,000 www.cypresscreekhomes.com iron stone phantom screens on twilight porch, 4describe zone geothermal HVAC, interior stone will leave Honed floors, 3 custom masonry fireplaces and custom 6cast Bedrooms, 5speechless! ½fireplace, Bathrooms, 6308 square feet. Wordswood cannot the attention to detail. This home 353 Paganyou Ridge, Smithfield, VAgranite, 23430reclaimed (Waterfront) $2,349,000 walls,leave dream exposed beamsscreens and soonmuch more. Chef’s gourmet kitchen, twofireplaces walk in pantries iron stone fireplace, phantom porch, 4describe zone geothermal HVAC, interior stone will you5closets, speechless! Honed floors, 3 custom masonry and custom 6cast Bedrooms, ½ Bathrooms, 6308granite, square reclaimed feet.twilight Wordswood cannot the attention to detail. This home plus iron a dream Butler’s Pantry, luxurious master with largeporch, master Commercial stylewalk pier with walls, exposed beams andsuite soreclaimed much more. Chef’s gourmet kitchen, two in pantries cast stone fireplace, phantom screens on twilight 4 bath. zone geothermal HVAC, interior will leave youclosets, speechless! Honed granite, wood floors, 3 custom masonry fireplaces andstone custom multia boat &closets, jet ski parking, lights, electric & gazebo. Call forbath. agourmet private showing.two MLS# 1337051 plus Butler’s Pantry, luxurious master with large master Commercial style pier with walls, dream exposed beams andsuite soon much more.porch, Chef’s kitchen, walk in pantries cast iron stone fireplace, phantom screens twilight 4 zone geothermal HVAC, interior stone multi boat & jet ski parking, lights, electric & gazebo. Call for a private showing. MLS# 1337051 plus a Butler’s Pantry, luxurious master suite with large master bath. Commercial style pier with walls, dream closets, exposed beams and so much more. Chef’s gourmet kitchen, two walk in pantries multia boat & jet ski parking, lights, electric gazebo. forbath. a private showing.style MLS# 1337051 plus Butler’s Pantry, luxurious master suite & with large Call master Commercial pier with multi boat & jet ski parking, lights, electric & gazebo. Call for a private showing. MLS# 1337051 Michael M. Gleason 757-329-4713 Michael M. Gleason mikegleason@verizon.net 757-329-4713 Michael M. Gleason www.cypresscreekhomes.com mikegleason@verizon.net 757-329-4713 Michael M. Gleason www.cypresscreekhomes.com mikegleason@verizon.net 757-329-4713 www.cypresscreekhomes.com mikegleason@verizon.net 103 Nairn, Smithfield, VA 23430 $479,900 www.cypresscreekhomes.com 4 Bedrooms, 3 full Bathrooms, 2827 $479,900 square feet. Custom all brick rancher with stone accents. 103 Nairn, Smithfield, VA 23430 Open kitchen with large island and wine station. Private owners w/ wall wallaccents. tile shower. 4103 Bedrooms, 3 full Bathrooms, 2827 square feet. Custom all brick suite rancher withtostone Nairn, Smithfield, VA 23430 $479,900 features include pocket custom bonus room with loft,w/family Open kitchen large island and office, wine Private owners suite wall wall accents. tilelaundry shower. 4Additional Bedrooms, 3 with full Bathrooms, 2827 squarestation. feet. Custom all brick rancher withtodesigned stone 103 Nairn, Smithfield, VA 23430 $479,900 and more. MLS# 1327603 features include pocket custom bonus room with loft,w/family Open kitchen large island andoffice, wine Private owners suite wall wall accents. tilelaundry shower. 4Additional Bedrooms, 3 with full Bathrooms, 2827 squarestation. feet. Custom all brick rancher withtodesigned stone and more. MLS# 1327603 Additional features include pocket custom Private bonus room with loft,w/family Open kitchen with large island andoffice, wine station. owners suite wall todesigned wall tilelaundry shower. and more. MLS# 1327603 Additional features include pocket office, custom bonus room with loft, family designed laundry and more. MLS# 1327603

Michael M. Gleason 757-329-4713 Michael M. Gleason mikegleason@verizon.net 757-329-4713 Michael M. Gleason www.cypresscreekhomes.com mikegleason@verizon.net 757-329-4713 Michael M. Gleason www.cypresscreekhomes.com mikegleason@verizon.net 757-329-4713 103 Gleneagles, Smithfield, VA 23430 $521,550 www.cypresscreekhomes.com mikegleason@verizon.net 5 Bedrooms, 3 ½ Smithfield, Bathrooms, VA 360023430 square$521,550 feet. The deCOrATed Hopewell Model is open for 103 Gleneagles, www.cypresscreekhomes.com tours! designed Stephen Alexander Homes featuring unparalleled craftsmanship floor 5103 Bedrooms, 3 ½by Bathrooms, 360023430 square feet. The deCOrATed Hopewell Model from is open forto Gleneagles, Smithfield, VA $521,550 5 star3luxury master Alexander bath, Chef inspired gourmet kitchen, extensive trim, screened porch tours! designed Stephen Homes featuring unparalleled craftsmanship from floor 5ceiling. Bedrooms, ½bySmithfield, Bathrooms, 360023430 square feet. The deCOrATed Hopewell Model is open forto and 103 Gleneagles, VA $521,550 much designed more. 1307199 5 starMLS# master bath, inspired gourmet kitchen, extensive trim, screened porch tours! Stephen Alexander Homes featuring unparalleled craftsmanship from floor 5ceiling. Bedrooms, 3luxury ½byBathrooms, 3600Chef square feet. The deCOrATed Hopewell Model is open forto and much 1307199 ceiling.more. 5 starMLS# luxury master Alexander bath, Chef Homes inspiredfeaturing gourmet unparalleled kitchen, extensive trim, screened porch tours! designed by Stephen craftsmanship from floor to and muchiNc. more. MLS# 1307199 2013-2014 CoPyright© VistaGraphics, 1264 Virginia 23454; Fax: 757-422-9092; Artw ceiling. 5 star luxuryPerimeter master bath,Parkway, Chef inspired gourmetBeach, kitchen, VA extensive trim,Phone: screened757-422-8979; porch and 2013-2014 iNc. Perimeter Parkway, Virginia Beach, VA may 23454; 757-422-8979; Advertising CoPyright etc. produced© VistaGraphics, by VistaGraphics, Inc. is 1264 the property of VistaGraphics Inc. and notPhone: be reproduced underFax: any757-422-9092; circumstances.Artw Vis much more. MLS#sole 1307199

$710,000

© VistaGraphics, Advertising produced by VistaGraphics, is 1264 thepiece sole property of Inc. attention and not betime. reproduced under any757-422-9092; circumstances. Vis responsible etc. for errors appearing in the finalInc. printed which are notVistaGraphics brought our at this time is of theFax: essence. please review 2013-2014 CoPyright iNc. Perimeter Parkway, VirginiatoBeach, VA may 23454; Phone: 757-422-8979; Artw responsible for errors appearing in the finalInc. printed which are notVistaGraphics brought our at this time is of theFax: essence. please review © VistaGraphics, Advertising CoPyright etc. produced by VistaGraphics, is 1264 thepiece sole property of Inc. attention and not betime. reproduced under any757-422-9092; circumstances. Vis 2013-2014 iNc. Perimeter Parkway, VirginiatoBeach, VA may 23454; Phone: 757-422-8979; Artw responsible etc. for errors appearing in the finalInc. printed are of notVistaGraphics brought to our attention at this time. time is of the essence. please review Advertising produced by VistaGraphics, is thepiece sole which property Inc. and may not be reproduced under any circumstances. Vis f o r o f f i C e u S e o N ly responsible for errors appearing in the final printed piece which are notfbrought time. time is of the essence. please review o r oto f our f i Cattention e u S eatothis N ly

GLOUCESTER High above Ferry Creek. Deep Water (approximately 4’), pool, tennis courts, and dock with boat lift!

(757) 879-0000 1-800-GARRETT

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Call Perry Pilgrim today Greg Garrett

for a confidential conversation about the benefits of joining the Abbitt Team. Perry Pilgrim • 757-472-6173 ppilgrim@abbitt.com • www.AbbittRealty.com W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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Life

Advertisement Advice on Elder Care

warwiCk De Caring ForPort The Caregiver Changing lives one smile It’s Important to Seek Support, Near and Far, When Providing For An Aging Adult By Bill Glose

Once elderly family members can no longer take care of themselves, roles switch and children or other relatives find themselves making decisions. But where do you begin, and where do you go for help? SPEAK WITH THEIR DOCTOR FIRST

1024 Artesia Lane

Virginia Beach, VA - 5 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 4260 square feet $650,000 - MLS #1337042

This gorgeous stately home features luxurious details throughout. Nestled on a private half acre of land, this home has all the bells and whistles imaginable including whole house stereo system, media room, flex room, 1st floor master w/custom bath, gourmet kitchen, screened porch, and much more.

ENHANCED INDEPENDENCE

817 Quail Pointe Cove

Virginia Beach, VA - 5 bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, 3900 square feet $690,000 - MLS# 1338377

Amazing brick ranch with pool on 3/4 acre lot. 5 bed 3.5 bath with upgrades everywhere. Roof, 4zone HVAC, Kitchen, baths, exterior doors, SOD, Fresh paint, pool liner, crawl space liner, and water heaters. Very open floor plan with beautiful outdoor lighting. Close to hilltop, hospital, and beaches.

1613 Star Grass Road

Virginia Beach, VA - 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3300 square feet, $625,000 - MLS# 1340470

Amazing all brick 4 bed 3 bath, 3300 sq ft ranch, 4 car garage, with stunning curb appeal. New open kitchen. Custom hardwood floors, sky lights, new roof, updated HVAC system & hot water heaters. House has a very open, bright floor plan. In-ground sprinkler system. Close to beaches, Hilltop & Hospitals.

If It Has To Sell, Call Chantel

Chantel Ray Real Estate (757) 747-0567

www.chantelray.com 44

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Anyone at any age can have memory issues or medical complications, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they can no longer take care of themselves. Consulting their primary care physician might provide answers that explain behavior you don’t understand. The physician can also refer you to geriatricians, behavioral health experts, neurologists, and other specialists who can help determine an elderly patient’s needs. Or he may suggest a change as simple as modifying the dosage of a medication. There are many things that look like dementia but in fact are not,” says Richard Jackson, executive director of the Center for Excellence in Aging, “and we call that pseudo-dementia.

As long as elderly relatives are not causing danger to themselves, you should consider keeping them in the homes and neighborhoods they’ve grown accustomed to. It’s not always possible, but remember that being forced out of your home is a frightful proposition. Certain organizations, such as Visiting Angels (800-365-4189 or www.visitingangels.com) and Care in Homes (888-413-0880 or www.careinhomes. com), will provide individuals who can come into the home and provide personal care for the older adult. Depending upon the level of care and amount of hours needed, they will provide someone to fix meals, do housekeeping, help with bathing and dressing, ensure medications are taken, and other similar functions. Or, if you prefer, you can just hire a companion to come over and keep your loved one company for a couple of hours a day. “What all of us want is for older adults to remain independent,” says Jackson, “to live well in their homes and avoid placement in a facility for as Michelle long as possible. That’s what older adults want. That’s what we want. That’s what the health care system demands in order to be sustained over the long term.” Another option is to use an adult daycare service. These daycares provide seniors with supervised care in a safe environment, allowing them to still live in their homes but get out and socialize or receive needed therapeutic treatments. Many adult daycare programs also provide vans with electronic lifts for door-to-door service. BEFORE

Additionally, a state-sponsored program, PACE (Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly), acts as a full-service healthcare provider for incapacitated individuals living at home. To be eligible, individuals must be 55 years of age or older and be pre-screened by an authorized physician or screening team. Once accepted into their program, individuals can socialize or take care of healthcare needs at one of the four centers in Hampton Roads:

Coco Pauley

PACE Newport News 757-234-8106 PACE Hampton 757-251-7977 PACE Portsmouth 757-392-2650 PACE Virginia Beach 757-456-2700 The PACE centers have large clinics for their physicians and well-equipped room for physical, occupations and speech therapy. But the program also provides a host of other services above and beyond the realm of standard healthcare. “At the actual day center we plan various activities such as music groups that come in and perform,” says Donna Fitzgerald, the marketing manager for Peninsula PACE. “We also take care of things that [Medicare and Medicaid] don’t cover, such as minor home modifications. If somebody needs grab bars in the bathroom or they need a ramp to get in and out of their home safely, we provide all of that.” Newport News resident Robert Robinson, who has been participating in PACE since July, was confined to a wheelchair when he first came to PACE, but the program’s physical therapists worked with him in their therapy room and progressed him from a specialized walker with armrests to a standard walker. “They got me out of my seat and up on my feet,” he says. “I come every day for therapy. Usually, the therapist has to come to drive the people in. She has to run me out because I’m determined to get back to walking.” Additionally, the PACE program helped place Robinson in an apartment suitable to his needs. Arsenault “This place has been a Godsend,” he says. “Until I started coming up here, I stayed home all the time. And now I get out. I get to be part of a community again.” Editor’s Note: Advice on Eldercare is a yearlong series of articles dealing with caring for again parents CoVa and relatives. n

Coming in our January issue: Respite care—what is it and when is it an option? AFTER

2013

10/15/13 3:24 PM


Port warwiCk Dental arts k Dental artsChanging lives one smile at a time

tisement

CENTER FOR COSMETIC DENTISTRY AND DENTAL MEDICINE

one smile at a time

Don’t Hide Your Smile –

Let Port Warwick Dental Arts help you show it off!

Coco Pauley

A beautiful smile can make all the difference in the world when it comes to your perceived attractiveness, your attitude, your confidence and even the overall youthfulness of your face. And while enamel (the translucent outer layer of your teeth) is the hardest substance in the human body, teeth are still relatively fragile, especially with all the stresses and strains we put them through. Once the enamel is decayed or cracked, it may be only a matter of time before extensive dental care is needed.

Dr. Lisa Marie Samaha from Port Warwick Dental Arts wants you to know that even if you don’t have a vibrant smile now, you can easily have one more simply and in less time than you think, thanks to such technological marvels as porcelain veneers, crowns, dental implants and Facelift Dentures.

In the contemporary dental practice, today’s dental procedures are much more sophisticated and are performed AFTER BEFORE with gentle skill. In fact, it used to take several visits over an extended period of time to perform many of the above procedures. Now, some can be performed in as little as one hour, thanks to new, computer-aided technology.

So what options are available to restore my teeth at Port Warwick Dental Arts?

Porcelain Veneers

A veneer is a very thin slip of porcelain requiring minimal to no preparation of tooth structure, due to new techniques provided at Port Warwick Dental Arts. In the past, veneers required aggressive tooth reduction. Not anymore, with the quality skill provided by the master lab technicians with whom Dr. Samaha works. Veneers enhance the color, shape and overall esthetics of a tooth or teeth. Porcelain veneers can also fill in gaps between teeth, brighten discolored teeth and strengthen a tooth weakened by decay, cracks or inherent enamel defects.

Porcelain Crowns

A crown is a tooth-colored shell of porcelain that is placed over the top of cracked or severely damaged teeth,

Michelle Arsenault

(757) 223-9270

www.PWDentalArts.com 251 Nat Turner Blvd., Newport News, VA 23606

Dr. Lisabeautiful, Marie Samaha Creating healthy in Hampton for smiles Creating beautifulRoads smiles over 30 yearsfor over in Hampton Roads 27 years. Founding Member, Member, American American Academy forAFTER BEFORE Academy of Cosmetic Oral Systemic Health Dentistry

restoring the strength and beauty of the tooth to near 100% of its original integrity. Crowns protect teeth from splitting, causing painful nerve exposure and/or even the Coco need for extraction. In the past, Pauley crown procedures would always include two or three visits to the dentist, who would first take a mold of the prepared tooth and CATIE HANKINS ASHE, WILLIAMSBURG, VA send it off to a dental lab, often taking weeks to be completed. While the new “tooth” is being manufactured, a temporary crown is worn JANE CALLAHAN, WILLIAMSBURG, VA over the tooth. Inconvenient and often uncomfortable, this proceAFTER dure has been almost completely replaced at Port WarwickBEFORE Dental Arts. Dr. Samaha offers strikingly beautiful, onehour porcelain crowns that she designs and mills herself, Readers’ on high-tech Cerec cad-cam technology. One visit, one Choice Award hour. Sounds great!

Dental Implants

A dental implant is a small post that is gently placed in the jaw in a matter of minutes, in order to replace a missing tooth. The post is then covered with a crown to make it look, act and feel like a natural tooth. “If you are missing a tooth, an implant may be the preferred option for tooth replacement,” says Dr. Samaha. “An implant feels and functions like your own tooth and is cleaned just like a natural tooth. Implants are quickly becoming standard care for the replacement of a missing tooth.”

Facelift Dentures

For patients who have many missing teeth or no teeth at all, Port Warwick Dental Arts offers their special custom-designed implant dentures along with their nationally acclaimed Strickland Facelift Dentures™. When a denture-wearing patient is disappointed with the look, fit or function of their dentures, Dr. Samaha truly has the answer. “Often, new patients come in who have been from place- to-place getting dentures made, hoping for a better result each time. Fortunately, we have the answer to all of their concerns with our Facelift Dentures.” As a bonus, experience dramatic facelift-like effects without the plastic surgery. Port Warwick Dental Arts was the first practice in Virginia to offer Strickland Facelift Dentures™. The technique is quick, easy and pain free, typically accomplished in 2-3 appointments. Everyone walks out with a smile on their face when it comes to Facelift Dentures. With this exciting technique, Dr. Samaha can determine where a patient’s teeth would have been ideally located when he/ she was in his/her 20s or 30s. “The Facelift Denture technique restores elements of the patient’s facial structure that help him/her look younger and more vibrant,” according to Dr. Samaha. That alone creates a winning situation.

The757

HamptonRoads MAGAZINE

GEOFFREY DE LARA, GLOUCESTER, VA

“In addition to looking great, people want dentures that are comfortable and work well – and Strickland Facelift Dentures™ provide that,” says Dr. Samaha. “For denture wearers, social isolation is a big problem.” Illfitting dentures can cause pain and embarrassment, preventing individuals from interacting with others. Badly fitting dentures can also encourage weight gain and poor nutritional health. Stable employment and advancements in the workplace can also be negatively impacted when dentures don’t function naturally or look attractive. Dr. Samaha explains, “If stability and function of an individual’s denture is a problem, we can gently provide dental implants in under an hour, which allow the denture to instantly snap into place. The new challenge might very well be getting the dentures out, not having them fall out! For a denture wearer, that is a very good thing!” If you’re embarrassed about yourNews, teeth, VA or if23606 you’re 251 Nat Turner Blvd., Newport experiencing gum, tooth or jaw pain because of cracked or missing teeth, let Dr. Samaha and team put a brilDr.healthy Lisa Marie Samaha liant, smile on your face. You’ll be amazed at how quickly most procedures can be done and even more Creating beautiful smiles astonished by how a few for smallover changes can improve your in Hampton Roads overall appearance. 26 years. PortMember WarwickAmerican Dental Arts is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Academy of Thursday, Cosmeticand 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Monday through Friday. Dr. Dentistry Lisa Marie Samaha is nationally recognized as a leader in comprehensive, cosmetic, periodontal and reconstructive dental care.

(757) 223-9270

www.PWDentalArts.com

— ADVERTORIAL —

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

CoVa health

Shoulder Work Ahead

a reverse replacement could provide some much-needed relief By K.H. Queen

46

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“People are stubborn and tough,” he says. “They FDA approval, patients in the United States could choose among living with the pain, pain manage- will put up with a sore shoulder and work around it. ment, or shoulder fusion—which left them with less By the time they get to us, it’s too late. If you overdo it raking leaves or shoveling snow and get real sore, pain but limited motion, Coleman says. Reverse shoulder replacement is still a relatively don’t panic over that. But if you still have pain three new technique, and it’s not certain how long the or four months later, something should be done.” But those patients who need a reverse shoulder new joint will last. “We know from experience that if you take a young person and put in a new (con- replacement to reduce pain are usually smiling by the day after surgery. Those ventional) shoulder, he or she who need the operation to will beat it up and wear it out,” Ideal candidates restore mobility are usually Coleman says. “The younger for this operation are 70 smiling by their fourth you are, the greater chance appointment, you have of wearing it out and or older and have severe follow-up Coleman says. having to have it redone.” One key question Coleman Because of that, orthope- arthritis in their shoulder asks potential reverse shouldic surgeons prefer that canjoint combined with a der replacement candididates be over 75, Coleman dates: ‘How does the shoulsays. “But we will go younger massive un-repairable der pain and lack of mobilthan that when we have people rotator cuff tear ity interfere with their daily who have no other choices routines?’ because they have a terribly “It’s usually one specific stiff, painful shoulder that is thing,” he says. “If your shoulder is killing you and useless,” he says. He cautions patients that reverse shoulder you can’t play golf any more, if your shoulder is replacement is not a cure all—that even after killing you and you can’t swim, if your shoulder is surgery they may have trouble putting plates on killing you and you can’t bowl, if your shoulder is killing you and you can’t garden ... If something in the top shelf. If the rotator cuff tear is repairable, it’s better their life is missing, we want to give it back to them. to fix it and get a conventional shoulder replace- We had one guy who was a master’s level swimmer ment. To possibly avoid an un-repairable rotator and couldn’t swim. We did a reverse shoulder cuff, don’t try to endure long-term shoulder pain, replacement and now he’s swimming again.” Coleman says.  

‘‘

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f you’ve been forced to give up golf, swimming, bowling, gardening or other activities you love because of shoulder pain and loss of motion, a reverse shoulder replacement may give you relief, says orthopedic surgeon Dr. Martin R. Coleman of the Orthopaedic and Spine Center in Newport News. Ideal candidates for this operation are 70 or older and have severe arthritis in their shoulder joint combined with a massive un-repairable rotator cuff tear, Coleman says. Such a patient would get pain relief from a conventional shoulder joint replacement, but very little improved function because the torn rotator cuff still could not do its job helping the shoulder to move, Coleman says. The reverse shoulder replacement improves shoulder function because the still functioning deltoid muscles take over the job of the non-functioning rotator cuff, Coleman says. In a normal shoulder, the upper arm bone ends in a ball that fits into a socket formed by the shoulder blade. In a reverse shoulder replacement, the prosthetic shoulder’s socket is instead on the upper arm, and the ball is on the shoulder. The reversal moves the shoulder’s pivot point about an inch, giving the deltoid muscles the additional leverage, after physical therapy, to take over for the atrophied rotator cuff, he says. Most patients stay in the hospital overnight and then have about three months of physical therapy, Coleman says. The procedure was developed in France in the mid-1980s and approved by the FDA in 2004. Before 2013

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S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

CoVa health

Screen Savers

computer glasses can help with headaches and eyestrain By K.H. Queen

E

yestrain? Headaches? Pain in the neck? If you’re over 45, wear glasses and work at a computer for hours every day, computer glasses may be your solution. Those who sit at the computer all day, especially those who use a desktop or separate monitor that sits higher on the desk, could see benefits from wearing glasses that offer only intermediate range vision—as opposed to bifocals, trifocals or progressive lenses, says ophthalmologist Dr. Samuel N. Garrett of Virginia Beach Eye Center. “People where the computer is their all-day job, they need glasses that are just for that intermediate zone,” says optometrist Dr. M. Alison Mercer of Tidewater Eye Centers, with offices in Chesapeake, Portsmouth and Virginia Beach. Says Garrett: “They can have a single pair of intermediate glasses and leave them at the computer. When they leave and take a coffee break, they can switch glasses.” Trifocals and progressive lenses are usually designed with the top part of the glasses for seeing at a distance, the middle part for intermediate vision (ideal for computer use) and the bottom part for near vision. If you occasionally surf the Internet or check email, trifocals or progressive lenses will probably serve you well, Mercer says. With progressive lenses or trifocals, you look out the middle/intermediate range of the glasses to see

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your computer screen. That works especially well for laptop users because the laptop screen is at the right height for looking out the middle zone of the glasses, Garrett says. But when you look straight ahead to see a higher desktop monitor, you’re looking through the top/ distance portion of progressive lenses or trifocals— when you need to be using the middle/intermediate portion of the lenses, Garrett says. To use the intermediate range, you have to tilt your head up, causing neck pain, he says. If you let your head drop to relieve the neck pain, then you end up with eye strain from looking through the wrong zone of the glasses, he says. “They’re tipping their head up to see the computer,” Garrett says. “Or they end up looking through the distance portion of the lens for intermediate vision and that causes eye strain.” Says Mercer: “They could get headaches, may complain of eye pain, eye strain, eye fatigue. They may notice their vision getting blurry after being on the computer for any length of time.” Other candidates for intermediate vision glasses include musicians because most music stands are at that intermediate range, Mercer and Garrett say. Musicians who need to see the music and then look up at the conductor may want progressive lenses or bifocals with some distance vision at the top to keep the conductor in clear sight with the

rest intermediate vision for the music, Garrett says. Additional choices for computer users include bifocal or progressive lenses that offer ideal intermediate vision at the top and near vision at the bottom, Mercer says. Those are ideal for people who alternate between computer work and looking at papers, he says. “You put the computer vision at the top where normally distance vision is at the top,” Mercer says. “If you need a little extra for reading, you can put that at the bottom.” If your glasses don’t have distance vision, you will need other glasses for distance—driving and even walking around the room, Mercer and Garrett note. For the best prescription, measure the distance from your eyes to the computer screen, the music stand and the distance where you normally hold papers to read, Mercer says. “Talk to your optician about what you do,” Garrett says. “A laptop is different from a desktop. An iPad is different from the position you hold a book.” Finally, Mercer recommends that her patients always get the anti-glare coating on their glasses. “The reflections off the computer screen can be bothersome and contribute to eye fatigue,” she says. “Cutting the glare off the monitor by putting on the anti-reflective coating is helpful.”

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Well

MIND BODY BEING

Individualized Treatment Privacy • Availability • • • •

Anxiety/Depression ADHD Relationship/Family Bipolar Disorder

Ryan W. Ingram, MD

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757-368-2001 | www.coastalpsychvb.com

3176 Holland Rd, Suite 102 | Virginia Beach, VA 23453

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MAKE ME A MATCH HAMPTON ROADS TOP MATCHMAKING AGENCY THAT’S DOCTOR APPROVED

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inding the perfect match can be a difficult and seemingly endless process, especially when you’re ready and anxious to discover that special someone. Maybe you’ve tried hitting the local bars with your friends, or perhaps you’ve given online dating a shot but haven’t had any success in meeting the right person. If you’re sick of searching, going on bad dates and discovering that online candidates aren’t always what they seem to be in person, there’s someone who may have the cure. Miss Mimi, head matchmaker for My Match Doctor, has been in the business of helping people find love for 15 years. She started her career in California working with Patti Stanger, who now hosts and produces Bravo’s Millionaire Matchmaker, but then decided to take her matchmaking in a different direction. Mimi is more mainstream, providing services for everyday people. Most of the clients that seek out her services are established in life, may have hectic work schedules or have possibly gone through a divorce, and they’re having a difficult time meeting new people. “As we get older, we have so much responsibility, and we get so caught up in our own life that it’s difficult to make new friends,” Mimi says. “Matchmaking is a process; it’s not just something you can do overnight, and it’s a lot of responsibilities,” Mimi says. “To become a matchmaker, you have to have a heart and a soul, you have to care about people, and you have to be willing to be patient.” To match clients, the matchmakers begin with age, appearance, commonalities and compatibilities. Next they issue a chemistry test for the likelihood of an instant spark. Unlike a typical online dating site, My Match Doctor employees get to know their clients and thoroughly study their interests before attempting to match them up with another single in Hampton Roads. “There’s not a lot of

matchmaking services out there that do what I do, “ Mimi says. “I’m very hands on, oneon-one and very personal with each client.” Also unlike other dating sites, Mimi screens all of her clients for back ground checks, job verification, personal references and drug testing. “We do the very best that we can to get to know that the person that I’m working with is truly that person so that my other clients will feel comfortable going out and that they’ll be in a safe environment,” Mimi says. Once a matchmaker believes they have found a match for someone, My Match Doctor sets up a date package for the couple that varies depending on the couple’s interests. Mimi feels confident that going through a matchmaker to find love is the best option for singles in Hampton Roads, and she is proof that a match can lead to marriage. “I found my husband through matching,” she says. “I definitely know it works.”

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20 sensational Get Into The Dating Game! You’re Not Likely To Strike Out With One Of These Fun And Fabulous Catches.

Photos by Veronica Dana (www.VeronicaDana.com). Hair and makeup by Emily Flood, Christina Tallmadge and Shannon Hoke with Spa Phoenix, Virginia Beach (www.SpaPhoenix.com). Special thank you to the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame & Museum (www.VSHFM.com) for allowing us to use their venue as our stylish and sporty backdrop.

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ADELA MITCHELL Age: 36 City: Norfolk Occupation: Director of Rehab, Kindred Healthcare Kids? If yes, how many? 0. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 3 years. Deal breakers? If you don’t love my dogs. What website do you visit every single day? Google because I’m the curious type. Favorite athlete? My sister. She was an amazing gymnast. What sport most fits your personality? Dancing. It is a passionate art, and I am a passionate person. I’ve been doing it for my entire life. What’s your favorite day of the year? My birthday! Birthdays are a celebration of you. I don’t think we (women especially) celebrate ourselves enough. Favorite team/sport to follow? In my family, it is sacrilegious to not be a Cowboys fan. Part of my charm: A little bit of feistiness that comes from my Latin roots. What’s your worst habit? I have to do the same load of laundry three times because I forget to take it out of the washer and all the clothes smell.  Favorite exercise activity? Lifting weights. It makes me feel strong. Most people don’t know this about me: My grandfather developed and named an azalea after me. Phobias? Arachnophobia! I dislocated my little toe trying to run down the hallway and throw a spider in the toilet so I didn’t have to squish it. Team sports or individual? Team. There is nothing like the camaraderie of a team. Dream vacation: Any tropical island that has a hut over the water. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Hot dog. I don’t know why, but they always seem to taste better at a game. What’s your biggest goal in life? To build a beautiful life with someone. The secret to a great relationship is ... allowing the other person to be exactly who they are without judgment or criticism.

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Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensat JOHN W. TRIPP Age: 60 City: Virginia Beach Occupation: Attorney Kids? If yes, how many? 1. Ever been married? Yes. Length of longest relationship: 19 years. In the market for? Groceries, 3 days a week. Deal breakers? Dishonesty. What website do you visit every single day? The local weather—always hoping for a sunny day. Favorite athlete? Muhammad Ali. I never leave the house without ... my cell phone. If I had one wish: World peace—isn’t that everyone’s? What sport most fits your personality? Surfing. Though I’m not very good at it, surfing is relaxing and relatively carefree. Funniest person alive? Bill Cosby. He’s both intellectual and funny. What’s your favorite day of the year? The first day of spring ... a new beginning. Favorite team/ sport to follow? Duke basketball—Go Blue Devils! Part of my charm: Boyishness. I am still waiting to grow up. What’s your worst habit? Diet Coke. Favorite exercise activity? Weight lifting. Most people don’t know this about me: My ill-fated boxing career. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Centerfield” by John Fogerty. Phobias? Mustard or onions on my sandwich. Team sports or individual? Individual. Dream vacation: Seven days in a tropical place without cell phone service. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Peanuts. What’s your biggest goal in life? To have my son graduate from college. So far, he’s on the 5-year undergraduate plan, but he’s surfed a lot of great spots. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Zia Marie’s. Great food and terrific ambiance.

JULIE ANN LANDVERSICHT Age: 30 City: Virginia Beach Occupation: Digital Specialist, The Daily Press Kids? If yes, how many? No. Ever been married? Yes. Length of longest relationship: 3 years. In the market for? Someone who wants to have fun and live the good life. Deal breakers? Open-mouth chewers, people who don’t like dogs. Favorite athlete? Athletes are people who play sports, right?  I never leave the house without ... sunglasses. If I had one wish: A trip to the Bahamas with my family and closest friends. What sport most fits your personality? Tennis. Funniest person alive? My brother, Pete Landversicht. What’s your favorite day of the year? Any day in October. Favorite team/sport to follow? ODU Monarchs. Part of my charm: Sarcasm (well, I think it’s charming). What’s your worst habit? I’m always either 20 minutes early or 20 minutes late, and no one knows which one it will be (including myself). Favorite exercise activity? Yoga. Most people don’t know this about me: I’m very passionate about my work with Norfolk Jaycees. Phobias? Having my belly button touched and living a life without dogs. Team sports or individual? Team. Dream vacation: Rent an all-inclusive hotel on a beautiful beach with white sand and blue water surrounded by those I love the most. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Beer (that’s a snack, right?). What’s your biggest goal in life? Start my own business. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Mermaid Winery. The secret to a great relationship is ... maintaining your independence while still building a relationship together.

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les • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles MICHAEL MARTIN Age: 26 City: Newport News Occupation: Deputy Chief of Public Affairs, Langley Air Force Base Kids? If yes, how many? No kids. Ever been married? Nope. Length of longest relationship: 3 years. In the market for? A fun-loving woman with a good heart and a ton of patience. Deal breakers? Smokers. I just can’t get past it. Favorite athlete? Tim Duncan. You see him, but you don’t hear him. Go Spurs Go! I never leave the house without ... my wallet. I can live without my phone. If I had one wish: Time travel or world peace. Either works. What sport most fits your personality? Probably bull riding. I’m fairly reserved, but once the gates open, I can be a handful. What’s your favorite day of the year? Dec. 31. There is just something about celebrating a fresh start. Favorite team/sport to follow? College football. Wreck ’Em Tech! Part of my charm: My sarcasm? What’s your worst habit? I’m a sunflower seed addict. Favorite exercise activity? Toss-up. Frisbee and basketball. Most people don’t know this about me: I’m Puerto Rican. But I can’t speak a lick of Spanish. What would your baseball walk-up song be? I would just loop the drums from “In The Air Tonight.” Phobias? Sharks! Team sports or individual? Team. I play well with others. Dream vacation: Bora Bora. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Is beer a snack? Yes? Beer, please. What’s your biggest goal in life? Happiness. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? I’m a huge fan of Taphouse in downtown Hampton. The secret to a great relationship is ... confidence, attraction and devotion. As long as those things stay solid, the sky is the limit.

LAUREN MUNDY Age: 25 City: Hampton Occupation: Director of Client Relations, Lions Bridge Financial Advisors

Kids? If yes, how many? Do 4-legged kids count? If so, I have one, my doggy, Lilly. She’s 4. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 2 years. Deal breakers? Bad hygiene (Gross!), lack of ambition...basically if you’re a bump on a log it’s not going to work. I never leave the house without ... completing my door locking ritual, which includes: turn knob, push, turn knob one more time. It’s totally normal. If I had one wish: I’d have enough funding so I could commit my life to my passions: children and animals. What sport most fits your personality? Volleyball because it is a team sport. You are always cheering each other on and constantly communicating with your teammates throughout the game. Funniest person alive? Vince Vaughn. No wait, Ellen DeGeneres—she’s my girl! What’s your favorite day of the year? Christmas Eve, filled with lots of family traditions—gift wrapping, baking and attempting (but failing) to build a gingerbread house. Part of my charm: I like to think I’m funny. What’s your worst habit? Over-organized. Most people don’t know this about me: Something on my bucket list is to go on a spur-of-the-moment trip. To jump in the car, no plans, no direction, and just see where I end up. Phobias? Anything that crawls or slithers. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Umm ... beer. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Gordon Biersch in Virginia Beach. The secret to a great relationship is ... a friendship foundation, trust, of course, being unique together (not doing the same traditional things you did in past relationships), random acts of kindness, and lastly, mutual attraction. Continues on pg 52… W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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JAMES ARELLANO Age: 32 City: Chesapeake Occupation: IT by day; Musician by night Kids? If yes, how many? No. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 3 months. In the market for? An adventurous girl. Deal breakers? Girl that doesn’t like live music. What website do you visit every single day? Facebook. I never leave the house without ... my guitar pick. If I had one wish: I would have gone to school to become an elementary school music teacher. What sport most fits your personality? Golf. I try to rely only on myself, but I know when to ask for help. Funniest person alive? Louis C.K. or Conan O’Brien. They’ve mastered making fun of themselves. What’s your favorite day of the year? The day after my birthday ... 364 more days until I’m reminded of how old I am. Favorite team/sport to follow? Redskins. Part of my charm: Easygoing. What’s your worst habit? Procrastinating. Favorite exercise activity? Paddle boarding. Most people don’t know this about me: I have been on five auditions for talent reality shows. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Eye of the Tiger.” Team sports or individual? Team sports. I like how a teammate’s strengths can make up for another’s weaknesses and vice versa. Dream vacation: Hawaii. Musthave snack at a sporting event? Fries. What’s your biggest goal in life? Have a family. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Mahi Mah’s at the Oceanfront seated right by the window. The secret to a great relationship is ... I wish I knew because then I wouldn’t be single.

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les • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles AKEEM Z. WALKER Age: 29 City: Suffolk Occupation: Mental Health Counselor Kids? If yes, how many? 0. Ever been married? No, not that I know of. Length of longest relationship: 2 years. In the market for? Potential partner. Deal breakers? Liars, complacency.  What website do you visit every single day? CNN.com. Favorite athlete? Muhammad Ali. I never leave the house without ... my wallet. If I had one wish: I would be financially stable, which would enable me to have a charter school for marginalized teen boys. What sport most fits your personality? Golf. Funniest person alive? Kevin Hart. What’s your favorite day of the year? Any day I am alive and alert. Favorite team/sport to follow? My favorite team is the Washington Redskins. Part of my charm: My smile and conversation. What’s your worst habit? Not having good followthrough skills. Favorite exercise activity? Running. Most people don’t know this about me: I love people, but I am an introvert. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Headlines” by Drake. Phobias? Big dogs, cats, heights. Team sports or individual? Individual. Dream vacation: A week in Paris. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Cashews. What’s your biggest goal in life? To be a spiritually, socially, politically, financially, scholastically balanced individual.  Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? I would have to say dinner on Steinhilber’s patio. The secret to a great relationship is ... compromise, communication, commitment.

MICHELLE IEZZI Age: 37 City: Newport News Occupation: Intelligence Analyst, Newport News Police Department Kids? If yes, how many? None of the two-legged variety. Ever been married? Yes, once. Length of longest relationship: 18 years (6 dating, 12 married). In the market for? Someone to join me on this journey who isn’t afraid to laugh at what life dishes out. What website do you visit every single day? The Oatmeal. Offensive, politically incorrect cartoons = funny. Favorite athlete? Brian Dawkins, former safety for the Philadelphia Eagles. Amazing, classy player. The world needs more like him. I never leave the house without ... a bottle of water and a snack. If I had one wish: I’d wish for one of those food-rainingmachine-thingies from Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs. What sport most fits your personality? Hockey—you get ticked off, throw down, sit in the penalty box for five minutes, and then it’s over and you’re sharing a plate of wings after the game. Funniest person alive? Whoever writes those things you find on someecards.com. Those are hilarious! What’s your favorite day of the year? Halloween. You get to dress up in a wacky costume for a day and no one looks at you weird. And EVERYONE has candy. Part of my charm: I’m wide open with very little filter. It rocks. What’s your worst habit? I’m wide open with very little filter. It sucks. Favorite exercise activity? Zumba! I finally found an exercise where my curves are an asset and not a liability. Most people don’t know this about me: I love reruns of The Golden Girls. Yes, I have the DVDs. Dream vacation: Australia and New Zealand. Must-have snack at a sporting event? A hot dog. It’s a rule. And a deep-fried s’mores at a Tides game. What’s your biggest goal in life? To take advantage of opportunities as they’re presented. I can handle crashing and burning. Regret? No so much. The secret to a great relationship is ... laughter, silliness, brutal honesty, chemistry and laughter. W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensat LINDY CASALE-RINALDI

Age: 60 City: Virginia Beach Occupation: Medical Marketing, Public Relations and Event Planning 

Kids? If yes, how many? 4—3 grown and married with 3 grandbabies, and 1 still at home. I never stopped carrying a diaper bag. Ever been married? Yes. Length of longest relationship: 13 years. Favorite athlete? Michael Oher and Alex Morgan, currently. I have many. I never leave the house without ... making sure that my shoes match. If I had one wish: As a humanitarian, I wish everyone to have equal opportunity and happiness. What sport most fits your personality? Swimming— smooth, steady and graceful. Funniest person alive? My 16-yearold daughter hands down to anyone famous. What’s your worst habit? Not thinking I have any bad habits. Favorite exercise activity? Thinking about exercising—ok seriously, weight training and water sports. Most people don’t know this about me: I’m shy. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “The Hallelujah Chorus” or “December, 1963 (Oh What a Night)” by Frankie Valli. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Anything that is easy to share, like popcorn, and not as messy as a hot dog. I don’t like squirting mustard all over everyone. What’s your biggest goal in life? Being happy and bringing happiness to others. It’s simple, fun and easy—pass it on. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Too many wonderful places here to list, but afterwards, a walk on the beach. The secret to a great relationship is ... no secret to it: communication, trust, humor and lightheartedness.

MATTHEW HILL Age: 25 City: Poquoson Occupation: Property Management Kids? If yes, how many? None. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 3 years. In the market for? Someone that I can have fun with no matter what. Deal breakers? Smokers and cheaters. What website do you visit every single day? Grantland.com—sports and pop culture website. Favorite athlete? LeBron James. He’s a great role model who stays out of trouble and gives back to his community, not to mention an outstanding basketball player. I never leave the house without ... my iPhone. My life is in there. If I had one wish: I would love to meet Dave Matthews. We’re in a bro-mance; it’s just a one-sided bro-mance. What sport most fits your personality? Football. I played my entire life all the way up through college at Hampden-Sydney, and it has shaped who I am as a person.  Funniest person alive? Kevin Hart. Love that guy. One of the best comedians around. What’s your favorite day of the year? Opening day of college football season. Roll Tide! Part of my charm: My sincerity. I never try to be someone else to please people. What’s your worst habit? Biting my fingernails. Favorite exercise activity? I love running. I also enjoy playing basketball and golf. Most people don’t know this about me: I secretly enjoy British comedy. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “When The Levee Breaks” by Led Zeppelin. Phobias? Snakes. They make me scream like a girl.  Team sports or individual? I’m all about the team and being a team player, both on the field and in a relationship. Dream vacation: Definitely sailing in the Caribbean. There’s nothing like the sun and the sand and a drink in my hand. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Hot dogs, peanuts and a cold beer. What’s your biggest goal in life? To have the type of family that I grew up in. My parents have been married 27 years and have raised my two brothers and me in a very loving and caring home. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Town Center in Virginia Beach. The secret to a great relationship is ... be friends and have fun with one another.

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les • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles

SARAH KATE MCMULLIN Age: 27 City: Suffolk Occupation: Dental Hygienist, Konikoff Dentistry  Kids? If yes, how many? No. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 2 years. In the market for? A best friend to laugh through life with who shares my same values. Great teeth are a nice bonus! Deal breakers? Smoking and liars. I never leave the house without ... sugarfree gum and cherry ChapStick. What sport most fits your personality? Baseball because it’s a fun, all-American game, and I’m just a fun, allAmerican girl. What’s your favorite day of the year? Christmas. Family, fires, Christmas carols, snow, Christmas decorations—I love it all.  Favorite team/sport to follow? The Razorbacks! I’m from Arkansas so I will always be a Razorback at heart. I do love my Tides games too, though. Part of my charm: I’m always smiling or laughing. Life is always better with a smile.  What’s your worst habit? I sing or hum while cleaning my patients’ teeth. I’m sure it’s not nearly as fun for them as it is for me.  Favorite exercise activity? Isn’t that an oxymoron? I love swimming, biking, and hiking ... exercise that doesn’t feel like exercise.  Most people don’t know this about me: I’m a theater nerd. I had leads in my high school’s musicals and still sing all the songs any chance I get.  What would your baseball walkup song be? “Livin’ On a Prayer” by Bon Jovi because it would take a lot of praying for me to hit the ball. Team sports or individual? Team sports because having a team to support and rally around you makes the game that much more exciting.  Dream vacation: I have so many places I’d love to see. My top would be a bungalow in Bora Bora with a see-through ocean floor. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Chicken fingers and beer at a Tides game. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Live music at a bar on the beach. The secret to a great relationship is ... keeping your faith as the center of your relationship, laughing and keeping things exciting and fun by always surprising each other. 

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Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensat GREG PAPP Age: 33 City: Norfolk Occupation: Head Brewer, Smartmouth Brewing Co. Kids? If yes, how many? No. Ever been married? Nope. Length of longest relationship: 6 years. In the market for? A new car! Deal breakers? Dallas Cowboys fans and picky eaters. What website do you visit every single day? TheOnion.com. Favorite athlete? Roy Munson. I never leave the house without ... fear of running into people. If I had one wish: Football season would last year-round. What sport most fits your personality? Dragon Boat racing. Funniest person alive? James Hong. What’s your favorite day of the year? First night of Shark Week on Discovery Channel. Favorite team/sport to follow? Philadelphia Phillies. Part of my charm: My sense of humor. What’s your worst habit? I scream at the TV during sporting events. Favorite exercise activity? Disc golf. Most people don’t know this about me: I’m fluent in Hungarian. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Street Fighting Man” by The Rolling Stones. Phobias? Horseshoe crabs. Team sports or individual? Team. Dream vacation: Culinary tour through Southeast Asia or seeing the Northern Lights in Alaska. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Cold beer and an Italian sausage sandwich. What’s your biggest goal in life? Live honestly, work hard, and be a good human being. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? A nice dinner and a show at The NorVa. The secret to a great relationship is ... honesty, communication and lots of laughter.

LAURIE DESANTIS Age: 58 City: Virginia Beach Occupation: Director, Patient Financial Services, Children’s Specialty Group; PLLC and Vice President of Operations, Healthcare Revenue Logic, LLC  Kids? If yes, how many? 2 daughters; 4 grandchildren. Ever been married? Yes. Length of longest relationship:  6–7 years. In the market for? A man who would enjoy sunshine and sunsets and romance. Deal breakers? An unemployed smoker with bad teeth and bad breath. What website do you visit every single day?  Facebook—keeps me up-to-date on family and friends across the country. Favorite athlete? Derek Jeter, hands down!   I never leave the house without ... purse, lipstick and toothbrush. If I had one wish: To retire one day with the love of my life. Funniest person alive? Bill Cosby. His rendition of a man giving birth is hilarious. What’s your favorite day of the year? Thanksgiving—the one day of the year there is guilt-free eating spent with family and friends. Favorite team/sport to follow? N.Y. Yankees, of course. What’s your worst habit? Indulging my grandkids in anything they want. Phobias? Spiders and snakes. I’ve run out of a shower naked with a house full of guests before when a spider was in the shower! Dream vacation: Paris, France. Must-have snack at a sporting event? A nice cold beer and popcorn. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Oceanfront—Mahi Mah’s—then a walk on the beach. The secret to a great relationship is ... when I figure it out I’ll let you know! 60

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DAVIDA MICHELLE DAVIS Age: 44 City: Norfolk Occupation: Circuit Court Supervising Deputy

ADAM KEEFER Age: 25 City: Norfolk Occupation: 2nd-year Medical Student, Eastern Virginia Medical School Kids? If yes, how many? No. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 1.5 years. In the market for? A real-life relationship. Deal breakers? Cigarette smokers. What website do you visit every single day? ESPN.com. Favorite athlete? Brian Dawkins. I never leave the house without ... my coffee travel mug. If I had one wish: All my med-school debt paid off. What sport most fits your personality? Curling—it doesn’t matter how long it takes the stone to get there; all that matters is the final outcome. Funniest person alive? While my father would definitely think he is, I would have to say Will Ferrell.  What’s your favorite day of the year? First day of summer. Favorite team/ sport to follow? Philadelphia Eagles. Part of my charm: I always put the seat down.  What’s your worst habit? Worrying about the little things. Favorite exercise activity? Running Tough Mudders. Most people don’t know this about me: I am a huge momma’s boy. I would bend over backwards for my parents. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Snow” by Red Hot Chili Peppers. Dream vacation: Something beach-esque. I’m fairly simple and am totally content with the Outer Banks but can’t complain about a tropical beach somewhere. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Beer and peanuts. What’s your biggest goal in life? To be the type of person my dog thinks I am.  Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Yorktown Beach and Downtown Norfolk’s Towne Point Park. The secret to a great relationship is ... honestly, if I knew I probably wouldn’t be here. But my best guess would be honesty and open communication.  

Kids? If yes, how many? Yes, 2. Ever been married? Yes. Length of longest relationship: 16 years. In the market for? Someone who is doting but not smothering, gets my sense of humor and likes amusement parks. What website do you visit every single day? I’m a news/political junkie, so I visit the major news websites like Huffington Post and MSNBC. Favorite athlete? The one and only Kobe Bryant. What sport most fits your personality? Roller Derby—it’s an exciting, fast-paced, contact sport. Not a lot of equipment needed to have loads of fun. Funniest person alive? My dad. He’s hilarious and doesn’t even know it. Favorite team/sport to follow? Dallas Cowboys. Yeah, I’m one of those obnoxious Cowboys fans! We are terrible losers and even more irritating when we win. Part of my charm: I’ve never met a stranger. What’s your worst habit? I correct everyone’s spelling and grammar. I should have been an English teacher. Most people don’t know this about me: I’ve always wanted to be a television reporter. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Lose Yourself” by Eminem. Phobias? I don’t do spiders, snakes or any other creepy crawlers. Team sports or individual? Individual. I like to be the master of my own ship. What’s your biggest goal in life? To be a positive role model to my children. To show them that it’s ok to make mistakes and that failing at something doesn’t make you a failure. Finally, to provide them with the support that they need to be successful and productive members of society. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Dinner at Catch 31 followed by a walk or horseback ride along the beach. The secret to a great relationship is ... communication, honesty and the ability to not sweat the small stuff.   

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Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensat JEFF BUNN Age: 49 and holding! City: Chesapeake Occupation: Sales Manager, Chesapeake Convention & Visitors Bureau; Realtor, Exit Realty Specialist Kids? If yes, how many? No children of my own, but love my nieces and nephews and the students in the Chesapeake school system. Ever been married? No, but it’s never too late! Length of longest relationship: 5 years. In the market for? Searching for my “Miss America” that is dedicated, adventurous, sincere and is ready and willing to explore the great things that make Coastal Virginia so wonderful to live and to play. Deal breakers? Smokers and selfish people. Favorite athlete? David Wright, Michael Cuddyer, B.J. Upton and Emanuel Upton—professional baseball players all from Chesapeake. I never leave the house without ... my cell phone and keys to work. What sport most fits your personality? Soccer because of its high energy, the scoring, the crowd, and it teaches teamwork. Funniest person alive? Any kindergarten student on any given day. Favorite team/sport to follow? Baseball and football—go N.Y. Yankees and Washington Redskins! Part of my charm: I am told that I have a ‘million dollar smile.’ I am still waiting to receive my contract from Crest for the T.V. commercial. What’s your worst habit? I cannot pass up a good sale. Favorite exercise activity? Going for a long, brisk walk at the Oceanfront or Northwest River Park and working out with my personal trainer. Most people don’t know this about me: I am an art collector and was on the T.V. show Romper Room. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Bad to the Bone” by George Thorogood. Phobias? Sharknado! And not reaching my full potential. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Ballparks showcase some of the finest cuisine that America has to offer. My favorite is a hot, buttery soft pretzel with spicy mustard. What’s your biggest goal in life? I want to leave a legacy of helping others, making a difference in the lives that I touch and following my dreams.

HEATHER KEEFE Age: 32 City: Norfolk Occupation: Consultant Kids? If yes, how many? Yes, 1. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 2-ish years. In the market for? A Jesus-loving, Paul Bunyan-type fellow. Deal breakers? People who chew grossly. And meanness. What website do you visit every single day? The usual—Facebook, Instagram, Runners World. I never leave the house without ... my phone. And ChapStick. If I had one wish: To take my whole family back to the motherland (Ireland). What sport most fits your personality? Ping pong. Funniest person alive? My son. He makes me laugh in the smartest ways. What’s your favorite day of the year? Christmas. Favorite team/sport to follow? Whichever one has the cutest outfits. Part of my charm: At any given time I am likely singing and/or dancing. In a totally non-annoying way. What’s your worst habit? I’m like Mary Poppins—perfect in every way. Favorite exercise activity? Running. Most people don’t know this about me: I have really bad stage fright. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Danza Kuduro” by Don Omar. Phobias? Spiders. Team sports or individual? Individual. But only because I can’t stand the idea of letting down teammates. Dream vacation: Tahiti. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Funnel cake. What’s your biggest goal in life? To be a positive influence on the people I meet. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? American Rover. The secret to a great relationship is ... good communication and lots of laughter.

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les • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles • Sensational Singles KIMI STEVENS Age: 50 City: Yorktown  Occupation: Radio Traffic Reporter  Kids? If yes, how many? 2; 18-year-old daughter and 15-yearold son. Ever been married? Yup. Length of longest relationship: 10-plus years. In the market for? Someone cool enough to hang out and be himself, no matter the situation. Favorite athlete? Don’t really have one, but I truly admire the dedication and commitment it takes to be an Olympian or a pro with a good attitude. I never leave the house without ... my phone, my shades, water and a hair tie (I have a convertible VW Bug). If I had one wish: That there was a common sense vaccine. What sport most fits your personality? Tennis. Funniest person alive? Denis Leary. What’s your favorite day of the year? Easter. I’m a bunny. Favorite team/sport to follow? Mariners and Vikings. Part of my charm: Smart yet unconventional. I’m a creative, not linear, thinker. What’s your worst habit? Not finishing tasks. Favorite exercise activity? Swimming, biking, hiking. Toning my arms and legs through everyday work and the gym. Most people don’t know this about me: I’m strong on the outside but gooey on the inside ... and I speak fluent dog and cat. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “I Did It” by Dave Matthews Band. Phobias? Being caged or possessed. Dream vacation: The world. I’ll go anywhere.  Must-have snack at a sporting event? Peanuts in the shell or a hot dog at a baseball game. What’s your biggest goal in life? Watch my children follow their dreams and enjoy that journey. Find a partner and friend, who loves me as me, supports my ‘Kiminess’ gently and can help me see perils or angles I might not. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? A good deck, a cool breeze, live music, good seafood and access to walking off dinner. If my toes are sandy and maybe my clothes are wet from a spontaneous swim ... success. The secret to a great relationship is ... scribe this in stone: FRIENDS. FIRST. 

DANIEL LATTARULO Age: 26 City: Virginia Beach Occupation: Baillie & Associates Wealth Management Kids? If yes, how many? None. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 4 Years. In the market for? The woman for me is family-oriented, motivated, emotionally mature and communicative; being cute doesn’t hurt either.  Deal breakers? Complacency and if you back into spaces in parking garages.  Favorite athlete? Mariano Rivera—humble, consistent and has been a Red Sox killer for almost two decades. I never leave the house without ... patting myself down to make sure I have my keys, wallet and cell phone in their appropriate pockets. What sport most fits your personality? Hockey—competitive, intense and full of passion. Funniest person alive? My father. The inappropriate things you say in your mind, he says out loud.  Favorite team/sport to follow? The N.Y. Yankees; if you’re a Red Sox fan, it won’t work out. What’s your worst habit? Cracking my knuckles. Favorite exercise activity? Pull-ups. It’s the most broad workout and doesn’t take much time. Most people don’t know this about me: I try to schedule important meetings for when it’s supposed to rain because it seems to give me good luck.  What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Kickstart My Heart” by Motley Crue. Phobias? Dentist drills and bees; both make me scream like a 6-year-old girl. Team sports or individual? Team sports for sure. You learn lessons beyond the sport itself, such as humility, camaraderie and sportsmanship. Dream vacation: I would love to go to Naples, Italy and Cuba, where both sides of my family are from.  Must-have snack at a sporting event? Funnel cake. A few thousand calories never hurt anyone, right? What’s your biggest goal in life? To leave a philanthropic footprint that would, in addition to make a difference in others’ lives, make my family proud. The secret to a great relationship is ... accepting that no relationship is perfect and embracing differences.     W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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DAN GALE Age: 29 City: Norfolk Occupation: East Region Sales Manager, CBS Collegiate Sports Properties Kids? If yes, how many? Just a proud uncle of an awesome 2-year old. Ever been married? No. Length of longest relationship: 1 year. In the market for? Someone who can put up with me; it’s tough. Deal breakers? Lack of communication. What website do you visit every single day? Espn.com. I never leave the house without ... my phone. If I had one wish: My grandmother would be still alive to have met my nephew. What sport most fits your personality? Track and field. Funniest person alive? Will Ferrell. What’s your favorite day of the year? First day of college football season. Favorite team/ sport to follow? ODU, Maryland and Towson sports. Part of my charm: I’m a blunt guy… is that charm? What’s your worst habit? I love a good cigar on the golf course. Favorite exercise activity? Going for a swim calms me the most, but I love to just be active. Most people don’t know this about me: As much as I am out in the community at events, I am introvert at times who needs to play 18 holes or shut down on Sundays to recharge the batteries. What would your baseball walk-up song be? “Black Betty” by Ram Jam. Phobias? SNAKES! Dream vacation: Ireland and Scotland for a golf trip. Must-have snack at a sporting event? Cold beer and a brat. What’s your biggest goal in life? Happiness. Best date spot in Coastal Virginia? Bardo in Norfolk. The secret to a great relationship is ... trust and friendship. If you can have these two elements the rest is easy. CoVa n

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Join us for an evening of music, food and libations, a mechanical bull and your very own shot at love. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit CoastalVirginiaMag.com. 64

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Images From THE CHESAPEAKE HOUSE: ARCHITECTURAL INVESTIGATION BY COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG edited by Cary Carson and Carl R. Lounsbury. Copyright © 2012 by The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Used by permission of the University of North Carolina Press. www.uncpress.unc.edu

Reading T he Buildings

The Chesapeake House Uncovers The True Art Of Fieldwork Done By Colonial Williamsburg Historians And Provides A New View Of Early American Architecture By Don Harrison

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arl Lounsbury is used to letting folks down gently. “Their buildings are often not as old as people think they are,” Lounsbury, senior architectural historian at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, says about people who send the museum photographs of their houses. “We urge them to do it because you never know what’s around the bend,” he says. “But it can be disappointing to them. I can’t tell you how many times we’ve had to give the bad news: ‘No, George Washington did not live in your house or stay there.’” Above: The reconstructed ballroom of the Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg is hung with plain blue wallpaper, re-created to correspond to Governor Botetourt’s order for wallpaper supplies, which was shipped to Virginia in 1768. Photo by Tom Green. Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

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figure out how they put the roof on it, to keep it from leaking.” At 470 oversized pages, The Chesapeake House is filled of mysteries like that, scraped away like paint until a garish glaze of truth, a secret nail, a loose piece of wallpaper, is revealed. “Sometimes when we go look at these old buildings,” Lounsbury says, “We think we know what the story is, but the more we look the more confused we get.”

Above: Thomas Nelson House, 1730, Yorktown, Virginia. Photo by Willie Graham. Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

The College of William & Mary history professor and his accompanying team of Colonial Williamsburg Foundation historians are so seasoned and battle-tested that not only can they tell you whether Ol’ George stayed in your crib but also the likely room where he ate his supper. The team of experts, most of which have worked for the Foundation for decades, has surveyed hundreds of houses, structures and plantation foundations from across the region over the course of a 30-year investigation into the building practices of early Virginia and Maryland. Their groundbreaking research has been compiled into a new book, The Chesapeake House, published by the University of North Carolina Press. “It’s a new view of early American architecture,” co-editor Lounsbury says. “When our predecessors went to Shirley or Westover or Carter’s Grove or Gunston ... you name the big house ... what they were interested in were the architectural details and those relationships with European and English precedents. What we see, though, are the choices that those builders made in the use of those details.” “This is really a book about fieldwork,” says Willie Graham, who penned the chapters on early timber framing and exterior finishes. “One of the big lessons from this study, at least for me, is thinking about what makes a place distinctive. Not necessarily those details that are distinctive, but why would we be different?” Beautifully designed with hundreds of photographs, period landscape paintings and floor plans, The Chesapeake House isn’t just a coffee table tome about the Coastal Virginia region’s stately buildings—from Gunston Hall in Fairfax to Williamsburg’s Wythe House to the Moses Myers House in Norfolk—it’s a look at the CW Foundation’s ongoing puzzle-solving. “We’re always encountering new things from the past that make us scratch our heads,” Lounsbury admits. Case in point: He and other CW researchers recently went to Jamestown to advise at the Church Tower that is being repaired. “We couldn’t figure out how they put the roof on the tower,” he laughs. “We see that it was built in two stages, but we think they might’ve run out of money and just capped it off. But we can’t 66

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The Real Early Virginia: Much Less Grand Than What Your See At Colonial Williamsburg Here’s some bad news right off the bat: Early Virginia was not exactly like the scenes you see depicted at the many restored residences overseen by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, which was founded in 1927 by John D. Rockefeller to help preserve the original architecture of the region. Co-editor Cary Carson, the retired vice president of Colonial Williamsburg’s research division, breaks it to us gently in The Chesapeake House introduction: “Millions of visitors to Williamsburg, and millions more who have seen ‘Rockafeller’s restoration’ in magazine illustrations, find it hard to forget the handsome public buildings where so much American history took place, the period taverns famous for their peanut soup and game pie, and most of all the attractive shops and houses that line the city streets.” But, he adds, time travelers would also encounter “other landscapes,” less familiar to today’s tourists—a countryside populated with ordinary people on smaller farms, modest houses, ramshackle buildings—structures that had less of a chance to survive than the houses of the local grandees, which make up most of the Colonial Williamsburg experience today. “We sort of have a love/hate relationship with our predecessors here,” Carl Lounsbury admits. “We certainly appreciate all that the previous architectural historians did. They were the first to start working on this at a time when this level of restoration hadn’t been done anywhere else.” Today’s approach is entirely different, though. “Our perspective is informed by a more inclusive idea of what architecture is, based on understanding of the full environment.” That would include a lot of missing data, infrastructure, people. “Our predecessors looked at the best houses in the region ... and they left off most of the landscape of the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries,” he says. “We’ve gone back to look at buildings and building types that they simply ignored, and from that we’re able to piece together a more complete environment in those early centuries. We’ve looked at the slave houses, at Shirley Plantation for example, and the agricultural buildings, the service buildings ... the complete plantation landscape.” As curator of architecture at CW, Willie Graham oversees the reconstruction of Colonial Williamsburg’s homes and buildings (he and the staff are currently at work on a reconstruction of a 17th-century Williamsburg market house). He’s indebted to the previous generations of architectural historians, but says that fieldwork today takes a much more scientific approach to looking at buildings that survive. “It’s not much different than what we do when we’re doing archeology and looking in the ground.” “We’ve all been doing this for a long time. We know elements that are absolutely common and expected,” Lounsbury adds. “We know the date ranges of these structures, and we’ve learned how to read a building.” “We sort of dissect it like a forensic crime investigator,” Graham says. “Part of our process is that we record what we see. So we’ll draw floor plans and elevation details, framing systems, photograph it all and write up what we see.” They tease out the structure’s sequence of development—what did it originally look like, how did it change? “And then we want to figure out why it changed—why people made the decisions that they made. And

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people are quirky. Your wife wants pink in the bathroom so you put pink in the bathroom to keep peace in the house. Right?” But, usually, he says, there’s a pattern to these changes—a societal pattern. Even in paint. “Early in the 18th century, a lot of people painted their houses, inside and out, red-brown,” he explains. “And that held a certain kind of meaning to them at that time; it said something about them being affluent, that they could afford paint. The red gave a sense of permanence. They weren’t fooling anyone that it was a brick building, but it gave the aura of a masonry building even with a frame structure, at a time when neighbors were still living in the tar-covered, ribbon-clapboard houses. Red sort of symbolized this new era of politeness and affluence.” But a century later, he says, the application of this same color meant something else. “It is being used for secondary rooms or baseboards or service spaces. And you fast forward another 20 years, and that red-brown is being used, but most likely to use on barns and out-buildings.” The many learned contributors and fieldworkers who contributed to The Chesapeake House have one thing that previous researchers didn’t have—modern technology. “We do dendrochronology to tree-ring date the buildings,” Graham says. “Once you survey enough of these buildings, and you chart all of their architectural features, you then begin to see patterns in the way things are done—what kind of molding profiles are used for a particular place and purpose, what kind of framing systems are used, what kind of material choices are they making. We kind of build all of this up. And we’ve been doing it long enough that we have this mental database of these details.” The gradual changes in American housing didn’t happen out of some grand design—American architects didn’t become prominent until the beginning of the 19th century. Buildings were usually designed by the clients themselves, and in a very traditional way. Lounsbury: “A tobacco planter would call up a carpenter and say, ‘Build me a house like Mr. Smith’s house over there.’ And car-

penters would build the same way from one house to the next until someone told them something differently.” Changes, trends and new styles were imported not by craftsmen but by the head of the household. “And because [these new styles] had cache, because the home was built by the wealthiest man, who had been to England, therefore everybody had to have one. It’s the same pattern today with builders.” Early America’s “practical things and social elements” did bring innovation, Lounsbury says. “Things like the passageway, which was revolutionary in the 18th century, because it allowed people to move, not just from one room to another but through corridors. That was a pretty radical thing to do in the late 17th and early 18th century.” Sort of like putting together a jigsaw puzzle, the fieldworkers try to identify what rooms were originally designed for until all the pieces fall into place. Most public entertaining spaces would have the best architectural finishes because they were intended to impress. Paneled with nice cornices and mantelpieces, these can be easy for investigators to identify. “They might have floorboards where you don’t see the nails,” Lounsbury says. “What Thomas Jefferson called Secret Nails.”

Left: Everard House, Williamsburg. Re-created green verdigris glaze on the woodwork in the parlor. Photo by Tom Green. Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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All of the little details make up the Chesapeake House’s evolution. “Especially the timber framing, the way Chesapeake carpenters framed their houses was certainly far different than anywhere else—New England, Old England, Ireland, South Carolina. And it finally evolved into a peculiar regional form that addressed distinctive needs.” “It wasn’t like they were starting new with new ideas,” adds Willie Graham, who knows a little about timber framing. “But they had to take what they knew from home and make it work. They were basically in the wilderness. It was physically different. And it was also socially and culturally different. The concern was to get it up fast,” he says. “Initially there just wasn’t room for lavish building because the structure had to be efficient and quickly erected.” By the middle of the 17th century, virtually all planters, rich and poor, were building some version of what they first called the Virginia House. “They still had wind chimneys and dirt floors,” Graham says. “But by the 18th century, they’d created an efficient way to use the materials on hand, particularly wooden materials ... and they developed some things, like the false plate.” A false plate, Carl Lounsbury explains, is “a small tiny detail—characteristic of Virginia architecture from 1640s onward.” It’s a board that sits on top of the ceiling joist, and the rafters sit at the end of the joist. “It makes it cheaper to build,” he says. “You eliminate the complicated labor involved in creating these very elaborate blind dovetail joints to make all of these timbers come together in a traditional English frame. In some ways, the Chesapeake carpentry tradition is the beginning of cheap construction. We’re still building that way.” The false plate wasn’t an entirely new idea, Willie Graham says. “But it was really not developed like it was here. They were doing it in Jamestown in the 1640s, and we still use false plates routinely in American building.” Construction became, as Lounsbury says, “a matter of technology, materials, climate and attitudes toward building.” Concerning the latter, the mindset of our forebears is often reflected in their construction habits. “The early settlers encountered an environment that was difficult and actually detrimental to their health so that they didn’t have great prospects for living long lives.” The result was that they would build cheap houses to just last their lifetime. “But not build for the future.” So when settlers started to build better homes in the New World, it showed that they were here for the long haul. “In the beginning, they were just trying to survive,” Graham says. “But certainly by the second quarter of the 17th century, there are people coming here to stay.” You can read it in their houses. The Chesapeake House is available from The University of North Carolina Press at uncpress.unc.edu.

n CoVa Top: Everard House, Williamsburg. Light yellow ocher woodwork and reproduction of wallpaper discovered in the dining room. The interior was later restored to its 1770s appearance. Photo by Tom Green. Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Bottom: View from the parlor through the passage with the dining room in the background. Wythe House, Williamsburg. The decorative scheme is a re-creation of its appearance about 1770. Photo by Tom Green. Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

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SPECIA L A DVERTISIN G SECTION

HAMPTON ROADS / 2013

SUPERLAWYERS.COM

THE ANNUAL LIST The Top Attorneys in Hampton Roads

INCLUDING RISING STARS

THE SELECTION PROCESS

Lisa Bertini, principal of Norfolk’s Bertini & Hammer, is a Top 50 Women and Top 100 Virginia Super Lawyers honoree. The employment and labor attorney is one of the many exceptional lawyers listed in this Super Lawyers special advertising section. READ MORE ABOUT THIS ATTORNEY AND OTHERS AT:

superlawyers.com/virginia/articles.html

Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, strictly adheres to a rigorous selection process directed at casting as wide a net as possible, evaluating quality in the most objective possible terms and verifying and validating all data. The only way a lawyer can be selected to Super Lawyers is through this selection process. The determination of whether a lawyer will be placed on the Super Lawyers list is independent of advertising or any other payments. No other legal publisher identifies qualified candidates by using a multistep evaluation process that incorporates peer recognition and professional achievement. Super Lawyers uses a system of nominations, peer evaluation and internal research, which acts as a system of checks and balances. You can find a detailed description of the selection process at superlawyers.com. If you are in need of an attorney, we believe you will find Super Lawyers a good place to begin your search. But don’t base your decision solely on this, or any other source. There are many fine lawyers who may not be included. You need to do your homework. And most importantly, you need to feel comfortable with the person you choose to represent you.

DISCLAIMER: The information presented in Super Lawyers is not legal advice, nor is Super Lawyers a legal referral service. We strive to maintain a high degree of accuracy in the information provided, but make no claim, promise or guarantee about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information contained in this special section or linked to superlawyers.com and its associated sites. The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be solely based upon advertising or the listings in this special section. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services performed by the attorneys listed in this special section will be greater than that of other licensed attorneys. Super Lawyers is an independent publisher that has developed its own selection methodology. Super Lawyers is not affiliated with any state or regulatory body, and its listings do not certify or designate an attorney as a specialist. State required disclaimers can be found on the respective state pages on superlawyers.com.

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SUPER LAWYERS / HAMPTON ROADS 2013

THE LIST BY PRIMARY AREA OF PRACTICE The list was finalized as of January 9, 2013. Any updates to the list (for example, status changes or disqualifying events) will be reflected on superlawyers.com. Names and page numbers in RED indicate a profile on the specified page. ◊ indicates attorney was named to the 2013 Super Lawyers top list.

APPELLATE Emmert, L. Steven, Sykes Bourdon Ahern & Levy, Virginia Beach, 757-499-8971

BANKING Kelly, III, Monroe, Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5378 Randolph Jr., Alfred M., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000 Scifres, C. Grigsby, Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-499-8800

BANKRUPTCY & CREDITOR/ DEBTOR RIGHTS Barnhart, Kelly M., Roussos Lassiter Glanzer & Barnhart, Norfolk, 757-622-9005 Campsen, Paul K., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3253 Crowley, Karen M., Crowley Liberatore Ryan & Brogan, Norfolk, 757-333-4502 ◊ Foley, Douglas M., McGuireWoods, Norfolk, 757-640-3715 Greer, David A., Law Offices of David A. Greer, Norfolk, 757-227-5155 Hauser, Jonathan L., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7500 Lannetti, David W., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Marks, Jeffrey L., Kaufman & Canoles, Virginia Beach, 757-491-4000 McIntyre, John D., Wilson & McIntyre, Norfolk, 757-961-3900 ◊ Reeves, Ross C., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5545 ◊ Schultz, Donald C., Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-623-3000 ◊

BONDS/GOVERNMENT FINANCE Consolvo, George L., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3208

BUSINESS LITIGATION Albert, Alan D., LeClairRyan, Norfolk, 757-441-8914 Barr, Jr., Stanley G., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3274 Bowles, George H., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5341 Bryant, Gary A., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5520 ◊ Casagrande, Adam, Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-629-0713 Devine, William F., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-622-3366 Giordano, Gregory A., Willcox & Savage, Virginia Beach, 757-628-5600 Gray, Jeffrey H., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7500

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Lynch, John C., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7500 ◊ Martingayle, Kevin E., Bischoff Martingayle, Virginia Beach, 757-416-6009 ◊ Shumadine, Conrad M., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5525 ◊ Sims, Jr., Hunter W., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3272 ◊ Snow, W. Ryan, Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-623-3000 Spain, Brett A., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Stauffer, Jr., William L., Williams Mullen, Newport News, 757-249-7113 Stillman, Gregory N., Hunton & Williams, Norfolk, 757-640-5314 Tata, Robert M., Hunton & Williams, Norfolk, 757-640-5328 Test, Stephen G., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5324 ◊

BUSINESS/CORPORATE Donn, Allan G., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5521 ◊ Frantz, Thomas R., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-499-8800 ◊ Patterson, Hugh L., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5557 Poole, Albert H., Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-552-6044 ◊ Purcell, Brian C., Willcox & Savage, Virginia Beach, 757-628-5688 Ramirez, John M., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7500 Savage, Jr., Toy D., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5513 Smith, Stephanie C., Stephanie C. Smith, Virginia Beach, 757-531-7311 ◊ Van Buren III, William R., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3220 Williams, M. Nicole, Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5385

CIVIL LITIGATION DEFENSE Beasley, Allen W., Breeden Salb Beasley & DuVall, Norfolk, 757-622-1111 Bowen, David C., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5507 McFarland, Robert W., McGuireWoods, Norfolk, 757-640-3700 Salb, T. Jeffrey, Breeden Salb Beasley & DuVall, Norfolk, 757-622-1111 Saunders, Richard A., Furniss Davis Rashkind and Saunders, Norfolk, 757-461-7100

CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS Bishop, Bruce T., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5573 ◊

CONSTRUCTION LITIGATION Hearne, David A., Outland Gray O’Keefe & Hubbard, Chesapeake, 757-547-0171 Lowenstein, Neil S., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Murphy, Terence, Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3139 Sterling, Michael L., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600

CONSTRUCTION/SURETY Franczek, William E., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Genzler, Patrick A., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600

CONSUMER LAW Bennett, Leonard A., Consumer Litigation Associates, Newport News, 757-930-3660

CRIMINAL DEFENSE Broccoletti, James O., Zoby Broccoletti & Normile, Norfolk, 757-466-0750 Pg. S-5 Neskis, George A., Decker Cardon Thomas Weintraub & Neskis, Norfolk, 757-622-3317 Sacks, Andrew M., Sacks & Sacks, Norfolk, 757-623-2753 Pg. S-5 ◊ Slipow, Larry B., Slipow Robusto & Kellam, Virginia Beach, 757-427-5094 Woodward, Jr., Lawrence H., Shuttleworth Ruloff Swain Haddad & Morecock, Virginia Beach, 757-671-6047

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: DUI/DWI Robusto, Michael Anthony, Slipow Robusto & Kellam, Virginia Beach, 757-427-5094

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE COLLAR Swartz, Franklin A. “Lyn”, Swartz Taliaferro Swartz & Goodove, Norfolk, 757-275-5000

ELDER LAW Wilson, John S., Wilson & McIntyre, Norfolk, 757-961-3900

EMINENT DOMAIN Waldo, Joseph T., Waldo & Lyle, Norfolk, 757-622-5812

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS/ERISA Mapp, III, Richard C., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000 Wynkoop, Cher Elizabeth, Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500

EMPLOYMENT & LABOR Bertini, Lisa A., Bertini & Hammer, Norfolk, 757-670-3868 ◊ Blackman, Susan R., Willcox & Savage, Virginia Beach, 757-628-5600 ◊ Bredehoft, John M., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3225 Buckius, Dean T., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 ◊ Burton, David C., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5354 ◊ Kezman, Scott W., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3008 Lucas, Thomas M., Jackson Lewis, Norfolk, 757-648-1424 Naughton, James P., Hunton & Williams, Norfolk, 757-640-5324 North, Christopher Colt, The Consumer & Employee Rights Law Firm, Newport News, 757-873-1010 Rachels, Jr., William E., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5568 Rafal, Sara B., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5384 Richardson, Timothy M., Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-499-1841

ATTORNEYS SELECTED TO SUPER LAWYERS WERE CHOSEN IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROCESS ON PAGE S-1.

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BY PRACTICE AREA Sartwell, P. Todd, The Dickerson & Smith Law Group, Virginia Beach, 757-828-0031 Shoemaker, Jr., James H., Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-223-4580 Sullivan, Ann K., Attorney at Law, Norfolk, 757-404-8463 ◊ Whitt, Burt H., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3275

Plumlee, J. Bryan, Poole Mahoney, Chesapeake, 727-962-6625

Eveleigh, Cheshire I’Anson, Wolcott Rivers Gates, Virginia Beach, 757-497-6633 Flax, Mona Schapiro, Mona Schapiro Flax, Virginia Beach, 757-425-9191 Garriott, Jr., Richard E., Pender & Coward, Virginia Beach, 757-490-3000 Pg. S-5 Kantor, Barry, Christie Kantor Griffin Smith and Harris, Virginia Beach, 757-499-9222 Keller, Julia E., Gilbert Albiston & Keller, Norfolk, 757-962-0530 Pg. S-5 Mahoney, Reeves W., Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-552-6032 Pg. S-5 ◊ Peters, Corrynn J., Phillips & Peters, Norfolk, 757-320-4133 Schwan, Henry M., Attorney at Law, Norfolk, 757-625-4221 Weinberg, Jerrold G., Weinberg & Stein, Norfolk, 757-627-1066 Zeigler, Brandon H., Wolcott Rivers Gates, Virginia Beach, 757-497-6633

ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE

FRANCHISE/DEALERSHIP

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: DEFENSE Furr, William M., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 ◊

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF Denton, III, Jeremiah A., Jeremiah A. Denton III, Virginia Beach, 757-340-3232

ENVIRONMENTAL LITIGATION

Brodsky, Neal P., LeClairRyan, Norfolk, 757-441-8912 Di Julio, Joseph A., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5360 Herman, Patrick W., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8621 Hook, Andrew H., Hook Law Center, Virginia Beach, 757-399-7506 Huber, Peter M., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Kelley, Kirkland M., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000 Midgett, John T., Midgett & Preti, Virginia Beach, 757-687-8888 Oast III, William H., Oast & Taylor, Portsmouth, 757-452-6200 Pesesky, Amy G., Amy G. Pesesky, Norfolk, 757-333-4779 Piersall, Christine Nguyen, Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-629-0703 Rack, Kevin B., Rack & Olansen, Virginia Beach, 757-605-5000 Rose, Neil L., Willcox & Savage, Virginia Beach, 757-628-5588 Thompson, E. Diane, Pender & Coward, Suffolk, 757-502-7329 Timms, Jr., Robert V., Inman & Strickler, Virginia Beach, 757-486-7055

ROBERT V. TIMMS, JR.

INMAN & STRICKLER, PLC Virginia Beach • 757-486-7055

www.inmanandstrickler.com Webb, III, Lewis W., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000

FAMILY LAW Albiston, Debra C., Kaufman & Canoles, Virginia Beach, 757-491-4006 Basnight, III, W. Brantley, Wolcott Rivers Gates, Virginia Beach, 757-497-6633 Chiusano, Peter V., Abrons Fasanaro Chiusano & Sceviour, Virginia Beach, 757-644-6789 Christie, George A., Christie Kantor Griffin Smith and Harris, Virginia Beach, 757-499-9222 Commander, Mary G., Commander & Carlson, Norfolk, 757-533-5400 ◊ Evans, James A., Evans & Bryant, Virginia Beach, 757-437-9500 SUPERLAWYERS.COM

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Devine, Jr., Patrick C., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-622-3366 McKee, T. Braxton, Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3123

INSURANCE COVERAGE Conrod Jr., R. Johan, Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000 Keller, Kevin L., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5677 Rashkind, Alan B., Furniss Davis Rashkind and Saunders, Norfolk, 757-461-7100

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Lockhart, Timothy J., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5582 ◊ Mytelka, Craig L., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5336

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION

Story, Stephen E., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3257

Burch, Kristan B., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3343 Noona, Stephen E., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3239

GENERAL LITIGATION

LAND USE/ZONING

Bischoff, William C., Bischoff Martingayle, Virginia Beach, 757-416-6008

HEALTH CARE Davis, Jason R., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3119

Crenshaw, Ann K., Kaufman & Canoles, Virginia Beach, 757-491-4044 Nutter, II, R.J., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7502 Romine, Stephen R., LeClairRyan, Norfolk, 757-441-8921 CONTINUED ON PAGE S-4

SERVING VIRGINIA & NORTH CAROLINA

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Attorneys left to right: C. Stewart Gill, Eric K. Washburn, John E. Zydron†, Carlton F. Bennett*, Shane W. Cunningham (Investigator), Dawn Martinez, MS, RN (Nurse Specialist) *Selected to Super Lawyers 2006-2013 † Selected to Super Lawyers 2009, 2011, 2012

     

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BY PRACTICE AREA MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS Inglima, Thomas C., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 ◊ Mastracco Jr., Vincent J., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3213 Siegel, Lawrence R., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5321

PERSONAL INJURY DEFENSE: GENERAL Brydges, Jr., James E., TaylorWalker, Norfolk, 757-625-7300 DuVall, Randolph C., Breeden Salb Beasley & DuVall, Norfolk, 757-622-1111 Moriarty, Joseph, Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5502 Protogyrou, Andrew A., Protogyrou & Rigney, Norfolk, 757-625-1775

PERSONAL INJURY DEFENSE: MEDICAL MALPRACTICE Dillman, Rodney S., Hancock Daniel Johnson & Nagle, Virginia Beach, 757-321-6555 Oast, Carolyn P., Oast Law Firm, Virginia Beach, 757-963-2300

PERSONAL INJURY DEFENSE: PRODUCTS Brunick, Timothy S., Clarke Dolph Rapaport Hull & Brunick, Norfolk, 757-466-0464

Greene, Kevin P., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Jackson, Stephen R., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: GENERAL Albiston, George T., Gilbert Albiston & Keller, Norfolk, 757-625-1011 Appleton, Randall E., Shapiro Lewis Appleton & Favaloro, Virginia Beach, 757-460-7776 Bennett, Carlton F., Bennett and Zydron, Virginia Beach, 757-486-5454 Breit, Jeffrey A., Breit Drescher Imprevento & Walker, Virginia Beach, 757-670-3888 ◊ Brooke, Jeffrey F., Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-499-1841 Cooper, John M., Cooper Hurley, Norfolk, 757-455-0077 Drescher, John W., Breit Drescher Imprevento & Walker, Virginia Beach, 757-670-3838 Fletcher, John R., Tavss Fletcher Maiden & Reed, Norfolk, 757-625-1214 Garnett, Jr., H. Duncan, Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-223-4550 Geib, Philip J., Attorney at Law, Virginia Beach, 757-425-7580 Gilbert, Oscar L., Gilbert Albiston & Keller, Norfolk, 757-625-1188 Kass, William E., Kass Law Firm, Portsmouth, 757-397-7777 Lewis, James C., Shapiro Lewis Appleton & Favaloro, Virginia Beach, 757-460-7776 Moody, Jr., Willard J., The Moody Law Firm, Portsmouth, 757-393-4093 ◊

Perez, Joseph J., Shuttleworth Ruloff Swain Haddad & Morecock, Virginia Beach, 757-671-6000 Sacks, Stanley E., Sacks & Sacks, Norfolk, 757-623-2753 Serpe, Richard J., Law Offices of Richard J. Serpe, Norfolk, 757-233-0009 Shapiro, Richard N., Shapiro Lewis Appleton & Favaloro, Virginia Beach, 757-460-7776 Shuttleworth, Thomas B., Shuttleworth Ruloff Swain Haddad & Morecock, Virginia Beach, 757-671-6020 ◊ Singer, Randy D., Singer Legal Group, Virginia Beach, 757-301-9995 ◊ Smith, Stephen M., Brain Injury Law Center, Hampton, 757-650-9818 Walker, Derrick L., Breit Drescher Imprevento & Walker, Virginia Beach, 757-670-3858

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: MEDICAL MALPRACTICE Hammer, Amberley Gibbs, Bertini & Hammer, Norfolk, 757-670-3868 Heilig, John A., The Heilig Firm, Norfolk, 757-461-1300 Pierce, David J., Pierce & Thornton, Norfolk, 757-625-7777 Swain, Stephen C., Shuttleworth Ruloff Swain Haddad & Morecock, Virginia Beach, 757-671-6037 Thornton, Jonathan L., Pierce & Thornton, Norfolk, 757-625-7777 Waterman, Jr., Avery T. “Sandy”, Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-881-9881

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: PRODUCTS Glasser, Richard S., Glasser and Glasser, Norfolk, 757-625-6787 Harty, William W.C., Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-223-4500 Hatten, Robert R., Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-223-4544 Pg. S-5 ◊ Imprevento, Michael F., Breit Drescher Imprevento & Walker, Virginia Beach, 757-670-3884 McCormick, III, Hugh B., Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-223-4500 Patten, Donald N., Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-223-4500

REAL ESTATE Brewer, Stephen W., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5595 Casey, Deborah Mancoll, Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 ◊ Chiles, Christian H., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5349 Davis, Stephen R., Willcox & Savage, Virginia Beach, 757-628-5600 ◊ Dewey, Robert L., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5580 ◊ Faggert, David Y., Faggert & Frieden, Virginia Beach, 757-333-4052 Farmer III, Robert E., Kaufman & Canoles, Virginia Beach, 757-491-4000 Gordon, Howard E., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-629-0607 Hunter, Barry W., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3291 Johnson, Jr., Thomas G., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5548 ◊ King, Ray W., LeClairRyan, Norfolk, 757-441-8929 Latchum, Jr., Joseph H., Williams Mullen, Newport News, 757-249-7100 Martin, Jr., Howard W., Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-623-3000

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BY PRACTICE AREA McGann, Bryant C., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8627 Nusbaum, William L., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-622-3366 Ruloff, Robert E., Shuttleworth Ruloff Swain Haddad & Morecock, Virginia Beach, 757-671-6000 Wilks, Jay F., Wilks Alper & Harwood, Norfolk, 757-623-6500

JAY F. WILKS WILKS ALPER & HARWOOD, PC Norfolk • 757-623-6500

www.wahlaw.com Windsor, James L., Kaufman & Canoles, Virginia Beach, 757-491-4000

Paris, Jr., John M., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5308 Rose, Thomas M., Troutman Sanders, Norfolk, 757-640-0004

TAX Atkinson, Elizabeth J., LeClairRyan, Norfolk, 757-217-4538 ◊ Hill III, R. Braxton, Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3106 McNider, III, James S., James S. McNider III, Hampton, 757-722-8000

TRANSPORTATION/MARITIME

Old, Jr., William A., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-629-0613 ◊

Abel, Christopher A., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5547 Brogan, Patrick M., Davey & Brogan, Norfolk, 757-622-0100 Chapman, IV, James L., Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-623-3000

JAMES O. BROCCOLETTI

RICHARD E. GARRIOTT, JR.

6663 Stoney Point South Norfolk, VA 23502 Tel: 757-466-0750 Fax: 757-466-5026 james@zobybroccoletti.com www.zobybroccoletti.com

222 Central Park Avenue Town Center, Suite 400 Virginia Beach, VA 23462 Tel: 757-490-3000 Fax: 757-497-1914 rgarriott@pendercoward.com www.pendercoward.com

SECURITIES & CORPORATE FINANCE

ZOBY, BROCCOLETTI & NORMILE P.C.

PENDER & COWARD, P.C.

Coberly, Mark T., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Davey, Philip N., Davey & Brogan, Norfolk, 757-622-0100 Gardner, Michael J., Troutman Sanders, Norfolk, 757-687-7506 Holloway, John E., Troutman Sanders, Norfolk, 757-687-7724 Martyn, Jessica Link, Troutman Sanders, Norfolk, 757-687-7706 Padgett, John D., McGuireWoods, Norfolk, 757-640-3779 Ryan, John M., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Stancliff, Steven M., Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-802-9071 Sump, David H., Troutman Sanders, Norfolk, 757-640-0004

ROBERT R. HATTEN

PATTEN, WORNOM, HATTEN & DIAMONSTEIN 12350 Jefferson Avenue Suite 300 Patrick Henry Corporate Center Newport News, VA 23602 Tel: 757-223-4544 Fax: 757-249-3242 rrhatten@pwhd.com www.pwhd.com

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

FAMILY LAW CIVIL LITIGATION DEFENSE

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: PRODUCTS

James  O. Broccoletti received his J.D. from the College of William  & Mary (1978) and is admitted to Virginia State Bar (1978). Has practiced in the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Virginia; U.S. Court of Appeals, Fourth Circuit; U.S. Supreme Court; Virginia courts. James is a member of the American and Federal Bar Associations (Past-President, Tidewater Chapter of Federal Bar Association); Virginia State Bar (Past Chairman, Criminal Law Section, 2003); Past Chairman, Virginia State Bar Standing Committee on Legal Ethics; Chief Justice’s Committee on Statewide Indigent Defense Training; Virginia State Bar Council; Virginia Capital Representation Resource Center (President, Board of Directors); Fourth Circuit Judicial Conference; and Virginia Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys.

A Fellow of the AAML, Mr. Garriott represents clients in divorce, property settlement agreements, child custody, and premarital agreements. He also handles a variety of civil litigation including personal injury, employment, workers’ compensation, and contract matters. Mr. Garriott was selected for the 2009  Class of Leaders in the Law by Virginia Lawyers Weekly and holds Martindale-Hubbell’s highest rating of AV preeminent. In 2011  and 2012  he was selected for Virginia’s Legal Elite by Virginia Business Magazine in the Family/Domestic Relations category. He has also been listed in The Best Lawyers in America. He serves on the governing boards of the VSB Family Law Section and is a member of the I’Anson Hoffman Inn of Court, the Virginia Family Law Coalition, and the Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals.

For 38 years Bobby Hatten has been a pioneer and national leader in asbestos litigation, prosecuting cases across Virginia and the nation for shipyard workers, Navy veterans, industrial workers, and their families. His work has established landmark decisions relating to maritime jurisdiction, statutes of limitations, conflicts of law, monetary damages, and product liability. For 18 years he has been listed in The Best Lawyers in America. In 2010  he was chosen to be a fellow of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. VTLA, ATLA, and Lawyers Weekly have each conferred special advocacy awards for his many contributions to the law.

JULIA E. KELLER

REEVES W. MAHONEY

ANDREW M. SACKS

4705 Columbus Street Virginia Beach, VA 23462 Tel: 757-552-6032 Fax: 757-552-6016 rmahoney@poolemahoney.com www.poolemahoney.com

150 Boush Street, Suite 501 PO Box 3874 Norfolk, VA 23514 Tel: 757-623-2753 Fax: 757-274-0148

FAMILY LAW PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: GENERAL

FAMILY LAW BUSINESS LITIGATION

CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: GENERAL CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE COLLAR

Julia E. Keller is a partner of Gilbert, Albiston & Keller, P.L.C., and has practiced exclusively in Hampton Roads since 1996. As a former officer in the Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps and as a civilian attorney thereafter, Ms. Keller has tried hundreds of cases in federal, circuit, and juvenile and domestic relations district courts. She has successfully handled cases in the areas of divorce, property division, and support and child custody. Ms. Keller also has an active practice as a guardian ad litem in circuit court matters. She has lectured on numerous family law topics before the Virginia State Bar, Virginia Beach Bar Association, and Norfolk and Portsmouth Bar Associations.

For over 30 years, Reeves Mahoney has practiced law and concentrated his efforts on the areas of divorce and domestic relations (with an emphasis on divorces involving substantial assets and contested custody issues), commercial litigation, and crisis management for non-profit and private organizations. Admitted to practice law in Virginia in 1980, he has been repeatedly elected by his peers to Virginia Business magazine’s Legal Elite and to Virginia Super Lawyers. He was most recently named as one of the Top 50 attorneys in Virginia and was named 2010 Family Lawyer of the Year for Norfolk, Virginia by The Best Lawyers in America. Mr.  Mahoney has achieved Martindale-Hubbell’s highest rating (AV) for legal ability and ethical standards.

Andrew, a partner with his father, Stanley, in their Norfolk law firm founded in 1911  by the late Herman  A. Sacks, is a summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Dartmouth College and graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law. For over 33  years, he has practiced plaintiffs’ personal injury and criminal defense. Andrew is a Past President of the Virginia Trial Lawyers Association, a Past President of the Virginia Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and a Fellow of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers and has been listed in the 1993-2014 editions of The Best Lawyers in America. He is also listed in this year’s Virginia Super Lawyers Top 100 list.

GILBERT, ALBISTON & KELLER, P.L.C. 580 East Main Street Suite 330 Norfolk, VA 23510 Tel: 757-962-0530 Fax: 757-625-1051 julia@juliakeller.com www.juliakeller.com

SUPERLAWYERS.COM

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POOLE MAHONEY PC

SACKS & SACKS, PC

andrewsacks@lawfirmofsacksandsacks.com www.sacksandsacksatty.com

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RISING STARS / HAMPTON ROADS 2013

THE LIST BY PRIMARY AREA OF PRACTICE

Sawyer, John F., Wolcott Rivers Gates, Virginia Beach, 757-497-6633 Smith, Shane L., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-622-3366 Travers, IV, Robert E., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5302

CONSUMER LAW

The list was finalized as of January 9, 2013. Any updates to the list (for example, status changes or disqualifying events) will be reflected on superlawyers.com.

BUSINESS/CORPORATE

Davis, III, Richard Joseph, Kozak & Associates, Portsmouth, 757-222-2224 Dunn, Jason A., Jones Jones & Dunn, Chesapeake, 757-410-3442 O’Brien, William H., Doummar & O’Brien, Virginia Beach, 757-422-0061 Pfeiffer, Stephen P., Wolcott Rivers Gates, Virginia Beach, 757-554-0258 Whitus, James, Albo & Oblon, Virginia Beach, 757-200-7900

Names and page numbers in RED indicate a profile on the specified page.

BANKING Gwathmey, G. Tayloe, Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-499-8800

BANKRUPTCY & CREDITOR/ DEBTOR RIGHTS Franklin, Shalanda, Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8653 Gilbert, Stephanie Novak, Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5622 Speckhart, Cullen Drescher, Roussos Lassiter Glanzer & Barnhart, Norfolk, 757-622-9005

BUSINESS LITIGATION Darnell, Marc E., Kaufman & Canoles, Newport News, 757-873-6300 Ferguson, Ryan G., Kaufman & Canoles, Virginia Beach, 757-491-4029 Korte, Kyle D., Wolcott Rivers Gates, Virginia Beach, 757-497-6633 McConaughy, Sarah Kate, McGuireWoods, Norfolk, 757-640-3700 Meadows, Matthew D., Jones Blechman Woltz & Kelly, Newport News, 757-873-8000 Miller, Scott C., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-622-3366

Ostroff, Ethan G., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7541

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Crouch, Richard J., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Domozick, Anne E., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5438 Harrell, Nicole J., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000 Maddox, Lamont D., Guidance Law Firm, Norfolk, 757-454-2045 Ullrich, Jeffrey G., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5634 West, Caryn R., Clarke Dolph Rapaport Hull & Brunick, Norfolk, 757-466-0464

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: DUI/DWI

CIVIL LITIGATION DEFENSE

Andrews, Mark A., Jones Jones & Dunn, Chesapeake, 757-410-3442

Foley, Robert L. “Bo”, Foley & Foley, Norfolk, 757-965-8773 Foley, Valerie, Foley & Foley, Norfolk, 757-965-8773 Hudson Kim, Lisa Taylor, Samuel I. White, Virginia Beach, 757-457-4234 Paul, Dustin, Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Winsky, Ashley W., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500

ELDER LAW Manz, Angela N., Law Office of Angela N. Manz, Virginia Beach, 757-271-6275

EMINENT DOMAIN Baker, Joshua E., Waldo & Lyle, Norfolk, 757-622-5812

CLASS ACTION/MASS TORTS Manning, Jason E., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7500

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS/ERISA San-Marina, Corina, Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500

CONSTRUCTION LITIGATION

EMPLOYMENT & LABOR

Chadbourn, Tara, Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-499-1841 McClure, Amy Taipalus, Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-623-3000 Ostroff, Gretchen M., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600

Hogan, Elaine Inman, Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-623-3000 Kushner, David A., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Muse, Jennifer L., Jones Blechman Woltz & Kelly, Newport News, 757-873-8045

WITH A SUPER LAWYERS RATING, THE SKY’S NO LIMIT. Each year, Super Lawyers evaluates attorneys across the country for its annual list. After rigorous peer review and third-party evaluation, the top five percent of each state’s attorneys are selected to the list, ensuring that the very best rise to the top. And then fly even higher. Learn more at SuperLawyers.com/SelectionProcess

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RISING STARS / HAMPTON ROADS 2013

BY PRACTICE AREA Smith, Anna Richardson, Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000 Vaquera, Kristina H., Jackson Lewis, Norfolk, 757-648-1448

GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: GENERAL

Reaves, J. Bradley, ReavesColey, Chesapeake, 757-410-8066

EMPLOYMENT LITIGATION: PLAINTIFF

HEALTH CARE

Gaynor, Todd, TaylorWalker, Norfolk, 757-625-7300

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS

Ambrose, Aaron J., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3307 Burton, Dorinda P., Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-499-1841

Marino, Amy G., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-499-8800

Brannon, Emily M., Law Offices of Richard J. Serpe, Norfolk, 757-233-0009 Duffan, Kevin, Shapiro Lewis Appleton & Favaloro, Virginia Beach, 757-460-7776 Kass, Aaron F., Kass Law Firm, Portsmouth, 757-397-7777 Sampson, Sandra L., Byler & Sampson, Virginia Beach, 757-490-8094 Pg. S-7

IMMIGRATION

ENVIRONMENTAL Oakley, David B., Poole Mahoney, Chesapeake, 727-962-6625

ESTATE PLANNING & PROBATE Brooks, L. Ashley, Jones Jones & Dunn, Chesapeake, 757-410-3442 Moccia, Jennifer, Rack & Olansen, Virginia Beach, 757-605-5000 Pascucci, Mark V., Wolcott Rivers Gates, Virginia Beach, 757-497-6633

FAMILY LAW Anders, Allison W., Kaufman & Canoles, Virginia Beach, 757-491-4000 Barnes, Elizabeth, Law Office of Elizabeth Barnes, Virginia Beach, 757-282-6181 Evans-Bedois, Erin, Shannon & Bedois, Chesapeake, 757-228-5529 Herrell, Sheera R., Hofheimer Family Law Firm, Virginia Beach, 757-425-5200 Nashatka, Shantell S., Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-552-6031 Pg. S-7 Phillips, Kimberly H., Phillips & Peters, Norfolk, 757-320-4133 Richmond, Andrew T., Poole Mahoney, Virginia Beach, 757-552-6059 Pg. S-7 Shupert, Jennifer, Shupert Law, Virginia Beach, 757-390-3331

JENNIFER SHUPERT SHUPERT LAW Virginia Beach • 757-390-3331

www.shupertlaw.com

GENERAL LITIGATION Giordano, Michael P., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Hall-McIvor, Dannielle, TaylorWalker, Norfolk, 757-625-7300 Murphy, Christy L., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3177

Caramore, Megan B., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Mijal, Mara S., Vandeventer Black, Norfolk, 757-446-8600 Valverde, Hugo Raul, Valverde & Rowell, Virginia Beach, 757-422-8472

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Swingle, John B., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5327

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: MEDICAL MALPRACTICE Gantous, Anthony M., Pierce & Thornton, Norfolk, 757-625-7777

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: PRODUCTS Jewell, Erin E., Patten Wornom Hatten & Diamonstein, Newport News, 757-223-4500

REAL ESTATE

Gallo, Eric A., Troutman Sanders, Norfolk, 757-687-7528 Huelsberg, III, Henry J., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5523 Reed, Jonathan B., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3122

Dudley, Matthew M., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Embree, Alyssa, Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-629-0631 Fausnight, Michael S., Willcox & Savage, Virginia Beach, 757-628-5600 Harman, Amy L., Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3000 Konikoff, Scott B., Scott B. Konikoff Esq., Norfolk, 757-648-8891 Miller, Jeffrey S., Cooper Spong & Davis, Portsmouth, 757-397-3481 Trant II, Timothy O., Kaufman & Canoles, Newport News, 757-259-3823 Tyler, Nathaniel P., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Via, Andrae J., Williams Mullen, Virginia Beach, 757-473-5326 Westnedge, Jr., K. Lee, Fee Simple Legal, Virginia Beach, 757-491-1990

PERSONAL INJURY DEFENSE: GENERAL

SECURITIES & CORPORATE FINANCE

Atlee, Michael L., Hall Fox & Atlee, Hampton, 757-865-4364

Hulcher, Jr., R. Willson, Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-629-2064 Raines, Lisa A., Troutman Sanders, Norfolk, 757-687-7711 Williston, J. Britton, Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3185

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LITIGATION Poynter, William R., Williams Mullen, Norfolk, 757-473-5334

LAND USE/ZONING Beaman, III, Robert P., Troutman Sanders, Virginia Beach, 757-687-7500

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

PERSONAL INJURY DEFENSE: MEDICAL MALPRACTICE Sherwin, Mary Elizabeth (“Mary Beth”), Kaufman & Canoles, Norfolk, 757-624-3244 Stegeman, Corey Allen-Taylor, Hancock Daniel Johnson & Nagle, Virginia Beach, 757-321-6555

PERSONAL INJURY DEFENSE: PRODUCTS

TAX Carnes, Delphine G., Crenshaw Ware & Martin, Norfolk, 757-623-3000 Olansen, Nathan R., Rack & Olansen, Virginia Beach, 757-605-5000

Blake, Patrick D., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Brandon, L. Lucy, Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5500 Cook, Eric D., Willcox & Savage, Norfolk, 757-628-5661

SHANTELL S. NASHATKA

ANDREW T. RICHMOND

SANDRA L. SAMPSON

4705 Columbus Street Virginia Beach, VA 23462 Tel: 757-552-6031 Fax: 757-552-6016 snashatka@poolemahoney.com www.poolemahoney.com

4705 Columbus Street Virginia Beach, VA 23462 Tel: 757-552-6059 Fax: 757-552-6016 arichmond@poolemahoney.com www.poolemahoney.com

505 South Independence Boulevard Suite 201 Virginia Beach, VA 23452 Tel: 757-490-8094 Fax: 757-490-0414 ssampson@garybyler.com www.garybyler.com

FAMILY LAW

FAMILY LAW

PERSONAL INJURY PLAINTIFF: GENERAL CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Shantell S. Nashatka, a Shareholder at the law firm of Poole Mahoney PC, devotes her practice to all areas of family law matters, including divorce, custody, child and spousal support, adoption, and premarital agreements. In addition she guides her clients through various forms of alternative dispute resolution, such as mediation, and is trained and certified to practice in collaborative divorce proceedings. She has been repeatedly named in Virginia Rising Stars. She was also named one of Virginia’s Legal Elite in the category of Young Attorney and was featured in the 2010 edition of Virginia Business.

Andrew Richmond, a Principal at the law firm of Poole Mahoney PC, has experience resolving complex divorces involving equitable distribution, support, and custody both through contested litigation and negotiated agreements. Mr. Richmond also handles a variety of other family-related matters, including Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court cases, paternity actions and Department of Human Services proceedings. In 2012, he was elected by his peers to be included in Virginia Business magazine’s Legal Elite in the category of Young Lawyer. Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Richmond clerked for the Honorable Robert J. Humphreys of the Court of Appeals of Virginia, which is the appellate court for all divorce and family law appeals in Virginia.

Sandra  L. Sampson was raised in Virginia Beach, graduated Green Run High School, and went on to Old Dominion University, receiving a Bachelor of Science Degree in criminal justice. Sandra graduated Regent University School of Law and was admitted to the Virginia Bar in 2003. Despite being a newly named partner at Byler  & Sampson, PC, she has worked at the firm for two decades assisting thousands of personal injury, traffic, and criminal clients. Sandra is the immediate past president to the Virginia Beach Bar Association and was named a Leader in the Law by Virginia Lawyers Weekly in 2012. Sandra is married to Jeffrey J. Menago and together they have four children.

POOLE MAHONEY PC

SUPERLAWYERS.COM

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POOLE MAHONEY PC

BYLER & SAMPSON

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

History for the Holidays Celebrate The Joy Of The Season In Jamestown, Yorktown And Williamsburg By Barrett Baker

T

here’s something wonderful about the months of November and December that bring out the best in people. Strangers greet each other with wishes of good tidings, family members go out of their way to gather and rekindle distant relationships, and friends carve out time from their usually busy schedules to connect and catch up. What’s the perfect venue to take out-of-town visitors or to meet up with your pals? How about the enchanting atmosphere of the place where American holidays were first celebrated—the Historic Triangle of Virginia—where you can carry on an old tradition or start something new to enjoy in the years to come. Festive decorations, exciting events and a plethora of shopping and dining spots make Jamestown, Yorktown and Historic Williamsburg the places to be throughout the year, but especially so during the holidays. Get your holiday shopping done, experience a Colonial fireworks display, tour historic homes, or just enjoy the festive ambiance as you soak it all in while sipping a hot cup of cider. To help you plan your holiday itinerary, here are a few intriguing events that will be going on during the next couple months:

>>>

Photo courtesy of Colonial Williamsburg

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Ongoing Events Christmas Town™: A Busch Gardens® Celebration Open select days, Nov. 22–Dec.31 Joy, laughter and cheer are in the air at Christmas Town™: A Busch Gardens® Celebration. This one-of-a-kind event combines the magic and merriment of the season with stunning Broadway-style shows, unique gift ideas and literally millions of twinkling lights. Sip on Busch Gardens’ signature peppermint fudge hot chocolate while strolling through Christmas Town’s latest addition, Holiday Hills™, a nostalgic vision of mid-20th-century Christmas traditions complete with tin toys and miles of garland. Busch Gardens, Williamsburg. For additional information, call 757-343-7946 or visit seaworldparks.com/en/christmastownwilliamsburg. A Colonial Christmas Dec. 1–31, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Explore 17th- and 18th-century English and Virginia holiday traditions during a monthlong program that includes holiday-themed tours and other interpretive events. Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center. For additional information, call 757-253-4838 or visit www.historyisfun. org/a-colonial-christmas-offer.htm.

Search for Hidden Treasures at Pre-Christmas sale Nov. 23-24 • One story 45,000 sq. ft. facility • Over 300+ dealers • Everything for the collector from A to Z and more! • Knowledgeable staff and dealers • Restaurant - La Petite Tearoom serving gourmet soups, salads, sandwiches and desserts

500 Lightfoot Rd, Williamsburg, Va 23188

From I-64: take exit 234 east onto 199, exit at Mooretown Rd. West. Turn left at stop light onto Lightfoot Rd., 500 ft. to mall on left. From Route 60: turn onto Lightfoot Rd., 1/2 mile to mall on right.

Look for our white picket fences! Open 7 Days a Week

757-565-3422

www.antiqueswilliamsburg.com

Monday - saturday, 10 aM to 6 pM sunday, 12 noon to 5 pM

Special Events

Yorktown Holiday Open House Weekend Nov. 9, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Soak up the ambiance of Historic Yorktown while enjoying special events, festive decorations, special sales, discounts, door prizes, strolling entertainment and much more. Hours of operation vary by business. Historic Yorktown. Free admission. For additional information, call 757-890-4490 or visit www.yorkcounty.gov. Yorktown Market Days Nov. 9, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. As part of the Yorktown Holiday Open House Weekend, the holiday market will operate with extended hours to provide you with a shopping venue full of unique holiday items. In addition, you’ll find fresh produce, meat and seafood, baked goods, coffee, specialty cut flowers, quality art and more. Riverwalk Landing, Yorktown. Free admission. For additional information, call 757-890-3500 or visit www.yorkcounty.gov. Foods & Feasts of Colonial Virginia Nov. 28–30, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Colonial Virginia foods are featured during this three-day event beginning on

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Yorktown Market Days

Thanksgiving Day. At Jamestown Settlement, learn how food was gathered, preserved and prepared on land and at sea by Virginia’s English colonists and Powhatan Indians. At the Yorktown Victory Center, learn about typical soldier’s fare during the American Revolution, and trace the bounty of a 1780s farm from field to kitchen. Various Locations. For additional information, call 757-253-4838 (toll-free: 888-593-4682) or visit www.historyisfun.org/foods-andfeasts.htm. Christmas Tree Lighting Dec. 6, 7 to 8 p.m. A tradition that began in 1945 continues with the Yorktown Christmas Tree Lighting. Evening highlights include a 7 p.m. performance by the Fifes and Drums or York Town at the Victory Monument, festival music at Riverwalk Landing, the procession of lights through the history village, and the arrival of Santa and Mrs. Claus. Historic Yorktown. Free admission. For additional information, call 757-890-3500 or visit www.yorkcounty.gov. 54th Annual Christmas Homes Tour Dec. 7, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Presented by the Green Spring Garden Club, this tour features private residences that are beautifully decorated with holiday floral arrangements. Tickets are $30 if purchased on Friday, Dec. 6 or Saturday, Dec. 7. Tickets are only $25 if purchased in advance by mail. Williamsburg. For additional information, visit green-springgarden-club.org/2.html. Grand Illumination 2013 Dec.8, 4 to 8 p.m. In the 18th century, illuminations, 78

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which included the firing of guns and the lighting of fireworks, were held to celebrate major events such as great military victories, the anniversary of the reigning sovereign’s birth, or the arrival of a new Colonial governor. Take a step back in time as you stroll the Revolutionary City and view all the unique decorations. Enjoy musical performances from multiple stages and delight in the fireworks from three different locations. Historic Williamsburg. For additional information, call 757-229-1000. Breakfast With Santa Dec. 14, 8:30 to 10:00 a.m. Get together with Santa and Mrs. Claus for a kid-friendly breakfast. Experience the enchantment on your children’s faces as they relay their Christmas wish list to our visitors from the North Pole. There will be special treats for the kids, too. Seating is limited and tickets are required. Riverwalk Restaurant, Yorktown Waterfront. For additional information, call 757-875-1522 or visit www.riverwalkrestaurant.net/. Great Wolf Lodge Holiday Luncheon Dec. 16–20, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Gather at Great Wolf Lodge for the 7th Annual Luncheon. Come and enjoy the feel of a big holiday party, served buffet style, for a small holiday price. Reserve a spot for one or two, or for a table of 10. All party attendees will receive a voucher for two water park wristbands to be used on a future date. Great Wolf Lodge, Williamsburg. For additional information, call 757-229-9700 or visit www. greatwolf.com/williamsburg/ waterpark.

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S P E CIAL A D V E RTISING S E CTION

Hi-Ho Silver, The Nautical Dog, Havana Connections and Parlett’s Paper Expressions. newtownwilliamsburg.com/ Williamsburg Premium Outlets If discount shopping in one great shopping complex is just the ticket for you, you’ll find 135 stores to choose from, offering up such names as Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, Burberry, Coach, Lacoste, Nautica, Nike, Carter’s, Vans, Bose and Harry & David, as well as several dining options. www.premiumoutlets.com/outlets/outlet.asp?id=89 Breakfast with Santa

Other Shopping Venues If shopping is your primary objective, the following sites offer plenty of unique giftbuying opportunities: New Town With more than 170 shops and restaurants to choose from, you’re sure to satisfy your holiday shopping needs, as well as any hunger pains that may arise in the process. You’ll find unique gifts at stores such as Charming Charlie, Icing by Claire,

Williamsburg Outlet Mall Located just one mile off I-64, the Williamsburg Outlet Mall offers a completely enclosed shopping experience with such quality names as Big & Tall, Bon Worth, The Bottom Line, Country Treasures, Famous Footwear, L’eggs, Hanes, Bali, Playtex, Pendleton, Totes Isotoner and Vitamin World. williamsburgoutletmall.com/ Williamsburg Pottery Celebrating 75 years of exceptional bargains, Williamsburg Pottery resembles a Dutchinspired European Marketplace that covers 19 acres and includes three separate buildings that encompass nearly 160,000 square feet of home essential and outdoor living retail space, as well as a bakery café. williamsburgpottery.com/

Where Knitters are like family! Fall/Winter Hours (11/4/13-3/8/14) 10:00am-5:00pm Special Holiday Hours: Sundays Dec 1, 8, 15, 22 Noon-4:00pm

Village Shops at Kingsmill 1915 Pocahontas Trl., Ste B1 Williamsburg, T: 757.258.5005 Come sit and knit with us!

Shop online @

www.KnittingSisters.com

Seasons Restaurant offers a wide variety of dishes to satisfy every taste. Our meals are prepared fresh using only the finest ingredients - casual dining that is suitable to upscale tastes. In the heart of Williamsburg!

Food, Fun & Spirits! Daily Specials • Free Wi-Fi Large Parties Welcome

Scan here for full menu, daily specials and more

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WA R N I NG:

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DO NOT ASK TO S I T O N H I S L A P.

9586871

H O L I D A Y

G E T A W A Y

his year, leave Santa behind at the mall. And start a different kind of holiday tradition with us. From our classic Christmas decoration tours to colonial-inspired feasts. Wine dinners with Thomas Jefferson to Holiday Tea with Charles Dickens. Here, you’ll find great new, yet traditional, ways to celebrate the season. To book your holiday stay call 1-877-741-6720 or visit colonialwilliamsburg.com/holidays.

When consumers know that a small business is a member of the chamber of commerce, they are 49% more likely to think favorably of it and 80% more likely to purchase goods or services from the company.

Join today. Visit HamptonRoadsChamber.com or scan this QR code with your mobile device.

ds

KNOW?

Vote today for your favorites in this year’s Coastal Virginia Magazine Readers’ Choice Awards. We want to know who you think is the best of the best. Polls open January 6 and close April 25.

BES Aw Tof ar

Did You

Let the Voting Begin!

Re ad ers ’

17710041_4.62x4.68_Holiday_1.indd Cyan Magenta Yellow Black

Visit

www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com

and go to the contests tab to cast your vote!

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Our Advisors Offer: u

u

u

u

Investment Services Financial Planning Life & Long Term Care Insurance Retirement Plans

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THESE TEACHERS CoVa Top TeaChers NEED YOUR VOTES!

Go to www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com and vote for your favorites! CHESAPEAKE

Danon Middleton Phoebus High School

Sonya Barnes

Beth Siegele

Western Branch High School

Kelly Demarchena

Culinary Institute of Virginia

Pat Doty

Saint Mary Star of the Sea School

First Presbyterian Preschool

Grassfield Elementary

NEWPORT NEWS

Layne Eggers

Wendy Chatman

Patricia Bailey

Lora Carnrike

Deep Creek Middle School

Hampton Roads Academy

Angie Cunningham

Robert Belkowski

Joliff Middle Scholl

Peninsula Catholic High School

LaurenDickerson

Elizabeth Bryant

Richard T. Yates Elementary School

Butts Road Intermediate

Linda Ellis

Brayden Emerick

Peninsula Catholic High School

Hickory High School

Billy Gargaro

Angie Stevens

Peninsula Catholic High School

Western Branch High School

Patti Grayson

Terri-Ann Thiebaud

Hampton Roads Academy

Greenbrier Middle School

Meredith Holt

Bridgette Walter

Saunders Elementary School

Grassfield Elementry

GRAFTON

Lauren Keating

Denbigh Baptist Christian School

Amy Insley

Dave Penrod

York High School

Peninsula Catholic High School

HAMPTON

Mike Pilola

Betsy Blackman

Peninsula Catholic High School

Tucker-Capps Fundamental School

Corina Porco

Jessica Hamilton

Denbigh Baptist Christian School

Saint Mary Star of the Sea School

Jenny Hamm James Jones

Kathryn Kelchner

Amy Allen

Michelle Law

Robert Bailey

Saint Mary Star of the Sea School

Madison Alternative Center

Greg Burroughs

Culinary Institute of Virginia

Carla Davison

Lake Taylor High School

Yvette Smith

Blair Middle School

Independence Middle School

Darnita Woodhouse

Kempsville Elementary

Madison Alternative Center

Caroline Hendrix

Brandy Robbins

Oceanair Elementary School

Jonathan Highfield

Hardy Elementary

Aaron Hill

Culinary Institute of Virginia

Smithfield High School

Justin Husser

SOUTHAMPTON

Edward Hutchison

Southampton High School

Maury High School Madison Alternative Center

Megan Jones

Ocean View Elementary

Amy Kidwell

The Governor’s School for the Arts

Teresa Kraft

Norfolk Collegiate School

Fransis Laury

Madison Alternative Center

Courtney Dziagwa Sarah McCall

Mary McClellan

Rita Yeary

Old Donation Center

Laura Johnson

Salem Middle School

Carol Kinsey

Kempsville Elementary

Maria Lamb

Kingston Elementary School

Mary Manley

SUFFOLK

Red Mill Elementary School

Kimberly Nierman

Pembroke Meadows Elementary School

Deb Perry

Rosemont Forest Elementary School

Kurt Straub

Linkhorn Park Elementary School

VIRGINIA BEACH

Trantwood Elementary

Sue Bailey

Pembroke Meadows Elementary School

Melissa Brock

Cape Henry Collegiate School

Sara Brola

Pembroke Meadows Elementary School

Nansemond River High School Summit Christian Academy Creekside Elementary Driver Elementary/ Florence Bowser Elementary

Landstown Middle School

Denise Miller

Madison Alternative Center

Rosemont Forest Elementary School

Jeff Phelps

Nicholas Burns

The Governor’s School for the Arts

Independence Middle School

Jennifer Scott

Andrew Cronin

Blair Middle School

Virginia Beach Middle School

Laura E. Scott

Nancy Crowe

Brookwood Elementary

Vanessa Dettrie

December 6, 2013

Frances Hatzopolous

Joleen Neighbours

Old Donation Center

Cast Your Ballots Today! Voting Ends

Nicole Glaser

Linkhorn Park Elementary School

SECEP REACH Program, Norfolk Public Schools

Saint Patrick Catholic School

Anthony Fryer

Eugene Watson

Norview High School

SMITHFIELD

Lake Taylor High School

Bay View Elementary

Tiffany Shahini

Child Development Center, Old Dominion University

Fairlawn Elementary

Valerie Stinson

NORFOLK

Saint Mary Star of the Sea School

Regina Glasgow

Booker T. Washington High School / Chesterfield Academy

Hampton Roads Academy

Benjamin Syms Middle School

Christine Gilbert

Ruffner Academy Middle School

Tina Silberhorn

Hampton Roads Academy

Francis Asbury School

Culinary institute of Virginia

READER’S CHOICE POLL

Nicole Martinette Laura Morris

Margaret Paulenich Lauren Phillips

Stephanie Piron MaryBeth Ryan

Carolyn Scullion Brianna Treat Eileen Ware

Ocean Lakes Elementary

Kelli White

John B. Dey Elementary School

Kelly Williams

Larkspur Middle School

Tricia Zimmerman

Cape Henry Collegiate School

Linkhorn Park Elementary School

YORKTOWN

Cindy Edwards

Cindee VanZandt

Princess Anne High School

Catherine Ennis

Red Mill Elementary School

Summit Christian Academy

Elizabeth Milne

Tabb/YCSD/York County School of the Arts

The listed names are outstanding teachers in the Hampton Roads region, as nominated by readers. Join us in determining the top 10 most deserving educators in the area by voting for your favorite teacher at www.CoastalVirginiaMag.com under Contests. The 10 individuals with the most votes will be recognized in our February/March 2014 Education issue with feature editorial profiles. Show your school and teacher pride and vote today! Live and Learn with

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Old Point National Bank Community EngagEmEnt REpoRt

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“ Each year, Old Point National Bank and their employees make a substantial difference for hardworking families by partnering with Habitat for Humanity Peninsula & Greater Williamsburg. Old Point’s commitment to affordable housing helps change the lives of families for generations. What Habitat for Humanity has accomplished in our community with Old Point’s generosity is truly a blessing.” Janet V. Green Executive Director Habitat for Humanity Peninsula & Greater Williamsburg

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Community EngagEmEnt REpoRt Old Point has had the unique opportunity to make a difference, not only with our business, but within the community as well. Yes, we provide products and services to enhance our customers’ financial futures, but as we all know, the community need is greater. With 90 years behind us and the future ahead, Old Point believes that, together, we can continue to make a difference. This Community Engagement Report celebrates our commitment to Hampton Roads and the dedication of our employees to the area in which they live and work. Top photo: Melinda Williams accepts certificate of appreciation from the Virginia Peninsula Chamber of Commerce. Bottom photo: Old Point employees attend a Habitat for Humanity home dedication ceremony for a home they helped build.

After 90 years, our story still begins

with you. “We believe that a strong community bank can help a community grow stronger.” Louis G. Morris, President & CEO and Robert F. Shuford, Chairman

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invEsting in Hampton Roads n 16% HealtH & WellneSS

$

Strong communities are made up of strong individuals, which is why we support a variety of health and wellness initiatives!

n 26% education

“ Old Point National

We all want the best for our children. That’s why

Bank’s commitment to

Old Point remains passionately committed to enhancing

promoting a healthy,

our educational resources throughout our community.

happy lifestyle is a big

n 27% aRtS & cultuRe

$ Old Point is proud to support arts and culture blossoming in Hampton Roads. We’re fortunate to live in such a vibrant area, rich in culture and history, so we make sure to support local museums, arts organizations and festivals.

reason for the continued growth and success of the family friendly Anthem Wicked 10k and Old Point National Bank Monster Mile. We at

n 31% community deVelopment Building the Hampton Roads community has always been a priority for Old Point. Today, we donate a significant amount of time and resources to area chambers of commerce, Rotary, Kiwanis, Lions and other service clubs and organizations whose main purpose is to help our communities thrive.

J&A Racing are proud of our association with Old Point and look forward to many years of making a positive

$difference in our community together.” Jerry Frostick Race Director J&A Racing

We collect approximately 3,200 lbs of food in our branches for area food banks every year.

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$

$

Through our United Way fundraising campaign, Old Point contributed over $90,000, with over $67,821.16 donated directly from employees.

$

Winner of Volunteer Hampton Roads’ velocity award for launching an employee volunteer program with immediate success ! In the past year, Old Point employees donated thousands of hours of community service to the Hampton Roads community! Over 235 volunteers participated in community service projects during the past year…nearly 90% of Old Point’s workforce!

Top photo: Joyce Dunning and Nancy Begor enjoy meeting local businesses at the Isle Expo. Bottom photo: Cheryl Farrior helps sort food at the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank.

$

Despite tough economic times, Old Point has continued to provide consistent support to non-profits when they need it the most.

100% of Old Point’s employees live, work and

shop in the Hampton Roads region.

In another effort to preserve our community, Old Point saved over 3,000 trees and received a certificate of Environmental Accomplishment by increasing efforts in recycling.

Photo on left page: Frank Buckley and family. Far right photo: Dr. Harold Cloud and Joe Witt at the West Mercury Business After Hours. Bottom photo: Sharon Davidson volunteers at a Head Start classroom in Williamsburg.

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it’s pERsonal to us “Community service is a privilege. It is a privilege to work for an organization that values not only its contribution to the community, but also the contribution of our employees.” don Buckless SVP, Peninsula Executive

“Hampton Roads invests so much in us. It’s only right that we would put it back into the community that we love.”

laurie Grabow EVP, Chief Financial Officer

In 2013, Raven Henning and April Howard, both Assistant Managers at Old Point, developed a comprehensive financial literacy curriculum for local Girl Scouts. This instantly successful program has served over 30 troops.

“As advocates for girls, we want them to feel that there is no barrier to what they can accomplish financially. Old Point shares our beliefs and helps them to envision a future where they are fully engaged in financial decisionmaking and planning.” tracy Keller CEO, Girl Scouts of the Colonial Coast

“I am extremely proud to work for a company that is passionate about giving back to the community. I volunteer because I want to make a difference by creating a positive and lasting impact on those around me. Old Point shares that value, which makes it an inspiring place to work.” Jonika yarborough AVP, Branch Manager

“When you put your resources into a community that you love, you want to know that your organization shares your commitment. For me, Old Point ties it all together.” cheri Green AVP, Private Banker

Top to bottom, left to right: 1) Melissa Burroughs, Laurie Grabow, and Sandy Stewart support the Girl Scouts’ Samoa Soiree. 2) Louis Morris, Robert Shuford, Sr. and Rob Shuford Jr. accept the Best Places to Work in Virginia award. 3) Ruby Holcomb presents a donation to Carol Sale at the Lackey Free Clinic. 4) April Howard helps local Girl Scouts earn their Financial Literacy badges. 5) JoNika Yarborough leads Old Point at the Coliseum Central Parade. 6) Laverne Jones helps load donations from Old Point’s Thanksgiving Meal Drive.

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it’s pERsonal to tHEm “Old Point National Bank was a great fit for our strategic planning and financial management needs at the YWCA South Hampton Roads. They helped us plan for the future and increase our scope of services for women and children in less than one year.” Ruth Jones Executive Director, YWCA South Hampton Roads

“Old Point National Bank has been a strong supporter of Chesapeake Regional Health Foundation since 2001, helping to ensure that patients get excellent care with state-of-the-art equipment and innovative programs.” Jorge dabul Chairman, Chesapeake Regional Health Foundation

“At the James City-Bruton Volunteer Fire Department, our mission of protecting life and property has been made easier through the generosity of community partners such as Old Point. Their support helps us purchase and maintain vital equipment and provide highly trained firefighters and EMTs.” phillip murdoch James City/Bruton Volunteer, Fire Department

“As a longstanding supporter of Patient Advocate Foundation, Old Point National Bank has proven its dedication to helping community residents. Without Old Point, PAF’s ability to assist patients during their healthcare crisis would surely be decreased.” alan Balch, phd CEO, Patient Advocate Foundation

“Old Point National Bank has been a crucial partner with our YMCA for more than two decades, providing leadership for our board and financial support of our mission. This partnership helps us nurture the potential of kids, promote healthy living and foster social responsibility.” danny carroll CEO, Peninsula Metropolitan YMCA

Top to bottom: 1) Ruth Jones and Cindy Black at the Patient Advocate’s Promise of Hope Affair. 2) Sylvia Hazelwood and Phillip Murdoch. 3) Left to right: Cheri Green, Sam Poole, Sharon Davidson and Paul Dishman help beautify a YMCA playground.

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notEwoRtHy aCComplisHmEnts BanK aWaRdS n

Velocity Award for volunteerism from Volunteer Hampton Roads

n

Best Places to Work in Virginia

n

Best Places to Work In Hampton Roads

n Best

Banks to Work For

n

Best Bank and Best Mortgage Company in the Daily Press CHOICE Awards

n

Best Financial Institution and Best Mortgage Company in the Virginian Pilot’s Best of Hampton Roads

n

Best Bank in Hampton Roads Magazine’s Best of the 757

n Best

Financial Institution in the Virginia Gazette’s Best in Williamsburg

n Business

of the Year from the United Way of Greater Williamsburg

employee aWaRdS n

Erin Black, Inside Business’ Top 40 Under 40

n

Melissa Burroughs, Virginia Lawyer’s Weekly’s Influential Women of Virginia

n

Sherri McQuillan, Rotary Club of Newport News’ Rotarian of the Year

n

Bonnie Purefoy, National Association for Professional Women’s Woman of the Year

about old point national bank Since 1923, our combination of sophisticated financial solutions, exceptional service and community involvement has kept our customers coming back. Old Point National Bank is part of a larger family of organizations designed to meet all of your financial needs. Visit OldPoint.com to discover Old Point Trust, Old Point Investment Services and Old Point Mortgage.

oldpoint.com | 757.728.1200 | P.O. Box 3392 | Hampton, VA 23663 Member FDIC | ©2013 Old Point National Bank | 10/13

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Thank You!

6

We are humbled by your support! Presenting Sponsors:

Key 2013 Achievements:

Gold

$1.3 Million Raised & Counting to Fund ALS Research and Break Ground on JT’s Camp Grom 6,000 People Participated Over 175 Sponsors 6,000 Meals Served by Beach Bully BBQ & Qdoba Mexican Fiesta 6 Bands $10,000 in Buried Treasure in King Neptune’s Treasure Hunt

Bruce Thompson & Family The Ruffin Family – Edmund, Alice & Dare Marie The Mitchum Family • MEB General Contractors Waterman’s Crush Fest

Silver

Monarch Bank & Mortgage • Sysco Hampton Roads Interval International • Virginia Beach Jaycees • Troutman Sanders WM Jordan Company • Richard Stravitz Sculpture & Fine Art Galleries Hopes & Dreams Quilt Challenge for ALS • John Dominguez & Family

Bronze

Anonymous • Bob & Wendy Howard • Capital Group Charles Barker Automotive Group • Colgate Enterprise Dalis Foundation • Hobbs & Associates • Hampton Roads Magazine Marcus Holman Photography • Michael Millisor • Otto Design & Marketing Optima Health • Paige Lawson • Taylor & Emily Franklin Tom & Lori Adams • WAVY-TV 10

Contributing Sponsors Tom Adams • Donuts For Daryl • Auction, Breckenridge Vacation - Truxton Malbon • Auction, Salacia Dinner Cruise - Tom Adams • Liberty Bank Congressman Scott & Teri Rigell • SKANSKA • Capital One Commercial Bank - Vacation Ownership Finance • Mike & Darlene Chesson Woodford Reserve • Fawcett Family Elizabeth River Landscape Management • Anthony Gargiulo • Ray & Nina Khushal • Katharine Malbon Billy & Tilli Malbon • Rob & Amy Millisor • Craig Nash - Interval International • Data Business Systems • Friends of Frank - Eck, Collins & Richardson ARDA-ROC • Sunny Day Guide • GEICO • Jim, Karen & Kristin Sparks • ValleyCrest Landscape • Cooper Carry - Robert Uhrin • Ken Van De Water Byrd & Baldwin Bros Steakhouse • Marcelo & Ida Carvajal • Jacqueline and Angel Juarbe

Friends of Josh Zero’s Subs • MCV Foundation • Bart Auer • DC & Denise Auman • Nathan Benson • John Bishard • London Bridge Trading • Michael Boucher • Maria Bowen • BB&T • FRIENDS OF JT • Pete Burke and Family • Christopher Burns • Corinna Caldwell • King’s Creek Plantation The Carson Family • James and Marsha Casey • Hap & Becky Chalmers • Comcast Spectacor Charities • Alvin R. Corbett, 1st Mobility Scooter Rentals, LLC • BCF - BOOM YOUR BRAND • Marathon Consulting • John & Sue Cosgrove • Neal Crawford • Coastal Towne Development Moe & Sal DaBiero • Jamie Dale • Glenn Davis • Virginia Beach Hotel & Motel Association • Ryan Dickerson • Sky Bar Donors • Dr. Ronald Dozoretz, Ms. Beth Dozoretz • Michelle Duchamp • Mike Dudick • Jackie & Steven Dunbar • Sam Rust Seafood • J T Eilertsen East Coast Electrical Equipment • Peninsula Community Foundation of Virginia • Alisyn Facemire • Dan & Lisa Facemire • Kitco • Fiber Optics • Daniel Fitzgerald • S.L. Nusbaum Realty Co. • Rotary Club of JCC • Thomas Frantz • Rob Giroux Bill And Suzanne Gooch • Warwick Plumbing & Heating Corporation • Rob Green • Burt Greenwood Jr • John Hadjikakos • Tidal Wheel - Beach Ride • Tom Hamel • Patrick Hand • Glenn Hanna • EVMS • William & Donna Haycox • Vandeventer Black LLP • RK Auto Group Paul and Susan Hirschbiel • New England Nonwovens • Patrick Holland • Embrace Home Loans • Bucky & Carmela Houser • Betty Ann & Gordon Huey • Stihl, Inc. • Interval International • Area Equipment Rentals and Sales • David Kassir • Juanita Kelly Bonnie’s Beach Bikes - Bonnie & Brittany Kettner • Luna Sea Key West Café • David Kilby • Kim Family • Neal Klar • Aviva & Jeffery Klein • Lily Knauft • George Kotarides • Shawn Lane • Atlantic Heating & Cooling-Aaron Lawyer • Williams Mullen • Michael Levinson Long Jewelers • Joe & Marque Lovas • Fred & Nancy Lowe • The Mah Family • Dave and Val Makarsky • Mike & Cathy Malbon • Malbon Brothers Petroleum • Dernis International Marketing Co. • Laurie Beth & Ilan Markus • John and Jan Martin Friends of Frank - Great Eastern Resort Corporation • Gordon McClendon • Duncan & Vicki McDuff • Cheryl McLeskey • Robert McMichael III • John Melley • Jared Meyers • Jungle Golf - Preston & Kim Midgett • Tom Miner • Frank & Diane Monroe/ BM Stanton Foundation Adrienne Nemura • Red Wing Lake Golf Course • Russell and Michelle Payne • Esteban & Anna Perez • Anna & Tom Petrisko • Colebrook Financial Company, LLC • Captain George’s Seafood Restaurant • Gordon and Helen Potter • Dean and Betty Potter • G. Brock Potter Jr. The Przymuzala Family • Coastal Management Solutions • Anthonly Radd • The Raynor Family • Kaufman & Canoles • Mary & Curt Reinhardt • Jeff, Mira, Riana and Kimberly Rich • In Memory of Captain Charles Riggs, USMC • Bank Of Hampton Roads • Bay Mechanical, Inc American Hotel Register • Arnold and Reyna Rosenshein • Dan Ryan • Entourage Salon & Spa • Sass Family • David Schaum • Amy Jo Scott Frischling • Thomas Shelton • Meridian Financial Services - Greg Sheperd • Patrick Shuler • Mike Sifen • Chip Simkins • Bart Sinanis Bruce Smith • GEICO 2012 Associate Matching • Crest Foodservice Equipment • Sonny & Joan Stallings • Robert & Denisa Sterchi • GTA Karate, Robert Sterchi • Blueridge General, Inc. • Mary Elizabeth and Meade Stone • David Stroeve • Cindy Summs Summs Skip and Collection Service, Inc. • Laurie Thompson • Keith, Debbie, Jon & Kevin Thompson • 2nd Annual JT Cup Golf Tournament • Young’s Upholstery • Paul & Janina van Leeuwen • Hoffman Beverage • Linda Watkins • Independence Construction Co. of VA Hilltop BP • Kevin and Elizabeth Weller • Preston White • Mark Whitfield • Framing Success Inc. • Tri City Developers, LLC • Fraternal Order of Police - Marty Williams • Bay Disposal & Recycling • Thomas Wolfe

For More Information: www.jtwalk.org

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g n g k c a b ards w A 2013

Honoring The Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outstanding Non-Profits

ed By Sponsor

Coastal Virginia Magazine is pleased to present the second annual Giving Back Awards winners. After a nomination period and a total of 19,264 online votes cast, the following 25 charities receive the highest honors. If you volunteer or support one of these organizations, or any of the wonderful non-profits in Coastal Virginia, we applaud you. Please read more about their amazing efforts on the following pages. PLUS: Our staff experiences the top three first-hand. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The Editors

Scan here for video that provides an inside look into the top three charities and the work they do.

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LCPL. CODY S. CHILDERS MEMORIAL FUND P.O. Box 16576, Chesapeake • 757-536-0496 • www.WeCareMarines.com Number of votes: 635 Established: The LCpl. Cody S. Childers Memorial Fund was established in August 2010 by Wendy Childers, the mother of Cody Childers, a 19-year-old Marine who was killed in action in Marjah, Afghanistan on Aug. 20, 2010 while on foot patrol. Mission: To honor Cody’s memory and share his story by continuing to support his Marine brothers by shipping care packages filled with snacks, blankets, magazines, electronics, socks and more to make their deployment more comfortable. To ensure that all Marines know that someone at home is thinking of them and appreciates all they do for the United States of America. Key people: The Childers Family: Wendy, Randy, Ryan and Cassidy, along with dedicated volunteers. Jeff Stewart and Chris Levins present the annual car show, and the Voorhees family presents the annual golf tournament at Broad Bay Country Club. Derrick Ward and Patty Brackett, with the Edinburgh Chick-Fil-A, hold numerous spirit fundraisers throughout the year. Tammi McAffee is responsible for creating all graphics and, in addition, mails all of the care packages through the Edinburgh Goin Postal, the official donation drop-off center. Volunteer opportunities: Various fundraisers throughout the year to fund filling and shipping the care packages, including an annual car show and golf tournament, spirit nights and other events. All events are listed online at WeCareMarines.com. What are the biggest struggles your organization faces? “Our packages are 100 percent paid for through fundraisers that we hold throughout the year. We have our annual events but are always trying to develop new, fun events for our supporters to attend. Raffles are huge for us, and we rely on donations for the prizes. We also reach out to local and national companies for donations to include in our care packages.” What is the most rewarding part about what your non-profit does? “Believing that Cody would be proud of the support that we have continued in his honor and knowing that the Marines who open our boxes feel that someone at home cares and is appreciative of all they do for our country.”

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SAMARITAN HOUSE 2620 Southern Blvd., Virginia Beach • 757-631-0710 • www.SamaritanHouseVA.org Number of votes: 492

Packed With Love “Mamma Childers” Takes Care Of Her Marines And Honors Her Son With Boxes Brimming With Good Will

W

By My Nguyen

hen you meet Wendy Childers for the first time, what strikes you immediately—before her sweet, Southern drawl, bright smile or warm and welcoming nature—is the fact that she is undeniably a mother. On a bright and beautiful Saturday afternoon in September, I arrive at Knuckleheads Bar & Grill in Virginia Beach for the All Wheels Show, an annual fundraiser to support the Cody Childers Memorial Fund. Though I had only exchanged phone calls and e-mails with Wendy prior to the car show, I identify her immediately. When I get her attention, she greets me and gives me a hug without any hesitation or pretense. We walk around the parking lot, which has transformed into a lively, animated reunion of friends, families and supporters (and their impressive cars), and she tells me more about her exceptional son and Marine, Cody, or “Codyboy,” as his father Randy Childers calls him to this day. Lance Corporal Cody S. Childers was a 19-year-old United States Marine who was killed in Afghanistan in August 2010. The Memorial Fund was created to honor him and to keep his memory alive by sending care packages in his name to the deployed Marines that he loved and called his brothers. Yet the concept for the Fund actually began while Cody was still alive, Wendy says. When Cody was stationed in Marjah, Afghanistan, Wendy sent him daily Moto-mail and care packages filled with his favorite things, such as Gatorade, Oreo Cakesters, homemade deer jerky, socks, cigarettes, diesel truck magazines and other deliverable comforts he might like. On one particular call home, however, Cody mentioned how one of his Marine brothers had not received any care packages from home. This upset Cody and distressed Wendy deeply. The next day, upon Cody’s request, Wendy mailed Cody’s care package, along with some extras for him to hand out to friends. Following Cody’s passing, Wendy and her family created the LCPL. Cody S. Childers Memorial Fund to pack and send care packages to his platoon—Golf Co., 3rd Platoon. She decided that they would provide a box for each Marine in the 3rd Platoon filled with all of Cody’s favorite things. These boxes included a PSP with games, a fan-pod and other snacks and food. They also sent disposable cameras so that the Marines could capture each other’s reactions to the boxes, as well as blank postcards so that they could write back. Each and every one of the “Devil’s Cowboys” wrote back and shared stories of Cody. Their letters, as well as these initial care packages, were and remain a testament to Cody’s loving and generous nature, and the influence he had on the lives he touched. The Marines came to call Wendy “Mama Childers,” and she, too, felt that they were now her Marine sons. Continues on pg. 99 ...

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Established: In 1984, the Virginia Beach interfaith community, which offered support to the Virginia Beach Department of Social Services, found that many service agencies were asking for assistance in providing shelter and food for homeless families. A task force was formed to address local and regional homelessness, and a fourbedroom shelter for homeless families was opened in 1985. Under the name of Virginia Beach Ecumenical Housing, Inc., Samaritan House was incorporated in 1984 and opened its first shelter in 1985 for homeless families. Mission: To foster personal safety, self-sufficiency and personal growth in adults and their children through freedom from domestic violence and homelessness. Key people: Angela Kellam, executive director; Grace Orsini, board president; Robin Gauthier, program director; Melissa Sutherland, grants; Larissa Sutherland, education; Shereese Floyd-Thompson, marketing; Melody Sanders, volunteers. Programs: Operates at 24-hour hotline for families in crisis that acts as the hub for inquiries about housing, safety planning, resources and referrals. Families who come into shelter have access to case management, support groups, housing assistance, and education and employment training. Samaritan House also offers aftercare services for up to a year from when families leave the Samaritan House. It works with families in the community through the victim advocacy program, where Samaritan House representatives help victims prepare protective orders and accompany them to court. It also offers a Safe Start program—a therapeutic model for children affected by violence. In addition, Samaritan House operates Connection Point, the only 24-hour central access line for homeless in Virginia Beach. Volunteer opportunities: Volunteers are always welcome to participate in day-to-day activities of administrative work and sorting donations. Samaritan House participates in the annual Day of Caring, and groups are encouraged to volunteer for shelter makeovers. Looking for volunteers with specialized skills or training in information technology, marketing and public relations, health care, counseling, children’s services, and/or real estate. Offers volunteer training four times a year. What are the biggest struggles your organization faces? “Like most nonprofits, Samaritan House is challenged with continually securing enough funding to grow programs. Samaritan House has served Hampton Roads for almost 30 years. In those years, our services have grown to accommodate demand. We are always looking for new ways to talk about domestic violence and homelessness to not only raise awareness, but to sustain funding that keeps our lights on and our doors open.” What is the most rewarding part about what your non-profit does? “Two words: Saving lives. Whether a family is fleeing the dangers of violence or weathering the elements, Samaritan House opens doors to not only housing, but a different way of living, thinking and being.”

—Melissa M. Stewart

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Letting The Light In Joining Samaritan House For A Vigil Commemorating Victims Of Domestic Violence Provides A Personal Look At The Organization’s Inspiring Work

D Sheresse Floyd-Thompson of Samaritan House with Brian Dunn and Patricia Nobles’ Silent Witness.

By Melissa M. Stewart

anielle Knarr, age 25, was pursuing a degree at Old Dominion University when her boyfriend stabbed her to death with a footlong hunting knife. Cheri Washington, 17 and five months pregnant, was duct taped and beat down in a domestic dispute that killed both her and her unborn baby. As I drift around the room, I am simultaneously heartbroken and lured in by each of these tragic stories written out on yellow shields fastened to wooden, red silhouettes that stand throughout the student center at Tidewater Community College’s Norfolk campus. Part of the Silent Witness Project, each figure commemorates a local woman who was murdered in an act of domestic violence. I shuffle around a thickening crowd of supporters who have come out on a wet and murky fall night to participate in the Day of Unity, Night of Remembrance Candlelight Vigil. The vigil happens annually on the first Monday in October (domestic violence awareness month) to showcase a commitment to ending domestic violence and remember those who have lost their lives. This year, seven local organizations have joined to host the event—Garden of Hope, Transitions Family Violence Services, YWCA, Genieve Shelter, Navy Fleet and Family, HER Shelter and Samaritan House. Representatives from each group have set up in the hallway to provide educational literature and information about their programs. I make my way back to the Samaritan House table to talk more with Larissa Sutherland, education and outreach coordinator, and Shereese Floyd-Thompson, marketing coordinator; to assist them with handing out purple ribbons; and to listen as they answer questions about the hard work they do day to day to help victims of domestic violence. Those tireless efforts include operating a hotline for families in crisis and providing emergency shelters, transitional housing, support groups, employment training, a victim advocacy program and more. Soon, it’s time for the program, and I grab a candle and take my seat to hear Norfolk Vice Mayor Anthony Burfoot welcome those gathered. After an address by the Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney Linda Bryant and a powerful spoken word performance by Teens With a Purpose, Brian Dunn steps up to the microphone and delivers the most poignant speech of the evening—a personal testimony about his mother, domestic violence victim Patricia Nobles. Dunn explains that his mother, a middle school teacher in Hampton, was killed exactly three years ago today. He says he received a call from a neighbor and raced to her home to discover she had been gunned down in her driveway. In the wake of this horrific event, Dunn turned to Samaritan House, determined to help others and give back to the community by assisting other families and victims. Here, he met Floyd-Thompson, who joins him tonight along with Sutherland to unveil his mother’s Silent Victim silhouette to the crowd. As Dunn describes how he coped with Nobles’ death by “doing something” and “letting the light in,” we all turn our lights on for a reading of the names of this year’s local domestic violence victims. Though Dunn’s story is somber, his mood isn’t, and he leaves me feeling grateful as I look down at my candle and think about all the inspiring efforts made by Samaritan House, along with all of the other organizations represented tonight. “To see a family come in with nothing and help them get on their feet is a job well done,” Samaritan’s Floyd-Thompson told me. “It is such joy witnessing the glow of change or knowing our services gave a child an opportunity. Our business is humanity, and that makes every day worth it.”

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Top Non-Profits PIN Ministry (People in Need) PINMinistry.org PIN serves homeless people in Virginia Beach, including food, clothing, hygiene supplies, living necessities, medical care and shelter. We Promise Foundation www.WePromiseFoundation.org Dedicated to making dreams come true for children struggling with degenerative, life-threatening, debilitating or chronic illnesses, or those facing tremendous hardship. Girl Scout Council of Colonial Coast www.GSCC.org Serves more than 16,000 girls throughout Southeastern Virginia and Northeastern North Carolina. Girls discover the fun, friendship, and power of girls together. Foodbank of Southeastern Virginia www.FoodbankOnline.org The Foodbank of Southeastern Virginia and the Eastern Shore leads the effort to eliminate hunger in our community by distributing meals through partner agencies and programs within the community. Goodwill Industries www.Goodwill.org Goodwill works to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity, and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work. Peninsula Pet Pantry www.Facebook.com/ PeninsulaPetPantry

The Arc of the Virginia Peninsula www.ARCVAP.org

Evelyn’s Wildlife Refuge www.EvelynsWildlifer Refuge.org

Junior League of NorfolkVirginia Beach, Inc. www.JLNVB.org

AidNow www.AidNow.org

Virginia Beach SPCA www.VBSPCA.com

Rotary Club of Hampton Roads www.RotaryHampton Roads.org

Cerebral Palsy of Virginia www.CerebralPalsyof Virginia.org

Kidz ‘N Grief www.HamptonRoads. BonSecours.com/ Our-Services-HospiceBereavementServices-Kidz-N-Grief.html SEVA GRREAT www.AdoptAGolden.com Children’s Harbor www.ChildrensHarbor.cc

The Virginia Arts Festival www.VAFest.org Forever Home Rescue and Rehabilitation Center www.ForeverHomeRehab Center.com Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia www.SSSEVA.org

Eastern Shore Coalition Against Domestic Violence www.ESCADV.com

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A Day For Dogs Chesapeake Humane Society’s Bark In The Park Gives An Opportunity To Show Off Furry Friends— Or To Welcome A New Member Into The Family

T

By Angela Blue

he temperature soars to the upper 80s as I approach the volunteer tent for Bark in the Park at Chesapeake City Park on this extraordinarily balmy October morning. I’m greeted by a group of people of all ages wearing orange shirts, and after asking my size, a woman hands me an orange volunteer shirt to match the rest of the group. I stand in a small circle with the others as Katie Fennig, volunteer coordinator for Chesapeake Humane Society, assigns volunteers to their stations. She explains that Bark in the Park is the organization’s largest annual fundraiser and that it’s important for us to try to raise as much money as possible—and to have fun. I’m assigned to the retail tent working with Diana Snyder, who’s on the board of directors for CHS. She warmly greets me and shows me a lineup of beautiful gift baskets she’s created to sell at today’s event. “All of the items inside the baskets have been donated,” she explains. I browse the baskets, which are loaded with anything from training books to food bowls to toys. As Diana puts the finishing touches on our stand, she recalls that at last year’s Bark in the Park, it was so cold that the big topic for volunteers was imagining ways they would warm up once they got home. It would appear that at this year’s event, the “dog days” of summer are still in full effect. People start arriving at noon, and the doggie diversions immediately begin. In a large ring to the left, I watch as a German Sheppard from the K-9 unit demonstrates an attack on one of the trained professionals wearing a padded coat, at the command of an officer. Later on in the ring, dogs dash back and forth, jumping over obstacles as owners clock their time. Other dogs bark in unison as if to cheer them on. Nearly every attendee has brought with them a furry companion, although some have come in hopes of finding a new best friend to adopt. At one end of the park, I gaze at the largest dog I’ve ever seen, and at the other end, I get a glimpse of a dog so tiny it could be mistaken for a guinea pig. And of course there’s every size, shape, color and breed imaginable. I excitedly stand underneath the retail tent, waiting for owners to bring their dogs by for a visit. Most dogs immediately try to crawl underneath our stand for a moment to get out of the heat, and I take this opportunity to greet them with a pat on the head. Some pooches are dressed in costume for the costume contest to be held later, and some are dressed like their owners for the lookalike contest. A few of the dogs even have pink- and purple-colored hair—surely the latest trend in fido fashion. One older gal, a poodle named Lady, is lovingly carried around by her owners because she gets tired from walking, and one cute Chihuahua is sporting a flowered dress and being pushed around in something similar to a baby stroller. As I look around at all the happy dogs and their cheerful owners, I spot several dogs wearing bandanas that say, “Adopt Me.” At first I feel sorry for the dogs that don’t have a permanent home, but as I look around the park, I realize that many of the dog/owner relationships seen here today are a result of the Chesapeake Humane Society and their mission to link companion animals with responsible pet guardians. That assures me that these fine canines will most likely end up in a great home and can attend Bark in the Park next year with their loving owners.

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CHESAPEAKE HUMANE SOCIETY 123 N. Battlefield Blvd., Suite D, Chesapeake • 757-546-5355 • www.ChesapeakeHumane.org Number of Votes: 479 Established: Phyllis Stein founded the society in 1972 when she realized that homeless animals in Chesapeake lacked the support they deserved. The stationary Spay/Neuter Clinic opened in March 2008, and since then, the organization has helped more than 10,000 animals through high-quality, low-cost spay/neuter, vaccinations, microchipping and adoptions. Mission: The Chesapeake Humane Society works to promote the welfare of companion animals through programs and initiatives that reduce pet overpopulation, increase adoptions and encourage responsible pet guardianship through affordable pet care. Key People: Board of Directors: Cheryl Hindle, president and operations manager; Kathy Selikson, secretary; Donna Servidio, treasurer; Jean Carideo; Diana Snyder; Scott Snyder; and Jillian Stanley. Staff: Lacy Kuller, executive director; Ben Kunkel, outreach and events coordinator; Katie Fennig, volunteer coordinator; and Dr. Sara Correa, veterinarian on staff. Dedicated volunteers are also considered an extension of the staff and are greatly valued. Programs: Along with promoting pet adoptions, the Chesapeake Humane Society offers a Foster Care Program for underage, sick or injured animals who need some TLC. The Society’s C.A.R.E. Clinic provides low-cost spay/neuter surgeries as well as low-cost vaccines, tests and flea and heartworm preventative. Volunteer opportunities: Being on the Bark in the Park committee, participating in the Foster Care Program, assisting in the MatchMakers program, assisting with community events through Party Animals!, providing kitty care with the Cat Care Team, being a part of the Pet Bank Collection Team, photographing pets or being on the administrative team. What are the biggest struggles your organization faces? “Our biggest struggle is growing pains. Chesapeake Humane’s current goal is to move our facility to a new building. We are raising money for renovations for a properly outfitted Spay/ Neuter Clinic and Adoption Center, which is a significant cost. Once we raise the money, renovate and move in, we will have the opportunity to expand our programs and services, hold more events at our location and increase our visibility in the community. Bottom line: we will be able to help so many more animals and the people who love them.” What is the most rewarding part about what this non-profit does? “Each dog or cat comes to us with their own unique story, some with quite a troubling past, but we feel the reward each time we place a companion animal in their new forever home. Nothing lifts our day more than a positive update from an adopter about the new furry addition to the family and hearing how well they are doing.” —Angela Blue

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THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF HAMPTON ROADS, INC. 729 Thimble Shoals Blvd., Suite 4-D, Newport News • 757-873-0281 • www.JLHR.org Number of votes: 380 Established: Founded as the Hampton Roads Service League in 1949. The group became the Junior League of Hampton Roads (JLHR) in 1956. Mission: The Junior League of Hampton Roads, Inc. is an organization of approximately 500 women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable. Key people: The JLHR is led by a board of directors drawn from active members of the organization. The 2013–2014 Board currently includes Lynn McMullin, president; Talley Williford, president elect; Jennifer Wong, communications vice president; Gwendolyn Meharg, community vice president; Haley Hanlon, finance vice president; Jamila Hardy, membership vice president; Nicole Camhout, membership ambassador; Sophie Davis, treasurer; and Cathy Westphal, secretary. Programs: This year, the JLHR has launched its newest campaign, the Women’s Initiative for Success and Empowerment (WISE). WISE is designed to empower and uplift women who are confronting economic uncertainty and adversity. It focuses on success and empowerment by providing increased access to resources which improve educational, financial, and life skills. In addition, the organization provides positive experiences to young women through the teen outreach program. WISE will be implemented in our local communities through three coordinated committees: Get WISEr!, MoneyWISE/LifeWISE, and Teen WISE.” Volunteer opportunities: Because training volunteers is such a large part of the mission, new members go through a three-month training course to learn about the organization and its community involvement. New members are accepted in January and August of each year. What are the biggest struggles your organization faces? “Our biggest struggle is one that many non-profit organizations are currently facing: recruiting and retaining members. There are so many dynamic volunteer opportunities available in our community.” What is the most rewarding part about what this nonprofit does? “The JLHR has always been known for finding issues in the community that need support and establishing a starting point to address those areas. We have a history of identifying gaps and needs in our community, collaborating with other community organizations and partners, and building sustainable programs to provide functional solutions. Doing this as part of a group of dynamic, motivated women is truly inspiring.” —Patti Hinson 98

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Packed With Love (continued)

NORFOLK SPCA

Continued from pg. 94 ...

916 Ballentine Blvd., Norfolk • 757-622-3319 • www.NorfolkSPCA.com Number of votes: 427 Established: Founded in 1892 to protect workhorses from mistreatment. Today, the Norfolk SPCA “shelters, treats, rehabilitates and re-homes household companion animals.” Mission: A private, no-kill humane society dedicated to fostering the human-animal bond to ensure that every adoptable companion animal finds a home. Focused on finding our animal friends the forever homes they deserve. The clinic’s special mission helps reduce the incidence of people surrendering their animal companions because they cannot afford medical care. Key people: Board of directors is led by President Kathy Ferebee. Dedicated staff includes Robert Blizard, executive director; Jill Arnone, director of development; Kimberlee Kendzora, director of finance and administration; Dr. Shannon Snoke, medical director; and a wonderful group of animal-loving professionals and enthusiastic volunteers in our shelter, clinic, and administrative departments. Programs: Primary functions include finding forever homes for the animals in the adoption center and offering affordable veterinary care—including spay/neuter, vaccinations, and dentistry—for animals belonging to public clients. Clinic also serves as a contractor to the City of Norfolk, providing medical and surgical services to the animals who enter the City’s animal control facility. Volunteer opportunities: Outreach with adoptable animals, kennel and cattery cleaning, animal socialization, laundry, pro bono professional help, and administrative assistance. Also a tremendous need for fosters—the foster program is critical to the success of the adoption center. Fosters provide a short-term, temporary home to create the link between a homeless animal and his or her forever home. What are the biggest struggles your organization faces? “We’re constantly working to find support to meet the endless demand for our services. Even if we were to adopt out every animal in our shelter today, there would still be more homeless pets to immediately fill our living spaces. This cycle could repeat every single day. We want to help even more animals and people, but it’s a challenge to find necessary resources from a community that’s already responding to multiple requests from a host of worthy non-profits helping others in need.” What is the most rewarding part about what this non-profit does? “We’re thrilled when we see smiling faces—someone who’s been helped by the affordable services at our clinic, animals who’ve been adopted or received medical care, someone who’s just found their new best friend. Anyone who’s ever experienced the joy of sharing his or her life with a pet knows the magic of seeing a happy dog or cat.” n CoVa

—Patti Hinson

Initially, the care packages were Wendy’s form of therapy, to keep her busy in the aftermath of Cody’s death. Now, it is her passion and mission. Before leaving the event, I ask Wendy if she might be comfortable with inviting me into her life just a bit more, as I’d like to see the care packaging in action. She hugs me and tells me she’ll e-mail me her home address. A few weeks later, I drive up to a home lined with United States Marine Corps flags. Before I can get out of my car, Wendy is already standing in the driveway, ready to welcome me into her home. Wendy leads me to an upstairs room filled with packing boxes and laundry baskets filled with snacks, magazines, DVDs, socks and even Girl Scout Cookies. Josh and his mother, Tammi, whom I met at the car show, are also present to help. One by one, we grab a box and begin filling them to the brim with goodies for the Marines. We’re free to select whatever we want to put into the boxes, with Wendy’s one caveat: fill all of the space and cracks. (I find that the Toostie Rolls and bubble gum work especially well in this case.) At $13 dollars to ship each box, I can certainly understand her philosophy. We work for an hour, and between the four of us, pack 70 boxes. Looking around, the whole production can be viewed as nothing less than a labor of love. Putting together the care packages and working the events are Cody’s family and friends. All of those in attendance at the fundraisers and events are individuals who have felt the kindness of the LCPL. Cody S. Childers Memorial Fund personally, or who have been inspired by it. Regardless, they are all a part of the Childers family now, and with Mama Childers at the helm, Cody can rest assured that his heart and spirit will never be forgotten.

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GivinG Guide Special Section

VersAbility Resources buSineSS ServiceS

verSability reSourceS

2520 58th Street Hampton, VA 23661 www.versability.org 757-896-6461

MiSSion StateMent

VersAbility Resources supports people with disabilities in leading productive and fulfilling lives.

viSion

We envision a world where people with disabilities enjoy dignified, productive lives of their choosing as fully accepted members of society.

year eStabliSHed

1953. Chapter of The Arc of the United States.

Service area

VersAbility Resources serves over 1,150 people with disabilities and their families from the entire Hampton Roads region and the Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck. We also hold 13 government contracts, through which people with disabilities work alongside enlisted and civilian personnel at military bases as far away as Hawaii.

new naMe, SaMe viSion To chart our future in the decades ahead, we determined we needed a new organizational name, as The Arc of the Virginia Peninsula no longer represents our services, some of which are nationwide in scope. On October 1, 2013, we adopted a new name - VersAbility Resources. This name is a fusion of Versatile and Abilities, a true representation of the individuals with disabilities we have proudly served for 60 years. This new name reflects our growing service area and commitment to creating new opportunities that highlight the abilities of people with disabilities. Our constituents, clients, and employees can expect the same relationships with the same strong vision. We will continue to support individuals with disabilities in employment, community living, day support, and early childhood programs. Our services, which range from coordinating developmental therapies for children to building successful business partnerships that meet the needs of employers while providing jobs for people with disabilities, will remain the same. 100

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With a budget of $39 million and 1,020 employees, more than half of whom are people with disabilities, VersAbility Resources is a major service provider, business, and employer in our region. Individuals with disabilities at VersAbility Resources earn an average of $5.5 million in wages and benefits annually. Develop a partnership with VersAbility Resources and watch your business thrive. Our flexible, dedicated workforce performs an array of tasks that deliver superior results. We provide business solutions, including electronics recycling, digital imaging services, production, manufacturing, mailroom services, switchboard operations, and more. Our Supported Employment Program provides long-term jobs for people with disabilities working directly with regional employers, giving them the opportunity to earn good wages, increase their independence, and contribute to the local economy. Skilled Employment Specialists provide individualized assessments, on-site job training, long-term supervision, and support to both employees and employers. VersAbility Resources earned its first government contract in 1984. Since then, we have added to our roster of diverse contracts that provide ongoing jobs for people with disabilities at military installations in the region and across the country. Individuals at these jobs work alongside enlisted and civilian personnel, earning competitive wages and benefits.

recycle electronicS, create JobS In 2012, over 462 tons of electronic equipment were kept out of local landfills. Through our Electronics Recycling program, VersAbility Resources partners with individuals and businesses to responsibly dispose of unwanted electronics, providing opportunities for people with disabilities to earn wages while keeping waste out of landfills and reusing materials. Our process ensures the safe destruction of data by erasing information from each computer’s hard drive with our state-of-the-art equipment. You can recycle your old electronics by dropping them off at the VersAbility Resources facility or we can arrange a pick-up at your business for large quantities.

board oF directorS Jack Ezzell, Chair Henry Mills, Vice Chair Richard Matthews, Treasurer Rick Gallaer, Secretary Steve Apostoles Francie Bailey Robert Baker Daniel Basnight Melanie Rapp Beale David Burley Steve Callis Doug Carper Akima Eleonora Debra Flores Robert Harper Phyllis Henry James Hines William Lewis The Honorable Mamie Locke Wayne MacMasters Sudhir Mehrotra Kelly Musick Everett Peckham Robert Register Sharon Warren

Get involved Join VersAbility Resources to improve the lives of people with disabilities in our community—and really make a difference. There are several ways to help. • Become a business partner • Recycle your old electronics while creating jobs for people with disabilities • Make a monetary donation • Attend one of our events • Include VersAbility Resources in your estate plans • Spread the word by scheduling a tour of VersAbility Resources or invite a member of our Speaker’s Bureau to present at your business, church, or civic club meeting. Visit www.versability.org/join-us/get-involved/ for more details.

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Nationally, 70% of adults with disabilities are unemployed...Move beyond the stats.

At VersAbility Resources we put people to work by working for you

VersAbility Resources partners with businesses from Hampton Roads to Hawaii providing jobs for people with disabilities and exceeding expectations. • Benefit from superior work, delivered on time • Gain long-term, dedicated workers • Able to meet diverse business needs

“The services provided are price competitive, 100% quality – 100% on time.”

Start with a free consultation. Contact our business solutions expert, Whitney Lester: wlester@versability.org

VersAbility Resources Business Partner

Formerly known as The Arc of the Virginia Peninsula Hampton, VA | 757.896.6461 | versability.org | w w w. Co a s t a l Vi rg i n i a M a g. co m

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Magazine

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Goodwill industries

hampton roads support center 1911 saville row hampton, va 23666 www.goodwillvirginia.org • 757-248-9405 Mission stateMent Goodwill works to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity, and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work. We offer customized job training, employment placement and other services to people who have disabilities, lack education or job experience, or face employment challenges. Our business is changing lives…helping people help themselves through the power of work. 2014 Goals • To place 2,000 individuals into long-term employment. • To open 2 new Community

Employment Centers as gateways to services. • Complete renovation of Hampton Roads Support Center to accommodate more mission services. • Expand Goodwill Staffing Solutions into Hampton Roads to help put more people to work. Year established 1923. Member of Goodwill Industries International. service area 39 cities and counties throughout Hampton Roads and Central Virginia. Fund raisinG events Goodwill funds its multiple job training and career development programs through: • Financial donations and Foundation grants.

• Donations of gently used items for resale in Goodwill stores and outlet. • Community donation events in partnership with local organizations, schools, and businesses. volunteer opportunities There are two main ways to volunteer and support Goodwill’s efforts to help area residents gain employment. First, if you’ve got experience in job search skills training, computer training, or career development then volunteering your time and talent would go a long way to helping others get back on their feet. Another important way to volunteer is to host a donation drive at your business, community organization, area school, or

neighborhood. Your material donations make it possible for us to provide funding for our mission programs through our retail operations. GivinG opportunities Gently used clothing and household items at our stores and donation centers. Automobiles Cash donations Legacy gifts Honor & Memorial Gifts Workplace giving Online giving board oF directors (Hampton Roads-based) Morgan Davis Joe Frank Tom Kleine Chris Rouzie Shawnta Totten Dot Wood

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HEALTH CENTER STATISTICS

Empower. No matter what.

1,182 breast exams

When a patient comes through our doors, their chief concern is often a medical emergency: Am I pregnant? Do I have an infection? Could it be HIV? Is this breast lump cancerous? It is an honor for Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Virginia to help so many people in need. The information below showcases 2012 results.

1,127

For every

$1

invested in patient care at PPSEV,

cervical cancer screenings

84¢

267

goes directly to meeting the health needs of the thousands of people that we serve annually.

prenatal visits

491

By keeping our administrative and patient costs low, we are able to help more people.

long-term contraceptive insertions

Comfort. No matter what. PPSEV offers breast health services, cervical cancer screenings, contraception, prenatal visits, well-woman exams and testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

140% increase

in sexually transmitted infection testing from 2011 Besides offering free testing in both health centers on the last Tuesday of every month, we also test hundreds of people in the community through events held by other organizations in Hampton Roads

3,388 8,133

Give. No matter what. Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Virginia receives no state or federal funding for clinical services. Contributions are crucial to keep our services affordable for families who have little or no insurance. • $120 covers the cost of one STI/HIV screening for a student who has no insurance. • $150 provides a full annual exam including breast & cervical cancer screening for an uninsured woman. • $700 gives an uninsured woman long-term birth control, such as an IUD or implant, which can last 3 to 10 years. • $1,720 covers the cost of prenatal care from the first visit through delivery for a pregnant patient who has no insurance. 104

, PPSEV presented comprehensive medically-accurate sex education to Newport News public high school students.

3,200 Informed. No matter what. Abstinence. Infection prevention. Healthy relationships. Through our education program, PPSEV has reached more than 10,000 people in 2012, seeking comprehensive, medically-accurate sexual health information that helps them live healthy and independent lives.

MISSION STATEMENT Our mission is to provide all people with access to high-quality, affordable medical and educational services, allowing them to take control of their health and better plan healthy, successful, independent families.

er 2013 515 Newtown Road Beach, VA 23462 • 757.499.7526 • www.plannedparenthood.org / D e c e m bVirginia

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After 90 years, our story still begins .

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Do Your Homework

P

How to prepare for and what to expect from a private school open house

rivate schools are an excellent way for your child or teen to get an accelerated education while also being exposed to numerous cultural and social endeavors, including sports, the arts and leadership training. But before you even start searching for a school, it’s important to sit down as a family to discuss exactly what you’re looking for from a private institution. Some examples to think about include: l Large or small school? A small school may provide more one-on-one educational opportunities while a large school will likely have a wider variety of educational programs. l Coeducational or single-sex? Does it make a difference? l Day school or boarding school? l What special programs/amenities do they offer, and do those programs meet your child’s needs? Once you have a broad idea of the kind of expectations the family is hoping to achieve, you can start doing some online searches to develop a preliminary list of spots you think will meet your goals and objectives. After you’ve done your homework and have narrowed the choices down, attending open houses will provide you with an opportunity to get a feel for the school 108

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while you learn more about the policies, teachers and administration. It’s a good idea to keep a separate file folder for each school you visit so you can keep all of your research and information in one neatly organized place. It might also be helpful to keep a journal handy to record notes and observations so details won’t blur over time, especially if you are visiting several different campuses. At the events you attend, it’s important to ask a lot of questions, but it’s also critical to observe how teachers and staff interact with the students while you are touring the campus: l Talk with parents and students to see if their impression of the school is the same now as it was when they were attending open houses. Do students and teachers appear to be happy? l Check out the classrooms and the equipment. Is the technology up to date? l Observe how students act between classes. Is the environment chaotic, or are student interactions peaceful and purposeful? l Make sure to also keep notes on admission testing dates and application deadlines. This information will be very important once you do decide on which school(s) you would like to apply to.

Most importantly, have fun. If you or your student don’t feel comfortable in one environment or another, that could be a potential red flag that a particular school may not be well suited for either of you. Ask for your child’s honest opinion after each open house, and keep a note of that, too. After all, your student’s education will be much more meaningful if you include him/ her in the decision-making process. HAMPTON Holloman Child Development & Education Center 1520 Todds Lane 23666, 757-884-9100 www.holloman.com Grades: Pk - 5 Year: 1959 Enrollment: Varies by location S/T: Varies by age ACS: Varies by location Uniforms: No Principal: Bart Holloman An accelerated learning program inclusive with full day care and meals. Licensed and accredited. Over 40 years experience. Locations in Hampton, Williamsburg, and York County Saint Mary Star of the Sea School 14 N. Willard Ave. 23663, 757-723-6358 www.saintmarystarofthesea.com

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S P E CIAL A D V E RTISING S E CTION

Grades: Pk - 8 Enrollment: 185 S/T: 16:1 ACS: Varies from 10 to 20 Uniforms: Yes Principal: Sister Mary Amata Mueller Saint Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School, Hampton, educates children (PreK-8) of all faiths in knowledge and love of Jesus Christ, building their spiritual, intellectual and social character. NEWPORT NEWS Hampton Roads Academy 739 Academy Lane 23602, 757-884-9100 www.hra.org Grades: Pk-12 Year: 1959 Enrollment: 600 S/T: 10:1 ACS: Lower & Middle = 14; Upper = 16 Uniforms: Pk-8; Dress Code 9-12 Headmaster: Peter W. Mertz Hampton Roads Academy is an independent college-preparatory school for boys and girls in grades pre-Kindergarten through 12. HRA is an academic community committed to excellence. Discover the possibilities of HRA. Peninsula Catholic High School 600 Harpervsville Rd. 23601, 757-596-7247 x12 www.peninsulacatholic.com Grades: 8-12 Year: 1903 Enrollment: 299 S/T: 11:1 ACS: Varies Uniforms: Yes Principal: Jenny Franklin A college preparatory, co-educational Catholic school for students from all backgrounds in grades 8-12 participating in the Tidewater Conference of Independent Schools.

Chesapeake Bay Academy 821 Baker Rd 23462, 757-497-6200 www.cba-va.org Grades: 1-12 Year: 1989 Enrollment: 112 S/T: 6:1 ACS: 2-12 Uniforms: No Head of School: MaryAnne Dukas Chesapeake Bay Academy was established to meet the needs of students who have not been successful in a traditional lecture-style environment due to learning differences such as ADD, dyslexia and dsygraphia.

WAYNESBORO Fishburne Military Academy 225 S. Wayne Ave. 22980, 800-946-7773 www.fishburne.org Grades: 7-12 Year: 1879 Enrollment: 200 S/T: 8:1 ACS: 10-12 Uniforms: Yes Superintendant: COL Gary R. Morrison Headmaster: COL William Sedr Founded in 1879, Fishburne Military School is an all-male Army JROTC college preparatory school for grades 7-12 and Post-graduates.

Accelerated Learning

Beyond offering quality child care and education, we believe in helping children grow in body, mind and spirit. Explore our programs to find out more.

Holloman

Child Development Centers Locations in Hampton, Williamsburg and Grafton

Visit www.holloman.com for more information.

Thank you for voting us an award winning Child Development Center!

Warwick River Christian School 252 Lucas Creek Rd. 23602, 757-877-2941 www.warwickriver.org Grades: Pk - 8 Year: 1942 Enrollment: 180 Uniforms: No Principal: Mabel Nelson Celebrating 70 years, WRCS offers quality education for 3 year-old preschool - Grade 8 enhancing the development of the whole child as life-long learners in service for Christ. VIRGINIA BEACH Cape Henry Collegiate 1320 Mill Dam Rd. 23454, 757-481-2446 www.capehenrycollegiate.org Grades: Pk-12 Year: 1924 Enrollment: 850 S/T: 10:1 ACS: 20 Uniforms: No Head of School: Dr. John P. Lewis Cape Henry Collegiate is an independent coeducational college preparatory school for Prekindergarten3- Grade12. CHC prides itself on the values of community, opportunity, scholarship, and integrity.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Financing Your

Future

part one of a two-part series on the best retirement decision you can make | By Karen Haywood Queen

F

orget the stock that supposedly guarantees a high return for your golden years and use these tips instead.

Delay Drawing Social Security The best financial decision you can make is basic: delay taking Social Security until age 70, says behavioral economist Lewis Mandell, author of a new book,

What to Do When I Get Stupid. “If you haven’t started taking your Social Security, the single most important thing you can do is not start taking benefits until your 70th birthday,” says Mandell, who waited until his own 70th birthday. The youngest age you can draw Social Security is 62, but taking benefits then means you get less money every year. The age at which you receive full benefits

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(757) 249-0355

13030 Warwick Blvd. • Newport News, VA 23602 www.mennowood.com

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ranges from 65 to 67, depending on when you were born. But you can get even more than full benefits by waiting until age 70 to get that first check. “The return the government gives you is obscenely large—eight percent for every year you wait—and it’s totally guaranteed against inflation,” Mandell says. “It’s amazing how much more money you get.” (Check for yourself at www.socialsecurity.gov/retire2/delayret.htm. You can also look here to consider other factors that will help you decide if this is the best decision for you: www.socialsecurity.gov/ retire2/otherthings.htm.) Mandell, known as the father of the financial literacy movement, is a behavioral economist, professor emeritus of finance and managerial economics and former dean of business at State University of New York in Buffalo. Worried Social Security won’t be around? Don’t be, Mandell says. “There are so many people who have accumulated very little in 401ks,” he says. “The government is going to have to help those people whether it’s with Social Security or not. So the government may as well do it with Social Security. We are not a people who are willing to see our neighbors dying of hunger.” There are many ways to fix Social Security that will keep the program solvent, he notes. The most likely change is to continue raising the age at which retirees get full benefits, he says. “But people will be given sufficient warning,” he says. Pay Off Your Home The second most important retirement decision you can make is to live in a fully paid off home that allows you to age in place, Mandell says.

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S P E CIAL A D V E RTISING S E CTION

Be Wary of Stocks and Inflation Speaking of inflation, Mandell’s advice runs counter to conventional wisdom regarding stocks—and that’s because of concerns about inflation. Anticipated inflation, at rates people

cover your core expenses before investhave come to accept as reality, tends ing in stocks. He defines core expenses to result in higher stock prices because as the cost of living in no-frills comfort, companies pass on higher prices to conwhich would include housing (if sumers, who will continue to buy you haven’t taken his advice products, Mandell says. That’s to pay off your mortgage), good news for a retirement food, utilities, and medistock portfolio. If you haven’t cal expenses. Conventional finanstarted taking your Once you’ve covered cial wisdom often those core expenses, advocates buying Social Security, the “What you do with stocks or stock funds single most important the rest is up to you,” to beat inflation—with thing you can do is not he says. an often-cited rule of start taking benefits “In the United thumb calling for a States, we haven’t had percentage of stocks until your 70th inflation to speak of equal to 100 or 105 birthday for 30 years,” he says. minus your age. Based on “People think it’s a probthat formula, a 60-year-old lem that is behind them. But would have 40–45 percent of there are a growing number of savings in stocks. economists who feel that a somewhat “I say that’s absolute nonsense,” Mandell higher rate of inflation, 3–4 percent, may says, citing the pitfalls of unanticipated be good for the economy to get us back to inflation. full employment. I’m not saying inflation Unanticipated inflation, which comes is going to come back and haunt us. But on quickly and unexpectedly, means conI am saying, ‘Are you prepared if it does?’” sumers will postpone buying decisions Coming in January: As the provocative and corporate credit will become more title suggests, Mandell also covers the expensive—resulting in lower stock prices, decline of financial acumen with age and he says. how to protect yourself from yourself So Mandell advocates making sure and others. you have enough guaranteed income to

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“Aging in place can not be stressed too much,” he insists. “If you live upstairs in the master bedroom and you have not prepared for your older age by having a master suite on the ground floor, you are asking for trouble. I know people who have had to go into nursing care because they couldn’t get into their upstairs bedrooms.” When Mandell and his wife moved to the West Coast, they bought a one-story house with no stairs and wide doorways. “I want to die in my house,” he says. “The only way I can assure that is to have an age-in-place home. You can bring in caretakers when you need them. The cost of caretakers is low compared to the cost of a nursing home. Dying at home is not only so much nicer, but it’s also much less expensive.” Eliminating housing expenses by paying off your mortgage greatly reduces your living expenses and, compared to paying rent, protects you from inflation-caused rent hikes, he says.

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Gourmet American Bar Fare THURSDAY - AYCE Crab Legs

NFL Ticket Sports - 22 TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Large Booths For Big Groups FRIDAY 1/2 OFF Burgers

Extensive Specialty Drink List Full Menu til 3am

Open Mon-Fri 5pm-3am Sat & Sun 11am-3am

Open Mon-Fri 5pm-3am Sat & Sun 11am-3am

401 N Great Neck Road Virginia Beach, VA 23454 757-470-5664 | www.venue112.com

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restaurants p.119

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dish » to

dine for

Colonial Crabcakes

C

hristiana Campbell kept a tidy tavern in Williamsburg from 1755 until the late 1770s, welcoming folks in for a meal. Among them were many of the nation’s founding parents. George Washington is said to have enjoyed Campbell’s seafood. Today the tavern is operated by Colonial Williamsburg, and the menu, overseen by Executive Chef Rhys Lewis, features many items that were favorites of 18th-century Virginians, including crab, shrimp, fish and scallops. We love the crabcakes—large, generous and filled with crab then drizzled in a delicate lemon-caper sauce. It’s a meal fit for a king CoVa ... er ... president. n —Patrick Evans-Hylton

RSVP Christiana Campbell’s Tavern Colonial Williamsburg www.Colonial Williamsburg.com 888-965-7254 P h oto by J i m P i l e

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Fruitcake

Fever holiday treats you’ll love— honest—as local bakers re-imagine the much-aligned dessert By Patrick Evans-Hylton

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ity the fruitcake. Perhaps there is no other dish so maligned as this amalgamation of liquor-soaked cake bejeweled with nuts and candied fruit. It wasn’t always this way. The ancient Romans gifted a pastry of barley mash, pine nuts, pomegranate seeds and raisins. During the Middle Ages, countries across Europe put their own spin on the cake, adding honey, spices and preserved fruits. English versions made their way to Virginia and other American colonies in the 16th and 17th centuries. Then sometime, less than 100 years ago, fruitcake fell out of favor. Maybe it was because by that time, the dish was largely mass-produced; the first mail-order fruitcake was shipped out in 1913. Gone was the personal touch—and a lot of the booze. The result was a hard, dry dessert riddled with stale pecans and chewy fruit that crossed the border from sweet to sickening. It doesn’t have to be this way. We asked some bakers across Coastal Virginia to make a better fruitcake—a fruitcake that you will enjoy baking, sharing and, most importantly, eating yourself.

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the grey goose

101 W. Queens Way, Hampton 757-723-7978 www.GreyGooseRestaurant.com “Everyone will definitely love my fruitcake. This is a lighter fruitcake that people will enjoy as it is not the traditional ‘doorstop’ fruitcake that the family passes off to each other. Based on the German Christollen, it features a fragrant blend of spices like cardamom, anise and fennel. It’s simply delicious.” —Phillip Epstein, owner/baker Ingredients 1-3/4 cup bread flour 2 tablespoons instant yeast 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons granulated sugar 2 teaspoons spice mixture (see note below) 4 tablespoons butter, room temperature 1 egg 2-3/4 ounces milk 1/2 teaspoon lemon extract 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup chopped pecans 1 cup dark raisins 1/3 cup mixed glaced fruit Myers dark rum or VSQ brandy Melted butter Sugar Method In a medium bowl, combine raisins and glaced fruit and cover with rum or brandy and allow to soak overnight. In a large bowl, combine half the flour, all of the yeast, salt and milk. Let sit 1 to 1-1/2 hours. Add the remainder of the flour, along with the sugar, spices, eggs, butter and extracts, and knead for 8–10 minutes until the dough can be spread. Let the dough relax in the bowl for 20 minutes. Drain the soaked raisins/fruit and add to the dough along with the

pecans and mix until just combined. Note: the dough will be very soft and slightly sticky. Preheat oven to 350F. Weigh out 1 pound and 8 ounces of the dough, add to a loaf pan, and let it rise for approximately 1 hour. Bake it for 20–30 minutes, then brush with melted butter and coat with sugar and wrap when cool. Serve sliced thin and topped with

confectionary sugar. Note: prepare the spice mixture by combining 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon, 1 tablespoon and 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1 tablespoon ground clove, 1 tablespoon and 1 teaspoon ground ginger, 3 tablespoons and 2 teaspoons finely ground fennel seed, 4 tablespoons and 2 teaspoons ground coriander, and 2 tablespoons and 2 teaspoons

ground aniseed in a medium bowl and whisking until incorporated. This will create more than you need for this recipe, but it will keep up to a year in a covered container kept out of direct sunlight. It is good used in many baked goods, and as an addition to hot beverages like coffee, tea and hot chocolate.

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la dolce vita bakery & wine bar café 316 Laskin Rd., Virginia Beach 757-321-9887 www.LDVSweets.com “Why eat my fruitcake? Well, the one thing I remember most about fruitcake is its density. By pouring the bourbon glaze it really gives the fruitcake some of what has always been missing—moistness. I have combined some unique ingredients like coconut and pineapple, in hopes that people will be excited to give it a try.” —Victoria DiCarlo Caruso, owner/baker Cake Ingredients 6 ounces of softened unsalted butter 4 ounces of softened salted butter 10 ounces of dark brown sugar, making certain it is not dry; it should be moist 1 tablespoon of molasses 5 large eggs, plus 1 or 2 more if needed (must be room temperature) 12 ounces of all purpose flour 8 ounces of currants 8 ounces of shredded coconut 8 ounces of chopped dried pineapple 4 ounces of golden raisins 4 ounces of red or green glazed cherries quartered or mix both colors 116

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4 ounces of ground almonds 3 ounces of chopped candied orange and lemon peel mixed 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon of allspice 1 tablespoon of vanilla extract Cake Method Preheat oven to 300F. Line a 9-inch round cake pan with parchment paper and set aside. Position your oven rack so it is central. In the bowl of an electric mixer, cream together the butter, sugar and molasses until the mixture is light and fluffy and pale in color. Beat in the eggs 1 at a time, adding 1 tablespoon of flour with each egg, to help the mixture from curdling. Add 5 eggs and then check mixture for consistency. Use a spoon to take some batter, then turn upside down and drop back in bowl; it should drop within 1 or 2 seconds. This is called “dropping consistency”; if it does not drop correctly, keep adding 1 more egg at a time, and test after each egg until you reach desired consistency. In a separate large bowl, mix the remaining flour with all of the remaining ingredients. Add the flour

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mixture to the creamed mixture and beat until just incorporated. Spoon the batter into the cake pan, and level the surface. Bake in the center of the oven for 3 to 3-½ hours. Keep in mind cooking times may vary depending on oven. Check the cake regularly, covering the top with parchment if it begins to get too dark. Begin checking for doneness after 1-½ hours by inserting a skewer in middle of cake, if it comes out clean then it is cooked; otherwise bake for a little longer. Once cake is cooked remove from oven and let cool for 15 minutes before covering in Bourbon glaze (see below) Bourbon Glaze Ingredients 2 sticks softened unsalted butter 2 cups light brown sugar 1 lemon, juiced 1 orange, juiced ¼ cup bourbon of your choosing Bourbon Glaze Method Place butter and brown sugar in a skillet on low until butter starts to melt, then add the lemon juice and orange juice. The mixture will begin to look like it is turning into a sauce.

At this point remove pan from flame if using a gas burner (otherwise see note), then add he bourbon. Bring back to stove top carefully, as the bourbon will ignite to burn off the alcohol. The flame will dissipate momentarily; keep stirring. Stir for a few moments until bourbon is fully incorporated into a glaze. Using a long skewer poke 10–15 holes in the fruitcake and pour the warm bourbon glaze over the top. It is best to place fruitcake on something perforated underneath with a tray that will catch the bourbon that drips down. Using a spoon you can keep adding drippings to cake. Although the fruitcake is ready to be eaten now, you can wrap it tightly in parchment paper and then aluminum foil and store in an airtight container for several weeks to mature. Before serving, decorate with candied fruits, toasted sliced almonds, and the like. Note: If using an electric top, once you add bourbon and place back on the stove, use a longhandled lighter to ignite the bourbon in the pan, which will help cook off alcohol.

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terebinth patisserie and bistro 717 Eden Way, Chesapeake 757-410-0900 www.TerebinthLove.com “Fruitcake is an amazing tradition, and who wouldn’t want to eat this reinvented version? We’ve removed most of the much loved (or hated) candied fruit found in fruitcakes from previous generations and brought it into the 21st century by adding candied ginger, dried cherries, cranberries, apricot, and peaches … just to name a few of the delicious ingredients. After one bite of this out-of-this-world treat, people will be saying, ‘This ain’t our grandma’s fruit cake!’” —Kisha Frazier, owner/baker

Cake Ingredients 1-1/2 cups candied pineapple chunks 2 cups golden raisins 1/2 cup dried cherries 1/2 cup dried cranberries 1/2 cup candied ginger 1/2 cup dried peaches 1/2 cup dried apricot 1 teaspoon Fiori di Sicilia or pure orange extract 1 teaspoon pure lemon extract 1/4 cup orange juice 1/4 cup rum 2 cups butter 2 cups extra fine granulated sugar 6 eggs, separated 4 cups toasted pecans, chopped

1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking powder 3 cups sifted cake flour Cake Method Chop pineapple, raisins, cherries, ginger, peaches, and apricots. Combine chopped fruit with dried cranberries, soak in orange juice and rum overnight. Preheat oven to 325F. Place a small pan of water in the oven. Spray 10–12 mini Bundt pans with cooking spray. In a large bowl, cream butter and granulated sugar. Stir in beaten egg yolks. Stir in fruit, rum, juice and pecans. Mix in sifted flour, baking powder, and salt.

In a clean bowl, beat the egg whites to peaks. Fold into batter. Fill pans 2/3 full. Bake for 30–45 until golden brown, or until toothpick comes out clean when inserted. Chef suggests topping each cake with a glaze. Option: Divide the batter into 2-½ sheet trays. Bake at 325F for 25–30 minutes or until golden and/or toothpick comes out clean. Cut out with 3-inch cake rings, fill with your favorite mousse, and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. Remove individual cakes when chilled, and garnish with fresh fruit or toasted CoVa nuts. n

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1723 Parkview Drive, Cheasapeake, VA. 23320 757-420-9191 www.eaglesnestrockincountrybar.com Thank you for voting us as Best Indian Restaurant, Best Vegetarian/Vegan Restaurant, and Best Buffet.

• • • • •

Full Bar Clay Oven Specialties Daily Lunch Buffet Take Out Catering/Private Events

OF

Readers’ Choice 2011

HamptonRoadsMagazine

Award Winner 2011

Inviting atmosphere, ethnic yet refreshing modern décor, and comfortable setting.

Best of Hampton Roads Award Winner Virginia Beach 756 First Colonial Rd. (757) 491-8600

norfolk 888 N. Military Hwy (757) 455-8080

newport news 11712 Jefferson Ave. (757) 591-9200

williamsBurg 204 Monticello Ave. (757) 565-3200

info@nawabonline.com • www.nawabonline.com 118

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2133 Upton Drive, Suite 128, Virginia Beach, VA 23454 757.563.2828 • info@themasalabites.com www.masalabites.com

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restaurants Restaurant listings are offered to winners of HRM Platinum Plate awards and at the discretion of the food editor with no compensation or obligation on behalf of the restaurant. Highlighted restaurant listings are paid advertisements and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of HRM editorial staff. For opportunities on listing your restaurant, contact our sales coordinator Tracy Thompson at 422-8979 x156 or tthompson@hrmag.com. (PP) - Platinum Plate Winner, (SC) - Stellar Cellar Winner

CHESAPEAKE BAKER’S CRUST (PP) 1244 Greenbrier Pkwy. 757-547-2787 www.bakerscrust.com CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL (PP) 1217 N. Battlefield Blvd. 757-382-0337 www.carrabbas.com Hampton Roads Dish is a free mobile dining app that helps you keep up with delicious dining options across the region. Point your smartphone’s web browser to www. vistagraphicsapps.com/ hrdish/ and save the site as a favorite on your home screen. PASSION THE RESTAURANT (PP) 1036 Volvo Parkway 757-410-3975 www.passionthe restaurant.com

TASTE 717 N Eden Way #600 757-424-4583 www.TasteUnlimited.com

CIRCA 1918 KITCHEN & BAR (PP) 10367 Warwick Blvd. 757-599-1918

GLOUCESTER

FIN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT (PP) 3150 William Styron Square 757-599-5800 www.finseafood.com

RIVER’S INN (PP) 8109 Yacht Haven Rd. 804-642-6161 www.riversinnrestaurant.com

KITTY HAWK OCEAN BOULEVARD BISTRO & MARTINI BAR 4700 N. Virginia Dare Trail 252-261-2546 www.obbistro.com  

NEWPORT NEWS

99 MAIN RESTAURANTS (PP) 99 Main St. 757-599-9885 www.99mainrestaurant.com CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL (PP) 12363 Hornsby Ln. 757-269-4917 www.carrabbas.com

NAWAB INDIAN CUISINE (SC, PP) 11712 Jefferson Ave. 757-591-9200 www.nawabonline.com SCHLESINGER’S STEAKHOUSE (SC, PP) 1107 William Styron Square 757-599-4700 www.schlesingerssteaks.com TASTE 702 Mariners Row 757-596-8651 www.TasteUnlimited.com THE VINEYARDS TRATTORIA AND PIZZERIA (PP) 1405 Kiln Creek Pkwy., #P 757-874-0114 www.thevineyardstrattoria.com

NORFOLK 219 AN AMERICAN BISTRO (PP) 219 Granby St. 757-416-6219 www.219bistro.com 456 FISH (PP) 456 Granby St. 757-625-4444 www.456fish.com BAKER’S CRUST (PP) 330 W. 21st St. 757-625-3600 www.bakerscrust.com BARDO EDIBLES AND ELIXIRS (PP) 430 West 21st St. 757-622-7362 www.bardoeats.com BITE RESTAURANT & CATERING (PP) 440 Monticello Ave. 757-486-0035 www.enjoybite.com BODEGA ON GRANBY (PP) 422 Granby St. 757-622-8527 www.bodegaongranby.com

BYRD AND BALDWIN BROTHERS STEAKHOUSE (PP) 116 Brooke Ave. 757-222-9191 www.byrdbaldwin.com

ANDREA’S LA BELLA IN GHENT (PP) 738 West 22nd St. 757-622-6172 www.labellainghent.com

CAPTAIN GROOVY’S GRILL & RAW BAR (PP) 8101 Shore Dr. 757-965-4667 www.captgroovys.com

LUNA MAYA (PP) 2010 Colley Ave. 757-622-6986 www.lunamaya restaurant.com

THE CILANTRO BANGLADESHI BISTRO 1011 Kempsville Rd. 757-962-1004 www.cilantrobistro.com

NAWAB INDIAN CUISINE (SC, PP) 888 N. Military Hwy. 757-455-8080 www.nawabonline.com

THE CITY DOCK (SC, PP) 777 Waterside Dr. 757-622-2868 www.sheratonnorfolk waterside.com CURE COFFEEHOUSE AND BRASSERIE (SC) 503 Botetourt St. 757-321-0044 www.curenorfolk.com THE GREEN ONION (PP) 1603 Colley Ave. 757-963-1200 www.thegreenonion restaurant.com

NO FRILL BAR & GRILL (PP) 806 Spotswood Ave. 757-627-4262 www.nofrillgrill.com NORFOLK SEAFOOD COMPANY FEATURING THE BIG EASY OYSTER BAR (PP) 111 W. Tazewell St. 757-227-6222 www.norfolkseafoodco.com www.bigeasygrillandoyster bar.com Continued on page 122<

The Perfect Setting for Holiday Gatherings.

Whether it’s dinner with friends or family, a holiday celebration, birthday, anniversary or business gathering, or a romantic dinner for two, we invite you to visit and feel special with us. EST 1985

757-422-6464 | 910 Atlantic Ave. at 10th Street | Virginia Beach, VA | www.ilgiardino.com W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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Who will make the list of 2014 Five Star Real Estate Agents? Find out in the May issue

2014

Real Estate Agent

www.fivestarprofessional.com

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Immerse yourself

Hospitality, culture and cuisine envelope you at cilantro BangladesHi Bistro

I

f you’re looking for a truly unique dining experience in Hampton Roads, there is only one place to go to savor the exotic aromas and flavors of Bangladesh—Cilantro Bangladeshi Bistro in Norfolk. Serving only fresh halal (which means permissible according to Islamic law) meats brought in from a farm in Pennsylvania, Cilantro Bangladeshi strives to introduce bangladeshi culture through the sharing of food while providing food options for every dietary need, including vegan and vegetarian dishes. “The uniqueness of our food is what drove my wife and I to finally do this; to participate in the American Dream,” says bistro co-owner Dr. Ali Siddiky who is originally from Bangladesh. Bangladesh is a country bordering India on the northeast that received its independence from Pakistan in 1971. enver siddiky The culmination of eight years of planning, Cilantro Bangladeshi Bistro is a true family affair with Siddiky’s son, Enver, acting as General Manager, while his wife, Shayma, and her sisterin-law, Farjama Haque, handle all of the cooking. “We are interested in sharing, and exposing people here to something they might not be familiar with,” says Siddiky’ s daughter, Rumana, who played an integral part in the planning of the menu. “I think in a lot of Muslim cultures, ours included, people aren’t necessarily that physically expressive of love and affection,” she says. “We’re a little more modest. So the way we show love and affection is through a table full of food.” You can certainly taste the care used in preparing the food when it comes to such made-from-scratch dishes as Veggie Mishali (a vegetable medley featuring zucchini, cauliflower, new potatoes, butternut squash and green beans sautéed in a blend of toasted spices), Shahi (Royal) Chicken (marinated in yogurt and a secret blend of spices, then seared in clarified butter and finished with a rich cream sauce flavored with saffron, cinnamon and nutmeg), Jhaal (Spicy) Beef (tender, slow-cooked beef with ginger and red chili peppers), and Shrimp Malaikari (shrimp slow simmered in coconut milk with turmeric and secret house spices). Diners will also discover a daily special affectionately called the One Hit Wonder based on the fact that the meals are spontaneously created each day, in addition to the Fish of the Day and the Saturday Special which features Biryani, a mix of meat, potatoes, raisins and Polao rice, seasoned with mace, nutmeg, cinnamon, cardamom and saffron, garnished with fried onions. Biryani is a classic dish, slow-cooked in a single pot and traditionally served at weddings and all major holidays. The result is a symphony of flavors that build together with individual tastes that each have their own special moments, and meat so tender it literally falls off the bone and practically melts in your mouth.

enver siddiky, rez Kabir, shayma siddiky & Farjana Haque

In addition to the regular menu, there are a number of bread, rice and side options available, as well as desserts. And don’t miss out on trying the fresh squeezed limeade. “A lot of people don’t know what to expect when they walk through the door, so they’ve got this deer-in-theheadlights kind of look,” says Enver. “But that’s good because we love explaining all of the items on our menu to them because there’s a lot of back history for every dish. We love having people here and providing them with a great experience. Hospitality is a big part of our culture.” For those who would like to check out the distinctive deliciousness of Cilantro Bangladeshi Bistro in their home or office, the restaurant also delivers and provides full catering services. Catering menus can be created for as few as 10 and as many as 150 people. “Sometimes people approach us with an exact desire in mind, and others will ask what we can do for them, and we’ll sit down with them and come up with a plan,” says Enver. “If they want to customize a meal or customize the spice level, or if they want to order something that isn’t even on the menu, we’ll accommodate them. Everything is customizable and we’ll be glad to make suggestions along the way.” For Shayma, it’s very satisfying to see people outside of their community of friends and family enjoying her labor of love. “The best part for me is enjoying the satisfaction of introducing Bangladeshi food to a whole new group of people. It’s like we’re extending our family when new people come in to try our food.” Cilantro Bistro is located just off Virginia Beach Boulevard and is open Monday through Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., with takeout remaining available until 6:00 p.m.

Cilantro Bangladeshi Bistro

1011 Kempsville Rd. • Norfolk, VA 23502 HAMPTON ROADS MAgAziNe JANUARY n FEBRUARY 2006 1 757-962-1004 • www.CilantroBistro.com W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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It’s hard to decide which you’ll enjoy more…

OMAR’S CARRIAGE HOUSE (PP) 313 West Bute St. 757-622-4990 www.omarscarriagehouse.com PASHA MEZZE (PP) 340 West 22nd St. 757-627-1317 www.pashamezze.com PRESS 626 CAFÉ & WINE BAR (PP) 626 West Olney Rd. 757-282-6234 www.press626.com THE PUBLIC HOUSE (PP) 1112 Colley Ave. 757-227-9064 www.publichouseeats.com RAJPUT INDIAN CUISINE (PP) 742 West 21st St. 757-625-4634 www.rajputonline.com RAZZO (PP) 3248 E. Ocean View Ave. 757-962-3630 www.razzo-norfolk,com

The perfect place to be for the holidays. Thanksgiving November 28, Christmas Eve Dinner December 24, New Year’s Day Buffet January 1. New Year’s Eve packages including dinner and hotel. Additional banquet space for your holiday functions.

SHULA’S 347 GRILL (PP) 235 East Main St. 757-282-6347 www.donshula.com TASTE 6464 Hampton Blvd. 757-623-7770 www.TasteUnlimited.com THE VINEYARDS TRATTORIA AND PIZZERIA (PP) 147 Granby St. 757-222-0431 www.thevineyards trattoria.com TODD JURICH’S BISTRO (SC, PP) 150 W. Main St., #100 757-622-3210 www.toddjurichsbistro.com TRILOGY BISTRO (PP) 101 Granby St. 757-961-0896 www.trilogynorfolk.com VINTAGE KITCHEN (SC) 999 Waterside Dr. 757-625-3370 www.vintage-kitchen.com VIOLA CUISINE INTERNATIONAL (PP) 509 Botetourt St. 757-640-0343 www.violacuisine.com

ONANCOCK

2800 Shore Drive, Virginia Beach 757-481-9000 • www.virginiabeachresort.com 122

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MALLARDS AT THE WHARF (PP) 2 Market St. 757-787-8558 www.mallardsllc.com

PORTSMOUTH BRUTTI’S (PP) 467 Court St.  757-393-1923 www.bruttisatthemansion.com LOGAN RAYES KEY WEST GRILLE (PP) 606 Court St. 757-295-0231 www.wix.com/loganrayes/ logan-rayes MANNINO’S ITALIAN BISTRO (PP) 606 High Street 757-966-7522 www.manninositalian bistro.com ROGER BROWN’S RESTAURANT & SPORTS BAR (PP) 316 High St. 757-399-5377 www.rogerbrowns.com STILL (PP) 450 Court St. 757-332-7222 www.stilleats.com STOVE - THE RESTAURANT (SC, PP) 2622 Detroit St. 757-397-0900 www.stoverestaurant.com

SMITHFIELD SMITHFIELD STATION (PP) 415 South Church St. 757-357-7700 www.smithfieldstation.com

SUFFOLK RIVER STONE CHOPHOUSE (SC, PP) 8032 Harbour View Blvd. 757-638-7990 www.riverstonechop house.com

VIRGINIA BEACH 112 VENUE ROCK’N SPORTS LOUNGE 401 N. Great Neck Rd. 757-470-5664 www.venue112.com 7 MARTINI AND TAPAS (PP) 2181 Upton Dr. Ste. 420 757-689-4870 7martiniandtapas.com ALDO’S RISTORANTE (SC, PP) 1860 Laskin Rd. 757-491-1111 www.aldosvb.com ALEXANDER’S ON THE BAY (PP)  4536 Ocean View Ave. 757-464-9999 www.alexandersonthebay restaurant.com

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dish BAKER’S CRUST (PP) 704 Hilltop N. Shopping Center. 757-422-6703 www.bakerscrust.com BELLA MONTE (PP) 1201 Laskin Rd. Ste. 100 757-425-6290 www.bellamontevb.com THE BOARDWOK RESTAURANT (PP) 1993 Sandbridge Road, Suite 109 757-426-1700 www.boardwokvabeach.com BURTONS GRILL (PP, SC) 741 First Colonial Rd., Ste. 107 757-422-8970 www.burtonsgrill.com CAPTAIN GEORGE’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT (PP) 1956 Laskin Rd. 757-428-3494 www.captaingeorges.com www.justgeorges.com CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL (PP) 739 Lynnhaven Pkwy. 757-631-0856 www.carrabbas.com CATCH 31 - FISH HOUSE & BAR (SC, PP) 3001 Atlantic Ave.  757-213-3472 www.catch31.com    CENTRAL 111 TAPAS BAR 401 N. Great Neck Rd. 757-222-1022 www.central-puff.com THE CHEFS TABLE (PP) 505 Independence Blvd 757-499-6001 www.chefstablevb.com CHIX SEA GRILL AND BAR (PP) 701 Atlantic Ave. 757-428-2449 www.chixseagrillandbar.com COASTAL GRILL (PP) 1427 N. Great Neck Rd. 757-496-3348 www.coastalgrill.com COBALT GRILLE (SC, PP) 1624 Laskin Rd. 757-333-3334 www.cobaltgrille.com CROC’S 19TH STREET BISTRO (SC, PP) 620 19th St. 757-428-5444 www.crocs19thstreet bistro.com EAT—AN AMERICAN BISTRO (PP) 4005 Atlantic Ave. 757-965-2472 www.eatbistro.net

EURASIA CAFÉ (PP) 950 Laskin Rd. 757-422-0184 www.eurasiavb.com

Enjoy the Holiday Season with Fine Dining At

FIRE & VINE (SC, PP)  1556 Laskin Rd. Hilltop East Shopping Center 757-333-4824 www.fireandvine.com GARRISON’S BAR & GRILL (PP) 401 N. Great Neck Rd., #121 757-233-2978 HAVANA AT GREAT NECK (PP) 1423 N. Great Neck Rd. #101 757-496-3333 www.havanagreatneck vb.com IL GIARDINO RISTORANTE 910 Atlantic Ave. 757-422-6464 www.ilgiardino.com ISLE OF CAPRI (PP) 3900 Atlantic Ave 757-428-2411 www.isleofcaprivb.com LA BELLA ITALIA (PP) 1065 Laskin Rd. 757-422-8536 www.labellaitalia.com LA BELLA ITALIA RED MILL (PP) 2133 Upton Dr., #128 757-301-3603 www.labellaitalia.com

Celebrating 25 Years of Great Food!

LA CASA RANA BAJA GRILL (PP) 3656 Shore Drive 757-216-3300 lacasaranavb.com LUCKY OYSTER SEAFOOD GRILL (PP) 2165 General Booth Blvd., #154 757-430-9600 www.luckyoystervb.com LYNHAVEN FISH HOUSE (SC, PP) 2350 Starfish Rd. 757-481-0003 www.lynnhavenfishhouse.net MAHI MAH’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT (PP, SC) 615 Atlantic Ave. 757-437-8030 www.mahimahs.com    MANNINO’S ITALIAN BISTRO (PP) 1608 Pleasure House Rd. 757-226-0019 4402 Princess Anne Rd. Ste. 107 757-474-4446 www.manninositalian bistro.com Continued on page 126<

Aldo’s Buys Local. Locally Owned, Locally Operated Since 1988. Private Dining for Rehearsal Dinners, Engagement Parties & Special Events.

La Promenade Shoppes 1860 Laskin Road, Virginia Beach, VA

757.491.1111 Online Reservations: www.AldosVB.com W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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Br ing Your Holiday Par ty Down-Home. (Special Holiday Par ty Packages Available.)

2105 west great neck road, virginia beach • 412.0203 • thirty7north.com Thirty7North_VGAd.indd 2

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dish local flavor

By Patrick Evans-Hylton

Shine On, Champagne whether with a capital “c” or not, this special imbibe celebrates the season

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longated flutes of gold-hued elixir sparkle with the slightest hint of light caught by thousands of tiny bubbles that ride the length of the glass; this is champagne, and it is magic. An imbibe often reserved for the most special occasions, champagne shines during the holidays, rightfully taking its place at the head of the celebratory table at gatherings large and small. What event isn’t more extraordinary when the air is pierced with the loud pop! of the cork announcing the presence of sparkling wine? The sparkle comes from those bubbles—the result of adding additional yeast and sugar to wine, creating a second alcoholic fermentation in the bottle and turning the resting bottle in timely intervals. The oldest recorded incident of this method comes in 1531 from Benedictine monks in southern France. Champagne is often associated with another French monk who did pioneering work on the production of the sparkling wine, Dom Perignon, in the late 17th/early 18th century.   But all that sparkles is not necessarily champagne. And not all sparking wines use the traditional Méthode Champenoise process of a second fermentation in the bottle; some wines get their sparkle by having carbon dioxide injected into the quaff. For a wine to be called Champagne (notice the capital “C”), it must be produced in the Champagne region of France and typically follows traditional production methods. Most Champagne is made with Chardonnay (Blanc de blancs) and/or Pinot Noir (Blanc de noirs) grapes. Most is also non-vintage, meaning that juice from a number of harvests are blended to create the wine; non-vintage is usually indicated with the letters “NV” on the label. Most champagne is white; some is rose’. Like other white and rose’ wines, sparking wines are best enjoyed chilled, with around 45F being a good medium temperature. Chill the champagne in the refrigeraA Classy and Classic tor about three hours before you Champagne Cocktail need it or in a bucket of ice water Here is my favorite recipe: for about a half-hour. The bottle   should never be placed in a freezIngredients er. Once opened, keep in an ice Sugar cube bucket to maintain temperature Angostura or Peychaud’s bitters while enjoying. Champagne The best glass for serving sparLemon Twist   kling wine is a champagne flute, Method which is a tall, elongated glass Place the sugar cube in the bottom of a designed to facilitate the flow of champagne flute and sprinkle 2–3 dashes bubbles and concentrate the flaof bitters on the cube; do not crush sugar vors and aromas of the quaff. cube. Fill the flute with sparkling wine, squeeze a lemon twist on top, and drop in as a garnish. Optional: Add 1 teaspoon Cognac to flute before adding champagne.

Make Mine Virginia Wine Sparkling wines are produced around the world, including Virginia. Here are five of my favorite Virginia sparklers:   Afton Mountain Tete’ de Cuvee (Afton Mountain Vineyards, www.AftonMountainVineyards. com) Barboursville Brut (Barboursville Vineyards, www.BarboursvilleWine.com)   Chateau Morrisette Star Dog (Chateau Morrisette, www.TheDogs.com) Ingleside Virginia Brut (Ingleside Vineyards, www.InglesideVineyards.com) Thibaut-Janisson Blanc de Chardonnay (Thibaut-Janisson, www.TJWinery.com)     

Sparkling Synopsis

Brut – a label designation; this is a dry sparkling, and perhaps the most common. It’s a good sparkling to pair with food.   Cava – a sparkling Spanish wine crafted in a traditional champenoise method using Spanish grapes like Macabeo, Parellada, and/or Xarel-lo. Styles range from dry to sweet. The differences in Cava and Champagne are often subtle, coming from grape varietals and terroir. Demi-Sec – label designation; this is a moderately sweet sparkling, and is a good finish to a meal or paired with sweets. Extra Brut – label designation; this is a very dry sparkling and often enjoyed on its own, such as at a cocktail party.   Extra Dry – label designation; this is a moderately dry sparkling, and is good to enjoy on its own, such as an aperitif.   Prosecco – a typically brut or extradry sparkling wine typically made with Glera (also known as Prosecco) grapes. It’s often lighter and crisper than traditional Champagne. Secondary fermentation is done either in stainless tanks, or in the bottle.   Spumante/Asti – a light, sweeter sparkling from Italy typically made with the Moscato grape. Secondary fermentation is done either in stainless tanks, or CoVa in the bottle. n

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dish

Open 7 days a week from 11:30 am until. King Neptune’s Banquet. Fresh Flounder, Scallops, 2 Stuffed Shrimp, Oysters Rockefeller.

Enjoy the Holiday season with expertly prepared seafood while you enjoy the incredible view of the Chesapeake Bay. We are proud to serve one of the largest selections of Virginia Wines by the glass in the area. Come and see why for over 34 years we are the region’s Seafood Dining Destination.

>Continued from page 123

NAWAB INDIAN CUISINE (SC, PP) 756 First Colonial Rd. 757-491-8600 www.nawabonline.com NO FRILL BAR & GRILL (PP) 1620 Laskin Rd. 757-425-2900 www.nofrillgrill.com ONE FISH TWO FISH (PP) 2109 W. Great Neck Road 757-496-4350 www.onefish-twofish.com PI-ZZERIA (PP) 3316 Atlantic Ave., #10 757-213-0600 www.pi-zzeria.com RAJPUT INDIAN CUISINE (PP) 4402 Princess Anne Rd., #111 757-467-6789 www.rajputlonline.com ROCKAFELLERS RESTAURANT (SC, PP) 308 Mediterranean Ave. 757-422-5654 www.rockafellers.com

2350 Starfish Rd., Virginia Beach

757-481-0003 • www.lynnhavenfishhouse.net

ROCKFISH BOARDWALK BAR AND SEAGRILL (PP) 1601 Atlantic Avenue 757-213-7625 www.rockfishvb.com RUDEE’S ON THE INLET (PP) 277 Mediterranean Ave. 757-425-1777 www.rudees.com RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE (PP) 205 Central Park Ave. 757-213-0747 www.sizzlingsteak.com

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THE SMOKEHOUSE & COOLER (PP) 2957 Shore Dr. 757-481-9737 www.smokehouseand cooler.com STEINHILBER’S RESTAURANT (PP) 653 Thalia Rd. 757-340-1156 www.steinys.com SURF CLUB OCEAN GRILLE (SC, PP) 5700 Atlantic Ave. 757-425-5699 www.surfclubvabeach.com    SWAN TERRACE (SC, PP) At the Founders Inn & Spa 5641 Indian River Rd. 757-366-5777 www.foundersinn.com TASTE 36th Street & Pacific Ave. 757-422-3399 4097 Shore Dr. 757-464-1566 1544 Laskin Rd. Ste. 110 757-425-1858 www.TasteUnilimted.com TAUTOG’S RESTAURANT (SC, PP) 205 23rd St. 757-422-0081 www.tautogs.com TERRAPIN RESTAURANT (SC, PP) 3102 Holly Rd., #514 757-321-6688 www.terrapinvirginia beach.com THAI ARROY (PP) 608 N. Birdneck Rd. 757-961-8868 www.Thaiarroy.com

SAFFRON INDIAN BISTRO (PP) 4532 Columbus St. 757-644-6904 www.saffronvabeach.com

THIRTY7NORTH (PP) 2105 W. Great Neck Road 757-412-0203 www.Thirty7North.com

SALACIA - PRIME STEAK AND SEAFOOD (SC, PP) 3001 Atlantic Ave. 757-213-3473 www.salaciavb.com

TRADEWINDS RESTAURANT (PP) 2800 Shore Dr. 757-481-9000 www.virginiabeachresort.com

SAVOR: VIRGINIA’S LOW COUNTRY CUISINE (PP) 1340 N. Great Neck Rd. 757-963-1641 savorva.com

TWISTED SISTERS CUPCAKES “THE SUGAR SHACK CAFÉ (PP) 2408 Princess Anne Rd. 757-675-3966 twistedsisterscupcakes.com

SONOMA WINE BAR & BISTRO (SC, PP) In Town Center 189 Central Park Ave. 757-490-9463 www.sonomatowncenter.com

WATERMAN’S SURFSIDE GRILLE (PP) 415 Atlantic Ave. 757-428-3644 www.watermans.com

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dish WHARFSIDE BAR AND GRILL (PP) 530 Winston Salem Avenue 757-351-0488 www.wharfsidevb.com YANNI’S CASUAL GREEK (PP) 2101 McComas Way 757-689-2533 ZOE’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD (SC, PP) 713 19th St. 757-437-3636 www.zoesvb.com ZUSHI JAPANESE BISTRO (PP) 4540 Main St. 757-321-1495 www.zushibistrovb.com

WACHAPREAGUE THE ISLAND HOUSE RESTAURANT (PP) 17 Atlantic Ave. 757-787-4242 www.wachapreague.com

WILLIAMSBURG ART CAFÉ 26 (PP) 5107 Center St. 757-565-7788 www.artcafe26.com BAKER’S CRUST (PP) 5234 Monticello Ave. #115 757-523-2787 www.bakerscrust.com BERRET’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & TAPHOUSE GRILL (SC) 199 S. Boundary St. 757-253-1847 www.berrets.com BLUE TALON BISTRO (SC, PP) In Merchant’s Square 420 Prince George St. 757-476-2583 www.bluetalonbistro.com CAFÉ PROVENCAL AT WEDMORE PLACE (SC) 5810 Wessex Hundred 757-941-0317 www.cafe-provencal.com CARRABBAS ITALIAN GRILL (PP) 2500 Richmond Rd. 757-564-3696 www.carrabbas.com FAT CANARY (PP) 410 West Duke of  Gloucester St. 757-229-3333 www.fatcanarywilliams burg.com

ICHIBAN (PP) 4905 Courthouse St. 757-253-8898 www.ichibannewtown.com LE YACA (PP) 1915 Pocahontas Trail 757-220-3616 www.leyacawilliamsburg.com NAWAB INDIAN CUISINE (SC, PP) 204 Monticello Ave. 757-565-3200 www.nawabonline.com OPUS 9 (PP) 5143 Main St. 757-645-4779 www.opus9steakhouse.com

Experience a breathtaking view of the York River while dining at lunch and dinner on fresh seafood, steaks, chops and tapas. Join us for Sunday Brunch Hours: Lunch 11am–4pm, Dinner 4pm–9pm, Bar 11am–9pm

SEASONS RESTAURANT 110 South Henry St. 757-259-0513 www.seasonsof williamsburg.com SECOND STREET BISTRO— AN AMERICAN BISTRO (SC, PP) 140 Second St.  757-220-2286 www.secondst.com THE TRELLIS RESTAURANT (SC, PP) 403 West Duke of Gloucester 757-229-8610 www.thetrellis.com

323 Water Street, Ste A-1,Yorktown 757-875-1522 • www.riverwalkrestaurant.net Private Event Room

THE WHALING COMPANY (SC) 494 McLaws Cir. 757-229-0275 www.whalingcompany.com WILLIAMSBURG INN REGENCY ROOM (PP) 136 E. Francis St. 757-229-2141 www.colonialwilliams burg.com

TAPAS • ARTESIAN • SEAFOOD • TAPHOUSE

TRADITIONS (PP) 310 S. England St. 757-229-2141 www.colonialwilliams burg.com

YORKTOWN RIVERWALK RESTAURANT (SC) 323 Water St. 757-875-1522 www.riverwalkrestaurant.net WATER STREET GRILLE 323 Water St. 757-369-5644 www.waterstreet CoVa grille.net n

Indoor and outdoor dining with waterfront view 20 Microbrews • Live Entertainment Hours (Seasonal): 11–1am, Mon.-Sun. 323 Water St., Yorktown, VA • www.waterstreetgrille.net W ww . C o a s ta l V i r g i n i a m a g . c o m

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dish nosh news

By Patrick Evans-Hylton

A Smorgasbord of CoVa* Food Happenings *Coastal Virginia

Makin’ Bacon

Foreground: Mike Farrell, chef/owner of Still in Portsmouth. Background: Jeff Brown, chef/owner of Cotton Southern Bistro in Chesapeake, competing at the Iron Skillet Chef Challenge at the Virginia Bacon Festival in Norfolk.

photo by peh

They came. They cooked. They conquered bacon. The first Virginia Bacon Festival was held Oct. 5 at Scope Plaza in Norfolk, with restaurants and other vendors offering everything from house-cured bacon to chicken-fried bacon to margaritas infused with, you guessed it, bacon. Also a component of the pork-a-palooza: the Iron Skillet Chef Challenge. Competing were Jeff Brown, chef/owner of Cotton Southern Bistro in Chesapeake and Mike Farrell, chef/owner of Still Worldly Eclectic Eats in Portsmouth. They were each given a couple of pounds of bacon and one single instruction: go hog wild. Brown unveiled several housemade sausages, among them boudin and garlic. He stacked the large links, slathered with barbecue sauce, and enrobed in a weave of bacon before cooking. The finished product received a drizzle of bloody mary mix. Farrell had another plan: he wrapped freshly-fileted rockfish in bacon, plunged into a bubbling hot bath of apple cider and rendered bacon fat, and roasted corn to add to a creamy polenta. CoVa food editor Patrick Evans-Hylton judged with fellow food writers Marisa Marsey of Veer Magazine and David Nicholson of The Daily Press. In the end, Brown took away two bragging rights: The High on the Hog Award given for best dish presentation, and the Swine-O-Mite Flavor Award for best tasting dish. Farrell also garnered two accolaids: the Pork-fect Use of Bacon Award for best bacon use, and The Hog Father Award for most bacon use. GOOD FOOD, GOOD CAUSE The 20th annual March of Dimes Signature Chef Auction took place Oct. 6 at The Founders Inn and Spa, raising funds and awareness for the group’s mission in preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. More than a dozen chefs were on site, dishing up sample plates from the restaurants they represent. A number of awards were given, includ-

ing The Dish of Hampton Roads, presented to a chef who creates a dish that captures the unique regional flavor of Hampton Roads through ingredients, preparation and/or imagination. The award this year went to Swan Terrace Executive Chef Scott Simpson, who wowed critics. We are going to tease you with a little appetizer: the dish comprised a trio of items on the plate, including a Hereford beef steak topped with red

crab claw and Chesapeake buerre blanc; peanut-encrusted bone marrow; and honey roasted root vegetables. More information about the dish, including an exclusive interview with Chef Simpson and a full list of all winners will be featured in the January 2014 issue of Coastal Virginia Magazine. WINE DOWN WITH US Mark your calendars now for the firstever Coastal Virginia Wine Fest, Jan. 25–26 at the Virginia Beach Convention Center. The fete will feature up to 90 vendors, including 40 of Virginia’s best wineries, as well as a full slate of workshops and seminars that are both fun and informational. Across the region, food pairings with select Virginia wines and packages at area restaurants with prix-fixe menus will be offered. For more information, visit www. CoastalVirginiaWineFest.com NO GLUTEN HERE Baker’s Crust has released a gluten-free menu, augmenting its current offerings. Some 30-plus items are available, from salads, sandwiches and burgers to wood-fired pizza and entrees. Sandwiches and burgers are served on gluten-free buns, and pizza comes on a gluten-free crust baked in a separate pizza pan from other crusts. Some entrees include gluten-free pasta, and all are baked in the wood-fired oven. Baker’s Crust has six locations across Hampton Roads. More information, visit www.BakersCrust.com FIND CHEF PATRICK Find Coastal Virginia Magazine food editor Patrick Evans-Hylton: the first and third Tuesdays of each month on The Hampton Roads Show on WAVY TV-10 (www. TheHamptonRoadsShow.com); and the last Wednesday of each month on HearSay with Cathy Lewis on 89.5FM, public radio in Hampton Roads (www.HearSay.org) n CoVa

Have food news to share? Email: patrick@hrmag.com

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back talk

A Year Not to Fear 13 reasons i can celebrate 2013

1.)

House of Cards: You don’t have to be a journalist intrigued with politics like me to get hooked on this Netflix show. You just have to love a story about D.C. insiders with twists and turns that you wish weren’t most likely based on reality.

2.)

The Engagements: This novel by J. Courtney Sullivan spans nearly 100 years, the history of marketing diamonds and stories of what engagement rings symbolize to men and women, rich and poor.

3.)

Duck, N.C. over Labor Day weekend: This is where I bought and read The Engagements, sitting in my beach chair with very few other people nearby. Sand. Stories. (Near) Solitude. Sweet.

4.)

Sand soccer at the Oceanfront: My son has played soccer for eight years, but that’s not why I loved this year’s event this spring since he didn’t even play. I liked the shorter fields, the slip-sliding action on the sand and the shorter games played by tiny tots and aging adults alike, all within the span of a mile or so for several days.

I

’m a woman of reason, with just one exception: I’m a wee bit superstitious. So last year around this time I was fearful as the countdown began to 2013—a whole year in which I’d have to see, hear and write that unlucky number. Looking back, though, I see that the year brought me much to savor and celebrate. Here’s hoping you can share my good luck by sampling some of what I experienced this year—either in the time that remains in 2013 or 2014:

sandwich and ice cream cone. The whole time he was saying he had to come back soon and sit at the ohso-cool counter. Who knew that a 12-year-old could appreciate a classic?

6.)

Mid-Atlantic Paddlers Association: My husband grew up on the water, riding the waves on surfboards and surfskis (a leaner, usually faster kayaklooking boat), so I was thrilled when he got involved with this local group that meets several times a month for casual paddles, races and events to introduce physically and mentally challenged adults and children to paddling. All kayakers, surfskiers and SUP-pers can check them out on Facebook.

7.)

Harder math SOLs: Please don’t think that I’m a fan of standardized testing. I see some benefits of tracking students’ knowledge on a statewide basis, but I’m also aware of the shortfalls and the related stress. It’s just that while helping my son with his SOL-prep homework, I saw multi-step word problems that I could actually see an adult facing in everyday life.

Doumar's 8.) since 1904

Diner and Curb Service

5.)

Doumar’s: I took my son on his second visit to the legendary drive-in, conecreating restaurant and loved how he watched cones being made outside and then devoured his barbecue

By Kristen De Deyn Kirk

Color Vibe 5K: I confess that I was not thrilled with the location of this race (barely shaded farmland in Chesapeake) and the fact that the start was so poorly organized and marked that we headed the wrong way for a quarter mile. However, the DJ that got us dancing beforehand and the guy with the leaf-blower filled with powered color and a desire to make sure my family was saturated head to toe earned my love.

ies during this district’s preview in April. One day it will become another great hangout spot in Norfolk. My favorite part was seeing toddlers, teens and 20-somethings drawing, dancing and skateboarding feet away from the J Crew-wearing, I–pay-$100-fora-haircut adults roaming through Exotic Home Interiors and waiting 25 minutes to get food from a food truck.

10.)

Congressman Bobby Scott: This fall, too many of our local congressmen voted to significantly cut funding for food stamps—even for pregnant women, veterans and the disabled in the event of a government shutdown. To keep myself from crying, I choose to be grateful for Scott, who voted in hopes of seeing our neediest adequately fed.

11.)

High school football: We’re sending our daughter to a school out of our district because of a great academic program. She loves it, and

I love the fact that her football team is ranked 10th in the country by USA Today. They were featured on ESPN this fall, and I can scream my head off at the games after paying only $4 for an admission ticket.

12.)

Farm Bureau Live at Virginia Beach: I can’t keep up with the latest name of this venue. But whatever it’s called from year to year, I love it. Every seat feels close, and the fresh air makes the music sound somehow more swayable – especially when you’re experiencing dancing flashbacks like I did at the Jesse McCartney/Backstreet Boys concert in August.

13.)

Art in the Grove: This small art show in the spring led me to Chesapeake artist Robin Mercer Snead’s work, and I bought her painting of poppies, which hangs near my TV and often pulls my attention away. She’s on Etsy. n CoVa

9.)

Norfolk’s Art District-Better Block pop up: What a fun day I spent with my daughter going into weekend-only shops and art galler-

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Coastal Virginia Magazine December 2013