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The Water Babies capacity has been extended, more tickets now available from the Box Office!

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Sunday 13th August 2017

Issue no.27

ARE WE THERE YET? by Catriona Macaulay s mentioned in the first issue of this year’s Fringe Review; we’ve been talking to some of the creative people Ventnor has produced, maintained or incubated over the years. To recap we’re heard from…

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Sophie Honeybourne: a home-grown thriving Ventnor business owner and artist. Steven Sales: Ventnor-born artist, now living in Bristol. Kate Powell: Wiltshire-born, nomadic puppeteer and travelling theatre owner. Hannah George: Ventnor comedian and script writer, now moved to London. Luke Joynes: Island born, eighteen-year-old music promoter. Jim Willis: Life-long Ventnor resident, builder, amateur film maker and historian. So we’ve had quite a collection to talk to this week. From those actually making things happen here on the island, to those that felt the need to take their careers elsewhere. Not forgetting the people that keep returning to create and facilitate art here in Ventnor. Hannah (scriptwriter) and Steven (artist) felt it necessary to move away in order to build their careers further. Unfortunately, this is the case for many here on the island, but is this going to change? While there is a clear demand for cultural music and arts events such as the Fringe, there are still obstacles to overcome when considering career paths for young people. As Luke Joynes pointed out yesterday, the costs of getting artists over to

Image by Tobias Penner the Isle of Wight are far greater than putting on a performance in somewhere like Southampton or Portsmouth. This is also hindered by the lack of a student population. For those that have never put an event on, it is far easier to sell tickets to student populated areas as there is always an initial demand. It seems that this problem is dependent on which career path you choose. On our first day we spoke to Sophie Honeybourne, who has

been incredibly successful with her jewellery business. Though the price of sending parcels is far cheaper than importing people and the business is blossoming, it is still quite a small one. Sophie has one apprentice at present and would find it difficult to take on any more due to the size of their work stations and volume of client work. In businesses like these you can generate enough money to sustain a family or two but beyond that is another ball game.

Jim made interesting points to do with the property on the island, how large numbers of houses are bought by DFLers (Down from Londoners) that stay vacant from 48 weeks of the year. He posed the question that while, yes, when these holiday-home owners are present they spend money here but if these homes were filled with people living on the Island for 52 weeks of the year, surely these people would contribute so much more to the community. Is this lack of financial support to the community why our business can’t succeed? And indeed, is this why housing prices are becoming so increasingly difficult for people to match? Yes, the houses on the Isle of Wight may be considerably cheaper than those of London but the work opportunities or salaries available to people, particularly young people are far lower too. On the other-hand you have people like Kate Powell, that have only made a connection with Ventnor through the Fringe and have returned multiple times throughout the year to nurture art on the Island. In the Fringe Forum on Thursday, Jack Whitewood stressed the importance of nurturing artists that come to the Island. As Kate is essentially one of these artists; she originally came to the Fringe as a volunteer. Her talents were revealed when she was working as a volunteer here and she has stayed in connection with the Fringe and Ventnor Exchange productions ever since she started out back in 2013. We need more of these people here in Ventnor, we have more people than ever trying to build their careers on the Island which is fantastic, but we’ve still got some work to do before everyone can get on this band-wagon. Let’s keep investing in our Island’s creative industries.

Ev e r yon e 's a Vo lu n t e e r ! by Ben Hansen-Hicks olunteers. What would you do without them? You wouldn’t have this paper in your hands for starters! You’re never too far from one of us whenever you are, enjoying something at the Fringe; our little festival here in Ventnor is run almost entirely by volunteers. Volunteers from the Island, the Northern Island (mainland Britain) and around the world all travel down to this wonderful town every year for a week in August to help keep the day-to-day of the festival motoring along, from ripping tickets and pulling pints, to interviewing your favourite bands and making sure everyone’s where they need to be when they need to be. Without all our wonderful volunteers, we would be nothing! We do it because we love the Fringe, we believe in the arts and we want to enjoy ourselves in the vibrant, cultural little bubble we call Ventnor. It always leaves you with a good feeling after volunteering, but don’t just take our word for it. Volunteering gives you the opportunity to meet new people, try new things, grow your skills and have a

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Instagram: @ventnorexchange

Twitter: @vfringe

great time all the while. Have you ever thought of volunteering at the Fringe yourself? It’s oh-so-easy to sign up! On this final day of 2017’s Ventnor Fringe Festival, you can come and sign up for next year by heading to the Ventnor Exchange. Just ask the lovely bar staff (also… you guessed it; volunteers!) for the signup sheet and we’ll get in touch with you to put your name down on the list. If you’re reading this on your way back home, just ping hello@vfringe.co.uk a line with your details and we’ll go from there. You’ll be hearing from our volunteers on where they’ve come from, their best Fringe memories, and what they like most about the festival in a special Volunteers of Ventnor podcast coming out tomorrow morning, as a sort of swansong to the annual wonder that is the Fringe. We love it and, from the bottom of our hearts, hope you have enjoyed yourself as much as we have. Until next year - we hope to see you on our side of the bar, sound-desk or production office. From everyone at the Ventnor Fringe Festival.

Email: media@vfringe.co.uk


vfringe.co.uk

Fringe Review

Issue no.27

Fr inge Fashion ista by Matt Hitt t’s carnival time and, after the washout of Wednesday, I’m just excited! There have obviously been some amazing outfits being sported last night; Ventnor always brings it, on this night of illumination and jubilations. Particular highlights included an adorable Moana, Britannia with a brush on her head, and the ubiquitous jazz band in their usual grand attire. However, after the habitual parade of the practiced, polished and preened, I decided to go for something all together more grubby. And dear Lord it was wonderful! The Rose was host to the sort of gig that I’ve not been to for a while. Quim Reaper were playing as a tribute to the late, great Dave. It was a brilliant tribute. The atmosphere in the room was electric, people were throwing themselves around the place, crowd surfers were thrust dangerously close to ceiling fans and, even from the back of the room, I could tell that lead singer Luke was the man for my fashionista column today. Arriving on stage with beautifully coiffeured, straightened hair, boxer shorts, stocking and a bum bag, it wasn’t long before the ironed tresses started to curl and Luke started to look like a young Oliver Reed, passion being sweated out of every pore, and oh how sweaty his was. There was a raw elegance to what Luke and the rest of the Reapers were doing. It’s been a long while since

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The only picture known to exist of Jim is on the side of the shipping container on the Plaza.

Interview

J im W i l l is by Catriona Macaulay

What is your creative passion, Jim? I am an amateur film maker I suppose you could say, well I’ve written scripts and had films made, and I help out Jack and Mhairi with the Ventnor Fringe. How did you get into film? I went to university and did a degree in creative writing which is where I learnt the process of script writing. I wrote a script for a workshop run by my university lecturer John Goodwin, here on the Island. All of our scripts were put into a kind-of contest and whoever had the best script would have it made into a film. John came up to me one day and said- Jim, your script is the best by far, we’re gonna make it into a film - so I was just happy to have that opportunity. We then filmed it nearby in Bonchurch. How did you get involved with Fringe? Well I’ve been connected from way back, before it first started 8 years ago. When Jack, Mhairi and Joe were just teenagers. Jack created a board of creatives to help him with theatre and script production. There were a few of us back then, but that was a long time ago now. So Jack was determined from a young age; how did you meet him? I used to help out with the local youth club, at the time it was the only thing to keep kids from hanging around the streets. Luckily now there are more opportunities for young people but there’s still some way to go (see the Fringe Forum article for more). What did you help Jack with in the beginning for Fringe? We all just helped to facilitate his vision I suppose,

he said he wanted to bring art and culture to Ventnor and talking about a fringe festival and we just helped him do that, any way we could. You’ve stuck with it all these years; how do you think the Fringe has effected Ventnor? I think it’s been amazing for Ventnor, the amount Ventnor has changed since the beginning of the Fringe is amazing. It’s what Ventnor needed for so long. Do you think of Ventnor is transforming into a place that people can start building businesses and be successful? I think it’s come a long way. I think all the Ventnor Exchange guys have done an amazing job as well as the other young people that have been starting up business in Ventnor, like The Events Co. But I think it still has a way to go; I think there are varying reasons for this. One that I have been talking about today, is the number of holiday-makers with second homes. As much as we need tourism, I don’t think it’s productive having people who own homes that only live in them for four weeks of the year. It would be much better to have people living in these homes all year round. There is a ridiculous amount of these homes on the Island, and a considerable amount of them in Ventnor. Yes, this has been brought up in conversation a lot over the last few years. Do you see this changing? I hope so, I think that we have people that have been coming down, seeing the work everyone in Ventnor is doing and are decided to spend more time here. It’ll take time but I hope that this will happen with more people.

F r i ng e Wo r d Se a r ch

R eview

Di ed Blon des by Catriona Macaulay

he first half of Died Blonds is a monologue in the form of a letter to David Blakey, Ruth’s victim and late-boyfriend. Local author, Joan Ellis’ portrayal of convicted murderer and last woman to hang in Britain, Ruth Ellis, is harrowing. Joan is able to convey the raw conflicting emotions that Ruth would have undeniably gone through while waiting for her final walk down to the gallows. This has clearly been a very well-researched and wellpracticed performance. Conspiring to kill someone is no little thing, so of course why wouldn’t you recall every little detail and emotion that lead up to the event.

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“I must have been standing there to so long- so long that my shoes began to pinch.”

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Instagram: @ventnorexchange

I’ve been to a gig like that. It was lovely. There was style, there was enthusiasm, and I’m not going to lie, somewhat surprisingly there was real musicality. I tried to catch up with Luke after the gig but frankly his time was at a premium. I managed to get a photo of him which I hope captures the feel, but really you need to experience the real thing. If you ever see a poster for a Quim Reaper, go!

BEACH CARNIVAL CHILDHOOD FIREWORKS FRINGE LIZARDS NAKAMARRA PARROTS PUPPETS

SPOOKY TUBERCULOSIS VENTNOR

Ruth passed her psychiatric evaluation, but Joan turns this idea on its head in under half an hour. Once her emotions take hold and old memories of an abusive relationship with David ensue, Ruth

A thought provoking and engaging performance.

M is s R e i d's Lon e ly H ea r ts Clu b

of love, considering it a tad overrated. If you can keep up with her surrealist humour and frantic wit, then you may stand a chance. Courting Miss M would be a challenge. But, by gosh, it would be an adventure. She is my final lonely heart of this year’s Fringe Review. Darlings, it’s been a pleasure. My heart with brimming with love on this final day of revelries. I will see you later this evening, on a moon-lit Ventnor Beach, basking in Fringe Team love and raising a glass to this wonderful town. I love you all. x

ho’s that girl? Running around with … a look of intense journalistic mania in her eyes? She is our benevolent leader, our guiding star, the lighthouse that’s guides us through the storm. And she’s a total babe. Miss M has particular taste and high standards. Her favourite Beetle is George. Her favourite film is The Labyrinth. Her favourite early evening snack is a Chocobon or two. Part time horse whisperer, full time writer of truth, Miss M is a busy lady. You will need to work around her schedule and her heart, as she is sceptical

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SMUGGLER

becomes almost hysterical. The second half of this show is Marilyn’s final phone call to ex-husband, Joe DiMaggio. Joan performs this from behind a screen in order to draw focus to Marilyn’s final words. She erupts down the phone to Joe with her many suspicions, all centred quite firmly around her relationship with the Kennedy brothers. At the time of her death, Marilyn had been suffering heavily with depression, and has various prescriptions to help her manage the condition. This becomes clear as she spirals in and out of consciousness. The conversation develops and details are revealed, questions are raised as to whether this was Marilyn’s paranoia or an assassination from the Kennedys.

Twitter: @vfringe

Joan will be performing Died Blondes at Edinburgh Fringe this coming Tuesday (15th August).

A big thank you to Ventnor Town Council for their support and printing this year’s Fringe Review.

Email: media@vfringe.co.uk

Ventnor Fringe Review 2017 - Issue 27  

Sunday 13th August 2017

Ventnor Fringe Review 2017 - Issue 27  

Sunday 13th August 2017

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