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Northern wetlands and floodplains and the Living Murray icon sites Where - Release through Gunbower Creek. When - Started in July and ended in November 2012. What/how much - Consumptive water is being delivered through the creek, en route to water users by Goulburn-Murray Water, with any additional use in the Creek being underwritten with a combination of Commonwealth, Living Murray and Victorian environmental water. Why - Provide habitat refuge, spawning and recruitment for fish. Who - North Central CMA, Commonwealth Environmental Water Office, MurrayDarling Basin Authority, Goulburn-Murray Water.

Where - Delivered from the River Murray into Boals Deadwood. When - Began in November 2012 and will continue into January 2013.

Boals Deadwood in Barmah Forest Source - Goulburn Broken CMA

What/how much - Filling flows totalling 2,950 ML. Why - Maintain appropriate water levels to support spoonbill breeding. Who - Goulburn Broken CMA, Murray-Darling Basin Authority, Goulburn-Murray Water. Where - Delivered from the Torrumbarry Irrigation Area into McDonalds Swamp. When - Began in late October and ended in late November 2012.

McDonalds Swamp Source - North Central CMA

What/how much - Filling flows totalling 1,044 ML. Why - Provide habitat for waterbird species including great egrets and royal spoonbills, and support wetland vegetation. Who - North Central CMA, Goulburn-Murray Water.

Where - Delivered from the River Murray into Richardson’s Lagoon via pumping. When - Began in late October and ended in mid December 2012.

Richardson’s Lagoon Source - North Central CMA

What/how much - Filling flows of 1,256 ML. Why - Inundate the river red gum zone of the floodplain and provide habitat for waterbirds. Who - North Central CMA, Goulburn-Murray Water. Where - Delivered from the River Murray into Sandilong Creek via pumping. When - Began in November and will continue into January 2013.

Sandilong Creek Source -Mallee CMA

What/how much - 89 ML has been delivered. Why - Reduce the encroachment of weeds, and improve the condition of river red gum and black box communities. Who - Mallee CMA.

Five facts about river red gums 1.

The river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) is the most widely distributed eucalyptus species in Australia.

2.

Most of Victoria’s red gum forests occur along the channels and floodplains of inland waterways, principally the Ovens, Goulburn and Murray rivers. The largest areas are Barmah Forest and Gunbower Island, both on the River Murray.

3.

In a well-watered forest, river red gums can grow up to 45 metres tall with long, twisted trunks. In more open forest and woodland, the trees are often shorter, with thick twisted trunks and large branches.

4.

River red gums need periods of partial flooding, where their trunks may be inundated for months. Seeds are washed to high ground during a flood and germinate to take root and grow before the next flood submerges the new tree.

5.

A river red gum forest can produce 250 million seeds per hectare per year. Most seeds fall in spring and summer as the floods are receding. Ideal conditions for germination occur if the flood waters recede in spring, allowing sufficient time for seeds to germinate and grow prior to the hot, dry conditions of summer.

River red gums in Barmah Forest Source - Keith Ward, Goulburn Broken CMA

Information sourced from the Victorian Department of Sustainability and Environment and www.murrayriver.com.au.

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VEWH Watering Update Edition 8, Nov-Dec 2012  
VEWH Watering Update Edition 8, Nov-Dec 2012  

This regular update gives you an overview of the environmental watering actions happening across Victoria, and a general news update

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