Page 1

DECEMBER 2012 | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


VEUX Magazine - Issue 9 - Happiness STAFF Ada Adams Editor-In-Chief/Content Director/Public Relations ada@veuxmag.com

Vivien Hoang Editor/Advisor/Layout Design vivien@veuxmag.com

Wales Wong Editor/Literary Editor/Photographer wales@veuxmag.com

Yawen Chan Web Producer

CONTRIBUTORS: Sandra Di Leo, Marc Ducharme, Vivien Hoang, David Levine, Joseph Mansourian, Christopher Palazzo, Christine Polz, Michael Walchuk, Wales Wong

PUBLISHER AVW Publishing Inc. CONTACT www.veuxmag.com General Information: info@veuxmag.com Editor-In-Chief: editor@veuxmag.com Editorial Submissions: editorial@veuxmag.com Writing Submissions: write@veuxmag.com Advertising Inquiries: advertise@veuxmag.com Subscribe: subscribe@veuxmag.com FOLLOW www.facebook.com/veuxmag www.twitter.com/VeuxMag

COVER PHOTO Photography: Tania Betti Make-Up & Hair: Eleonora Rossini Wardrobe Styling: Rachel Terrorini, Usami Assistants: Martina Mammola & Davide De Luca Models: Nicole Di Mario, Martina Bianconi & Claudia Knyspel BACK PHOTO Photography: David Levine Model: Anastasia


IN THIS ISSUE

Photography: Hugo Soo Make-Up: Christina V Nguyen Wardrobe Styling: Lydia Chan Model: Romone Thomas

ISSUE NINE | HAPPINESS

FEATURES

5 Beauty: That Holiday Sparkle 18 Feature: Now in 3D 22 Beauty: Haro 34 Feature: Making an Independent Film in Canada 72 Feature: Reborn in Rome

ARTS

28 Visual: Michael Walchuk 59 Poetry: Spirit Eversion 78 Visual: Sandra Di Leo 96 Photography: Christine Polz 102 Photography: David Levine

EDITORIAL

12 Giuseppe 38 Happy Holidays! 44 blue story 50 As the Rush Comes 56 Wonderland 60 Silver Bullet - Space Traveler! 66 Master of Disguises 80 Sunny Days 90 So What?

IN EVERY ISSUE

4 Letter from the Editors 86 Travel: Las Vegas


Letter from the Editor

As the joy of the holidays is upon us and 2013 shines its bright potential in our direction, a reflection of what the last 12 months have encompassed is a significant step in welcoming the New Year. Happiness can be both an inspiring and whimsical feeling, but it is present in many of life’s precious moments. When we decided to have Happiness as Issue 9’s theme, we were excited to see how people would interpret this emotion. The simple solitude of seeking solace in one’s own space elicits the sublime. Transforming a 2-dimensional idea into a 3-dimensional contraption delights our curiosity. Discovering a shiny and blingy surprise after unwrapping a gift excites the heart. Finding sanity in the craziness of madness gives us peace. Having luck on our side when we need it the most reminds us of our good fortune. Not caring for anything, but laughing our hearts out until tears stream down our cheeks reminds us of the beauty in the little things in our lives. We often hold back on enjoying the moment because it can be so fleeting, but don’t let that anchor weigh you down from venturing into the amazing opportunities that wait for you if you just let yourself smile. We here at VEUX Mag, hope that this past year has brought you much happiness. With Issue 9 now in our collection, we continue to look ahead with excitement and joy towards 2013 and can’t wait to see what the future holds for us. So hug your loved ones, dance to your own tune, kiss without hesitation, and share your laughter. WW, on behalf of the Editors

Photography: Anna Fowler Make-Up & Hair: Ruth Reynolds Wardrobe Styling: Lauren Carter Model: Lauren Carter (Flair Talent - London) Dress by Haute Hippie

4 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


That H oliday Sparkle Ada is wearing Carmina-Cristina Makeup: - Vitamin C Eye-Gel - Vitamin C& E Lip Treatment - Tinted Primer SPF 20 in light - Baked Hydrating Powder-Foundation in Light - Baked Finishing-Powder in Satin Glow and Matte Bronze - Blush in Hush Pink - Plumping Sheer Lip-Gloss in Starlet - Super-Wear Brow Definer

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 5


BEAUTY

6 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Carmina-Cristina Makeup: - Eye Shadow in White(206) and Cashmere - Blush in Hush Pink - Super-Wear Brow Definer

BEAUTY

Temptu Airbrush Foundation Makeup ForEver Aqua Liner (3)

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 7


Makeup by Carmina-Cristina: - Eye Shadow in Jade and Mojito - Blush in Pink Quartz - Lip Liner in Mochaberry - Plumping Sheer Lip-Gloss in Seduce - Super-Wear Brow Definer

8 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 9


10 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


CANADA Photography: Andriy Zolotoiy - X-processed Photo (www.x-processed.ca) Make-Up & Hair: Carmina-Cristina (www.carminacristina.com) Styling: Carmina-Cristina Model: Ada Adams

Makeup by Carmina-Cristina: - Eye Shadow in Iced Coffee (289), Dark Brown(216), Twig - Blush in Rose Marble - Lip Liner in Heather - Plumping Sheer Lip-Gloss in Screen Gems - Super-Wear Brow Definer HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 11


Giuseppe 12 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 13


EDITORIAL

T-Shirt by C.A.M Pants: Vintage Bag by CAM Boots by Frankie Morello Bracelets: Stylist’s own

14 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 15


EDITORIAL

Hat: Vintage T-Shirt by C.A.M Jacket by Marco Manieri Pants by Antony Morato Shoes by Converse All Star Necklace: Vintage Bracelets: Stylist’s own Ring by Marco Manieri 16 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


EDITORIAL

Sweater by Le Gallinelle T-Shirt by C.A.M Pants by Diesel Boots by Frankie Morello

ITALY Photography: Veronica Duszynski Make-Up: Elisa Ferranti Wardrobe Styling: Valeria Fumi Art Direction: Giuseppe Leccisotti Model: Giuseppe Leccisotti

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 17


FEATURE

Now

in 3D By Vivien Hoang

A few blocks from one of San Francisco’s main streets is a non-descript door of a warehouse-loftstyle building. It doesn’t look like much from the outside, but inside is the sleek, brightly lit offices of 3D Systems, a company that is bringing 3 dimensional (3D) printing from the realm of science fiction to our humble present day existence. I’m greeted by Effie Seiberg, my bubbly and knowledgeable tour guide for the afternoon, but my attention is immediately drawn to the three humming machines on the table by the wall. They’re buzzing like the old dot matrix printers from the early 1990s, with the shiny appearance of a gadget from Star Trek. They are the 3D printers, and the reason for my nerdy curiosity. 3D printing is exactly how it sounds: it is a printer that has the capability of printing a 3 dimensional object, that you can then pick up and hold. Much like conventional 2D paper printing, the 3D printer has cartridges filled with plastic which is carefully squirted out onto a moving tray according to a preset design, to slowly build the object layer by layer. There is something strangely mesmerizing about watching the printer do its little dance; watching them work is a slow reveal, as the little toy soldier or spaceship materialized before my eyes. 3D Systems started in Southern California, in 1986. From humble beginnings, 3D Systems is now headquartered in South Carolina and is a global company with over 1000 employees. 3D Systems’ Cube 3D printer is the first 3D printer for consumer and home use – the machine is plug-and-play, and probably more easily installed than your deskjet printer. Cubify.com is a brand of 3D Systems, and the website where most home users, customers and creators will interact with the 3D printer. Users can either create their own objects using the Cubify App store where pre-designed templates (such as jewellery and toys) are available or the more ambitious creator can use Cubify Invent, a 3D design computer program, which allows the users to design anything. For the more entrepreneurial artists, they can upload their designs to the Cubify website, where customers can either buy the finished printed product or buy the designs to print from home. It’s a solid business model, meant to foster a community of makers and buyers. Our movies and TV shows are now 3D, and we live in a 3D world – why not 3D printing? Top: Robots by Cubify Middle: Phone case by FreshFiber and Freedom of Creation Bottom: Macedonia High Heel Shoes by Freedom of Creation

18 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Drape Dress by Freedom Of Creation

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 19


I wasn’t sure what to expect when I started the tour of the facilities with Seiberg. My assumption going in was that 3D printing was great for people who wanted to make little trinkets and knick-knacks. This revealed more about my own limitations than the machine’s, as Seiberg led me over to their showroom. I picked up something white, with a vaguely familiar shape...

Michael Glove by Freedom Of Creation

“That’s a glove! You can put it on,” Seiberg encouraged. So I did, marveling at the fine chain-linked construction. “It was printed in one piece!” That is probably the single most amazing thing about 3D printing for me - that something so intricate and movable could be done in one print session. Seiberg also showed me the chainmail purse; sadly the chainmail dress was not in the office.

Artists and designers are beginning to embrace 3D printing as another medium of expression and creativity. Perusing through Cubify’s home and lighting collection, objects ranged from the mundane (a fork) to the boutique high end such as the collection from Dutch designers at Freedom of Creation. Objects made from the 3D printers can be functional as well as decorative. Olaf Diegel makes guitars using 3D printers: not only do they look cool, they sound great and are 100% customizable. What about something a little more homely? This was perfectly demonstrated by one of Effie’s colleagues, who stopped us on our tour and mentioned offhandedly, “Hey! We’re printing your coat hook now. Should be done soon.” Need a place to hang your jacket? Make your own wall hook - and customize it with your name, logo of your favorite sports team, or whatever! Seiberg told me a story of needing a last minute mask for a masquerade party – the solution was to 3D scan her face and custom print a perfectly fitting mask for the ball. In an era where everything can be customized (ringtones, wallpapers, license plates, T-shirts), this is the next logical progression. More serious usage of 3D printing includes medical devices such as orthotics, and NASA 3D prints complex spaceship parts for their missions. 3D printing is now being used in artificial tissue and organ growth as well.

Park Necklace by Freedom Of Creation

20 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Guitars by Olaf Diegel Left: Spider LP Guitar; Right: Scarab Guitar

3D printing gives creators who have ideas, but not necessarily the technical construction know-how or skills, the ability to bring their concepts to life. 3D printing can also be invaluable for the manufacturing process for designers and craftspeople who need to test a new design but do not have the funds or the quantities necessary to work with a factory or manufacturer. Instead, they can print from the comforts of their own homes, tweak their designs, print again, and perfect their vision in 3D and real time. 3D Systems believes in, and is spearheading, a change in our manufacturing economy, where production can be local, sustainable, and scalable. 3D Systems’ entry level consumer printer – the Cube - is currently being sold for $1299 USD; like most technology the price will probably drop over time. Will 3D printers soon be a staple in the average home?

Palm Hanging Lights D32 by Freedom Of Creation

It’s quite possible - after all, a few years ago the concept of everybody having a laptop and a smartphone was foreign - but now people wonder why you DON’T have such gadgets. In the near future, we might just take for granted the ability to print our own shoes to match our printed purses! For more information, check out www.cubify.com.

Special thank you to Effie Seiberg and Alyssa Reichental for additional information and technical guidance. Photographs courtesy of 3D System.

Shy-light Eno by Virtox

Olaf Diegel guitars: www.cubify.com/products/guitars/index.aspx Freedom of Creation 3D designs: www.cubify.com/partners/foc Making a 3D printed mask: http://cubify.com/blog/a-3d-printed-masquerade-2

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 21


22 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HARO

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 23


BEAUTY

24 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


BEAUTY

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 25


26 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


UNITED STATES Photography: Kilker Photography Make-Up: Stacy Leigh (Charm City Makeup) Model: Haro Epaulets, head piece, bracelet, and collar by Amorous Cats Attic

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 27


ART

MICHAEL WALCHUK

28 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


ART

“July 27th, 2010. 9:11 PM.” | Oil on Panel | 20.5”x65.5” | 2010

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Mike Walchuk is a Toronto based realist painter. Having graduated with a BFA from York University in 2009, Mike has since been focused on the creation of a body of work that depicts natural landscapes from around Ontario. His exceptional mimicry of real images with only brush and paint invokes a sense of awe and admiration which ultimately parallels those same feelings one experiences in the actual presence of such scenes. Of his work Mike says the following, “I am trying to recapture that unique importance which landscapes once held for us but has since been drowned out and lost over the years amongst all of the mass marketed and commercialized imagery.”

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 29


ART

30 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


ART

“August 30th, 2010. 9:21 AM.” | Oil on Panel | 30”x47” | 2011 HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 31


“August 15th, 2010. 1:35 PM.” | Oil on Panel | 24” x 68” | 2011

32 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 33


Roseanne Supernault, Adam Garcia and Michelle St. John star in Every Emotion Costs.

The Extraordinary Venture of Making an Independent Film in Canada By Joseph Mansourian For those who know me well, it was a shared secret that I was in fact under extreme pressure in the days leading into production and throughout the entire 16 days of filming. I would go to bed at around 2:30 a.m., my mind numb from the unusual number of tasks that I would have to tackle the following morning. Waking up was scheduled for 6 a.m. and the phone started buzzing with texts at 5:45 a.m. (fact: texting is equally annoying as calling someone that early in the morning). Is this what I signed up for? Did I need this? I thought I was a Producer, a curator of relationships while securing financing; making decisions on cast and crew; hiring a caterer. Not at all. And it certainly wasn’t what I wished for – it was grueling, catty and exhausting. I’m not a film lover, I’ve never studied film, and I could recall telling friends during university that I couldn’t sit through a film that proved to be boring in the first 5 minutes. I would get up and leave, abandoning the cinema and my friends. But I’ll tell you one thing: I loved making an independent film in Canada. I loved the extraordinary circumstances that lead me to making a film with an amazing First Nations filmmaker who admires her community and has a tremendous respect for others, the land, and herself. Let me paint the picture for you… It’s 2005. I’ve just graduated from university and I’m determined to start making my mark. Résumé in one hand, a business degree in Commercial Aviation Management in the other, I returned home to Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. This was the plan. I didn’t want to start off “life after debt” in Toronto. It wasn’t home to me, and I couldn’t fathom achieving success at the pace I desired. I knew Toronto had the most prospects for me considering it offered big city potential and it was home to Canada’s largest international airport. I didn’t give up on aviation; rather I accepted that it was ‘something to do’ in pursuing a university degree. I returned home and landed a job with a creative agency within 2 weeks. A random email to one of the partners provided me with an opportunity to pursue a passion I had – exploring the marketing and design industry. So it began, with my footprints in an unplanned career choice. I was acquainted with Darlene Naponse before we made this film. I knew much about her success in the film industry and her celebrated achievements, including her films making it to the Sundance Film Festival and other

34 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


FEATURE

international festivals. We had spoken on and off in our encounters at the local YMCA. It was on a squash court that Darlene served me the biggest opportunity that I couldn’t pass on. She simply asked if I would be interested in making her next feature film. I said yes. I didn’t know exactly what it entailed, but I knew she was looking for somebody who had never worked as a producer, someone she saw potential in; I appreciated that opportunity. I distinctly remember being excited, but did my best not to show it at the time. From there, Darlene and I were successfully chosen as a National Screen Institute (NSI) award recipient in their Features First program. This happened within weeks of our rendezvous on the squash court. I was being sucked into this industry almost immediately. Of all applicants across Canada, we were one of five projects selected to go through a yearlong professional development experience. Working full-time at the creative agency, I used vacation time to travel to NSI planned events as part of this grant opportunity to incubate our project and nurture its development in the pre-production phase. The objective of this program was to break new feature filmmakers in by exposing them to Canada’s best of the best. NSI had that pull and they used resourceful staff and innovative programming to train us in the skills we needed to make this film a success. For Darlene it was about perfecting her script by lining her up with a professional screen editor, or by sending her to California to study how to direct actors. For myself, it was about pitching the film and selling the project to prospective financiers. Those skills would remain with me today, proving to be extremely useful beyond the film industry. Not everyone is fortunate to undergo the training we received from NSI, but I would say that not all budding filmmakers have the willingness to scout out these support networks. That’s a valuable lesson I try to pass on to any young filmmaker that I meet at festivals around Canada. Programs to support filmmakers at any stage of their development are widely available. Canada has a unique positioning to support and nurture Canadian content films because we’re neighbours with the world leader in filmmaking, the USA. Our governments recognize that our country needs that support to promote Canadian independent films. Without that support it’s extremely difficult to get projects off the ground and onto the big screen in order to share Canadian generated content with other Canadians, and for these films to be exported around the world. Understanding this cultural dilemma will assist in selling your independent film. So it’s important to recognize that you need more than the idea and script. You need to do your research in your province and tap into the envelopes of money allocated to film and television making (low interest loans or full out grants). This is a hard industry and it’s definitely not a profitable one. I share the resources that I have made, but only when someone shows a willingness to go further. I suppose this is relevant to any person who talks about something but misses the boat on what it takes to get there. Most of the time there are no lucky breaks; it’s just persistence and the will to want something. Get rejected? Learn from it! Dust yourself off and try again – considering that it is an independent film in Canada, it would be again and again and again. So part of my training involved selling my film and making the pitch. Getting this far into my article, I recognize that I didn’t even mention my film title and what it’s all about. It’s a stark contrast to what I was trained to do – make the pitch immediately. You only have 1 minute of face time when you meet someone important.

So here goes: “Hello, I’m Joseph Mansourian and I’m the Producer of Every Emotion Costs, a new feature film being shot in Northern Ontario on the First Nations community of Whitefish Lake First Nation. It’s a new film by Writer & Director Darlene Naponse, whose first feature screened at the Sundance Film Festival. Every Emotion Costs is a story about Quilla and her exploration of the reality of returning home to the First Nation reserve to face family, community and the ceremony of death. We follow Quilla and her sister June as they return to bury their mentally ill mother. Quilla has to deal with a sister she hasn’t spoken to in years, her past loves that emerge from the forest, and the resentment she had with her dead mother. Emotionally abandoned by her mother, we follow Quilla as she explores an upbringing of life on the reserve, past relationships, and find out what drove her away.”

Give or take a few words, that was essentially it. You would pitch to a few prospective funders or champions you knew who would go off and talk to others in the industry. Then you would try hard to foster a relationship to keep the conversation going and land another face-to-face meeting in a more formal setting. So, fully financed, the film went into production and was filmed in 16 days (it was supposed to be 18 days, but it started to snow hard and we improvised by shooting longer hours the days before). These 16 days were a true test of my patience. It was a low-budget film production that should have had a $2 million budget, yet we worked with a stretched $640,000. It was truly independent and considering the cast involved and the resilient crew, it had all the makings of a larger budgeted film.

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 35


We brought in some truly talented cast including Michelle St. John (“Where the Spirit Lives” and “Smoke Signals”), Roseanne Supernault (“Blackstone”), Tantoo Cardinal (“Legends of the Fall” and “Dances with Wolves”), Adam Garcia (“Coyote Ugly”) and Nathaniel Arcand (“Heartland”, “Smallville”, and “North of 60”).

The days of production were long and my regular duties of Producer were supported with other side-jobs like craft and catering support, transportation, equipment and supplies purchase and “fixer”… Don’t ask. In the end, this film was 100% worth it. The 6 years it took to get this to final-cut and premiere on the big screen gave me an appreciation for patience and the utmost appreciation for the true artistry found in Canadian filmmaking. Today, I’m the owner of a leading communications and design agency in Northern Ontario, and I’m not a full-time Producer - never was. Throughout the entire process of making this film I retained a full-time job starting up my company called OvertheAtlantic and building a portfolio in that industry. I believe that if it were not for the dedicated people in the Canadian film industry then who else would tell our unique stories and capture our land on film? How would the Canadian experience get exported around the world and, even be filed with Archives Canada in perpetuity, if not for the blood sweat and tears of these creators?

Roseanne Supernault (left) went on to win Best Supporting Actress in her role as Quilla. Tantoo Cardinal (right) is a celebrated First Nations actress and activist. 36 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Our film went on to world premiere at the imagineNATIVE Film + Medial Arts Festival in Toronto and then the American premiere at the American Indian Film Festival, where it won two awards - one for Best Actress and the other for Best Supporting Actress. It’s been to many festivals around North America including the cities of Chicago, Calgary, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Thunder Bay, Halifax, Sudbury and so many more. It’s been well received and it’s very interesting to do the Q & A sessions after each screening in these cities. Both Darlene and I are amazed at the comments that emerge and how different each audience seems to pick up on things we never gave much consideration to. What’s universal between each audience is their support for our independent film and the support they have for Writers and Directors like Darlene Naponse. Kudos to the story tellers! The film is wrapping up its world festival circuit and will be scheduled to air on television in Canada in mid-February 2013 on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. It’s slated to be released on BluRay, DVD and digital download in mid-2013. To learn more about the film, look up the trailer at EveryEmotionCosts.com/trailer and friend us on Facebook (“Every Emotion Costs Movie.”)

Joseph Mansourian is Managing Director of OvertheAtlantic, a leading communications and design agency in northern Ontario. This year he was awarded Young Entreprenue of the Year from the Northern Ontario Business Awards. He sits on the Board of Directors with Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce and the local art gallery board. He’s an avid Dodgeball player.

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 37


38 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Dress by Camilla & Marc

Happy Holidays! HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 39


Ivory Corset by Ender Legard 40 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Coral Bra & Panties by Stella McCartney HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 41


Ivory Corset by Ender Legard

42 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


EDITORIAL

UNITED KINGDOM Photography: Anna Fowler Make-Up & Hair: Ruth Reynolds Wardrobe Styling: Lauren Carter Model: Lauren Carter (Flair Talent - London)

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 43


Dress by Pavonine Coat by Son Jung Wan 44 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


blue story UNITED STATES Photography: Julie Dickerson Make-Up: Cassandra Renee Hair: Joey Oso Fashion Editor: Renessta Olds Fashion Assistant: ShiSeer James Model: Elycle Cole

Jacket by Isabel Lu Top by Krisa Pants by Son Jung Wan HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 45


Top by Son Jung Wan Pant by Siway Tights by DKNY Shoes by Nine West

46 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Leather Vest by Mathieu Mirano Dress by Rapheal Cenamo Tights by DKNY Socks by Richer Poorer Shoes by Timo Weilland

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 47


EDITORIAL

Top by A + Ro Pants by Isabel Lu Tights by DKNY Shoes by Ralph Lauren

48 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Gray Tweed and Fur Jacket by Son Jung Wan Gray Leather Skirt by LINE

EDITORIAL

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 49


EDITORIAL EDITORIAL

Blazer by Lanvin Shirt by Zara Pants by DVF Shoes by Dolce & Gabbana

50 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


EDITORIAL EDITORIAL

As the Rush Comes UNITED STATES Photography: Merry Widjaya (www.merrywidjaya.com) Make-Up: Lisa Pelayo (www.lisapelayo.com) Hair: Gregory Rodriguez (www.theeditorialhouston.com) Wardrobe Styling: Vico Puentes (www.vicopuentesmens.blogspot.com) Model: Candice Dobbs (Neal Hamil Agency)

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 51


EDITORIAL

Jacket by Kenneth Cole Shirt by Chanel

52 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Suit by Louis Vuitton Shirt by Kenneth Cole Sunglasses by Thom Browne

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 53


Dress by Geoffrey Henning Shoes by Michael Kors

54 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Blouse by Leela Rose Tee by Just Cavalli Skirt by Prada Sunglasses by Dita

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 55


Sabrina is wearing make-up by Kryolan and Wimpernwelle. 56 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


WONDERLAND

ITALY Photography: Wanda Liliana Pacifico Make-Up & Hair: Manuela Melillo Fashion Design: SV Babooshka (Silvia Valletta) Wardrobe Styling: SV Babooshka (Silvia Valletta) Model: Sabrina Binda

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 57


58 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


SPIRIT EVERSION By Marc Ducharme

The little pill you took opened you out A rainbow pressed through the prism Into the daystar edge And you engraved shining glyphs into your flesh A map scrawled in photons smashing and outward But the pretty boys and girls couldn’t find you Behind the lasers and neon and smoke and strobes And undulating curtains of bass and aural warfare They stumbled past the territory of your spirit eversion Stumbled sweating and chilled into the streets, blinking in the glare. Sun rises over Steel towers stooping downward Your body sings light

Marc Ducharme, small-town lawyer and part-time domestic engineer, spins threads of ennui and existential angst when he’s not drafting an agreement or changing a diaper. Marc is happiest when he’s hauling himself and his family into the backcountry in an overloaded canoe. Biography photograph by Melanie Ducharme.

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 59


Silver Bullet Space Traveler!

60 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 61


EDITORIAL

UNITED STATES Photography: Sinbad Kazakian Make-Up & Hair: Lucy Dittes Wardrobe Styling: Sinbad Kazakian Model: Chanel Ryan (www.chanelryan.com)

62 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 63


64 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 65


Fuchsia Bra (in the hair) by Fifi Chachnil Right Black Jacket with red piping by BĂ–HEMIAN Black Pearl Necklace by LK PARIS (Laure Kczekotowska) Fuchsia Belt by Jean-Claude Jitrois Black Skirt by Fifi Chachnil Pink Long Skirt by Elma Victoria Watch by Toy Watch Shoes by Cotelac

66 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


master of disguises

FRANCE Photography: Yuji Watanabe Make-Up: Shino Ariizumi Hair: Danielle Frances Wardrobe Styling: Aurore Donguy Model: Julian Iannantuoni Shot on location at JNSN Area

Gold Leather Jacket by Ralph Lauren Top dress with sequins by Deby Debo Black Shirt by G-Star Black Hat by H&M Black Skirt by On Aura Tout Vu Black Long Dress by LK PARIS (Laure Kczekotowska)

Fuchsia Leather Pants by Jean-Claude Jitrois Leather Bi-Color Gloves (Gold / Fuchsia) by Gloves Story Pink Fuchsia Watch by OPEN WATCH Fuchsia Pink Belt by Jean-Claude Jitrois Hoop and Ball Necklace by Marion Godart Pumps with Gold Glitter by Walter Steiger

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 67


Fuchsia Panties (In Hair) by Fifi Chachnil Black Leather Coat by Tag Me Fluid Rose Dress by Elma Victoria Black Velvet Skirt with Leaves by Deby Debo Fuchsia Silk Belt by Jean-Claude Jitrois Printed Houndstooth Pants by Tequila Solo White Leather Gloves by Clarisse Hieraix Leather Croco Bag by Ethan K Boots in Grey Leather by G-Star

68 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Structured Black Jacket by On Aura Tout Vu Gold Leather Jacket by Jean-Claude Jitrois T-Shirt by Gigolo Multicolor Necklace by Marion Godart Pleated Grey Trousers grey by Cotelac Black Leather Boots by The Kooples

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 69


EDITORIAL

Fur Coat by Tag Me Ivory Leather Buttoned Jacket by Hoon Ivory Body “FrouFrou” by Clarisse Hieraix Gold Leather Pants: by Jean-Claude Jitrois Fur and Leather Brown Bag by Tag Gold Mittens by Gloves Story Black and White Shoes by Underground Shoes

70 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


EDITORIAL

Coat by On Aura Tout Vu Long Gloves by Gloves Story

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 71


FEATURE

Reborn In Rome The Life of Catherine Hill: From Auschwitz to Paris Fashion Week By Christopher Palazzo

Diana Vreeland, the famed fashion editor of Harper’s Bazaar and editor-in-chief of Vogue once said, “There is only one really good life and that is the life you know you want and you make it yourself.” Success is a fickle thing; in its purest form it is the feeling of sheer elation - happiness - that we create on our own by achieving our goals by ourselves. Ourselves - I do not believe we can call a person successful if they went up through the corporate ranks simply by knowing a few people. No, nothing but hard work can truly give a person that euphoric feeling of success. Catherine Hill is the embodiment of success. Born in a small town in Hungary to a loving middle-class family, she had the ideal life, but it was short lived. It was the height of World War II, and Catherine, a Hungarian Jew, was rounded up along with her parents and sent to Auschwitz. This story is a testament to the human condition; despite adversity, hope and happiness will always prevail. It was a grey October afternoon in Toronto. After finishing the day’s classes at the University of Toronto, my friend and I walked over to the local Starbucks for a drink to celebrate her birthday. She wore a bright apple green lace dress - certainly the punch of colour one needed on such a dismal day, and I was in a camelcoloured Mack, oxford button down shirt and my now ubiquitous coloured socks which were gifted unto me by a former colleague. We ordered our drinks and then grabbed a seat to begin our gossip of the day’s events. As I sat down, I noticed this finely dressed woman at the table next to us: golden blonde hair and wearing a pair Chanel drop-pearl earrings, the Globe and Mail style section splashed out across her table. On the empty chair across from her laid a fine cashmere Hermès scarf. After a luxurious trip to Paris this past summer, I spent some time in Hermès where I purchased a scarf myself, so naturally, I knew the scarf draped elegantly over the chair next to me was indeed Hermès, yet for some reason I was too timid to ask. My friend and I began our conversation only to be shortly interrupted thereafter by this woman. She complimented my friend’s style - what followed was an in depth discussion of the fashion industry. So knowledgeable, so chic, so en vogue; I knew early on that she was no ordinary woman. For over 30 years, Catherine Hill has been the arbiter of Italian fashion in Canada. Through her successful store once located in Yorkville - Toronto’s über chic shopping district, home to some of the world’s finest stores - she was the first to bring Italian labels such as Armani and Versace to the women of Toronto. “I knew these guys when they were just starting out - no one paid attention to them, but I did,” recalled Catherine.

“Christopher...” spoken with her still rich Hungarian accent, “What do you think of Armani today?” Not my style, no pizzaz, I reply. “Mmmhhmm, Armani’s suits were so fine - he knew how to dress a woman in a suit, unfortunately, that’s all he could do! I’m bored of the look now,” remarked Catherine.

72 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


FEATURE

The train came to a stop. SS Officers lined the rails; dogs barking; people screaming; death hovered over the air: Auschwitz. “I emerged from the cattle car along with my parents. RIGHT! An SS Officer yelled to me. RIGHT! Another yelled to my father. LEFT! Yelled one to my mother; that was the last time I saw her.” Left, the direction of death; Catherine’s mom, along with the millions of Jews before her, was sent straight to the gas chambers. Age heals no wounds; still raw with emotion all these years later Catherine breaks down into tears, “My father was a beautiful man; I loved him so.” Her father died in Auschwitz of typhoid fever. Catherine does not like to talk about her time at Auschwitz. “Why should I relive all the horrible memories of those days? I’ve cut that experience out of my life; I was reborn after the war.” Homeless, no family remaining, and very little money, Catherine made her way to Italy where she settled in Rome. “I loved Italy! The people, the way they were dressed, the way they lived, the food, the love, the life - I learned to live again,” remembered Catherine. “The generosity of strangers: when I was hungry, I remember locals giving me some food, even though I couldn’t afford it.” As I have always believed, Paris teaches you how to love, whereas Rome teaches you how to live. Myself, a son of Italian immigrants, felt an immense sense of pride in my culture. My family left Italy shortly after the war for a better life in Canada, so it was refreshing to hear a story of postwar Italy that was not at all depressing. “So Christopher tell me, have you ever been to Rome?” I reply with a dismaying no. “You must go to Rome! Travel the world. See it while you’re young, The world is so beautiful.”

Catherine in Paris

Rejuvenated and alive again, Catherine set her gaze on Canada. She lived in Montreal for a number of years. “It was not an easy life, I struggled, but I got through it.” It was in Montreal where she met her husband, and had a daughter. But the marriage did not last; Catherine does not talk openly about her marriage, saying only “I loved him, I did.”

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 73


FEATURE

“The fashion world changes all the time. You can even see the approaching revolution in clothes, you can see and feel everything in clothes.” - Diana Vreeland.

“Canadians are so boring, no class, no sense of chic,” jokingly remarked Catherine. “Now Italians, they know fashion!” Divorced and a single mother, Catherine was once again looking for a new beginning. She found that sense of newness as a saleswoman at Eaton’s, Canada’s largest department store chain at the time. “I used to help the women pick out clothes.” It was there that Catherine developed her eye for fashion. She told women what really did look good on them. Her outspoken nature got the attention of none other than Jack Eaton, owner of Eaton’s. Catherine reflects on the time Mr. Eaton walked up to her to ask her for advice on a gift for his wife. Unbeknown to Catherine, she told him, “If you’re looking for a gift for your wife, maybe you should go to another store, because there is nothing good here.” It was not until the next day that she found out that the man she told to shop elsewhere was Mr. Eaton himself, and it was on that day that Mr. Eaton made Catherine a buyer for Eaton’s and sent her off to Europe. The 60’s were such exciting times for fashion: the look of the girls were changing, it was young, it was adventurous, it was sexy. As a buyer for Eaton’s, Catherine brought the fashion revolution home to the women of Canada. Her success was almost instantaneous; she had her own shop located in every Eaton’s store across the country that featured her latest must-haves for the new woman.

Chez Catherine, Palm Beach

74 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS

However, the 60’s were a turbulent time in Canada: it was the height of the Quebec separatist movement. Homegrown terror was a threat for many living in Montreal, and for Catherine having already witnessed the rise of the Nazis, she knew danger when she saw it. So when Creed’s — a fashion store located in Toronto — offered her the position as their fashion director, she took it. She packed their bags, and with her daughter in tow, moved to Toronto.


FEATURE

Her eye for exuberant fashion fell flat to the interest of Canadian women. “Canadian women were conservative. Italian fashion was very colorful and revolutionary.” Citing the cultural disconnect, Creed’s fired Catherine shortly thereafter. “Now Christopher tell me.... Do you believe in angels? Because I do,” remarked Catherine. “I believe that everything in life happens for a reason, and regardless of all the bad things that happened to me, I kept my faith in not only myself, but in God alive.” I turned to her and nodded in agreement. She was at the front rows of the couture shows in Paris, the fashion shows in London and Milan; she bought the finest garments and brought them home and sold them to the women of Toronto in her new store, Chez Catherine, which opened its doors in 1972 in Yorkville. “Do you know John Galliano? What a wonderful man, a GENIUS!” proclaimed Catherine. “Gianni Versace, now he knew fashion! I remember spending time at his home in Palm Beach... Now his sister [Donatella Versace] on the other hand, not so great.” Labels such as Valentino, Armani, Ferré, and Versace all had their own stand-alone boutiques within Chez Catherine. The success of the business was so astronomical that it allowed her to open a secondary store in Palm Beach. “Palm Beach is such a high-class place, much better than South Beach.” She recounts the time she spoke with Donald Trump, “Trump’s wife Ivana used to shop at my store in Palm Beach, so when he was building Trump Tower in New York, he approached me to open up a shop there. He offered me any spot I wanted. Unfortunately I declined his offer, and I regret it to this day.”

With Mikhail Baryshnikov (top) and Linda Evangelista (bottom) at Valentino’s 30th Anniversary party in Rome.

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 75


FEATURE

The glamour, the jet-setting life, the dream had come to an end - the fashion world changed once again at the beginning of the twenty-first century and sadly, not for the better. In 2002 - the height of the post 9/11 recession after thirty years in business, Catherine closed her stores. Every meeting I’ve had with Catherine following our initial encounter at Starbucks never once did I see her in black clothing. “I don’t wear black because black symbolizes sadness, and I am not a sad person... Why should I be?” She had remained on the down-low since she closed her stores, enjoying her retirement, but she was thrust back into the limelight in 2009 when Linda Grant, a British author, wrote about Catherine’s story in her book, The Thoughtful Dresser. Suddenly Catherine found herself in London doing interviews with the BBC, the Telegraph, and back here at home with the Toronto Star. She felt alive once again; she harnessed that energy to write her memoirs, which she continues to write with enthusiasm today. While time has passed, her eye for fashion and individuality has not ceased to exist. Often during our conversations, her eyes would move and become fixated on the young girls walking by us; she sized them up, either admiring their styles or hoping they would find a stylist to dress them in the future. While having drinks at the Shangri-La, a luxury hotel in Toronto, I remember distinctly how Catherine fixed her gaze on our server - our conversation had ceased - she complimented the server on her beauty; Asian elegance I would say. She then admired the uniform she wore and asked from which designer it was from. The art of conversation I would call it: being able to make any stranger feel comfortable around you, so that you could extract information from them. At that moment I realized the spiritual connection Catherine makes with her audience: she provided a sense of validation, “...I love your outfit,” while she channeled the youthful exuberance vested within our server, “...I feel so young.”

76 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


FEATURE

Prior to meeting Catherine, I was reading A.L.T. A Memoir by Vogue editor André Leon Talley. I have always admired André’s tenacity and love for the fashion industry. Born in Durham, North Carolina, he wrote about the two women that shaped him into the man he is today, the women that taught him about glamour and elegance: his grandmother, Bennie Frances Davis and Vogue editor, Diana Vreeland. Diana Vreeland, the epitome of what an elegant woman is supposed to be, revolutionized the fashion industry through her work at Harper’s Bazaar and later at Vogue. André saw in Mrs. Vreeland a gateway to a life that was so out of context from his own humble beginnings in the Jim Crow south. André wrote about the eccentricities of Diana’s life; for instance, the importance of keeping the soles of your shoes polished - Mrs. Vreeland always polished hers. This certainly took the expression ‘elegance from head to toe’ to a whole new level! I was captivated. After I met Catherine, I began reading D.V., Diana Vreeland’s memoir, and when the documentary made about her life, The Eye Has to Travel, opened in Toronto, I asked Catherine to accompany me to the viewing. We saw the scenes from Paris and would reminisce about our respective time spent in the city of lights. Once the film was finished, we ordered chocolate croissants and began our discussion of our usual topics: fashion, life, society, and ignorant people. I realized at that moment, I saw Catherine the same way André saw Mrs. Vreeland; I had found my Diana Vreeland in Catherine. It is not about the years in a life that matter, but rather the life in the years. Catherine’s knowledge and insight into the fashion industry captivated me and inspired me. Dr. Maya Angelou once said, “The greatest gift any human being can give is the gift of inspiration; there is no higher honour than being able to inspire another human being through your life and through your work.” Today Catherine does not enjoy talking about her time in Auschwitz. She has moved on from that point; the camps do not define the woman she is. She much rather prefers talking about her new life after the war: Rome, Paris, drinks with Alber Elbaz and Giorgio Armani, flying on the Concorde, and the countless exclusive parties and dinners she enjoyed over the years. I began this story by talking to you about success; I believe Catherine’s story is the model for success, and through all of her accomplishments, she has always retained a sense of humility and compassion. I shall end this story of Catherine’s life with a very famous line spoken by the great French actress, Jeanne Moreau that I find quite fitting: “I shall die very young. How young you may ask? Oh I don’t know, maybe seventy, maybe eighty, maybe even ninety. But I shall be young, very young.”

Christopher Palazzo is a men’s fashion, lifestyle and culture enthusiast. He is currently studying political science and history at the University of Toronto. He can be reached at chris.palazzo@me.com. HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 77


78 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Sandra Di Leo “BLISS”

Acrylics on canvas | 48”x48” | 2012

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Sandra Di Leo is an abstract expressionist painter, who experiments with colour and rich textures to create bold, graphic paintings. Inspired by nature, fashion, music, and various forms of design, she connects with her audience by creating modern and aesthetically engaging art that evokes an emotional response. Visit her website at sandradileoart.com.

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 79


SUNNY DAYS

80 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 81


EDITORIAL

82 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


EDITORIAL

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 83


ITALY Photography: Tania Betti Make-Up & Hair: Eleonora Rossini Wardrobe Styling: Rachel Terrorini, Usami Assistants: Martina Mammola & Davide De Luca Models: Nicole Di Mario, Martina Bianconi & Claudia Knyspel

84 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 85


Luck be a Lady in Sin City By: Wales Wong As the old adage goes, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas!” However, there’s nothing that needs to be kept as a secret when Sin City has so much to offer to any adventure-seeker in search of a thrill. Whether it is a weekend trip or a longer stay to enjoy the landscape beyond The Strip, there’s an endless list of activities to delight every visitor. When selecting hotels, often times it’s the price that is the top priority for determining the final location. Keep in mind that there are many online travel sites such as Expedia that offer great deals on hotel and flights to Vegas. Last minute deals can make the difference of $100 CAD compared to purchasing weeks ahead of time. However, if you are traveling during low season, a glamorous 4-star hotel plus flight will cost around $800 CAD for a 3-night stay (flying from Toronto, Canada). Keep your eyes peeled and sign up for email updates from these sites because they will always send out specials on well-frequented vacation spots. Our luck landed us a hotel suite at the Bellagio plus flight for about $750 CAD per person (3-night stay). The convenience of getting from point A to point B is one of the advantages to being in Las Vegas. There are car rentals, taxis, buses, and even a monorail is available, but plan ahead of time as to which mode of transportation you use because it might be a matter of saving you money or time. Most hotels offer free parking, but finding a parking spot can be like finding a sober bachelor on Las Vegas Blvd. During peak hours on The Strip, a 5 minute taxi ride may take up to 20 minutes due to the heavy traffic flow and crammed taxi stops in front of the hotels. The buses are frequent and consistent. Just keep in mind that they travel along the same main streets as the cars and taxis. Finally, with the monorail, it runs along The Strip, but each trip, no matter the distance, will cost you $5.00 USD. Consider paying $12.00 USD for a one-day pass if you want to explore the differently themed hotels.

86 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


If you have the time to stroll and the weather is nice, walking will be the most dependable option. You’ll not only burn off the calories from the decadent buffets and sugar-loaded margaritas, but you will also get a chance to photograph the many interesting individuals wearing costumes of wellknown Vegas icons such as Elvis, Marilyn Monroe, and even Alan from the movie The Hangover. The night lights, the tourist-attracting volcanic explosions (at the Mirage hotel) and fantastic fountain works (at the Bellagio hotel) are an irresistible temptation to put on a pair of comfortable walking shoes. Find yourself thirsty? There are plenty of “resting stops” for you to fill’er up on margaritas, daiquiris, and pina coladas. These slushy drinks are available in hotels, malls, and along the streets. Popular among the younger crowd, those who come back to Vegas will usually bring back the reusable tall drink containers for a discounted refill. Never overlook the planning of your meals. There’s a long list of restaurants and eateries, but there will be a line up if you don’t make reservations ahead of time. The city is known for its buffets and you’d be a fool to not at least stuff yourself silly at one of the three top all-you-can-eat locations. Since we were staying at the Bellagio, we had easy access to their Champagne Brunch. Yup, all you can drink champagne along with the fantastic spread they have for their honoured guests! Other well-liked buffets include the Bacchanal Buffet at Caesars Palace and The Buffet at Wynn. Dinner will usually set you back by about $35-40 USD. However, here’s a fair warning before you decide on the whim to eat at a buffet: all of the popular spots will easily have a one-hour wait during meal times (no reservations). Have a plan of action and an idea of where you want to go the day before so you can avoid the line-ups. If the focus is only on the quality of the food, and not quantity, there are many restaurants that offer a wide range of dining experiences. Again, make your reservations a few days or even a week before. Many of the top international chefs that have made a name for themselves on cooking shows and lifestyle magazines have set up shop in Vegas. Some notable places include Michael Mina’s Nobhill Tavern, Joel Robuchon, Emeril’s, Wolfgang Puck, and Thomas Keller’s Bouchon. Service is impeccable because many of these places understand that the clientele is there for both the food and experience. Shows, clubs, and shopping are the other perks of being in the centre of the hubbub. The range of entertainment is wide and varied. Cirque de Soleil, the Montreal-based company, has all-ages performances (O, Ka, and Zarkana) and an adult-only revue (Zumanity). Magic and illusion may spark the curiosity in you so think about buying a ticket to David Copperfield. If showgirls and strippers tickle your fancy, consider Fantasy at the Luxor or the Thunder From Down Under at the Excalibur. For a tamer night with some Canadian flavour, watch Celine Dion sing her heart out or Shania Twain sweetly serenade you at the Colosseum in Caesars Palace.

Top: Core of The Strip 2nd from Top: Front of the Bellagio hotel 3rd from Top: Night lights Bottom: More slot machines

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 87


Champagne Brunch at the Bellagio

Right next door to our hotel is the ever posh and modern Cosmopolitan, which houses the Marquee night club. On any night with a special guest DJ spinning at the tables, the place will be jam packed with club goers. Come early or purchase your ticket ahead of time to avoid the long line-ups. XS Club at Encore is also a popular venue to get your music fix. Not only does it have an indoor area, but it also has access to a large outdoor pool. In the summers, they have pool party events that rival even the best beach parties in Miami. Drinks cost around $10-15 USD, but it’s worth it because they don’t hold back on the liquor. Both nights were the highlight of my trip since they were either a short walk or taxi-ride back to the hotel and the crowd was energetic, and happy. Everybody was looking to make a friend! After winning some money, the best thing to do is spend it. Shopping centres are conveniently located next to the more popular hotels. Across from us is the Miracle Mile Shops. If you need a sexy dress for a night on the town or the obligatory souvenir shirt stating, “I HEART Vegas”, you will easily find it here. To get more bang for your buck, visit one of the Premium Outlets (North and South) situated at both ends of The Strip. Be prepared to spend a day there. For the high-rollers out there, Crystals at City Centre is the ultimate shopping experience with brand name labels such as Louis Vuitton, Hermes, and Harry Winston. Hotels also have a large section of their property devoted to shops such as the Forum Shops at Caesars and The Grand Canal Shoppes at The Venetian.

Refillable slushy drinks

The joys of gambling bring plenty of visitors hoping to have a lucky hand at the tables and slots. You’d be hard-pressed not to find an adult that will drop a couple of coins or dollars to have a date with Lady Luck. You will have to tolerate the smoke-filled casinos (yes, smoking is still allowed indoors on these premises) in order to win some money. I, myself, slipped in an Andrew Jackson into a 25 cent slot machine to have my go at it. Ten minutes after, I found myself Jackson-less and looking for a cocktail from one of the servers who are more than happy to get you liquored up. Moderation. One thing to learn and never forget in Vegas is: if you want to make your stay a happy one, always remember to do everything in moderation.

For more information, check out the following links: www.bellagio.com www.expedia.com www.lvmonorail.com www.mirage.com www.caesarspalace.com www.wynnlasvegas.com www.venetian.com www.mgmgrand.com/restaurants/nobhill-tavern-restaurant.aspx www.mgmgrand.com/.../joel-robuchon-french-restaurant.aspx www.mgmgrand.com/restaurants/mgm-grand-buffet.aspx www.wolfgangpuck.com http://www.venetian.com/Las-Vegas-Restaurants/Fine-Dining/Bouchon/ www.cirquedusoleil.com/en/destinations/las-vegas/home.aspx www.mgmgrand.com/entertainment/david-copperfield.aspx www.luxor.com/entertainment/entertainment_fantasy.aspx http://www.excalibur.com/entertainment/thunder_from_downunder.aspx www.marqueelasvegas.com www.xslasvegas.com www.miraclemileshopslv.com www.premiumoutlets.com/lasvegas/ www.crystalsatcitycenter.com 88 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


Busy Nights

XS Nightclub

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 89


so what?

90 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 91


EDITORIAL

92 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 93


EDITORIAL

94 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


EDITORIAL

CANADA Photography: Hugo Soo Make-Up: Christina V Nguyen Wardrobe Styling: Lydia Chan Model: Romone Thomas

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 95


EDITORIAL

Liebe, Frieden, Gl端ck!

96 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 97


PHOTOGRAPHY

GERMANY Photography: Christine Polz (www.christinepolz.blogspot.de) Model: Avianna McKee 98 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 99


100 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Christine Polz is a 21 year old self-taught photographer living in Germany. She began photography three years ago, when she took her own photographs for her blog in order to give it a personal touch. From the humble beginnings of playing with her father’s camera, she is now always striving to improve upon her craft. She works with modeling agencies, and is also the lead photographer for a local magazine.

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 101


splash! “Paul” 102 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


“Huong” HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 103


PHOTOGRAPHY

“Paul”

“Brittany”

104 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


PHOTOGRAPHY

“Donna”

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 105


“Chad”

UNITED STATES Photography: David Levine (www.davidlevinephoto.com)

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: David is a portrait photographer who is passionate about melding concepts and fashion into captivating narratives. He strives to create relevant imagery that exudes drama, humor, and beauty. Aside from shooting portraits for professionals, models, and fashion, David also shoots portraits for families affected by Alzheimer’s Disease and pictures of pets with their family. 106 | VEUX | ISSUE 9 | HAPPINESS


“Kursten”

HAPPINESS | ISSUE 9 | VEUX | 107


www.veuxmag.com AVW Publishing Inc.

ISSUE NINE | HAPPINESS  

We look at what makes people happy and how that happiness is expressed around the world.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you