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View from the Sunset Fish Tavern, Oia, Santorini

We stop in at the Sunset Fish Tavern and I have a swordfish steak. It is grilled to perfection, and the fresh lemon and herbs give it a fresh, light flavour. The white wine that accompanies dinner is among the best I have ever tasted. The people of Santorini have been making wines since they mastered agriculture on the island, but many of their lovely vintages have been kept and sold for local consumption and North American distribution is practically nil. To guarantee that we have our fill, we polish off a bottle, then move onto their house reds. It would be easy to linger here all night but something very special to Oia beckons us. The sunset. Every tour guide and brochure about Santorini will rave about the sunset views from Oia. Unlike the wines, this is not a secret waiting for an enterprising tourist to discover. As the sun dips towards the horizons, the streets slowly fill with people all seeking the perfect vantage point. We climb the hundreds of stairs to get to the top of the cliffs and jockey for room on a ledge. The sky turns every shade of soft pastels as the golden orb sinks towards the waters, the last light reflecting off the famous white walls and blue domed buildings of Santorini . There is a hush among the observers - save for the frantic clicking of cameras - and then the sun tucks itself away for the night. Fira is the capital of Santorini. It’s easy to get lost as you wander the narrow, cobblestone streets - most of 38 | VEUX | ISSUE 6 | FLUIDITY

the buildings are painted the Cycladic white. Still - no matter where you go, there is shopping and food to be found. Like all tourist destinations, you can find stores to sell you T-shirts, bags and trinkets. But I’m looking for a different souvenir of my Santorini adventure: a donkey ride! To get from the port to the top of the cliffs where many villages are located, donkeys were used by locals before the invention of the car; in some areas, these beasts of burden are still very much a mainstay in the economy. For tourists, the benefits of riding the donkeys (a one way trip costs about 5 euros) is twofold: firstly, the donkeys can get you to the top of the cliffs in about 10 minutes whereas on our measly two feet, it would take the better part of 30 minutes of huffing and puffing up hill in the scorching Mediterranea sun. Secondly, it would save your shoes from shuffling through generations of donkey droppings! Luckily in Fira, for those who are not so keen on a journey with some floppy-eared friends, there are cable cars to take tourists and their luggage up from the harbour for about 4 euros per person. Santorini is a gem in the Aegean sea, a little pocket where a tourist can experience the trademark Greek hospitality, culture, and beauty. My biggest regret is not having more time to explore, eat, and relax in the beautiful atmosphere - but this just means I’ll have to return one day, doesn’t it?

ISSUE SIX | FLUIDITY  

Issue 6 explores the theme of fluidity - water, identity, life, and disaster - through arts, fashion, and writing. Check out www.veuxmag.co...

ISSUE SIX | FLUIDITY  

Issue 6 explores the theme of fluidity - water, identity, life, and disaster - through arts, fashion, and writing. Check out www.veuxmag.co...

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