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DECEMBER 2013 | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


VEUX Magazine - Issue 15 - Celebrations STAFF

Ada Adams Editor-In-Chief/Content Director/Public Relations ada@veuxmag.com

Vivien Hoang Editor/Advisor/Layout Design vivien@veuxmag.com

Wales Wong Editor/Literary Editor/Photographer wales@veuxmag.com

Yawen Chan Web Producer

CONTRIBUTORS: John Chung, Isaac Ely, Vivien Hoang, Phyllis Lane, Christopher Palazzo, Colin Shafer, Tyler Tilley, Ana Vujcuf, Wales Wong Features & Regulars PUBLISHER VEUX Magazine is published every two months by AVW Publishing Inc. CONTACT www.veuxmag.com General Information: info@veuxmag.com Editor-In-Chief: editor@veuxmag.com Editorial Submissions: editorial@veuxmag.com Writing Submissions: write@veuxmag.com Advertising Inquiries: advertise@veuxmag.com Subscribe: subscribe@veuxmag.com FOLLOW www.facebook.com/veuxmag www.twitter.com/VeuxMag

COVER PHOTO Photography: Phyllis Lane Make-Up & Hair: Linda Wagner Model: Gena Lee Nolin BACK PHOTO Photography: Tina Picard Make-up: Natalie Peachy Hair: Kirsty Macdonald Fashion Design: Charlotte by Myriam, and Paola Trapani Model: Jazmin (MIM)


IN THIS ISSUE

ISSUE FIFTEEN | CELEBRATIONS

Features & Regulars 5 Letter from the Editors 10 Beauty: Raw Diamonds 16 Feature: MenEssentials By Christopher Palazzo;

Photography by John Chung

Photography by Phyllis Lane

30 Feature: Gena Lee Nolin By ViVien Hoang; 46 Feature: A Tailor’s Cut By Christopher Palazzo;

Photography by Ana Vujcuf, Isaac Ely, &

Christopher Palazzo

Photography by Colin Shafer

82 Feature: Portraits on the Streets By Wales Wong;

Art & Writing 18

Visual: Tyler Tilley

Editorials

photography: Vlad Savin make-up: Amy Kenny wardrobe styling: Christabell McDonald assistant: James Prasser model: Carey W (Scene Model Management) Top by Cotton On Denim Jacket by Industry Necklace: Stylist’s Own

5 White Noise 24 Exotic Jewels 34 Troublemakers 40 Sun Destination 52 Struttin’ and Puttin’ 58 Cassouki 59 Color Theory 70 Film Noir 76 Road Trip 90 Southern Solitude 96 West Hollywood 102 The Dark Queen 108 Lost in the Wind


Jumper by Topshop Unique Necklaces by Ella Maximillion 4Shorts | VEUXby| ISSUE Mercy15 | CELEBRATIONS


Letter from the Editor

Season’s Greetings! In many places around the world, December is a time for celebration, reflection, and looking ahead. Throughout this issue, we aim to capture the spirit of the holidays in a variety of ways. Everyone has a different interpretation of celebration and we are so happy with all the unique submissions! For some, like our cover model and featured celebrity Gena Lee Nolin, it’s all about celebrating life, good health, and learning valuable lessons along the way. Our many talented photographers, make-up artists, designers, and models from all corners of the world have chosen very diverse takes on holiday art and fashion. We also have an article on the up-and-coming photography project Cosmpolis Toronto that takes a whole new look on celebrating culture! Resolutions are another big part of every new year. Each year, VEUX grows and changes in ways that make our online and print pages more accessible to viewers and contributors from all across the globe. In 2014, our submission process will be undergoing a transformation that will make it easier for all to use. Please make sure to visit us online at www.veuxmag.com/submit in January to view the new and improved contribution system and guidelines. The February theme is “Happily Ever After” and our editors are very excited to see your takes on happiness, fairytales, and real-life love! Deadline is January 20, 2014. As always, we celebrate you, dear readers and contributors. From all of us at VEUX, we wish you a safe and happy holiday season!

AA on behalf of the Editors at VEUX

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EDITORIAL Top by Mercy Skirt by Mossman Shoes by Asos Cuff: Stylist’s Own

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EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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Facing Page: Coat by Bronson Jack Jumpsuit by Carina Rice Necklaces by Ella Maximillion Shoes by Jeffrey Campbell


AUSTRALIA

photography: Bronwyn Townsend make-up: Rose Mossman hair: Danielle Murrihy wardrobe styling: Amy Wright model: Madeleine Parry (Chadwick Models) CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 9


BEAUTY On Semery Rings by Simons Cheeks: MAC in Emphasize, Peaches and Harmony Eyes: MAC in Copperplate, Woodwinked and White Frost Lips: Make Up For Ever, Lab Shine D0 On Ariel Ring by RW&Co Bracelet by Simons Cheeks: MAC in Emphasize, Blushbaby and Harmony Eyes: MAC in White Frost, ORB and Scene Lips: Make Up For Ever, Lab Shine D0

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BEAUTY

Raw Diamonds

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BEAUTY

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Earrings by Simons Necklace by Club Monaco Cheeks: MAC in Emphasize, Blushbaby and Harmony Eyes: MAC in White Frost, ORB and Scene Lips: Make Up For Ever, Lab Shine D0


BEAUTY

Earring by Simons Necklace by Simons Cheeks: MAC in Emphasize, Peaches and Harmony Eyes: MAC in Copperplate, Woodwinked and White Frost CELEBRATIONS 15 |Shine VEUX D0 | 13 Lips: Make Up For| ISSUE Ever, Lab


BEAUTY

This Page On Semery Headband by Simons Necklace by RW&Co Cheeks: MAC in Emphasize, Peaches and Harmony Eyes: MAC in Copperplate, Woodwinked and White Frost Lips: Make Up For Ever, Lab Shine D0 On Ariel Necklace by RW&Co Cheeks: MAC in Emphasize, Blushbaby and Harmony Eyes: MAC in White Frost, ORB and Scene Lips: Make Up For Ever, Lab Shine D0 Facing Page On Semery Swarovski crystals Eyes: MAC in Typographic Lips: Make Up For Ever, Lab Shine D0 14 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS

On Ariel Glitters: Ben Nye Eyeliner: MAC Penultimate eyeliner in Black


CANADA

photography: Audrey Belval (www.audreybelval.com) make-up: Isabella Forget (www.isabellaforget.com) wardrobe styling: Marie-Ève Côté models: Ariel & Semery (Montage Models) CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 15


FEATURE

MenEssentials: A New Man

One Stop Shop for a Grooming Overhaul By Christopher Palazzo Photography by John Chung With the holidays right around the corner, many shoppers will be plagued with the question of what gifts to buy their loved ones. For many, it is the men on their shopping list that pose the hardest problems when buying gifts. Men are often indecisive, picky, brand-loyal and unwilling to change what works. Remember those jeans your husband has worn since the 1980s? With an out of date wardrobe and a stubbornness to boot, many women believe that men are indifferent when it comes to their appearance. Well, many women would be shocked to realize that this is in fact not true! For the average man, a great deal of investment, both financial and in time, has been placed in creating and maintaining an appearance. We have witnessed the changes in the trends from metrosexual men who were once considered to be men on the fringes - caring about their appearance and using moisturizers not found in your local drug store - to today, where a stringent beauty and health regiment is regarded as necessary without any quip on a man’s masculinity. This is where MenEssentials comes into play. Operated by Seth Harman, an entrepreneur from Silicon Valley, he foresaw the shift in men’s fashion and culture. He led the charge and bought out the men’s grooming company from its Canadian founder back in 2011. It is the first and, as of now, the only shop of its kind in Canada, selling exclusively men’s grooming products. 16 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS

MenEssentials is simply put, the de facto place to buy all of your grooming products. With over 1,200 products such as moisturizers, shaving creams, fine shaving brushes, there is nothing too extravagant to be omitted from the product line at this shop. They even carry Floris, the cologne adored by James Bond. They first operated online, but Seth quickly opened a physical shop in May 2012. “We knew that we needed to allow our customers to come in and try our products, and the physical shop then became a necessity to build.” It is located on Danforth Avenue in Toronto, the heart of Greek Town. The shop is the quintessential man cave as the owner likes to refer to it. The subterranean shop has a flat-screen TV, a fireplace, wooden cabinets, and hardwood floors creating a welcoming environment. While visiting the shop, I quickly noticed the stream of customers it attracted. Since opening in May, business has been booming at the shop and now parallels the sales produced by the online store. In fact, business in so good that the company is expanding into the United States. American customers should be able to buy products via the online shop by year’s end. As well, another physical store expansion is not out of the question. Seth has hinted that a shop in Vaughan is an option for him since his customers who are based in the 905 area code are asking for one closer to home.


FEATURE In the age of large department store expansion in Canada, be it either Hudson’s Bay buying out Saks Fifth Avenue, or Nordstrom’s following the cue from Target by setting up shop north of the border, it truly is exciting to see Canadian retail enterprises growing and holding their own against the big box shops. MenEssentials prides themselves on product lines that are unavailable at department stores. Take Penhaligon for instance. A perfume company based in England whose lines of cologne are so unique and satisfying to the senses that once you sample one, you will be wondering why you have spent your money on those boring copycat department store brands you once fancied. Yes, Aqua Di Giò has nothing on some of these colognes. What I found most compelling was the sheer number of products the shop carries. When a brand is purchased, the entire product line is available, not just the moisturizer or the shave cream. With a price range starting from $10 (CAD) to several hundred dollars, everyone from the university student to the CEO can find what they want. From beginners to experienced man care aficionados, the shop welcomes all. With a talented and knowledgeable staff, no question is too big or unimportant to be answered. Staff wear casual clothing and are decked out with name tags. There is a certain high school reunion feel that admonishes the stuffiness and arrogance of their suited retail counterparts whose presence may shy away many customers. So this holiday season, in between buying gifts for everyone on your list, celebrate yourself by visiting the shop and trying out some of the unique and phenomenal products available. Your skin and maybe even the lover in your life will thank me. Shop online at: www.MenEssentials.ca Shop in-Store at: 412 Danforth Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Christopher Palazzo is a men’s fashion, lifestyle and culture enthusiast. He holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto in Political Science and History. He can be reached at chris.palazzo@me.com .

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ART

TYLER TILLEY 18 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


Amsterdam | 12” x 30” | Mixed Medium on Panel

Tyler Tilley is the co-founder of the Next Level Art Collective and co-owner of Goodfellas Gallery in Toronto. He has been experimenting with art his entire life, but it wasn’t until his mid-20’s that his art went from an outlet, to a passion, to a career. Now he thrives on finding original and raw ways to share his passion with the public. See more art at www.tylertilley.com .

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ART

Left for Dead | 24” x 18” | Mixed Medium on Canvas

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ART

Kids ii | 24” x 36” | Mixed Medium on Canvas

the Jedi | 22” x 24” | Mixed Medium on Canvas

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ART

Carl Beam | 24” x 48” | Mixed Medium on Panel

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ART

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EDITORIAL

Dress by Lotus Eye Belt by Topshop Earrings: Stylist’s Own 24 | VEUX | ISSUE&15Ring | CELEBRATIONS Bangle Bracelets by Irit Sorokin Designs Cuff: Stylist’s Own


Exotic Jewels

EDITORIAL

CANADA

photography: Christina Lazar-Schuler make-up & hair: Elena Ismail & Andrea Salazar fashion design: Lotus Eye wardrobe styling: Claudia Da Ponte models: Natalie Jean White & Mishel Efimov (Charles Stuart International)

Dress by Lotus Eye Bottom Dress by American Apparel Earrings: Stylist’s Own Top Necklace by H&M Bottom Necklace by Topshop Ring: Stylist’s Own Shoes| ISSUE by BCBGeneration CELEBRATIONS 15 | VEUX | 25


EDITORIAL Dress by Lotus Eye Socks by Missoni Body Chain Worn as Necklace by Element 7 Style Headpiece, Bracelet & Ring: Stylist’s Own

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Dress by Lotus Eye Belt by H&M Earrings and Ring: Stylist’s Own Socks by Missoni Shoes by Michael Kors

EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

Dress by Lotus Eye Top necklace by H&M Bottom Necklace by Topshop 28 | VEUX 15 |by CELEBRATIONS Ring, Cuff |&ISSUE Bracelet Irit Sorokin Designs


EDITORIAL

Dress by Lotus Eye Top Necklace by Topshop Belt Worn as Bottom Necklace: Stylist’s Own Ring from Original Toronto Shoes by Privileged

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FEATURE

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FEATURE

Gena Lee Nolin:

Sexy Inside and Out

By ViVien Hoang Photography by Phyllis Lane

When you’re in the magazine business, you never know who you will have a chance to have a conversation with. A new artist, the hottest designer, a singer-songwriter – it’s all possible – maybe even a Hollywood star? So it was with slight nervousness that I dialed the number for Gena Lee Nolin’s cell phone so we could talk about her career, her struggles with her health, and her new book, Beautiful Inside and Out: Conquering Thyroid Disease with a Healthy, Happy, ‘Thyroid Sexy’ Life (co-written with New York Times bestseller Mary Shomon and published on October 8, 2013). I mean, this is Gena Lee Nolin. She was on TV as Neely Capshaw, Baywatch babe, as I was growing up, and her posters probably adorned the walls and lockers of many of my pubescent friends. Turns out, I didn’t have to be nervous at all. Nolin was warm and candid as she shared the stories of her life and career. Nolin’s career started when she moved to Los Angeles, California at 19. California always drew the blonde beauty and initially she went to California to pursue an education in interior design. On a whim, she auditioned to be one of Bob Barker’s beauties on the hit daytime game show The Price is Right but never expected anything of it. “I was a cocktail waitress. I lived in the real world. But I went and auditioned, and I got the part. It literally went from being a cocktail waitress, going to school, going to the studios, to being on TV! It happened really fast.” Being at the right place at the right time certainly didn’t hurt her career. A casting agent for Baywatch saw her modeling in a bathing suit and contacted Nolin’s agent to have her come in to read lines for a new character, Neely. “I thought to myself – no way! I’ve never acted, I don’t even know what a script looks like. They told me not to worry about it, here are your lines – and oh, by the way, you’re going to read with David Hasselhoff!”

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FEATURE Nolin got the part and after that, she was everywhere. She continued working at The Price is Right for four months after she began filming Baywatch, driving back and forth from set to set until she figured that this Baywatch thing was really taking off. “It was crazy. I was in magazines, everywhere. It was a whirlwind.” What makes it all the more amazing is that Nolin didn’t originally go to California to be a Hollywood actress and a big star. Even today, she is remarkably humble about the whole experience. “I always thought it was for other people – really beautiful, amazing, incredible women. I just thought I was a normal girl. When it happened, I didn’t know what hit me.” Unfortunately, Nolin’s beachside fairytale took a dark turn. Shortly after her son Spencer, now 16, was born, she found herself in the depth of post-partum depression. Other symptoms began showing up as well, but doctors chalked it up to the depression and prescribed antidepressants. It helped in the short term but many of the symptoms, like exhaustion, hair loss and weight gain, were still there. Undiagnosed, they worsened during Nolin’s second pregnancy (with her son Hudson). “I got up to 200 pounds. Not a lot of people have those pictures! I was a mess. My hair was dry and brittle. My face was puffy. Everything was off. That’s when I knew I was sick.” Doctors were unable to give Nolin a definitive diagnosis – and guesses ranged from Valley Fever to diabetes – and finally her family doctor recommended that she see a psychiatrist. “They thought it was all in my head. I was mortified. I went to my car and just bawled. There’s got to be somebody who will listen to me. Something isn’t right.” During Nolin’s third pregnancy, she found herself in the hospital suffering from atrial fibrillations. Fortunately, she had a healthy daughter, Stella. It was five months after Stella’s birth and many years after the initial symptoms first appeared that Nolin was finally diagnosed with Hashimoto’s Disease (also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), a condition where the immune system attacks the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system and helps to control and regulate your body’s hormones. A doctor, on a hunch, sent her for an ultrasound on her neck and as Nolin tells me, it was obvious. “My thyroid was enlarged. They saw Hashimoto’s. They saw nodules, some which could have been cancerous. It was scary, but now I knew and I could take control.” She became glued to the Internet, reading and researching. Nolin tried various medications until she finally found a thyroid medication based off of a pig’s thyroid. “Within a week, I felt like a different person. Having this other medication really saved me.”

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Nolin decided that she was done suffering in silence and wanted to have a voice to help people learn about the disease and their options. Her “Thyroid Sexy” Facebook page has nearly 60,000 LIKES from all around the globe and she has teamed up with Mary Shomon to help her advocacy. Nolin herself is a regular contributor on Yahoo!, CelebrityBabyScoop and is starting her own website, www.officialgenaleenolin.com. Nolin will also be going on a book tour to promote her new book, Beautiful Inside and Out. Nolin admits that the book is brutally honest about her health struggles. “It’s very personal. I don’t think I’ve ever been so open. There are things I’ve said in the book that my mom didn’t even know. But I’m talking about it and it’s on my terms. I’m able to tell my story. This book was all or nothing.” Shomon collaborated with Nolin on the medical and technical elements of thyroid disease and they were able to have several doctors contribute as well. “People are getting a real medical guide for their thyroid.” Nowadays, you’re more likely to find Nolin reading bedtime stories than scripts. She is married to former hockey player Cale Hulse and is a mother of three children. Listening to her speak about her life, she sounds like a woman who has found her happy place and the right balance between life and work. “I always knew I wanted to be a mom and to have a family. My life is so full and I love it. Doing school projects, watching school plays and then doing a premiere or writing my book – it’s a cool place to be. Being a mom is by far the best thing I’ve ever done.” I don’t doubt this last statement for a second – and even if I had my doubts, Nolin would have quickly erased them as she launches into a frank discussion with me about her philosophies on raising her children. “I always had a good head on my shoulder and always surrounded myself with good people. I think that’s the best advice I could give my kids. Keep your eyes open, go with your gut instincts. You really have to be aware. Life lessons are everything!” It’s clear Nolin has found a purpose after all of her hard fought and hard won life lessons. “I’m happy where I’m at. I’m almost 42 and I’ve never felt better, never felt sexier. When I was 25, running on the beach and super skinny – I didn’t know what I was doing or who I was. But now – I think I get it. And I love it.” We love it too, Gena Lee! Photography: Phyllis Lane (www.phyllislane.com) Make-up & Hair: Linda Wagner (www.lindawagnermakeup.com)

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EDITORIAL

Troublemakers 34 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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FRANCE AND JAPAN

photography: Yuji Watanabe (www.yujiwatanabe.book.fr) make-up: Justine Tallot hair: Amelie Salomon wardrobe styling: Amany Behounna post-production: Alexandra Dumitrache models: Adrien Volkov & Julien Sznejderman (Bananas Models)

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Shirt by H&M Bikini by Victoria’s Secret


Sun Destination

EDITORIAL

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Bikini by Victoria’s Secret Drape Cardigan by LA SENZA Accessories: Model’s Own

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EDITORIAL Bikini by Victoria’s Secret Pants by LA SENZA Accessories: Model’s Own

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EDITORIAL

Necklace by H&M Earrings: Model’s Own 44 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


CANADA

photography: Hong Lee (www.hongvision.ca) make-up & hair: Irene Sy (www.irenesy.com) wardrobe styling: Hong Lee model: Melissa Pank (Annabelle Cho - annabellechomodelplacement.blogspot.ca / Spot 6 Management - www.spot6management.com) CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 45


FEATURE

A Tailor’s Cut

Bespoke Tailoring in the Age of Fast Fashion

By Christopher Palazzo Photography by Ana Vujcuf, Isaac Ely, & Christopher Palazzo

Drinking an espresso street side in Yorkville – Toronto’s epicentre of fine fashion and dining – while people watching is not so much a past-time as it is a sport. Murmurs from Toronto’s well-to-do quietly yet unapologetically judge and size up every man, woman, and child that walk by.

I love those shoes. That bag is fake. Her husband cheated on her. Label addict.

Christopher Palazzo is a men’s fashion, lifestyle and culture enthusiast. He holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto in Political Science and History. He can be reached at chris.palazzo@me.com . 46 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


FEATURE Yet a one of kind look comes with a one of a kind price tag. On average, suits can sell for a few thousand dollars, some even eclipsing the price of a low end Volkswagen depending on the fabric chosen. Couture, like bespoke, provides their well-to-do female clientele a dazzling array of finely crafted garments and a high-end alternative to the offthe-rack, mass-produced styles of clothes that currently flood the marketplace. Watching a couture show is nothing short of a treat for one’s senses. The finest fabrics emblazoned with jewels transport the audience to an era of glamour and indulgence - a place of pure dreams and an escape from the mundane life of 21st century Western society. But couture has been on the decline for the last fifty or so years. The famed fashion houses which were once the jewel of Paris have since gone out of business. Christian Lacroix – a genius in my standing – Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Balmain, and Balenciaga are just a few of the great artists whose collections no longer include couture. However, unlike couture, the business of bespoke has been on the rise.

Yes, ‘label addict,’ no term has come to define a generation of fashion patrons quite like this. Today, the fashion industry’s biggest players know the importance of branding: every bag, every pair of sunglasses, every coat, and yes, every pair of underwear are emblazoned with a company’s logo. The mantra today is simple why spend thousands of dollars on a bag if no one will know what brand it is? Flaunt it or do not even bother. But above the label-addicted crowd and the companies that cater to them, one genre of fashion has remained unshaken by the branding juggernaut: bespoke tailoring. Catering to a select clientele of discerning men who choose to put style and fit above brands and showmanship, they trust their fashion desires in the ageold craft.

Suits and shirts custom tailored to a man’s exact measurements and tastes. Hundreds of fabric choices yielding thousands of options for creating that truly customized look.

“I have never been busier,” says Isaac Ely, owner and tailor of Isaac Ely Bespoke in Toronto. In business for over 25 years, I sat down with Isaac to discuss his business and how bespoke has changed since opening his shop. “Men care about how they look more so than ever before,” Isaac remarks. For many fashion watchers, the most revolutionary and game-changing aspect of the global fashion industry has been with regard to men’s fashion. The dissemination of retailers and designers producing and selling clothes and accessories geared towards men has increased dramatically in the last decade or so. The drab and dreary blue and black staple suits every boy was told to own by their father have evolved. A standard blue cotton suit? How about a navy blue suit with pink pinstripes instead. Or that ubiquitous cotton black pallbearer-esque suit every teenage boy and unadventurous accountant has stored in their closet? Why not a black velvet dinner jacket with satin peak lapels. Men’s fashion is no longer a status quo, but rather a statement. Colour, fit, and fabrics tell the inadvertent virtues and vices of their owner. CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 47


When I visited Isaac to discuss his life, his work, and his passion towards tailoring, he offered to make me a shirt and a pair of pants to give me a first-hand look at the process of bespoke. For many, bespoke is unattainable, a luxury available only to those of us who can afford the steep prices of quality. However, in a comparative sense, the cost of a bespoke garment is no less than what one would expect to pay for a garment of similar quality from a high-end designer. Shirts start at roughly $350 (CAD), pants at $650 and suits at $3000. For the man who can afford these, the fit of the product far outweighs a clichéd brand logo. I am a man of colour. Colour for me is life. It is representative of all the wonderful emotions I choose to fill my life with, so naturally I disdain anything black. For my customized shirt, I chose a yellow and white ging48 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS

ham fabric from Italy. For my pants, I went conservative and chose a navy blue fabric. The options were endless. From the cuffs to the collars, to the fit of the pants, to the size of the belt rings. For even the most seasoned style mavens, the process may seem daunting. Luckily, there is a tailor by your side to guide even the wariest of fashion seekers. “First off, you must know the difference between bespoke and made to measure, because they are not the same - not even in the slightest regard,” Isaac tells me as he begins to take my measurements. “Made to measure are predesigned garments – the fabrics, the collar and the cuffs are already chosen – they are adjusted to the customer’s measurements, whereas bespoke is a completely new garment designed to the customers specifications.”


Isaac takes my measurements. The length of my arm, my waist, my chest, my wrist and my neck - the standards. He then begins to discuss with me the shape of my torso and why a made to measure shirt cannot address the issues that plague me. “See, your shoulders begin to slope inward. They aren’t perfectly straight, so on a standard shirt the fabric folds on the shoulder blades, and secondly your neck bends slightly forward which, on a standard shirt, creates a gap from the shirt collar to the back of your neck which can choke you if you wear a tie,” Isaac educates me. I nod in agreement. So much for my claim to knowing what looks good on me. We move on to the pants. Knowing my shortcomings, I inform Isaac that I have no rear end (let’s keep it polite) and ask him if, by changing the fit of the pants, can we recreate one? He replied, “Yes, of course… by raising the waistline, slimming your pant leg and raising your inseam, it will fit you perfectly to create the look you want.” Who needs plastic surgery when you have a good tailor? But the issues that plague my body type are rather minuscule, compared to other body figures such as athletes, or heavier set individuals, who benefit the most from bespoke tailoring. Athletes with broad shoulders, muscular legs, and narrow waists tend to have the problem of unusable pockets on their pants because the pants are not wide enough around the thighs to allow a pocket to freely sit. Or heavier set men who have larger waistlines, yet smaller shoulders are unable to find jackets that fit their body type. Bespoke addresses those issues.

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FEATURE

After my fitting, I visit the workshop Isaac has on site; all garments are manufactured in-house under the quality assurance of its owner. Every worker is personally trained by Isaac, a revelation that shocked me. Here in Toronto, there are still remnants of the old ways of manufacturing clothes, passed on from skilled tailors to apprentices. It delighted me to see this practice still in use. Ask Isaac why he is a tailor and there’s a simple response, “It’s all I know.” Working in the textile industry for nearly 30 years, fleeing Iran shortly after the revolution, and then arriving in Toronto via Turkey and Holland, his life is the quintessential rags to riches story. Walking around the shop, I can feel the energy. The workers all believe in Isaac’s mission to create the best clothes possible. As the expression goes, ‘It takes a village to raise a child,’ so it certainly takes more than one hand to make a shirt. Last summer, while in Paris, I left my hotel located in the glitzy Avenue Montaigne and Champs-Élysées district of Paris and walked down to Place Vendôme to Charvet, a high-end men’s retail shop selling bespoke and ready-to-wear shirts and other fine garments. Charvet is the pinnacle of men’s tailoring. From kings to the societal elite, all have donned Charvet’s fine quality fashions. The closest I could get to recreating that fine French quality was at Isaac’s in Toronto. Unlike made to measure, bespoke involves fittings to produce the best fitting garment possible. On average, 2-3 fittings are required for shirts and suits in a timespan of roughly three weeks. Once I received my shirt and pants, I saw the quality and effort that went into making them. Hand-stitched patterned fabrics are sewn together at the cuffs to create a seamless pattern in which all the lines simply match up. There is the stately presence of mother-of-pearl buttons. The excess shirt fabric is gathered and sewn into the waist strap inside the pants creating a truly unique and complimentary outfit. If I was inclined to buy a new shirt, all shirt sizing sheets are kept in shop so future purchases do not require fittings. This is another practice many tailors do not do.

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You know Mother Teresa said, ‘I am a pen, and God does the writing,’ so in a way, I’m God’s scissors…

So the question becomes, why should you buy a bespoke garment instead of a high-end off-the-rack copy? Well, if I have not convinced you yet, then there is little hope remaining. If one feels that a Tom Ford suit or a Versace shirt represents their own style then by all means walk around the city donning it. However, if fit and quality is superior to you than labels, the choice is clear. Bespoke caters to the man whose presence is enough to make a statement. His clothes are secondary. Labels do not define him and the needless mark up some of these luxury brands do not represent his status. Fashion and style, once complimentary, are now two completely separate entities. Fashion is simply what we are told to wear and style is how we wear it. Fashion disdains individuality whereas style hates conformity. These two groups may never reach a compromise but for now there is a middle option and that, for me, is bespoke. Fabric choices and a perfect fit which is enough to please the style conscious shopper and guaranteed exclusivity to please the fashion crowd. During one of my visits to Isaac’s shop, I asked him to sum up his work in a few words. After a brief moment of contemplation, the well-read tailor turns to me and says, “You know Mother Teresa said ‘I am a pen, and God does the writing,’ so in a way, I’m God’s scissors… I make clothes to make people happy, and when they are happy, I’m happy.” And really, what else could we ask for from a tailor? Visit Isaac in Shop at: 85 Champagne Drive Toronto, Ontario M3J 2C6, Canada www.isaacely.com

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EDITORIAL

Struttin’ and Puttin’

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EDITORIAL

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CANADA

photography: Ricci R. Chen (www.chenran.cc) make-up: Christine Spence (DCD Approach Inc) hair: Denise Style It Couture (DCD Approach Inc) wardrobe styling: Diane Mcbean (DCD Approach Inc) models: Valery (Velocci Model Management) and Willard Gillard

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CASSOUKI 58 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL UNITED STATES

photography: Jim Hesterman make-up: Jessica Fiero fashion design: Cassouki Couture video direction: Chris Barron model: Rachel Kaye Eblin Shot on location at Epiphany Studios.

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EDITORIAL

Shirt by Ralph Lauren Dress by Mod Luseve Bow Tie by Tommy Hilfiger 64 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS Vintage Hat: Stylist’s own


COLOR THEORY

UNITED STATES

photography: Wander Aguiar (www.wanderaguiar.com) make-up & hair: Christina McCord wardrobe styling: Jorge Corella assistant photography: Andrey Bahia model: Alexandria Williams Jacket by Via Spiga Shirt by Ralph Lauren Sunglasses by Gucci Bow Tie by Barill Shorts by Tahre Shoes by Jimmy Choo CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 65


EDITORIAL

Shirt by DKNY Pants by Ralph Lauren Tie by Tommy Hilfiger Watch by DIESEL Belt by WCM-NY 66 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


EDITORIAL

Top Left: Suit by Vince Camuto Shirt by ALFANI Watch by DIESEL Top Right: Skirt by Walter Baker Rain Coat by Via Spiga Tie by ALFANI Shoes by Cole Haan Sunglasses by Chanel Bottom Right: Suit by Walter Baker Shirt by Halogen Sunglasses by Gucci

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EDITORIAL

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Pants by Adrianna Papell Shirt by INC Jacket by Diane Von Furstenberg Belt by WCM-NY Glasses: Vintage


EDITORIAL

Shirt and Pants by Michael Kors Jacket by Kensie Tie by Bar III Belt by Another Line Clutch by Zara Hat by Rachel Zoe

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EDITORIAL

Film Noir

CANADA

photography: Vladimir Kevorkov (www.kevorkov.com) make-up & hair: Karelea Mazzola fashion design: Reena Green Designs wardrobe styling: Reena Green model: Josie Lee (www.josielee.com)

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EDITORIAL

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Jewellery and hat design by Reena Green.


EDITORIAL

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Road Trip JAPAN

photography: Ko Kawaguchi (kokawaguchi.net) make-up: Kento Utsubo (kento-utsubo.com) hair: Ken Tanuma wardrobe styling: Naki Yoshida model: Ekaterina (Zucca Models - Japan) 76 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


EDITORIAL

Knit Top by Akane Utsunomiya Belt: Stylist’s Own Skirt by The Reracs Shoes by Fabel CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 77


Dress by Markus Lupfer Accessories by Flake

Top by Stylistone Pants by ANT!PODiUM Loafers by Nalin Hat: Stylist’s Own

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Knit Top by io Pants by Lep Luss Shoes by Fabel Accessories: Stylist’s Own Coat by ANT!PODiUM

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EDITORIAL

Knit Top by Akane Utsunomiya Skirt by Markus Lupfer Belt: Stylist’s Own 80 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS Shoes by ANT!PODiUM


Top by Fleamadonna Accessories by Flake

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Portraits

on the Streets

By Wales Wong Photography by Colin Shafer When I first meet Colin Boyd Shafer, it was like meeting an old friend. Within ten minutes, we jump right into a conversation about coffee. I take it that he’s been drinking a lot of the caffeine loaded concoction nowadays to help him stay up for all the work he’s been doing.

Cosmopolis Toronto, as the project is so appropriately titled, is about documenting immigrants who now call this city their home. My introduction to Shafer was in the early days when the physical aspect of this project started to unfold. By physical, I mean the traveling back and forth every day from Kitchener, Ontario to Toronto so that he could interview his participants and capture these individuals in a place that makes them feel at home, along with a photograph of them holding an object which reminds them of their past. There is a curiosity about migration and how Canada “shows the breadth” of diversity that made this idea take form. When I ask why he decided to embark on this exploration for immigrants in Toronto, he says: “I wanted a cohesive picture of the city.” Being the second participant, I am excited to see how this project will develop. Born in the United States, then moving to Hong Kong during my adolescence, and finally calling Toronto as my home now, the project tickled my curiosity. 82 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


FEATURE Catalina from Colombia at Robarts Library on the University of Toronto campus.

Catalina’s picture of her best friends.

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FEATURE

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FEATURE

His goal is to photograph a person from every country. At least 200 people. Wow. A big venture and one that will clearly show just how multicultural this city is. As a Torontonian, there’s a lot of humble pride that manifests itself when I say where I live now. When I read each person’s story on the website, they are very different, but there has been an overall feeling that Toronto is a welcoming place that is a safe haven and a place of opportunities.

But let’s rewind a bit. Shafer is a teacher by trade but began his journalism endeavours when he became a columnist for The Malaysian Insider while he was teaching in Malaysia from 2008-2012. His unique goal and style incorporate awareness of social issues through photography. Shafer started photography back in 2005. His interest was spurred on by a trip to South America. Then there is a family history as well. With a great-great-grandfather who used to shoot portraits professionally, a mother who photographed children with ponies on film, and a father who is a collector of cameras, it’s no surprise that he pursued this art form. He is no stranger to topics that invite the viewer to engage in conversations regarding human rights and social issues alike. When it came to this project, he wanted to make sure he had a plan. Previously, he pieced together the narrative based on the pictures he had taken, working from the finished products. CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 85


FEATURE From the series “Americans” - Gaitlinburg

But for Cosmopolis Toronto, Shafer has set his visionary goals. Keeping the end in mind, his journey has been no less than an adventure, giving him numerous opportunities to discover different parts of Toronto as he spent most of his life in Kitchener, the UK, and Malaysia. From the Toronto Public Library at Yonge and Bloor to a water filtration plant, there aren’t many places he has not ventured for his subjects. With street photography, he photographed individuals who were working on the streets during a trip to Bangkok, Thailand. Understandably, the nature of candidly photographing humans and their interactions can be tricky. “Within that environment, they have their communities which they have to protect… There’s always a conflict in how much we should photograph, how much we should portray.” Looking through his images, it is evident he has found the delicate balance between showing reality while revealing the subject’s vulnerability. Shafer’s travels took him to numerous cities around the world. While in the United States, he compiled images of “Americans” which show an eclectic mix of everyday people in cities such as New York City and Gatlinburg. Contrast that collection with “The Piknik” and “Uprising”, photographs of protestors in Istanbul’s Gezi Park back in May.

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FEATURE Documenting the protests in Gezi Park was quite possibly one of his toughest projects because of the intensity and danger of tear gas being used by the police. But you won’t see the fighting, the anger, nor the rage between those protesting and the police forces. His intention was to “tell smaller stories on the side” and these photos illustrate the lives of citizens who occupied the park to make a statement. For the work that he did in Turkey, he was the winner of the 2013 Human Rights Photography Competition in connection with the Human Rights Watch Film Festival (London, UK). Every couple of days I see updates on Cosmopolis Toronto’s Facebook page with postings on various media outlets featuring his project highlighting the attention it has gained since he started back in September. Due to the positive response, the project will have its first exhibition at the Toronto Centre for the Arts in North York, Ontario from January 15 to February 22, 2014. After that, Shafer plans on continuing to photograph and teach, taking Cosmopolis Toronto on tour, and possibly moving to South America. If you live in Toronto and are interested in participating, Boyd is still looking for a few individuals from various countries. Check www. cosmopolistoronto.com to see an updated list of the countries and to read the participants’ stories about their past and present. Stay tuned for our next issue as we follow up on the progress of Cosmopolis Toronto. www.colinshafer.com

Photograph of Colin Shafer provided by Wales Wong.

From the series “The Piknik”

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From the series “Uprising”

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EDITORIAL Top by Cotton On Suit Jacket by Sports Craft Pants by Neuw Belt by Country Road

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Southern Solitude

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Shirt by French Connection Pants by Neuw Belt by Country Road


Top by Cotton On Jacket: Stylist’s Own Jeans by G-Star Raw

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Singlet by Cotton On Jeans by Lee Bracelet by Buckle Belt by Country Road Shoes by Windsor Smith 94 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS


Shirt by French Connection Pants by Neuw Belt by Fossil Jewellery: Stylist’s Own

AUSTRALIA

photography: Vlad Savin (www.vladsavin.com.au) make-up: Amy Kenny (www.amykennymakeup.com) wardrobe styling: Christabell McDonald (www.christabellmcdonald.com) assistant: James Prasser model: Carey W (Scene Model Management)

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EDITORIAL

West Hollywood

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UNITED STATES

photography: John Russo make-up: Evilyn Ramirez hair: Andy Hernandez wardrobe styling: Masha Lund videography: GEA model: Kaki West Shot on location in Beverly Hills, CA.

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EDITORIAL Dress by Michael Costello Belt by Michael Costello Earrings by Alexis Bittar Ring by David Yurman

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EDITORIAL

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Bodysuit by BCBG Fur Coat by Douek & Jones Shoes by YSL Belt by Alaia


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The Dark Queen

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EDITORIAL Coat by Kristofer Kongshaug Silk Blouse by Voriagh Headdress by Laure Mory Pumps by Jorge Bischoff

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EDITORIAL

Dress by Atsuro Tayama Shoes by Jorge Bischoff 104 | VEUX | ISSUE 15 | CELEBRATIONS Earrings by Kokon to Zai


Leather Top by Giorgio & Mario Harem Pants by Atsuro Tayama Necklace by Laure Mory Fringed Cuff by Laure Mory

Wool Coat by Atsuro Tayama Skirt by Kristofer Kongshaug Ring by Gavilane Headdress by Laure Mory Silk Blouse and Neck Scarf by Atsuro Tayama Jacquard Skirt by Voriagh Pin by Laure Mory

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EDITORIAL

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Long Dress by Kristofer Kongshaug Cape by Atsuro Tayama


Jumpsuit by Balensi Chez L’Eclaireur Leather Pouch by Balenciaga Necklace by Laure Mory

FRANCE

photography: Joffrey Montes (joffrey-montes.tumblr.com) make-up: Sarah Henry (www.sarah-henry.com) hair: Camille Siguret (camillesiguret.tumblr.com) wardrobe styling: Jessy Cottineau model: Nicole Meyer (Karin Models)

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Lost in the Wind

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EDITORIAL

Dress from Charlotte by Myriam

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EDITORIAL

Dress by Paola Trapani

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CANADA

photography: Tina Picard (www.tinapicard.com) make-up: Natalie Peachy (www.nataliepeachy.com) hair: Kirsty Macdonald fashion design: Charlotte by Myriam, and Paola Trapani model: Jazmin (MIM) CELEBRATIONS | ISSUE 15 | VEUX | 113


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