Page 1

OCTOBER 2013 | ISSUE 14 | MASKS & MONSTERS Vol. 2 - “Monsters”


VEUX Magazine - Issue 14 - Masks & Monsters - Vol. 2 “Monsters” STAFF

Ada Adams Editor-In-Chief/Content Director/Public Relations ada@veuxmag.com

Vivien Hoang Editor/Advisor/Layout Design vivien@veuxmag.com

Wales Wong Editor/Literary Editor/Photographer wales@veuxmag.com

Yawen Chan Web Producer

CONTRIBUTORS: Joylyn Chai, ViVien Hoang, Tim Jeffs, Kelly Liu, Mark Matcho, Effie Seiberg, Aero Windwalker PUBLISHER VEUX Magazine is published every two months by AVW Publishing Inc. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine are soley those of the original author and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of VEUX Magazine, AVW Publishing Inc., any of its staff, and/or any/all contributors to this magazine. CONTACT www.veuxmag.com General Information: info@veuxmag.com Editor-In-Chief: editor@veuxmag.com Editorial Submissions: editorial@veuxmag.com Writing Submissions: write@veuxmag.com Advertising Inquiries: advertise@veuxmag.com Subscribe: subscribe@veuxmag.com FOLLOW www.facebook.com/veuxmag www.twitter.com/VeuxMag

COVER PHOTO photography: Der Wei Chan make-up & hair: Sherry Vanstone model: Vivien H BACK PHOTO photography: Jesse Fox make-up: Galvin Mason hair: Macy Fox wardrobe styling: Rachelle Andra & Ashley Bowman model: Kendal Elder (MTM Cincinnati) & Lil Bub


IN THIS ISSUE

ISSUE FOURTEEN | MASKS & MONSTERS Vol. 2 - “Monsters” Features & Regulars 4 Letter from the Editors 16 Devil in the Details: Tim Jeffs - By ViVien Hoang; Photography by Mark Matcho 24 Beauty: All Creatures, Great and Small

Art & Writing 10 Visual: Kelly Liu 40 Fiction: Strong as Stone - By Effie Seiberg; Photography by Aero Windwalker 54 Visual: Joylyn Chai

Editorials 4 Raven 30 Ultraviolet 34 Umbra 48 The Year of the Snake 60 Fallen 66 Concrete 72 Woodland Ritual 78 Guardian 84 Beauty and the Bub

photography: Alexandro Adds make-up & hair: Amanda Schön wardrobe styling: Dayana Molina model: Priscila Cavaliere (40 Graus) and Hugo Oliveira


Letter from the Editor

Shirt by Bebe Pants by Forever21 4Shoes | VEUXby | ISSUE Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS Gianni14 Bini


In our Volume Two - Monsters, we reveal the sublime and the grotesque. These are creatures that deviate from what we think is normal, but are very much a part of human nature. An all-consuming force that frightens or inspires us, we all have something within. Can we tell the difference between a devil and an angel? Can a fearsome exterior belie a vulnerability? How we confront these monsters is evident in the aesthetics around us. Every artist, writer, and photographer in this issue has found a way to illustrate their interpretation. In silence or in screams, the subjects in each of our features and editorials reveal the power of our inner demons. This time around, we had a very challenging time selecting submissions due to the numbers and calibre of the work. We thank everyone who has taken a chance to let us showcase your story in our publication and are, as always, grateful to you for the work that you have done.

~W.W. On behalf of the Editors

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 5


EDITORIAL

Raven

6 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS

Shirt by Bebe Pants by Forever21 Shoes by Gianni Bini


BEAUTY

Jacket by Bebe Swimsuit by White House Black Market Boots by a.n.a

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 7


EDITORIAL

Vest by Express Swimsuit by White House Black Market Leggings by One Step Up Shoes by Sperry

8 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL Shirt by Worthington Bra by Victoria’s Secret Scarf by Guess Shoes by Mossimo Belt by Antek Emporium

UNITED STATES photography: Kristy Mapp make-up & hair: Areial Taylor wardrobe styling: Kristy Mapp model: Leela Kapadia MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 9


10 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


ART

Kelly Liu

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Kelly is always looking for the intelligence and relationship between human being and the nature, while paying attention to emotion. She is inspired to paint by her subconscious and dreams. She has a better understanding of herself by reflecting on her works. She hopes her works can arouse empathy and resonance to others You can contact her at liujingwen1026@hotmail.com MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 11


ART

12 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


ART

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 13


ART

14 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


ART

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 15


FEATURE

16 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


FEATURE

Devil in the Details: Tim Jeffs

Interview and Text by ViVien Hoang

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 17


FEATURE Some people are blessed with creativity and talent in all artistic media. Tim Jeffs is one of those people: some might know him as a guitarist and founding member of the heavy metal band White Zombie, while others have worked with him in New York City as he pursued a career as a Creative Director in publishing. He has done design work for websites, books and logos. But visual art and drawing have always been a passion for Jeffs. Known for his highly intricate and detailed ink drawings of animals, for the very first time, his artwork and prints are available for purchase.

Many children make drawings which proud parents put on their refrigerator, but Jeffs discovered his talents early. He recalled, “I’ve been drawing since I can remember. Throughout elementary school I would draw constantly, and animals were my favorite subject matter. I loved detail the more complex and intricate the better. With every drawing I did, I tried to outdo the last in its complexity. I challenged myself, finding increasingly intricate creatures to create on paper.” He had an opportunity to hone his art skills in the 7th grade, when his school offered an art elective. “The art teacher had a reputation of being extremely hard on his students and I remember being completely intimidated by him. His name was Oroon Barnes – a man with an extremely large presence. He was over six feet tall, with a strong southern accent. He ran his art class like boot camp. He took it seriously and if you didn’t, he was going to let you know.” Because of Jeffs’ hard work, he was noticed by his art teacher who encouraged the youngster to pursue art as a career. Jeffs’ confidence was bolstered when he began winning art contests. His path continued in high school, where in addition to his regular classes, he spent his afternoons attending Mr. Barnes’ art center for gifted art students. In his final year of high school, his fate as an artist was sealed when he placed 2nd out of dozens of students in the national Presidential Awards art competition in Miami, Florida which helped him secure a spot and a scholarship to Parsons School of Design in New York City. He later graduated from Parsons with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Illustration. Jeffs’ time at Parsons was life changing, in ways beyond the usual collegiate experience. It was here that he met his roommate and Illustration classmate, Rob Cummings – who would later become the renowned American musician, film director, producer and screenwriter, Rob Zombie. 18 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 19


FEATURE

Photography by Mark Matcho

Together, along with fellow student Sean Yseult and Ivan de Prume, they founded the heavy metal band White Zombie. Jeffs’ musical and art history are so linked it would be impossible to separate one from the other. “Art was something we all loved to do, did all the time, and all shared among each other. Rob and Sean did all the White Zombie Band art. If there is one thing that is common among artists, it’s music. Most every art student I met in college played some type of instrument. Rob and I immediately gravitated to playing music. So when Rob and Sean had the idea of forming a band and asked me to play guitar, I instantly said yes.”

20 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


FEATURE

Like his art, Jeffs’ started playing music as a child. “I had a newspaper route and I saved up $500, which for a 12 year old kid, was a huge amount of money in 1979. I went to the local guitar store and bought a 1979 Fender Stratocaster in Antiqua burst. I didn’t know how to play a note. I got home and my father said, “You paid $500 for that guitar and you can’t even play yet?” And I remember saying, “Yup, but I will.” I spent what seemed the next 2 years of my life locked in my bedroom listening to albums and learning songs. I never learned to read music; instead I taught myself everything by ear.” A pattern should be emerging. What sets Jeffs apart, beyond his obvious skill, is his willingness to put the perspiration behind the inspiration. Many of us have talents; but how many of us have the drive and dedication to take our gifts to the next level? Jeffs always knew this was what he needed to do: “The more you do something, the better you get at it. I draw everyday if I can. And every drawing I do feels like a completely new learning experience. When I start a new drawing, I forget about the last one and all my focus goes into making the current drawing the best one ever. Not that I always succeed at this, but it serves as a challenge that drives me to improve.” I asked about how he did such detailed drawings. I can’t help it; when I think about my own attempts at art, I’m happy if the limbs are vaguely in the right place. But even the most philistine amongst us has to acknowledge Jeffs’ attention to details: how the texture is so inviting to touch, how the eye can’t take it all in at once. His drawings make you stop and truly appreciate.

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 21


22 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


FEATURE

“It’s all about the detail. When I decide to draw a certain animal, I do extensive research on it. Reading about its statistics, its habits, the environment in which it lives, and if it’s endangered, its future. I then do extensive photo research on the particular animal. Gathering lots of different photos, and filling my brain with the textures, skins, furs, and patterns that it is made up of. Most of the detailed patterns of my drawing are found by chance once I start doing the art.” He continues: “I am constantly discovering interesting shapes and patterns as I go along. Most of my work doesn’t mimic the exact look of the creature’s skin or fur. I would rather it be my own creation. Finally the eyes are my most cherished part of each animal that I draw. I feel the eyes give it a personality, express emotion and let the animal tell its own story as it looks back at the viewer.” As Jeffs takes inspiration from his scaly, furry and finned subjects, he also plans to give back. “My ultimate goal is to be able to give back to the animals I love so much by helping with specific animal charities. So many of the incredible creatures I am drawing are in trouble, and I want to do anything that I can do to help their futures.” Gallery showings and an art book are in the works. To have your very own print in your home, you can purchase them at his Etsy shop; follow the progress of his new pieces on his blog. His new website TimJeffsArt.com will be up and running soon. After a lifetime of waiting in the wings, it’s time for Tim Jeffs’ drawings to take center stage.

Photographs courtesy of Mark Matcho and Tim Jeffs. Websites Shop: www.etsy.com/shop/TimJeffsArt Blog: timjeffsart.blogspot.com Website: TimJeffsArt.com

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 23


All Creatures, Great and Small 24 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


BEAUTY

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 25


BEAUTY

26 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


BEAUTY

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 27


BEAUTY

28 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


BEAUTY

CANADA photography: Der Wei Chan (www.derweichan.com) make-up & hair: Sherry Vanstone model: Vivien H All animals are the model’s pets and were adopted from shelters and small animal rescues. No animals were harmed during the photoshoot.

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 29


ULTRAVIOLET

30 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Facing Page Swim Suit by Norma Kamali Latex Stockings by The Black Room Las Vegas Boots by Jeffrey Campbell Necklace by Betsey Johnson

This Page Panties and Top by Agent Provocateur Latex Stockings by The Black Room Las Vegas Boots by N.Y.L.A. Necklaces by Betsey Johnson| and Loungefly MASKS & MONSTERS ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 31


Top by David Dalrymple for House of Field Skirt by Lena Hoschek Bodysuit by FetsFash Boots by Jeffrey Campbell

32 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


UNITED STATES photography: Helen Olds (www.helenolds.com) make-up: Mynxii White hair: Dawn Marie Carter wardrobe styling: Emmalynn concept: Emmalynn model: Louann von Brochwitz (Pole Position Management New York) MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 33


Headpiece by Creature of Habit Dress by MossĂŠe Neckpiece (worn on shoulder) by 214 Designs

34 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Mask by Creature of Habit

Umbra

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 35


Hat: Stylist’s own Dress by 2wins Belt: Vintage 36 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Headscarf: Vintage Neckpiece by 214 Designs Vest by Mossée Bracelets: Vintage

EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 37


EDITORIAL Headpiece by Creature of Habit Coat by Olena Dats’

38 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Mask by Creature of Habit Sweater by Faubourg Du Temple Skirt by Mossée Neckpiece: Stylist’s own

UNITED STATES photography: Sylvia Gunde (Sylvia G Photography - sylviagphoto.com) make-up: Hikari Murakami (facebook.com/hikarimurakamiofficial) hair: Alex Thao fashion design: Vanessa Walton (headpiece designer) and Creature of Habit (www.creatureofhabit.me) wardrobe styling: Lillian Fu assistants: Brandon Luong & Randy Tran model: Taylor Bell (LA Models) MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 39


FICTION

UNITED STATES photography: Aero Windwalker model: Pari Ehsan Set was designed by Ugo Rondinone. 40 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Strong As Stone

A Story by Effie Seiberg Photography by Aero Windwalker

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 41


I thought Halloween would be different. The one day where I could go out and run around with kids my age, and be myself - truly myself, with nothing to hide. I was right, but not in the way that I thought. For you see, I’m made of stone. My skin is rough granite, my teeth are like river-washed pebbles, my hair crystalline gypsum. I’m streaked in grays and whites and browns. A veritable cornucopia of races all shoot through my palms and ankles and stomach. I am the melting pot, where the stones of the earth liquify and boil together. The doctors don’t know what it is. For as long as I can remember, I’ve been in and out of the hospital. Mostly in. A banged-up knee is a bigger deal if you chip off a piece and leave it on the sidewalk when you fall off your bike. Broken bones are not as big a problem as you might think, but gallstones and kidney stones, forced out through crystalline paths, are much more problematic. Worst of all, it’s hard for doctors to treat me when their needles break on my skin. My parents tell me I need to be strong as the rocks I’m made of. Little girls need to be strong to deal with the whole wide world, and look how strong I am already, they say, when they see me crush a Coke can with one stony hand. But they protect me from the world. It’s nasty out there, they say. People don’t understand someone who’s different. But Halloween, I think, is where that can change. Where they’ll let me go outside and play with other kids like me, where it’s okay that I look different because that’s the day that everybody looks different. And I won’t need to wear long sleeves and gloves and a bandana over my nose and mouth, which is annoying because in the summer it gets really hot and I look even weirder dressed like that. Sometimes I think they’re ashamed of me, of how I look. Why else would they want to hide me so. But Halloween… everyone is allowed to look like anything they want, so why not me? Why not go outside and feel the sun on my stony skin and let it heat up, even in the chill October air. Everyone will think it’s a costume, a mask, and it will be okay. I come up with a backstory. I’m Stony Girl, a new superhero. When the other kids say they’ve never heard of her, I’ll just act superior like they clearly don’t read the cool new comics. She’s got a blue cape and a green outfit, because those are my favorite colors. But the other kids won’t need to know that. I go to school online. There are classes for kids like me, kids in the hospital too often to keep up with a regular school. You can video in, but my parents told me I should keep my avatar up instead. Just because the other kids may have a tangle of tubes coming out of them doesn’t mean they too won’t be cruel. They were right. One girl videoed in with burns on half of her face, and the other kids laughed at her. They called her pizzaface, and half-cheese-half-pepperoni. She cried, the tears making her wince when they hit her raw red flesh. At least stone doesn’t hurt like that. But even so, I’ve kept my avatar.

42 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


This year Halloween is on a Saturday. No school to video into with my “costume”, but there are block parties and parades and costume contests for everyone. And it’ll all be outside. I’ve been working on my costume. A needle is hard to hold with fingers of stone. It slips out with a scrape, grating against my rough fingertips. I asked one of the nurses for a spare pair of rubber gloves, and those help keep the grip a bit. Thread is another issue. But the costume is done, after a month of work - a blue shirt (tank top, where I can show my arms) with a big “SG” logo in green, and a green skirt and cape. Every superhero needs a cape, even if it is just a cut-up bedsheet. My parents are hesitant, but in the end they let me go. The neighborhood around our house (I’m rarely there, the hospital’s neighborhood feels more familiar) has a Halloween potluck in the street. No running, they tell me, so I don’t chip when I fall. Just be very very careful, they tell me, over and over. It’s okay though. I’ll be able to play foursquare and jump rope and red light/green light and all the usual games I can’t go outside to play. No hand clapping games, though, to avoid bruising the other kids’ palms. And no freeze tag, so nobody slaps their hand on my stony flesh, even through my overalls. I shake with excitement as I go outside, arms and legs and face and hair exposed. It’s windy, chilly. My hair doesn’t move, stalactites curving down my head in tans and browns. I lift my face to the cold October sun and feel the weak heat come down on me. I can feel dry leaves whip around my bare gray ankles. It feels glorious. As I walk with my parents through to the cluster of neighbors (not my neighbors - my neighbors are the kid with liver cancer and the kid with normal scleroderma - my parents’ neighbors) I see people point and stare. But everyone’s pointing and staring at everyone, as the costumes stream through, so it’s okay. For once, I’m just like everyone else. Like all the other kids.

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 43


For once, I’m normal. A big smile cracks through my face, tiny pieces of granite crumbling at the corners. It hurts a bit, but I’m too happy to care. I run over to a group of kids that look about my age. “Hi!” I say with a wave. “I like your costumes.” There’s a Batman and a princess and a Pikachu and a teddy bear. “Who are you supposed to be?” says the kid dressed as Batman. His mask is too big for his face, and he chews the bottom of the nosepiece. I’m glad I prepared for this. “I’m Stoney Girl! The strongest superhero out there!” I strike a pose, one arm flexed and the other pointing out. I bet I look like I can take on the world. But to make sure I don’t sound like I’m dissing him, I add, “I bet between Stoney Girl and Batman, we could save the world from all the bad guys out there! Stoney Girl’s strength plus Batman’s great fighting powers make us unstoppable!” I smile. Batman isn’t smiling back. The princess gives me a strange look. She’s got glitter lip gloss on, and it shimmers as she curves out the words, “I’ve never heard of Stoney Girl. What are you, some kind of nerrrrd?” She stretches out the word. “I’m not. Stoney Girl is real! She’s so strong, she can lift buildings and throw cars. She saves people from big bad supervillains.” Good thing I had the backstory ready. “I’ve never heard of her either,” says Batman. “But you know who’s made of rock? The Thing!” The teddy bear and the Pikachu laugh. “Haha yeah, The Thing! He’s a big monster made of rock, like you!” says the Pikachu. “And as ugly as you!” says the teddy bear. “Yeah!” says the princess. “You’re not The Thing, you’re The Ugly Thing! Because you’re so ugly!” This gets another laugh from the teddy bear. “Ugly Thing! Ugly Thing!” she chants. 44 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


I want to cry, but rocks can’t do that. So all I feel is pressure behind my nose and eyelids, where water would come out if it could. You can’t squeeze water from a stone. So the underground geyser has nowhere to go, and the pressure builds up. Maybe these are just mean kids. I didn’t want to be friends with mean kids anyway. I’m as strong as stone. I walk up to the table where all of the adults have brought their food. Two identical plastic containers with vanilla and chocolate cupcakes with orange jimmies on top sit next to three identical plastic containers with pumpkin-shaped cookies. Looks like some of the adults go shopping at the same Safeway. I grab a cookie. Crunchy things feel better in my mouth. My teeth are good at grinding and snapping, but my stiff basalt tongue is not as good at poking into the crevices to lick out frosting stuck between them. One of the mothers is there, arranging orange and black paper napkins next to orange and black plastic forks. She’s put on cat ears and drawn whiskers on her face. “Ooh, aren’t you scary!” she said. “What kind of monster are you?” The pain beneath my nose and eyelids grows. I’m not a monster! I’m a superhero! Why can’t they see that? I clench my fists, crumbles of shale coming off my nails as they grind against my palms. Without a word I run to the other side of the table where I just barely manage to stop myself before I run into another one of the mothers. This one is in some sort of warrior costume, with a gold plastic breastpiece and a gray plastic sword strapped to her side. “Oh no!” she says in mock horror. “A scary monster! Whatever will I do?” She draws her plastic sword and makes a few swipes in the air. I bury my face in my hands, wishing the tears would come so at least I wouldn’t have this horrible trapped-geyser pressure behind my face.

“Aw honey, I’m sorry,” she said, kneeling down. “It was just a bit of fun. Here, you can play with my sword if you want. What are you supposed to be? Your makeup is just incredible!” She’s wearing too much eyeliner, and there are clumps at the end of her eyelashes. If that’s what makeup makes you look like, I wouldn’t want it in the first place. I raise my face out of my hands. “It’s not makeup,” I whisper. It’s just me. They think I’m the monster. Even a superhero cape can’t make them look past my monstrous face. “No no, of course it’s not makeup!” She’s playing along. “Oooh, you’re just the scariest thing I’ve ever seen!” I run back to my parents, past the crowd of kids who, when they see me, chant “The Thing! The Thing! Uglier than anything!” I can’t even console myself with how lame their rhyme is. I guess it takes Halloween for the monster to come out. Look out, here she comes. Run and hide, or the ugly rock monster will getcha. All they see is stone, and what’s inside makes no difference. I could be the most beautiful geode in the world, with blue and purple and gold shimmering crystals inside, and they’d still laugh. Would they stop, if I broke open and they could see what was inside? Or would even that not make a difference? I find my dad and bury myself in his pant leg. He reaches down to hug me, and I can feel him jolt back a bit when he feels the heat from my stony skin. He kneels down and cups my hot face in his hands, “Sweetie, I’m so sorry,” he says. He gives me another hug, and as he moves his hands away from my face I see they’ve gotten a bit pink from the temperature. That’s what happens when you can’t cry. He turns to my mom and gives her a knowing look. “Come on sweetheart,” he says softly. “Let’s take you back to the hospital.”

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 45


Within the week, it’s back to the usual. Online classes, doctors taking skin samples (skin chips, which they bore out with a diamond-tipped drill which itches as it whirls), pain in my stomach, doctors putting me in more machines that beep and buzz. I don’t like it, but here at least I’m someone to take care of. Someone who poses an interesting problem. Someone who can speak up in class when we learn about long division or the ecosystem, because my voice is not so gravelly to be distinguishable. My avatar is as good a mask as any. But the next day, I get a new neighbor. This kid’s hands and feet and tongue burn with red-orange fire. The doctors have a hard time getting close enough to him, and he keeps burning through the bedclothes. Eventually they bring in a metal gurney for him and set it up like a bed. The metal glows to match the flames, but doesn’t bend or drip. They bring in heavy clumsy heatproof gloves that make them struggle with the needle for the IV. They say he’s getting dehydrated, and no wonder. The IV quickly boils and bursts from the pressure, scalding water shooting everywhere. A few of the nurses shriek as it burns their skin. Eventually they clean things up and leave. The boy is one more puzzle to be solved. He lies there, heat emanating from his side of the room. “Hi,” I say. He turns over onto his side and looks at me. But his eyes don’t do that giant jump, that sudden widening like a blob of silly putty splatting onto the ground, when they see me. He looks me up and down, thinking. “I bet they call you The Thing,” he says. I scrunch my lips together, hard enough that some bits of rock scrape together and crack. So he’s going to be like that. Fine. He can go burn on his own. I wonder if you can tell a kid who’s on fire to go to hell. “They laugh at me too,” he continues, flames jumping from his lips as he talks. “They call me the Human Torch, after the other guy in the Fantastic Four. It’s not that bad though.” I un-purse my lips. “Why’s that?” Tiny bits of cracked stone fall from my mouth and make a quiet clatter on the floor. 46 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


“Because we’re badass!” he says. “We may be freaks now, but someday we’re going to save the universe. We’re better than those superheroes, because we’re real. Those ones are only what people dreamed they could be. Everyone wants to be a superhero, but all they can do is put on tights and a mask, and even then it’s only pretend. But us - we don’t need a mask. And tights are stupid anyway, and don’t make you any more super.” I smile. My stony face isn’t used to that - my cheeks feel stiff as I push them out. “I’m Emma.” He smiles back, fire between his teeth. “I’m Roger. I can melt the corner of this bed, if I concentrate enough. Check it out.” He does. I look around. “I can break the chain that holds the window shut.” I walk over and squeeze it between my hands. It’s hard, but after a bit of work I’ve made a thin spot in the metal. I waggle the bits of metal in the link back and forth until they break, and then shimmy it out of the lock on the window. “Nice!” he says, appreciative. “Can you open it?” I push the windowpane to the left, and a light breeze hits my stony skin. I catch my reflection in the glass. My cheeks sparkle a bit where the sun hits them, prettier than any stupid princess’s glitter lipgloss. My sparkle is real. I’m as strong as stone. And stone is beautiful.

Effie Seiberg lives in San Francisco near a sculpture of a pirate bunny with a skull in its mouth. She’s a graduate of the 2013 Taos Toolbox writing workshop and is shopping around her first novel, a comic fantasy which is a snarky romp through chaos theory, with an ostrich. In a previous life, she worked in Silicon Valley tech. In a previous previous life, she was a lab rat with machinations to take over the world. Things change. You can follow Effie on twitter at twitter.com/effies or on G+ at gplus.to/effies.

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 47


The Year of the Snake 48 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 49


EDITORIAL

50 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 51


EDITORIAL

52 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

CANADA photography: Sameep Singh (www.sameepsinghphotography.com) make-up: Natasha Daniloff hair: Gregory Dennis wardrobe styling: Sameep Singh model: Clare Xu (Agency Models)

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 53


ART

“Time to Kill” 54 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Joylyn Chai

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Joylyn Chai’s pen and ink illustrations are intended to be humorous and ironic. Chai’s work has been exhibited in Toronto. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Toronto’s east end. You can contact her at jchaiworks@gmail.com

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 55


ART

“Walking on Water” 56 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


ART

“Praying Child” MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 57


ART

“2 O’Clock” 58 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


ART

“Underwater” MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 59


Fallen

60 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 61


EDITORIAL

62 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 63


EDITORIAL

UNITED STATES photography: iii Photography by Misti Leigh make-up: Angelica Ross hair: Lilly Powers fashion design: Serket Jewelry and iii Designs 64 | VEUX |Jessi ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS model: Neidert (Sigal Models)


EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 65


EDITORIAL

66 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Concrete

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 67


EDITORIAL

68 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

PVC Mermaid Gown MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 69


EDITORIAL

Spider Web Morticia Gown

CANADA photography: Ian Compton (iancompton.com) make-up & hair: Vitamin Elle (www.vitaminelle.com) fashion design: Violet Love (Lady Violet Designs - www.etsy.com/shop/LadyVioletDesigns) model: Brittnee Madden

70 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Black Widow PVC Overbust

EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 71


Woodland Ritual 72 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

On Facing Page Annabelle Eyebrow Pencil in Black MAC Fluidline in Blacktrack Nyx Jumbo Eye Pencil in Milky White MAC Eyeshadow in Free to Be Annabelle Lip Liner in Bordeaux On This Page (Top) Black Sheer Cape Dress by B.L.T. Couture Spiked Bracelet, Metal Ring, and Neck Piece by H&M Annabelle Eyebrow Pencil in Black MAC Fluidline in Blacktrack Nyx Jumbo Eye Pencil in Milky White MAC Eyeshadow in Free to Be MAC Lipstick in Dark Plum

On This Page (Bottom) Photograph by Joshua Rille Black Leather Long-sleeved Top by B.L.T. Couture Chain-link Beaded Necklace by B.L.T. Couture Flared Leather Skirt by B.L.T. Couture Black Rose Metal and Gold Cross Bracelets by H&M MAC Cosmetics Lipstick in Black MAC Cosmetics Clear Lip Gloss MAC Eyeshadow in Dark Lilac Urban Decay Eyebrow Liner in Black MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 73


EDITORIAL

74 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Annabelle Eyebrow Pencil in Black MAC Fluidline in Blacktrack Nyx Jumbo Eye Pencil in Milky White MAC Eyeshadow in Free to Be MAC Cosmetics Clear Lip Gloss

On Facing Page Black Cape Coat Jacket by B.L.T. Couture Spiked and Diamond Rings: Model’s own Skull and Cross Bracelets: Model’s own Pentagram Necklace by Silver Enchantments On This Page and Next Page (Top) Black Cape Coat Jacket by B.L.T. Couture Dark Wash Denim by ZARA Man Leather Buckled Boots by Aldo Spiked and Diamond Rings: Model’s own Skull and Cross Bracelets: Model’s own Pentagram Necklace by Silver Enchantments MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 75


Bottom Black BouclĂŠ Shimmer Owl Sew-on Top by B.L.T. Couture Gold and Ruby Droplet Headpiece Necklace by H&M Gold Cross Ruby Bracelet and Silver Bead Bracelet by H&M 76 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS

Annabelle Eyebrow Pencil in Black MAC Fluidline in Blacktrack Nyx Jumbo Eye Pencil in Milky White MAC Eyeshadow in Free to Be Make Up For Ever Lipstick in Satin Rust


EDITORIAL

CANADA photography: Neda Ahmad and Joshua Rille make-up: Jacqueline Fedorowicz hair: Melissa Purcell fashion design: Ildiko Csorgo-Kiraly & Vanessa Kiraly (B.L.T. Couture) wardrobe styling: Vanessa Kiraly models: Vanessa Kiraly (True Colours Model Management) and Tyler Lorenc (Velocci Model Management) MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 77


Guardian

BRAZIL photography: Alexandro Adds make-up & hair: Amanda Schรถn wardrobe styling: Dayana Molina model: Priscila Cavaliere (40 Graus) and Hugo Oliveira

On Hugo Wings by Collection of Production Shirt by Renner On Priscila 78 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS Short Sleeve Shirt by Collection of Production


EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 79


80 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

On Facing Page Chamise by Collection of Production Boots by Riachuelo On This Page Short Sleeve Shirt by Collection of Production High Waisted Shorts by Collection of Production Gloves by Guetta Fishnets by Collection of Production

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 81


82 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS

On Priscila Blouse by Collection of Production Pants by Alexandre Herchcovitch Boots by Riachuelo


On Priscila Blouse by Collection of Production Skirt by Composure Boots by Riachuelo

EDITORIAL

On Page 3 (Table of Contents) On Hugo Shoes by Converse Pants by Street Kids Shirt by Renner Suspender by Collection of Production On Priscila Jacket and Skirt by Collection of Production Gloves by Guetta Boots by Riachuelo

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 83


EDITORIAL

84 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


Beauty & The Bub

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 85


86 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


EDITORIAL

MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 87


EDITORIAL

88 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS


UNITED STATES photography: Jesse Fox make-up: Galvin Mason hair: Macy Fox wardrobe styling: Rachelle Andra & Ashley Bowman model: Kendal Elder (MTM Cincinnati) & Lil Bub Kendal is wearing MAC Cosmetics.

Page 84 Leather Halter by Rachelle Andra Shoulder Piece by Gotham Smith Studio Bracelet and Earrings by Anne-Marie Chagnon
 Bracelet by HARDWEAR Repurposed & Uncommon Jewelry Make-up: Fascinating Kohl Liner Silly Eyeshadow 
 Carbon Eyeshadow Page 85 Make-up: Lemon Pigment
 Silly Eyeshadow Girl About Town Lipstick Page 86 Earrings by Molly M Designs 
 Necklace by Anne-Marie Chagnon 
 Hat by Psyber Psociety Make-up: Rapid Black Eyeliner 
 Up the Amp Lipstick
 Peach Twist Blush

Page 87 Pumpkin Ring by Aminimal
 Crystal Ring by Leah Busch (Brazee Street) Sweater & Necklaces by Psyber Psociety
 Earrings by Mel-Kat Make-up: Lemon Pigment
 Silly Eyeshadow
 Girl About Town Lipstick Page 88 Neck-cuff by Serket Jewelry
 “Urban Gridded Cincinnati” Earrings by Aminimal
 Bracelet by Psyber Psociety Make-up: Smolder Black Kohl Liner
 Embrace Me Eyeshadow Back Cover Headdress & Cowl by Rachelle Andra
 Earrings by Chicken Lays An Egg
 Ring by Psyber Psociety Make-up: Nikki 2 Lipstick
 Hajar Karim Eyeshadow
 Embrace Me Eyeshadow
 MASKS & MONSTERS | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | VEUX | 89 Peach Twist Blush


www.veuxmag.com AVW Publishing Inc.

90 | VEUX | ISSUE 14 Vol. 2 | MASKS & MONSTERS

ISSUE 14 | VOL 2 Monsters  

In our Volume Two - Monsters, we reveal the sublime and the grotesque. These are creatures that deviate from what we think is normal, but ar...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you