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AUGUST 2012 | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS


VEUX Magazine - Issue 7 - Paper & Clocks STAFF Ada Adams Editor-In-Chief/Content Director/Public Relations ada@veuxmag.com

Vivien Hoang Editor/Advisor/Layout Design vivien@veuxmag.com

Wales Wong Editor/Literary Editor/Photographer wales@veuxmag.com

Yawen Chan Web Producer

CONTRIBUTORS: Conner Allen, Linna Chang, Vivien Hoang, Joey McGuire, Andrew Oplinger, Christoper Palazzo, Christine Polz, Amanda Roberts, Alissa Santiago, Chris Tranter, Nicole Trilivas, Wales Wong PUBLISHER AVW Publishing Inc. CONTACT www.veuxmag.com General Information: info@veuxmag.com Editor-In-Chief: editor@veuxmag.com Editorial Submissions: editorial@veuxmag.com Writing Submissions: write@veuxmag.com Advertising Inquiries: advertise@veuxmag.com Subscribe: subscribe@veuxmag.com FOLLOW www.facebook.com/veuxmag www.twitter.com/VeuxMag

COVER PHOTO Photography: Merry Widjaya Make-Up: Jason Melgar Hair: Brandy Stokes Model: Maddison Kram

BACK PHOTO Photography: Derwei Chan Make-Up & Hair: Vicki Millar Model: Michelle Gray


IN THIS ISSUE

ISSUE SEVEN | PAPER & CLOCKS

Photography: Christine Polz Models: Susanne and Bettina Kohlhund

FEATURES

EDITORIAL

6 Beauty: Shine 16 Book Review: Pretty Girls Make Graves 44 Lifestyle: Get Back to Your Roots - Local Brews 64 Beauty: Aurum 76 Feature: Fashion in the Age of Austerity 80 Feature: The WestWood 88 Feature: Coming into Focus 90 Beauty: Fallin’ High

18 RedEmption 32 Linearity 38 Pieces of You 54 Paper Dolls 70 Beautiful Creatures 82 Rain on the Rooftop 96 Disco Glam Bold and Free 102 from ALANA with love 108 The Modern Geisha

ARTS

IN EVERY ISSUE

12 Linna Chang 24 Photography: Young and Wild 48 Photography: the days go by

4 Letter from the Editors 60 Travel: Pearl of the Orient - Hong Kong


Letter from the Editors Six beautiful issues of VEUX Magazine are currently displayed in my office. Six issues that stand for a lot of hard work, passion, and pride. Looking back on each of VEUX’s themes over the past year, I believe that they are a reflection of our journey both as a magazine and as editors. Our inaugural issue, “Summer Love”, launched VEUX into the world. The magazine was born from the love three people share for fashion, beauty, art, literature, lifestyle, and adventure. It was also created with the desire to feature and support those who are united by such passions. I’m happy to say that this call has been answered by artists, humanitarians, and creative trailblazers from all over the world! With the second issue, “Metamorphosis”, we realized that the one constant our magazine will always possess is the ability to change and morph with each story and every editorial. After all, the content we feature is ever-changing. The excitement of that is what draws most of us into this industry in the first place. VEUX would not be a success without engaging in both the “Splendor & Squalor” of life. We’re a small operation—three editors working from a home office, paying for everything out-of-pocket—but at the same time, we’re spoiled by the wealth of astonishing content from our contributors. If I’ve learned one thing from running a magazine, it’s that “Commitment” and perseverance are required every step of the way. From working with all of our partners, to pushing through when the deadlines loom ahead, commitment to our readers and love for what we do has always kept us going. We’ve celebrated many different “Milestones” in the past year, but my favorite of them all is the fact that VEUX Magazine has featured work from talented artists from all around the world. I have always taken great pride in the global aspect of VEUX, and appreciate the learning experiences provided by collaborating with such a diverse talent pool.

Ada Adams

Lastly, I wish to touch upon the importance of “Fluidly” within this field. Learning to roll with the punches even when things don’t go as planned is a lesson that has been imparted on me by my partners, Vivien and Wales. I’ve applied it not only to how I approach my work as an editor at VEUX, but also how I approach life in general. I’m thankful for the many things I’ve been able to discover while working on the magazine because it has broadened my horizons and made me a better person. My year at VEUX can only be described as a great journey with even greater partners. I’m very thankful for the opportunity to collaborate with such wonderful editors and contributors. Here’s to another great year full of fun and adventure!

When we decided to start this magazine, we honestly did not know what we were doing. We did know, however ,that we could learn what we needed to know along the way to get our first issue out. Between the three editors, each one of us could bring a different skill set and unique experiences to the table to create the finished magazine. With every issue, things get a little smoother and a little easier - which means we can push ourselves a little more to bring to the readers an even better artistic and fashionable experience. VEUX Magazine is truly a product of teamwork. We are constantly emailing and texting each other, providing support, insight, and ideas every step of the way - from the initial submission to finally publishing. The whole process works so well because we have an innate trust of the other editors; I’ve got their backs, and they’ve got mine! What surprised me the most was the level of organization required to get each issue out. Keeping track of the requests, the photographs, the team’s credit and information, and the releases, and then remembering to follow up on outstanding items probably takes up over half of the time we spend on the magazine. We have to remind ourselves not to get bogged down with the important but nitty gritty aspect of running the magazine, and to continue to do fun things for ourselves as well - such as organizing this issue’s cover contest and shooting our own photoshoots. I’m not sure this magazine could have happened a few years ago. At VEUX Magazine, we rely heavily on technology! We can communicate seamlessly with people from around the world, and reach the widest possible audience. Our meetings are all done via Google Hangouts, our files are stored in a cloud, and our releases are signed electronically. It has allowed us to continue to work even when one of the editors is on vacation halfway across the world, or at the lakeside cottage. We’ve been blessed to have achieved our successes and to be celebrating 1 year of publishing. Our friends, family, and fans have all helped us get to this point; we will always be grateful! Thank you!

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ViVien Hoang


Photographs by Chris Tranter and Wales Wong

The theme of “PAPER & CLOCKS” is a nod to the traditional gifts for a couple celebrating their first wedding anniversary. While we might get strange looks if we called the Magazine our spouse, we certainly do feel “married” to it: we are dedicated to the project, to our fans and artists, and we are looking forward to celebrating our 2nd anniversary in a year!

Serendipity. I’ve found that many of the momentous occasions in my life are a result of this word. As I reflect back to a little over a year ago on how our labour of love – VEUX Magazine – came to fruition, I remember a series of events that led to three young female professionals looking for something fun to do. Yes, to us, it was and still is fun! We all have busy schedules outside of the magazine and are constantly balancing our jobs, family, friends, and anything new that comes our way. We still find it funny that it is so difficult for us to coordinate our schedules to physically meet up - especially since we all live in the same city. It took us over a year to once again get together, after our initial afternoon tea gathering in 2011 where we conceived of the idea of this magazine. With the progress and support of technology nowadays, we’ve been able to communicate and work through cell phones and the internet. It was no surprise to me that since we’re all always on the go, the running of VM has naturally evolved as we constantly use different tools and services to help us operate an efficient publication. The process of producing a magazine every two months has not only become a part of our daily routine, but it has also been a learning process that has influenced other aspects of our lives. The amount of discoveries and knowledge that I have personally gained from this endeavour has been invaluable. We have tried and tested many different ideas and trends. While the road has not always been smooth, it’s the willingness to take risks and experiment that has helped us to encourage and support each other when some crazy idea dawns upon one of us in the middle of the night. For me, I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished. There were times when we’d be burning the midnight oil to cross all the T’s and dot all the I’s so an issue can be published. We all come from a different background of work experience and we just naturally gelled well when it came to sharing ideas and getting things done. There are no egos here. Just three women who share the same passion and love for creativity, innovation, and talent. I have the deepest gratitude to all my friends and family who have always given positive input since day one. I am especially thankful to Ada and Viv for always being there no matter how challenging it was and for teaching me so much about how to run a magazine. Doing a magazine was completely new to us but my partners’ enthusiasm and confidence in VM has helped me to grow, not only as an editor, but also as a person.

Wales Wong

Thank you, with all my heart, to each and every one of you who have supported us. Your passion for what you do is what inspires us here at VEUX Mag. PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 5


BEAUTY

SHINE UNITED STATES Photography: Andrea Acailawen & Christopher Wright Make-Up: Yara Ocasio Nails: Brenda Irizarry. Creative Direction: Andrea Acailawen. Model: Genii Tully (Front Management)

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BEAUTY

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BEAUTY

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ART

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ART

Linna Chang

Series: Hair

Technique: acrylic on canvas done using toothbrush

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Linna Chang is a graphic designer/art director working in advertising. In her downtime she enjoys painting and photography. She has her own photo blog where she uses just 15 minutes to conceptualize and photograph her subjects. 15snap.tumblr.com

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Book Review: Pretty Girls Make Graves Novel by Nicole Trilivas Reviewed By Vi Vien Hoang We all know girls like Justine, the main character of Nicole Trilivas’ novel “Pretty Girls Make Graves”. To call her a heroine might be a bit of a stretch. She smokes too much, drinks even more, sleeps with all the wrong boys, and kisses all the other ones. She is the girl whose online profile you creep, if only to live vicariously through her adventures for a few hours. Scotland? Ireland? Australia? Unidentifiable photographs of boys and men, through the thick haze of cigarettes and dingy dive bars - unidentifiable because our protagonist probably can’t remember and probably doesn’t care. And if you don’t know a girl like Justine, then maybe you’re the “Justine” of your group of friends. The plot is a simple one: a girl, lost after a break-up, goes overseas to find....something. Anything. Everything. This is a story of a rich privileged girl from New York CIty - who solves her problems in a rich privileged girl’s way: overindulgence, drugs, escapism, self-entitlement, and a vulnerable sense of invincibility. The novel is less driven by plot points than it is a study in a tragic character. It’s less “Eat, Pray, Love” than “Drink, Smoke, Fuck” but Trilivas has created a character in Justine that is real, raw, and gritty. You love to hate her, and hate to love her; she’s a trainwreck from which you can’t look away. You cheer her on, while wanting to shake some sense into her and maybe feed her a sandwich. Her happiness is fleeting, but she is so self-destructive, you wonder if she is self-sabotaging her own joy in order to get a better romantic narrative.

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Like I said, we all know people like this - who are addicted to the drama for drama’s sake. She is broken, but it has been so long since she has been whole, it seems as though she doesn’t know how to be. Trilivas is an author, writing about a writer who is writing her cathartic diaries. Her command of Justine’s voice is masterful; several times while reading I had to remind myself that I was not reading Justine’s book, but Trilivas’. Justine writes in the loose, casual tones of many bloggers. She liberally uses gimmicks such as photographs, breaking down the 4th wall, and blacking out pages to hide secret or private thoughts - at times it is a little distracting, but it is a trick that is not overused or abused by Trilivas. The book is replete with obscure references, nods to pop culture and Greek heroes, and metaphors. After all, as Justine notes, she is borrowing the voices of other stories to help tell her own and as an intelligent, well educated girl she has an arsenal at her disposal. Interestingly, as I read the book, I found myself reflecting back on my own life and my own decisions. What made me so different than Justine; or was I one bad decision away from my own lost wanderings? It is a testament to Trilivas’ character development that I could take Justine out of the book, and play the dangerous game of superimposing her on myself, and my friends. Nicole Trilivas’ debut novel “Pretty Girls Make Graves” is an emotional and absorbing read, engaging and perfect for the final days of a carefree summer.


BOOK REVIEW

I’m not a good writer. I just have something to say.

I’m not charming enough to eat, pray or love myself onto a best-seller list. This isn’t Oprah’s Book Club material, and I use the word “fuck” a lot. My name is Justine and I have a story to tell. I have a story the way everyone has one, and it’s not a new story the way no one’s story is new. You’ve heard this one before. You hear it everyday. I once read that the whole cosmos of stories could be concentrated into only a handful of basic plotlines—a few plastic mannequins that we dress in immeasurable ways. Every story comes down to those basic, naked prototypes: man vs. man, man vs. nature, man vs. self—whatever. Because I can’t make my story fresh, I’m shamelessly jumping onto the backs of existing plotlines and characters to piggyback my way through my life. If I’ve felt this way, so has someone else. If I’ve felt this way—then so have you. You and me, Reader—we’re in this together. I know more about you than you think. I know you’ve worn a scarlet letter (though it wasn’t necessarily an “A”). I know because we’ve all been both the adulterer and the cuckold, the widowed and the one dearly departed; we’ve bared everything from crosses to our teeth, albatrosses and Jewish stars. We have all been dominant and submissive; the inquisitor and the witch—burnt to a crisp upon a stake; the virgin and whore; the spider and the fly. We have had things stolen from us, and we have sticky, sticky fingers. I’m hijacking the vocal chords like puppet strings off archetypal characters because we’ve all been there—but that’s not the only reason.

Excerpt from “Pretty Girls Make Graves” by Nicole Trilivas

I’m doing it as a cop-out. I want to tell you the story of all the amassed stupid, sordid shit from this last year of my life—about every amassed stupid, sordid boy—without having to admit I’m still adrift in girlhood, and have to take any ownership of this head-turning mess. I just want to be the writer. Yet even still, my mark is all over this story like an ill-concealed murder weapon. It wasn’t Miss Scarlet in the conservatory with the candlestick. It was me—but I don’t want it to be. So I abduct lost girls to help me: coasting in hand-me-down pick-ups, sometimes; sometimes in glossy limousines. Pretty girls from myths, fairy tales, literature, pop culture, or current events. They’re the type of girls you’d find in dew-stained parks too late in the midsummer night, in dank cathedral basements, or slung in thin hallways between dreams and red-lit windows; the girls from everlasting nursery rhymes. The girls imprisoned. The girls interrupted. I pick them up and let them crash on a sheet-less mattress until their histories spill like milk. These are the same disavowed girls who—in my uppity Massachusetts boarding school—would wake me from a thick slumber by slithering in drunk with clownishly smeared lipstick, who’d wear discolored negligees and get mistaken for the undead. The clean ones with the dirty, dirty mouths. Their narratives echo too familiar, they always have, so I conjure them like specters, and speak in their tongues when I chicken-out. Sometimes I use them do things I shouldn’t be doing, or to make the points that they could make sharper. They’re here to do brave but messy work. I need stories of flame-licked goddesses, stories with the desperation of teenage runaways. So Ophelia, Dido, and Sleeping Beauty need not apply. If a poisoned apple brought you down, if you gauged out your dandelion eyes, threw yourself on your husband’s funeral pyre, or drowned yourself in a brook over a boy who was just not that into you—you’re not needed here. You may want to know—these stories I tell through all my pretty, lost girls—are they true, is it really my story? Some of these stories are true and some of these stories are lies. All of these stories are true. All of these stories are lies. Our deepest secrets are the ones we keep from ourselves. True story: I’m scared no one will love me after they read this. True story: the rest of these words are lies. Don’t believe another thing I say. This book is fiction. True story: this is the truth and nothing but the truth. So help me God. These are the contents of my life—except they happened to someone else. And these are all the bad things I’ve done—except someone else did them. And this is all the shit that made me—except the shit didn’t happen to me. And these are all my secrets—except someone else confessed them. This is what I have to say. I’m not a good writer. I just have something to say.

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EDITORIAL

redEmption

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EDITORIAL

Black Jacket by Pimkie Pants by Intimissimi PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 19


EDITORIAL

Black Jacket by Pimkie Pants by Intimissimi

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EDITORIAL

Black Jacket by Pimkie Pants by Intimissimi

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ITALY Photography: Daniela Pizzurro (www.danielapizzurro.com) Make-Up & Hair: Mathilde Xavier (maquilleuse-pro.net) Wardrobe Styling: Daniela Pizzurro Model: Joyce (Women Model Management Paris) 22 | VEUX | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS


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PHOTOGRAPHY

Young and Wild Young and Wild Young and Wild Young and Wild

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Young and Wild Young and Wild

Young and Wild

and Wild PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 25


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PHOTOGRAPHY

GERMANY Photography: Christine Polz (www.namimosa.de) Models: Susanne and Bettina Kohlhund

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Christine Polz is a 21 year old self-taught photographer from Germany. She began photography nearly three years ago, when she took her own photographs for her blog in order to give it a personal touch. This humble beginning, playing with her father’s camera, soon became an obsession, and the desire to shoot photographs which were works of art grew. Christine is always striving to improve upon her craft. She now contributes to several online magazines. PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 27


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PHOTOGRAPHY

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EDITORIAL

LINEARITY

Make-Up: Glitter by MAC Eyeshadow by Urban Decay & Kryolan Gloss by Kryolan

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EDITORIAL

ITALY Photography: Tiziano Toma Make-Up & Hair; Giada Petrangeli Fashion Design: Makeup Book, Roma Studio Model: Alexandra Constantin

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Pieces of You PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 39


EDITORIAL

All make-up done using MAC Cosmetics

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EDITORIAL

ITALY Photography: Alessio Migliardi (www.alessiomigliardi.com) Make-Up & Hair: Silvia Sadecka (www.silviasadecka.com) Paper Clothes Designer: SS Creations Model: Alena (Women Management)

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Get Back to Your Roots - Local Brews By Joey McGuire Photographs by ViVien Hoang & Amanda Roberts

Beer – a beverage normally reserved for cookouts, sporting events, and weekends at the cottage. It was what college kids drank in excess and was the blue collar drink you enjoyed after a long, hard day. It was considered social faux pas to show up to a dinner party with anything other than wine. Not so anymore. This used to be the mentality surrounding beer but local craft brewers are quickly changing that image in Ontario. Now, don’t get me wrong - I’m not suggesting you show up to a formal event with a two-four of king cans and ask the host to shot gun one back with you - but if you stroll past the big brand names on the shelf at your liquor store you might find something a little more unique, fresh, and local. Smaller independent breweries are creating distinct beers with flavour palettes that rival even the most sophisticated wines. The micro brewing scene has never been more fertile, and not to mention, more satisfying. This is reflected in the increased sales and the increase in new breweries opening up across Canada. There are now multitudes of specialised local brews with rich and layered flavours that would sway even the most doubting critic, while lining the rows of the stores and keeping watch behind the bar at your local pub. As the general public has become well-versed in wines, there has also been a demand for a better understanding of the art of beer. The Niagara College’s teaching brewery is the first of its kind in Canada and is established in the heart of Ontario’s wine country. It has provided a new testing ground for young brewers in the region and serves up unique brews each and every week. Visitors can stop by and take home a “growler” poured straight from the tap. The growler’s resemblance to a moonshine jug is a conversation starter on its own, not to mention the great story and taste behind the beer. School is a time for experimentation and there’s no shortage of that found at this teaching brewery. Small batch brews with ambitious flavor profiles you would never see a larger brewery even attempt to make are regularly on tap: chilli, chocolate, or even a beer meant to evoke the memories of leftover Christmas cake. Try their aptly named First Draft lager and ale if you’re in the mood for something a little less adventurous. Expect big things from this program. The Niagara region already has a well-established wine route, complete with organised wine tours and tastings. Don’t be shocked if a beer route emerges in the not-too-distant future.

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With the warm weather so cherished after a cold Canadian winter, come the summer festivals. The Ontario Craft Brewers (OCB), a collective of 25 Ontario brewers, holds and participates in a multitude of events over the summer where you can explore the different tastes of the region. Session 99, held during June in Toronto, is a prime example of this. Session 99 is a summer bonanza that closes out the Ontario Craft Brew Week. It features food vendors, live entertainment, and over 100 beers for you to sample. If you’re at all questioning if you’ll ever find a beer you like, this is the place to go. A warm friendly atmosphere greets you at the entrance to the festival and with dozens of cold beers waiting beneath festival tents, the expectations that you’ll find your new “it” beer is high. The crowd is here with one mission in mind: to drink beer. No matter what your tastes are, you’ll find something that pleases you at Session 99 or any of the other great beer festivals across the province. Perhaps it’s that hoppy Conductors Craft ale from Junction Brewing or an Antigravity from Flying Monkey craft brewers. The festival is also a great introduction for new beer drinkers who don’t know if they like pale ales, lagers, or stouts – and who may not have known there was a difference between pale ales, lagers, and stouts! All the more established craft brewers are represented at the festival. Great Lakes Brewery, Black Oak, F&M, Mill St., Beau’s and Muskoka are familiar faces at all the summer festivals, but look for newer breweries such as Sawdust Craft Brewing Co. from Gravenhurst, Ontario, to make a splash at all the summer events as well. Festivals such as Session 99 are fantastic opportunities for smaller outfits to gain exposure, and for customers to try something different from their tried-and-true favourites without the commitment of buying an entire case. Craft brewers in Ontario are putting out great, peerless seasonal brews every month. Wine is great, cocktails are wonderful, but I encourage you to give your local brews a try. You’ll be pleasantly surprised with the great flavours you’ll find and the delectable meal pairings you can come up with from the beers made in Ontario. Upcoming Events: National Capital Craft Beer Week – August 10-18, 2012 Ottawa Folk Festival – September 6-9, 2012 Great Canadian Beer Festival – September 7-8, 2012 Oktoberfest – September 28-30, 2012

Websites: http://www.ontariocraftbrewers.com http://sessiontoronto.ca http://www.firstdraft.ca

Joey McGuire is a marketing and design specialist in the Niagara region of Ontario, a part-time writer, and a full time beer enthusiast. joeymcguire.com PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 45


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PHOTOGRAPHY

the days go by Day 18. As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler; solitude will not be solitude, poverty will not be poverty, nor weakness weakness.

UNITED STATES Photography: Conner Allen (www.facebook.com/ConnerAPhotography) Model: Danny Cronk Text: Conner Allen

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Day 19. It is so hard to leave — until you leave. And then it is the easiest goddamned thing in the world. -John Green. 48 | VEUX | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS


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PHOTOGRAPHY

Day 33. Dog Days Are Over.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Day 42. Crises Refine Life. In them you Discover what you are.

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Day 44. I hope I never figure out, Who broke your heart, And if I do, if I do, I’d spend all night losing sleep.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Day 49. Just because they can’t feel it too, Doesn’t mean that you have to forget.

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Conner Allen is a 19 year old conceptual portrait photographer based out of the Inland Northwest United States. He explores themes of representation: how he, as the photographer, is represented in his subjects. Furthermore, he hopes his photography elicits memories of key moments in the viewer’s life, while also showcasing the unique landscapes and scenes accompanying his subject. His goal is to work on conceptual editorial projects on the West Coast USA, while also finding time to work on personal projects with local designers and other artists.

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EDITORIAL

Paper Dolls

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EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

UNITED STATES Photography: Kristy Mapp Make-Up & Hair: Joy Chance Wardrobe Styling: Kristy Mapp Model: Joy Chance

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Pearl of the Orient:

Hong Kong

Text and Photographs by Wales Wong

At the Peak, overlooking the Hong Kong skyline

I’ve seen Hong Kong (HK) go through many changes while I lived there as a teenager. Once a colony of Great Britain during 1841-1997, the citizens have learned to quickly adapt to the metamorphosis of the now Special Administrative Region (SAR) after the handover. The relationship between Hong Kong and China under the system of “one country, two systems” has been turbulent to say the least. While the transformations have been met with more resistance than approval by those who have lived in Hong Kong long enough to have carried a BNO passport, this pearl of the orient is still home to many. With an economy that has strong ties to many major countries around the world, its capitalist system has welcomed many leading companies to its shores. It is a city that never rests, especially not when there is time to make money. The handover was a time of uncertainty for many and even today, many are still trying to find a secure place in society when it comes to purchasing a home or settling on a career. While this may breed anxiety, for those who have decided to embrace it, there is much excitement in the present. A new shopping mall is built practically every year. The city is no stranger to grand openings of shops and restaurants today and then the closures of them within a year or two.

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The brightly lit skyline still maintains its glory in the evenings, as seen from Victoria Peak, the highest point on Hong Kong Island. A classic tourist hot spot, many ride the Peak Tram up 550 metres to look at the sight that’s appeared on thousands of post cards. Never to lose out on capitalizing on a much favoured location, there is also the Peak Galleria which is home to many eateries and souvenir shops. While the history requires a much more detailed description of the conflicts that existed between Japan, China, and Britain, the geography of the land is simple. Hong Kong itself is comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon, and the New Territories. Each area offers a different personality of the region, but the prevalent roots of the Chinese culture are never hidden. From temples that are permeated with the sweet smell of incense to the ornate wooden carvings on doorways, locals still hold on very strongly to their traditions. Superstitions are also still evident when you talk to citizens here. Temple Street in the Jordan district is where you will find many fortune tellers, tarot card readers, and palm readers. Trinkets and plants that symbolize luck are readily available for purchase and you’d be hard


Classic Chinese meal of dim sum

Market for seafood, meat, and produce

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TRAVEL

pressed to find a business owner who didn’t in some way check the feng-shui of the location before setting up shop. The translated meaning of Hong Kong in Cantonese is “fragrant harbour”. However, the locals know this to not be so true. Those who cross Victoria Harbour, the body of water that separates Hong Kong and Kowloon side, on the Star Ferry have seen water bottles, plastic bags, and other miscellaneous junk float on its waters. The smell that emanates from the harbour on the hotter days leaves many to wonder what is so fragrant here. But those in HK have adapted to all sorts of overwhelming odours, so don’t be turned off by this. Just enjoy the 10 minute ride across the waters and make sure you get in some photo-ops on these ferries that have helped millions of passengers cross over to the other side since 1888.

Noodles, duck, and BBQ Pork Lucky bamboo plant

There is a very strong Canadian-Hong Kong connection. Lan Kwai Fong (LKF), home to many popular clubs and pubs, was brought to life in the 1980s by a German Canadian businessman, Allan Zeman. Known as the “Father of Lan Kwai Fong”, he was born in Germany but raised in Montreal, Canada. He saw the potential that this little island had and invested millions of Hong Kong dollars to develop property in LKF. As a result, many expats found a local hangout, attracted by the Western style restaurants and discos. On any given night, the streets are crowded with people spilling out of pubs and having a pint of beer or glass of wine. Never a stranger to variety, food is one of HK’s top attractions. The official languages are English and Cantonese, but don’t let that throw you off from the many delectable menus that are prevalent here. Food stalls, also known as dai pai dongs, that literally set up shop on sidewalks and McDonalds are still go-to eateries for many. These places are a reflection of the dominant culture that exists here. However, HK being the international hub that it is, have had many restaurateurs come from overseas to profit from the people’s need to try something different. In pockets throughout the city, there are many well-known places for Indian, Indonesian, Malaysian, Singaporean, Western, and of course, different types of Chinese food. Locals have a deep affection for Japanese culture so there are many sushi restaurants that line the streets. Fresh seafood dishes can be found in the New Territories on the outlying islands such as Cheung Chau. Even with the many places to eat, you’ll still find yourself waiting for a table at 9pm if you don’t make reservations ahead of time. Also, don’t miss out on some authentic dim sum, dishes that are usually steamed and served in round bamboo baskets. A traditional staple in any Chinese diet, these mini-sized sweets and savories are washed down with tea. Be warned though. Dim sum restaurants are always packed in the mornings and afternoons with high volumes of conversations that can often leave you wishing you brought your ear plugs. But you’ll quickly get use to it once you settle in and catch up on all the gossip with the people at your own table. If you’re feeling adventurous and are staying at a place with a kitchen, try buying some fresh meats, seafood, or produce

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Stanley Market


The Lounge and Bar’s High Tea at the Ritz Carlton

TRAVEL

from the local wet markets. Most shop keepers here will only speak Mandarin or Cantonese, but don’t let that sway you from the international language of hand signs. Point to the desired purchase and then show with your fingers the dollar amount you want to pay for it. For a more indulgent treat, go for high tea, another example of the British influence. The more famous locations for afternoon tea are at the big-name hotels. Recently, the newly opened Ritz-Carlton in Kowloon has seen a constant demand for a spot at The Lounge and Bar for their high tea at 3pm. One could say it is literally high tea because the venue is on the 102nd floor! Never one to miss out, I requested a window seat that overlooked Victoria Harbour and displayed a gorgeous view of HK side. They don’t take reservations so arrive an hour before to get yourself of the list downstairs. It may seem like a lot of work, but the experience is worth it! If you believe that money makes the world go round, then you need to know that money makes HK spin. It is a rapid pace city with people always on the go. News travels faster than the local subways, also known as the Mass Transit Railway (MTR). The Kowloon Motor Bus Company’s (KMB) double-decker buses are literally bumper to bumper on streets during rush hour. Millions of travellers touch down at the Hong Kong International Airport in Chep Lap Kok every year. Lastly, shopping is an all-out marathon for many who choose this place as their destination. I’m always fascinated by all the brand name stores that are densely packed in the core areas. Almost every business woman and sales girl is an owner of a Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Christian Dior, or Prada bag. Often times, a HK gal has one of each in her collection. It isn’t a surprise that tourists from other Asian countries save their paychecks to buy a few of these luxury items since there’s no sales tax and often times, there are so many sales that one can spend the whole visit just shopping and still not be satisfied that he/she has taken advantage of every good deal.

Shopping in the streets of Kowloon Visiting the Chinese doctor for herbal medicines

Fret not though if you want to be more careful with the purse strings. There are a number of streets and night markets that offer trendy clothes and accessories. While you may be able to bargain a bit with the vendors, do a walk-through of the area so that you can compare prices. Often times, there will be another vendor who is selling the same item at a cheaper price which can save you the time of haggling just to get a few dollars off. Mong Kok’s Ladies Street and Prince Edward’s Fai Yuen Street are just a few popular places to purchase clothes and souvenirs. Travel a bit farther to a less congested area and you’ll find yourself in Stanley Market which offers some kitschier Asian ornaments and novelties. Herbal remedy shops and Chinese doctors can also be found throughout HK for those seeking alternative medicines. A city that has seen many changes, HK still keeps the old traditions and beliefs that set it apart from other Asian cities. The ability of the people in HK to learn, adapt, and roll with the punches has what made them survive and continue to build a strong and progressive economy with age-old customs. No doubt, this pearl of the orient is a treasure that will keep shining for many to see in the years to come.

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Aurum CANADA Photography: Derwei Chan (www.derweichan.com) Make-Up & Hair: Vicki Millar (www.vickimillar.com) Model: Michelle Gray

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BEAUTY

All make-up by Yaby Cosmetics

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BEAUTY

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EDITORIAL

Beautiful Creatures

ITALY Photography: Antonio Guzzardo Make-Up: Alessandra De Vito Fashion Design: Mimmo Lodedo (Milo) Photographer’s Assistant: Giovanni Merone Models: Glorya Occhipinti and Katerina Pishchala Special thanks to “Saponeria” Club On location at the former hospital at Marcigliana

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EDITORIAL

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UNITED STATES Photography: Merry Widjaya (www.merrywidjaya.com) Make-Up: Jason Melgar Hair: Brandy Stokes Model: Eugene Esselborn

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FEATURE

Fashion

in the Age of

Austerity By: Christopher Palazzo

Christian Lacroix, the once famed couturier said, “Haute Couture should be fun, foolish and almost unwearable.” Couture is the crown jewel of the fashion industry; the finest materials, the most decadent gems all stitched together to create garments that elicit either the ubiquitous awe inspiring moment or that mundane response of “Who in the world would wear that?” As Couture Fashion Week comes to a close in Paris, there is a notable absence this year. No, not a particular designer or yet another fashion house defunct due to the poor economic climate, but rather, gone is the grandeur that was once couture. At a quick glance, the couture shows seemed more like the ready to wear shows that followed later on in the year. Girls in - dare I say - pant suits. Bland with all, but a single glimmering diamond encrusted broach. For us mere mortals, it most likely carries the price tag equivalent to that of an automobile. As the global economy enters into a post-recession austerity-focused era, the fashion industry is taking note. The trend heading into fall is transparency. Sheers and silks replaced the more common uses of tweed and furs that usually inundate the Fall/Winter collections. This is an unusual trend the industry is moving towards, as some may note. Likewise, gone are the form-fitting outfits that accentuate the female body. In their place are loose fitting garments that resemble a woman covered in drapes more so than a Chanel coat. It seems in these grim economic times, the fashion industry, like main stream society, has relinquished its attachment to superfluous opulence. As governments are reining in spending and new social movements erupt that target the wealthy for nothing less than being wealthy, it seems allowing one’s self to dress grandly and ornately is no longer in vogue. The most talked about show during this year’s Couture Fashion Week was Dior. Following the abrupt departure of John Galliano as the house’s head creative director in February of 2011, the success of the famed fashion house was in jeopardy. Galliano reinvented the way we think about couture. Models prominently marched down the runway clothed in the most ornate and decadent outfits. These are clothes that would likely have adorned Marie Antoinette herself. After a few collections, designed by the house in Galliano’s absence, Dior named Raf Simons as their head creative director.

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After formerly commanding the house of Jil Sander, Simons’ couture collection, albeit stunning, was lacking in the qualities that make couture special. No more long flowing gowns encrusted with jewels. In its place, oversized jackets cemented by metal belts that imprisoned the models as they walked down the runway. While we have to remove the enigmatic brilliance that was Galliano when evaluating Simons, the days when couture was the reincarnation of a fashion designer’s wildest imagination is all too quickly becoming passé for those who love the art form to accept. Simons was not the only designer to feature a less than stellar couture collection - Karl Lagerfeld of Chanel produced a collection that left many asking, ‘Where is the glamour?’ Featured at the Grand Palais in Paris, the grey-scaled coloured collection reflected more of the grey-coloured room in which the collection was shown than the desires of those who watched the show. While there is no doubt that Lagerfeld’s collection will sell in the stores, overall, there is a push within the broader fashion industry to attract a new legion of buyers. While fashion trends change from season to season, a house’s loyal following is what sustains them. With an aging population, many fashion houses are left to deal with the reality of losing their major customers. Today’s young fashionistas may not necessarily care about hand stitched, diamond encrusted jackets that sell for thousands of dollars. Instead, they are turning their attention to ready-to-wear clothes. Today, the fashion industry is at a crossroads. Two questions are posed to all designers now:

1. Do you create a collection for a small, distinct group of people, thus allowing for artistic freedom in your designs? Or

2. Do you create a collection that can be mass-marketed and sold throughout the world that, essentially, inhibits your artistic freedom due to the varying degree of interests among buyers?

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Basic economics will side with the latter. The truth of the matter is, many of today’s fashion houses are no longer independent companies. Rather, they are owned by multi-billion dollar corporations that finance a designer’s work. One could call it, “creativity on loan.” The problem with this is that the only concern for designers today is to create a collection that can sell next season therefore satisfying their bottom-line, rather than striving to create a collection that can shape and formulate their legacy as a great designer. Needless to say, this year’s post-recession procession of clothes showed more reinvented basics than those highly sought-after once-a-season show-stopping pieces. The ‘return to basics’ trend that has dominated female fashion has also crept into men’s fashion. The look was minimal and effortless: simply cut suits made from fabrics ranging from cotton to silk, boxy-oversized jackets, and unlike the couture, colour-infused garments that were all the rage. Salvatore Ferragamo produced a show stopping men’s collection during the Milan fashion week this year. Colour blocking is back with a vengeance. Still continuing the minimalist theme, the clothes relied more on their colour to make a statement than their designs. Perhaps the recessionary times that we live in has taught us that there can be beauty in nothing. The fashion industry is now just realizing what main stream society was forced to accept years ago - less is more. While economics are the driving force of the fashion industry, many are reluctant to accept this shift to simplicity. There are a few in our industry, myself included, that see fashion as a form of selfexpression. Coupled with one’s own sense of style, the clothes we wear dictate more about the way we see ourselves than we can even fathom. Yet there are individuals such as Anna Wintour, editor in-chief of American Vogue, whose bias towards simple, wearable clothes have all but stifled a creative-driven industry. Years of promoting accessible fashion over innovative fashion has brain-washed a generation of young designers to pursue austerity over opulence which is the true travesty.

Christopher Palazzo is a men’s fashion, lifestyle and culture enthusiast. He is currently studying political science and history at the University of Toronto. He can be reached at chris.palazzo@me.com. PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 79


FEATURE

Local sources and supplies

From Your Neck of the Woods:

THE WESTWOOD By Andrew Oplinger Photographs by ViVien Hoang

In an age of fast food, overly processed and unidentifiable meat, and frozen vegetables, finding restaurants that serve fresh food can be a culinary delight. But it is a rarity to find a restaurant that takes “fresh” so seriously that the price sticker is still on the produce and the chef is seen daily carrying the grocery bags in from the local markets. An even more pleasant surprise is when such a restaurant’s fare is as delicious as the prices are reasonable. The WestWood (1152 Valencia St, San Francisco California) is an ambitious project by owner Hans Purohit and chef Jonny Becklund to sustainably support and purchase all of their food from local and neighbourhood stores in the Mission District of San Francisco, while also creating delectable dishes that do not compromise on taste or quality. Hans explained, “Most restaurants order from suppliers who send cases of food. The same amount every day and at the end of the day the restaurant throws away much of that food - upwards of 25%.” In a city which will start charging for plastic bags in October of 2012, this level of waste is shocking. Hans went on to explain his solution, “By sourcing locally and shopping every day, we can vary the amount of food we have in stock and waste much less.” It is more work for the staff, but the payout for the diners is undeniable. Quality is extremely important as well. Since they are in San Francisco, they have access to some of the greatest sources of food in the world. The WestWood is, as Hans, noted “the type of restaurant that can only happen here”. However, it’s not just ingredients that make quality. While dining on brussel sprouts (a perennially despised dish) the tattooed and mohawked chef, Jonny, insulted my mother:

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“Most people don’t like a certain kind of food - it’s because our parents couldn’t cook them. Steamed brussel sprouts are terrible. But throw some bacon grease on top and it’s delicious.” He was right and my mother would agree. Pricing is another aspect which they are breaking the mold. Both Hans and Jonny are long time restaurateurs. Because of their experience, they know many of the servers, chefs and owners in the San Francisco Bay area by name. Jonny went on to discuss the injustice of having to cook and serve fantastic foods all day when you aren’t making enough money to afford to eat. “I wanted to make a spot where the servers and chefs could come, and get food as great as what they were cooking and serving, at a price they can afford. Nothing on our menu is over $16.” The devilled eggs are a crowd-pleaser and easy to share among friend while the pork belly is a succulent feast. Their low-gravity cocktails, like the aptly named Valencia 75, are carefully mixed and dangerously delicious. San Francisco is a city with many different tastes and flavours, both literally and in fashion, but there is an underlying drive in everyone who lives here to create something new, fresh, and high in quality. Hans and Jonny have set out to operate a restaurant which is socially responsible, sustainable, and adaptable while simultaneously creating a welcoming spot for a great meal and good conversation. If the hubbub of happy patrons on the Wednesday evening when we stopped in is any indication, they have succeeded.

Andrew Oplinger is a software engineer living in San Francisco, California. When he is not searching the Bay Area for good eats and drinks, he can be found traveling, singing, and climbing.


Inside the Restaurant

Hans Purohit

Jonny Becklund

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Rain on the Rooftop

SCOTLAND Photography: Oliver Schneider (www.oliverschneider.co.uk) Make-Up & Hair: Ramilia McCaskie (www.ramiliahairandmake-up.co.uk) Fashion Design: Tracey MacDonald Wardrobe Styling: Tracey MacDonald Model: Numba Siluka (www.numba-siluka.co.uk)

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EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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FEATURE

Coming into Focus By Alissa Santiago

Distraction. There are a million things that can pull your attention away from what is important. Let me use this past long weekend as an example. My three goals for the weekend were to finish some marketing print work for a good friend, decide on a topic to write about, and go for a run. I had three days, plus a Friday night, so I figured I’d have enough time for fun and work… or so I thought.

the day and met up with some friends for some Sangrias on a patio. It was a great ending to the day. It’s now Monday night. I’m on #3 on my list of things to-do as I type these words. I went for a run in the morning and had dim sum with my sister and brother-in-law. Look at that! All three things on my long weekend to-do list almost done. I can be productive and have a social life if I set my mind to it!

On Sunday morning, all three things had not been checked off my checklist. Instead, I hung out with my BFF, went to a BBQ, attended a graduation party, caught up on three hours of TV online and went home to visit my parents and cat. On top of that, I probably spent about three hours online Facebooking, Tweeting, and blogging. My morning started late so the run would have to wait for sundown or Monday morning.

These realizations dawned upon me in the past three days:

My social life is not an issue. I had plenty of down time to get one thing off my list. It is sex. Let’s hit pause for a quick second before you start jumping to conclusions. It’s not the physical act of sex that was taking up my time. This would be a completely different article and probably not meant for this type of magazine, although mommy porn seems to be all the rage right now. It’s the stuff that comes before sex. I couldn’t sit still for even a few hours because I was wasting my time flirting with, messaging, talking to, and thinking about men. The problem with casual dating is the need to be aloof and interested at the same time. This paradoxical state required effort and time that is far from what I understand as “casual” and definitely far from what I am capable of achieving at the moment. Being single does have its perks alongside the new-found freedom of living on my own without the restrictions of someone stopping me from attaining satisfaction. I change my mind on what I want with the cycle of the moon. “I want! I want! I want!” But all this wanting doesn’t really get me anywhere. Goldilocks went out looking for her “just right” but she was looking for it in all the wrong places and almost met her demise because of it. With the overwhelming amount of choices that we have now, it’s no wonder many of us suffer from indecisiveness. I will not be Goldilocks! So on my Sunday morning, I made an effort not to communicate. I tucked into my little writing corner, turned off the wi-fi, put my phone on silent and got down to business. I chipped away at my project and started to enjoy the momentum I was gaining. Slowly, the morning started to turn into afternoon and I actually finished the marketing work and was rather happy with it. I allowed for a slight distraction by going on an afternoon walk. I grabbed an ice cream and happily explored my new neighbourhood. I completed enough of my to-do list for 88 | VEUX | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS

1. I’m a slave to distractions. Seriously, I have a bag of wet laundry that needs to be hung out to dry and it’s been sitting there for the past two hours. #2: I should develop healthy relationships instead focusing only on sex. Sex is everywhere you turn, but you have to remind yourself that it isn’t always your target. I recognize that I have spent too much energy on this lately. I need to make adjustments and appreciate my wonderful support system as I move away from my constructs of sex to thinking about healthy relationships. I will try, very humbly to surrender to the universe and listen to what it’s telling me. I just wish sometimes the universe was loud and sent a very clear message like, “Walk away from him! He’ll break your heart!” or “He’s right there in front of you! Say hi!” #3: I need to commit to the finish. When I started working on my first novel, I had no idea how much work it would take to complete a book. The number of edits frustrated me but in the end I realized that it was my labour of love and completely worth the effort. My goal for this year is to have a working copy of my second piece that will be ready to show my editor. They say writing down a goal is the first step to obtaining it. Learn from my missteps and recognize where you are putting your energy, and make sure it is going into what matters to you. Don’t waste the moments you have on things that will not make you the “best version of you”. When there are too many things on your todo list, just take a step back. Breathe and get one task done at a time. We aren’t meant to multitask but the world we live in insists that we must. There are some things you just need to hold back on in order to spend time on your wants and needs. You’ll be a better person for it. I’m optimistic that this short exercise of stillness has had its effect on how I look at each challenge. I have learned that to strive for perfection is a mistake. Rather, be forgiving of your distractions and learn to refocus on what is important. I am finding perfection in my imperfections.


Alissa Santiago is the author of the novel “On Stand By”. She is a graduate of York University’s Glendon College and has travelled to many countries including China, France, and Japan. She lives and works in Toronto. www.alissasantiago.com Photograph by Wales Wong

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BEAUTY

Fallin’

High On the Eyes: Crease: MAC Orange Eyeshadow Eyelid and highlight: MAC Goldenrod Eyeshadow Eyeliner: MAC Fascinating Eye Kohl Pencil Lashes: MAC Lash Prep & Prime Lips: MAC Made to Order Lipstick Blush: MAC Gingerly Blush

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BEAUTY

Facing Page On the Eyes: Crease and highlight: MAC Sushi Flower Eyeshadow Eyelid, highlight and eyeliner: MAC Fascinating Eye Kohl Pencil Lashes: MAC Lash Prep & Prime Lips: INGLOT AMC Lipgloss #544 Blush: MAC Frankly Scarlet Blush

Above On the Eyes: Crease: MAC Free to be Eyeshadow Eyelid and highlight: MAC Naked Lunch Eyeshadow Eyeliner: MAC Fluidline Blacktrack Lashes: MAC Opulash Mascara Lips: MAC Chromagraphic Pencil Process Magenta Blush: MAC Minerlize Gleeful Soul Blush

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On the Eyes: Crease: MAC Kid Eyeshadow Eyelid and highlight: MAC Naked Lunch Eyeshadow Eyeliner: MAC Fluidline Blacktrack Lashes: MAC Opulash Mascara Lips: MAC High Tea Lipstick Foundation: MAC Face and Body C1 & MAC Bare Essential Oils Blush: MAC Mineralize Warm Soul Blush

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BEAUTY

UNITED STATES Photography: Merry Widjaya (www.merrywidjaya.com) Make-Up: Jason Melgar (www.jasonmelgar.com) Hair: Brandy Stokes (www.brandystokes.com) Model: Maddison Kram

On the Cover On the Eyes: Crease: MAC Free to be Eyeshadow Eyelid and highlight: MAC Vex Eyeshadow Eyeliner: MAC Fascinating Eye Kohl Pencil Lashes: MAC Opulash Mascara Lips: INGLOT AMC Lipgloss #543 Blush: MAC Cosmetics Coy Girl Blush

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EDITORIAL

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CANADA Photography by Neeto da Silva (www.photographybyneeto.com) Make-Up: Natalie Mowatt Hair: Tamara Collins Wardrobe Styling: Camille Evans Models: Zanana Pinas & Alexx Wiseman (Elite Model Management)

Disco Glam Bold and Free PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 97


EDITORIAL

On Zanana: Black Jumpsuit by Bungalow Shoes by Winners Jewellery byT.M. Glam Boutique

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On Alexx: Floral Pant by Winners Vintage Sheer Top by Modestar Shoes by Mia


On Alexx: Wide Legged Pant by Joe Fresh Fuchsia Shirt by Winners Shoes by Mia Turban, Gold Belt & Jewellery by T.M. Glam Boutique On Zanana: Gold Vintage Jumpsuit by Exile Shoes by Winners Gold Scarf & Jewellery by T.M. Glam Boutique

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EDITORIAL

Wide Legged Pant by Joe Fresh Striped Shirt byModeStar Shoes by Mia Turban & Jewellery byT.M. Glam Boutique

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EDITORIAL

On Alexx: Wide Legged Pant by Joe Fresh Leopard Print Scarf: Stylist’s own Shoes by Mia On Zanana: Black Jumpsuit by Bungalow Shoes by Winners Jewellery by T.M. Glam Boutique

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A N A

L . A . . m e o v o r f h l t i w

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EDITORIAL

CANADA Photography: Willow Nova (willownova.com) Make-Up & Hair: Jeanette Schwarz (mymakeupartist.ca) Wardrobe Styling: Nichole Khoo (nicholekhoo.com) Creative Assistant: Bernard Patacsil (grazingfashion.com) Model: Alana Meikle (Lexington Models)

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Hat by Kokin

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the Modern

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EDITORIAL

Silk Kimono Robe by H & M Necklace: Vintage PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 109


Silk Kimono Robe by H & M Necklace: Vintage

110 | VEUX | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS


EDITORIAL

Top by Muheeka Skirt & Bottoms by Sugarpuss Bracelet by Muheeka Crown & Necklace: Vintage

PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 111


Top by Miss Sixty Skirt by Sugarpuss Earrings & Bracelet by Muheeka Belt by Fornarina

112 | VEUX | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS


EDITORIAL

PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 113


Top & Shorts by Sugarpuss Bracelet by Muheeka Necklace & Ring: Vintage

114 | VEUX | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS


EDITORIAL

Top by American Rag Cie. Skirt by Sugarpuss Bracelet by Muheeka Necklace: Stylist’s Own

PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 115


Kimono & Beads: Vintage

116 | VEUX | ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | PAPER & CLOCKS


Bodysuits by Sugarpuss Shoes by Steve Madden Kimono: Vintage

UNITED STATES Photography: Benjo Arwas - MS Management (www.benjoarwas.com) Make-Up & Hair: Berenice Gallegos (www.facebook.com/beautybyberenice) Wardrobe Styling: Jen Summers (www.jensummers.com) Creative Director: Jen Summers Assistant: Daniel Rosenthal Model: Codi Babcock

PAPER & CLOCKS |ISSUE 7 - 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY | VEUX | 117


www.veuxmag.com AVW Publishing Inc.

ISSUE SEVEN | 1 Year Anniversary - Paper and Clocks  

Our 1 Year Anniversary Issue featuring the winners of the Cover Contest. Come celebrate 1 year of publishing as we once again showcase amaz...

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