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WEEKLY, SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1, 2013

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Serving Bridgewater and surrounding communities “Changing Ourselves and Changing Our Community”

veritas.bridgewater.edu

Pianos and harmony Picture by Morgan Elkins

BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE bridgewater.edu

Read about Alexander Mack’s age this year. SEE MORE on pAGE 7

Aces high SEE MORE ON pAGE12

Two talented musicians at the Dueling Pianos event By Morgan Elkins

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or several years, Eagle Productions has brought in Dueling Pianos International for Family Weekend and this year was no exception. With a breaking record enroll-

ment of students this year, an already hefty amount of upperclassmen, and parents, the Bridgewater campus was seeing quite a bit of traffic this past weekend. So many students and their parents

were excited to see Dueling Pianos that the line for the event reached outside the KCC breezeway and to the exterior sidewalk. There is no doubt that Dueling Pianos was playing to a full

crowd last Friday night. Dueling Pianos is an entertainment group whose core goal is to give the audience an array of musical comedy using only two Continues on page 6.


Editorial

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Home is where the heart is By Brooke Thacker

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ith the passing of family weekend on campus, all students feel that tightknit bond draw a little farther apart. It is hard to leave home and start a new life in a new place. However, commuter students do not have a drastic as a change as students from other states. Commuters or on-campus students who are from the area do not necessarily need a family weekend to see their parents and, or, siblings. For me, I live less than two hours away from home so I can see my family regularly. However, I have never stayed on campus for a family weekend. My freshman year, I went home every other weekend to spend time with my parents. I am the baby of the family so, of course, I got a little more spoiling. By my sophomore year, I was not going home as much but I still went home during family weekend to spend

some time with just my mother and myself. Now, in my third year, I have not been home in a month and I am feeling a trip home because a month is too long for me to be away. And for those of you who are waiting until break to go home, be strong. We only have three weeks until we can all go home for a little relaxation and family fun! Everyone has their own different ways of handling family though. Some are like my freshman self where they cannot be away for too long for fear of homesickness. Others may go home less often, but still enough to get mom’s home cooking when they need it. Then there are those who only see their families on breaks or at the end of the semesters. I, personally, could not be a person to go away from home for too long though, which is why I am glad that Bridgewater has a designated family

weekend. It represents the close-knit community that we have here at BC. Students live so close to one another that they form close bonds with hall-mates as well as classmates. Students can also form close bonds with professors, seeing as their doors are always open for questions about class or about a specific academic field that a student wishes to learn more about. BC is a family for those who may not have a family that comes for family weekends. If your parents do not come, then a friend’s parents come that will treat you as one of their own. It is an amazing feeling never to be left out, even when you feel it is inevitable. Be thankful for your family at home and your family at school. You will never have these relationships with another person at another time of life. Take it in while you can.

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SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Veritas is a publication manged and produced by students of Bridgewater College. As a news organization serving the Bridgewater and surrounding communities, Veritas publishes regularly opinion articles and letters submitted by members of the community which do not reflect the opinion of the Veritas staff or of the Bridgewater College’s administration. We encourage members of the community to submit information, opinion, and critiques in order to promote a healthy dialogue. The Veritas Editorial team also reserves the right to edit, modify, or exclude any submissions containing offensive or innappropriate language or remarks. To reach the newsroom, contact the advertising team, or submit articles and letters, please send us an email at:

veritas@bridgewater.edu TWITTER: @BCVeritas FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/BridgewaterCollegeVeritas Executive Director: Brandy Brode Editor: Brooke Thacker Business Team: Advertising Manager: Kate Hutton Public Relations Manager: Emily Nowak Social Media Manager: Victoria Wilson Marketing Associates: Emily Heacock Office Manager: Latisha Branch Editorial Team: Managing Editor: Lacey Naff Head Copy Editor: Alyssa Pennington Layout Editor: Tayseer Al-Safar Content Editors: Morgan Alexander Emily Higgins Melina Norman Senior Staff: Chris Conte, Jason Manago, Christopher Michael, Abgail Blair, Ellen Morris, Nicholas Davies, Cyndi Wibe, Katie Matherlee, Sarah Conner Printed by the Daily News Record in Harrisonburg, Va.


SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

Campus

2013

Spreading the joy of music

Quiet down! By Sam St. John

By Lindsey Barnes

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s children, many aspire to be teachers later in life, but few stick to that as they get older. One student, Kayla Becker, a junior at Bridgewater College, has pursued that childhood dream of spreading knowledge to future generations. Becker desires to teach music to elementaryaged students. “Teaching is something I’ve always wanted to do. I want to be able to make a difference in the lives of my future students. Music gives me the avenue to do just that. Since music has always had such a special place in my life, I have a deep desire to share my love of it with kids,” Kayla Becker said. Becker is in Music 422 with three other students. This Music in the Elementary School class is perfect for preparing these four students for the field of teaching music on an elementary level. “For the first time ever, the class will be hosting a small group of younger elementary-aged children

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four times over the course of the semester,” said Becker. “This new opportunity provides a great chance to put the different teaching methods and strategies we’ve been discussing into practice.” To fulfill the requirements of this course, Becker and her fellow classmates must develop lesson plans that teach different musical concepts such as timbre, voice exploration, pitch and rhythm. In order to get to this advanced level, all of the students put much dedication into their studies by taking other required classes such as music theory and other education-related classes. Hours of out of class dedication go into fulfilling the goal of becoming a teacher to elementary students such as creating lesson plans that will fulfill the national music standards as well as the VA SOL standards. Just like with anything any of us do, dedication and hard work is required if a dream is to become reality.

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oise—it is everywhere on college campuses. From the dining halls to the academic buildings, to residential housing and the surrounding community, noise is ever present. Bridgewater College has established several “Excessive Noise Policies” to discourage loud noises during times when students are studying or sleeping. According to the Eagle Student Handbook, “[t]he official quiet hours in the

residential areas are from 10:00pm to 8:00am from Sunday through Thursday and 12:00am to 8:00am on Fridays and Saturdays. During these times, noise should not be heard outside a student’s room if the door is closed.” Visitation hour policies may also be found in the Eagle Student Handbook. For freshman residents on campus, these policies are applicable: From SundayThursday, 8 a.m. to midnight and Fridays and Saturdays

from 8 a.m.-2 a.m. According to the handbook, “[f] reshman should not only talk to their roommates about guests but also establish a roommate agreement.” Further information on this subject can be found on pages 82 and 83 of the Eagles Student Handbook. There are no visitation hour policies for upperclassmen, but quiet hours are still in effect for sophomores, juniors and seniors.

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Bridgewater fall yard sale By Katie Mathrelee

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ellow deal seekers, sale searchers and bargain hunters, it’s time to gather ‘round! September has finally graced us with its presence with fall not too far behind it, which can mean only one thing: the Town of Bridgewater fall yard sale! The yard sale is a town-wide yard sale where anyone can participate, no matter where one lives in Bridgewater. If you’re a seller, call Bridgewater’s town office at (540) 828-3390 or you can email them at cloveless@twon. bridgewater.va.us to add your yard to the list. If you are a buyer, your

job is a little less complicated. Simply bring money with you on your tour and buy whatever you want. The yard sale will be held this Saturday, Sept. 28. There is not really a set time when it begins and ends. Usually when yard selling, you will want to be out as early as possible before the good stuff is gone. This can be as early as five in the morning. The sale usually ends in early afternoon, or even sooner if the sellers are sold out. Now before you create havoc throughout the community, here are a couple things to remember:

1. Bring cash. It is highly likely that no one will have a card swipe. 2. It’s okay to haggle, but be reasonable and nice about it. 3. Be nice! There’s nothing worse than a grumpy yard sale enthusiast. 4. Have fun! Who knows, you might want to do it again next year! Now that you know the ins and outs of yard selling, you’re sure to have a successful, entertaining, and memorable trip. Look forward to seeing you all on Saturday!

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Campus

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SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Senior ring ceremony

By Cyndi Wibe eniors dressed up and made their way to the main dining hall where they ate and enjoyed the annual ring ceremony with their family and fellow students of their senior class. Each year, this ceremony kicks off the senior celebrations. The ceremony began with seniors Christopher Michael giving the invocation. Once Michael’s finished, Troy Jackson gave a speech to the class

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of 2014 a speech. Third to speak was President Bushman. He stated his excitement that this senior class will be his first at Bridgewater College. President Bushman talked about the four words on the Bridgewater seal: harmony, truth, beauty, and goodness. These words are carved into the school’s traditional ring. After the speeches, seniors lined up by the stage. Each student then took a turn walk-

ing across to receive his or her ring from President Bushman and his assistant Troy Jackson. When the rings had all been distributed, Dean Miracle talked to the senior class about how they are a BC family. Over the four years of school, students create lifelong friendships. A lot changed since freshman year, but this is still not the end. Jackson said, “This is the first milestone of senior year.”

The truth being, many more senior year events will come sooner than seniors think. For seniors of the class of 2015, senior year approaches quickly. The time comes for this class to think about ordering their rings. Jostens’s will visit Bridgewater College and have a ring sale set up in the KCC lobby. Students can choose from different designs and styles to create their own ring, or they can choose to go

Critical encounters

with the Bridgewater’s traditional ring comes with the Bridgewater seal. No matter the style chosen, the rings together symbolize the unity of the class. Next time senior class walks across the stage to receive something to unify them, it will be their diplomas at their graduation. For now, congratulations seniors and enjoy your moment in the spotlight.

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By Jess Snellings

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oday, a friend and I went into Morgantown to check out West Virginia University’s campus. On the way in, on the median of the highway off the interstate, there was a homeless-looking man holding up a cardboard sign to let passersby know he was in great need of food. A couple of hours later, as we were leaving campus, the man was in the same place with his sign, but this time he was accompanied by a much younger man. This guy looked like he was either in high school or early college. He also held up a sign promoting a buffet at a restaurant for under $6. At first, I thought this was irony, a cruel kind of humor. It didn’t seem very kind for the restaurant to advertise beside a man begging for food. Simultaneously, I

Humanity for the win couldn’t help but wonder if there was another purpose for that young man to be there with that sign when he could have been standing anywhere else. It wasn’t until just a few moments ago when another idea dawned on me. I do not believe the restaurant was playing a cruel joke on the hungry man. Instead, it seems they were trying to help him out. The young man’s sign read: *insert restaurant name* Buffet: $5.86 (or whatever the exact price was). What I now understand the sign to have said was, “As you pass by on your way to or from lunch, think about how much you’re paying, and that you don’t have to worry about your next meal. It’s less than $6 for anyone to eat as much as they want here, so why not help this man out?”

That’s a strong message. It speaks to one of the greatest aspects of humanity. It hits a person’s basic desire to help another. In today’s world, we are taught not to hand out money to those on the streets with signs asking for handouts because it could be a rouse. There are people who put on an appearance and take advantage of the generosity of others. Still, there is a natural instinct in everyone that, when left untouched, wants to provide for others. So when we see a man in need of food, shelter, and other essentials, our first desire is to help in any way we can. If the man’s sign touched someone’s heart first, the next sign showing how little it took to provide what the man needed would have done a great deal more. Furthermore, the restau-

rant sign was somewhat of a slap in the face. As the multitude of people drove by without even a second glance, a man (and many like him) was suffering and in search of help. When the second man came with the buffet sign, it served two purposes: 1) to follow the first basic human instinct, which is to help others, 2) (unconsciously) remind the rest of us of our humanity. Scenarios such as what I saw today with those signs, one asking for help and the other supporting the first, helps the restoration of my tapering faith in humanity. There are instances everywhere that say we as a culture are not completely absorbed by this way of life, and that inside, we are still human and function under basic human needs and wants. It also helped me

believe that the desire to do selfless acts is more prominent than selfish ones. By the end of the day (or the very early beginnings of this day and I try to figure out why I’m awake), I like to think I have re-learned the importance of looking around for simple and small, or even not-so-small, acts of compassion among humans. I firmly believe we are of a loving nature, and sometimes this can be seen through actions, no matter how minuscule they may seem on the surface; we just have to remember not to give up on that idea. Like a parent can’t give up on a child after a few disappointing actions or grades, we as people can’t give up on our society as a whole. There is good–we just have to find it, see it and bring it out.

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SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

Community

2013

Ace race on September 28

By Taylor Prillaman o you adore the presence of being outdoors? Do you enjoy playing Frisbee? How about golf ? Why not try some Frisbee golf ? If you’re already familiar with the relaxing sport of Frisbee golf then you must experience the game of Ace Race! Ace Race, which is sponsored by Disccraft, is not the same as regular Frisbee golf but has the same mindset. Ace Race is set up to the advantage of the players where every hole is designed for players to get an “ace” or hole in one. At this nationwide event, locally held right down the road in Harrisonburg, players will pay a small fee of $25 to participate. They will receive two identical Frisbee prototypes, sunglasses, a koozie, magnet,

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stickers and even a water bottle. The event takes place on Sept. 28 at 11 a.m. As mentioned earlier, Ace Race is not the same as regular Frisbee golf. The holes are reset between 180 and 250 feet which technically makes every hole ace-able and ideally each player should throw the disc only once per hole. At the end of 36 holes, the player with the greatest amount of aces is declared the winner. One stipulation of Ace Race is that one must use the two discs given to them as no personal discs will be allowed in this game. The reasoning behind this rule is simple—this Race is designed for Disccraft to test their products. A local at Bridgewater College, Dr. Puffenbarger,

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International festival By Jessica Singh and Ellen Morris

will be in attendance this year. This is her third year participating and from previous years, she says it is “super fun” and encourages anyone to come out to try it. All one needs is a couple of Frisbees and tennis shoes. Even if this is the first time hearing about Frisbee golf, we encourage all to come out and give it a try. If you love Frisbee, why not try a different approach. With this event being held so close it is senseless not to come and see what it is all about. To learn more information, you can contact Dr. Puffenbarger at rpuffenb@bridgewater.edu or visit discgolfacerace.com.

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n Saturday, Sept. 28, the International Festival at Hillandale Park will occur. This festival will showcase heritages of people from Argentina, Brazil, Thailand, Ethiopia, Mexico, El Salvador, India, Puerto Rico and more. “There will be cultural dances, International Cultural Fashion Shows, a native American storyteller and a drum circle to learn World Beats,” said Vaunda Brown, co-coordinator of the festival. There will be 16 different food venders

from countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Thailand and more. “Twenty vendors [will be] selling exquisite hand-made and imported art and souvenirs,” Brown said. The Harrisonburg International Festival will continue on Sunday, Sept. 29 at 2 p.m. where there will be World Cup Soccer Games. Those who would like to participate in the soccer games are encouraged to come early to register. There will be a $5 fee and teams will receive a t-shirt.

the event only had eight sets of boards, but due to the game’s increasing popularity, this year’s had 16 sets, doubling the previous year. The rules to corn hole are very basic yet still entertaining. One sack in the hole is worth three points. One on the actual board is one point, and every bag that you match cancels them out. To win the game the sack tossing goes on until someone scores 21 points. Some of the players included an uncle and nephew duo, Danny and Chris, who excitedly won their first match.

“It’s a fun game and the camaraderie is great”, the team said. Although the event has more amateurs than professionals, event co-chair Gnagey is still impressed by the skill of the players they host. “There are people who follow it and do tournaments all the time, and there is a group of the professionals that are playing every weekend,” said Gnagey. The sports growing popularity fuels many weekend activities, so there is always time for practice.

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Cornhole tournament

By Emily Townsend and Katie Labranche espite the competifun started at 10. tive edge some may The Harrisonburg-Mashave had, it was all sanutten Rotary Club hosts smiles as friends and strang- the event to raise money for ers played together, all while various organizations that helping to raise money for raise awareness and assislocal and international protance to areas in need. grams that aid communities “Whatever funds we make everywhere. here we do not take as a On Saturday September club. All the proceeds get 21, local corn hole lovers split into each one of those put their game face on and groups”, said club president headed down to Turner Stephen Hess. Park in Harrisonburg for Last year’s event raised the annual Harrisonburg$3,410.65 and the profits Massanutten Rotary Club went to the Harrisonburg Corn hole Challenge. Check Rockingham Free Clinic. in for the competition was In the previous years the at 9 AM and then the real event also included vol-

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leyball, but this year they decided to just focus on corn hole. “As the club members got older it seemed like we needed a new thing and corn hole seemed like it might be a place of interest in the community”, said event cochair Keith Gnagey. Because it’s so easy to set up and the rules are not too complicated, anyone can play at any time. The demand for the game has increased as well, which can be seen with the increase of corn hole boards the event provides. Last year

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Main Focus

SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Picture by Megan Ford

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Four students dancing to “YMCA.”

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grand pianos. Two pianist and two grand pianos are the basis of a show that can go from wooing the crowd with Macklemore to sending everyone back to their childhood with a Disney mash-up. Not only does the group perform songs solely by request to add uniqueness to every show, but they also get the audience involved as

well. During a rendition of “YMCA” the two pianists, Ryan and Noel (yes, it’s just first names with them), had five girls pick five guys to dance during the song. Although the audience kept begging for more songs, resulting in parents staying up past their bedtime with the event lasting until midnight, it was not as musically inclined as past years.

“I felt that this year’s Dueling Pianos was definitely more money driven. They kept asking more for tips. I felt it took away from the audience and what actually matters,” one student said. During the show, if at any time a song was being played that someone in the audience did not like or they wanted another song to be played more, they could run

up to the stage and give the pianists a tip to switch the song. On several occasions students ran up to change the songs. There was even a $20 tip an audience member put on the stage to play a song. As distracting as the tips might have been, the event was still able to give the students and their family an entertainment-filled night.

The last song that Dueling Pianos performed was none other than the “Piano Man.” With everyone in the audience singing along, the voices of students and their families filled the main dining hall, fulfilling Dueling Pianos objective of creating a harmonious environment.

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SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

Main Focus

2013

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Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Alexander Mack Memorial Library By Rianna Hill and Megan Ford

Students (below) make use of the first floor tables to study for their classes.

This plaque (above) commemorates when the library was built between 1962 and 1963, and dedicated in 1964.

The art gallery (above) is located on the second floor of the library featuring art from students, professors and guests.

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n April the 19th20th, 2013 Bridgewater College’s Alexander Mack Memorial Library celebrated its 50th anniversary. The library didn’t have its own building until 1963. Andrew Pearson, the director of The Mack since 2007, says alumni will always remember September 18th, 1963 because all classes were cancelled in order to move the library books to their new, permanent location. Stephanie Gardner, Special Collections Librarian and Archivist for The Mack, said that the shift of 50,000 books across campus in four hours and nine minutes into the library was called “Operation Booklift.” The

move was a huge benchmark for the college, signifying the first time the library had its own space. According to Pearson the movement was a “major community effort. The 50th Anniversary Jubilee featured alumni that graduated many, many years ago, along with current students like Chris Conte, a special collections intern, and Daniel Hallman, a special collections student assistant, both class of 2014, who helped organize and facilitate the various activities surrounding the celebration. Gardner said that one of the biggest events at the jubilee was “Name That Photo.” “That was a lot of fun,” Pearson chuckled as he

and Gardner remembered the excitement. Hundreds of historic photographs, artifacts, and yearbooks were laid out on display for alumni to identify the unnamed faces, and prizes were awarded to those who could identify the most people. “If they could spot one face on the picture, then all of a sudden we have a name, we have year,” Pearson said. The event captured the importance of reclaiming the past that was being lost because of unidentified people. “We’ve been making a lot of good steps,” Pearson commented when asked about what new things can

be expected for the library in the near future. Over the years the library has made tremendous efforts to expand their collections and databases to give students access to as much material as possible. “We are now in excess of 42,000 full-text journals that students have access to online that are professional, scholarly journals,” said Pearson. “And we’re continuing to build on that.” In terms of the library’s space for studying and researching, Pearson comments that, “we’re looking to try to develop better learning spaces for our students.” Gardner says that Special

Collections has been seeing more and more student use for various projects. “It’s also very exciting that the museum and the archives can be used as a teaching tool to train students in the preservation of history,” she adds. Since 1963, the library has undergone many different changes. According to Gardner, The Mack provides students with, “a tangible way of learning history,” and stands as a significant database that serves and will serve students, faculty, and community members for years to come.

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Commununity in Action

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SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Llamas and learning Events at the Massanutten Regional Library go beyond books Story and photo by Rianna Hill

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he Massanutten Regional Library, located in Harrisonburg, Virginia, has seven branches throughout the Shenandoah Valley that provide the area with a unique culture and various technological resources. From borrowing books directly from the library to eBook resources, the MRL gives the community access to a plethora of learning utensils that serve the diverse community that surrounds it. “We do various things,” says community relations manager Cheryl Griffith when asked about what types of events and programs the MRL hosts for the Shenandoah Valley area. This past Saturday, September 21st, Virginia Poet Laureate Sofia Starnes came to the library and read selections of her poetry to the community. Griffith said that, “she also talked about the power of language and words,” emphasizing the impact that Starnes had on those who listened. This is just one example of the many things that go on at the MRL. The library has a number of informative adult programming, with topics that range from Obama-care to public policy and foreign affairs. Every Thursday in October, start-

ing on October 3rd at 7pm, the Deyerle Series will have its first program of the year. In the past, the program’s focus was on music, introducing various entertainers and types of music from around the Shenandoah Valley to the community. This year, the focus has shifted to “A History of Art in the Valley.”

read to the kids, happens on a weekly basis. Aside from just being read to, though, children in the past have had the opportunity to interact with live llamas in the library, and even meet the infamous Bubble Lady who can blow very large bubbles. Another upcoming event will be this Saturday, September 28th, where the library will have a puppet show for the children. The week of October 13th to the 19th, teens can come in and participate in a scavenger hunt for a prize, and on November 23rd, teenagers up to age seventeen are invited to participate in the library’s very own Hunger Games event. Griffith emphasized the various special learning programs that the MRL hosts outside of the Griffith says that this pro- pages of a book. “Certainly gram is intended to highlight yes; we do welcome volunand focus on the “culture teers,” Griffith said when and history and the heritage asked about how students of the Shenandoah Valley.” can participate. “We love One of Bridgewater Colvolunteers,” she added, lege’s own English profesdescribing how she desires sors, Dr. Scott Suter, will be to get young adults more ina speaker for the program. terested in and involved with In addition to these unique the goings-on at the library. learning opportunities for For more information on adults, the MRL hosts a how to get involved with number of events that cater the Massanutten Regional to the children and teenagers Library and for a full list of of the Shenandoah Valupcoming events, visit www. ley area. Story time, where mrlib.org. books are selected to be

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This week’s events and opportunities Community in Action is a partnership between The Community Foundation, United Way and Veritas. The Annual Harrisonburg International Festival will be held at Hillandale Park on Sept. 28. This festival will feature international foods, music, dance and activities for all ages, a multi-language area, fashion show and international breed. It will also feature a dog show, a world bazaar and lots more. Celebrate our community of cultures from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. The event will take place rain or shine. For more information call 540-4336228. The Rockingham Educational Foundation, Inc (REFI). will be hosting The Great Pumpkin Run for Education on Saturday, Sept. 28. The 5K-run and 1-mile-walk has a unique course at Back Home on the Farm in Harrisonburg. The event will benefit the Rockingham Educational Foundation to support projects in the Rockingham County Public Schools. Registration forms and details are available from the REFI website, the County School Board Offices and from Back Home on the Farm. For more information call Ed Smith at 540-564-3218. The Alpine Loop Gran Fondo is an event hosted by professional cyclist Jeremiah Bishop. It is an event to welcome cyclists and spectators to his hometown of Harrisonburg for an exciting weekend of special events, challenging rides, charity fundraising and festivities for the entire family. These courses showcase the true beauty that Harrisonburg and Rockingham county have to offer. The Event will be held, Sunday Sept. 29 but registration ends on Sept. 27. For information visit http://alpineloopgranfondo.com/


SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Community

Bridgewater fall festival

By Jessica Reynolds

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n September 21st bright and early in the morning the Rockingham county fairgrounds held the Bridgewater fall festival. A delicious omelet breakfast made by the Mill Creek church of the bretheren started at 7:30 and went on till 10 a.m. After filling your tummy up with breakfast, guests could check out a variety of activities going on. The silent auction was held all day and items such as Virgina Tech baskets filled with Hokie birds and Tech apparel and Bridgewater college apparel could be bided on. Starting at 9:30 am the live auction began. This year they had everything from a vacuum cleaner, homemade quilts from some of the residents at the bridgewater home ,to local artist donating paintings, and local businesses like Shreckhise Shrubbery sales & Landscaping donating bigger items. Ellie Drapper the woman behind this wonderful festival gushed about the outstanding support from the community and even

the outsiders. She even stated that in the past there had been people who stayed in the Ramada Inn and people who came all the way from Massunutten to support the Bridgewater Home festival. The festival began forty four years ago and after outgrowing there space at the Bridgewater home they moved to the Rockingham County fairgrounds where they have been for thirty years now. Local Churches from the area donated their time and supplies making scrumptious goodies, like the Staunton Church of The Brethren who made about a 150 apple turnovers throughout the day. As you looked around everyone working was a volunteer and a hundred percent of the proceeds go to the Bridgewater home. In the past they have made a net gross of anywhere from 30,00050,000 and this year they are very excited about beginning renovations at the Home to give it more of a community feel.

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Arts & Style

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Murder mystery dinner theater By Janelle Alexander and Kelsey Velandria

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ooking for somea gathering of popular fai- gain evidence. This creates thing fun to do with rytale characters together in a hands-on “detectives and your family and the enchanted forest with a suspects relationship” between characters and audifriends while visiting the dramatic twist: murder. Shenandoah Valley? Or are The audience gets to ex- ence members. The seating area, where dinner is served you in need of a “hump perience the performance day” getaway to get you up close and personal with acts as the stage for the characters so through the one may even last few days Picture courtesy of massresort.com be sitting next of classes for to you! the week? This $65 Well an experience has exciting and been given intriguing five stars on experience is Tripadvisor. waiting for com, a webyou at the site designated local Masspecifically sanutten Ski for tourists to and Lodge find the best Resort—the attractions Once Upon in areas they A Time, Murare visiting. der Mystery Though it Dinner Thehas been said ater. The Murto be a bit der Mystery overly priced, Dinner most reviews The Murder Mystery Dinner’s interactive play Theater is describe the an interac“Once upon a crime” has fairy tale characters show as being well worth it. tive meal and commiting and investigating a murder. Since most show. Your college studinner reservations serve not only as the actors. Intermission in- dents have a tight budget, the one-time viewing is a luxurious dining expericludes a high- rated buffet ence, but also as an exciting style dinner break. Follow- well worth the money and interactive part on a ing dinner, audience mem- and can be contributed to memories shared with your room-wide stage. The show bers get the opportunity friends and family. involves a performance by to question suspects while the Clever Half Producthey are in character in tion. Their performance is order to sort out clues and

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Arts & Style

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SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Home run!

Story by Kathleen Herring rea Hinegardner has been playing softball since she was six years old. When she came to college, her dad gave her some great advice: “Think of something where you can go to work every day and it doesn’t feel like work.” After some consideration, Brea realized that she had to find a

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job working in sports. Baseball and softball were still her favorites, so she decided that she wanted to work for a professional baseball team. This past summer, Brea performed an internship with the Valley Baseball League, which serves as a summer training ground for collegiate players from all

over the country. While the Staunton Braves lost enough games for an early end to the season, the internship experience was both exciting and beneficial. “Probably the most difficult thing was working – having a day job and then going and working at the field all night until 11 p.m.,”

Brea said. “When they had five home games in a row, I would be doing that from about eight [in the morning] to about 11 [at night]. It was stressful but when it was over, I thought I would love to go back and have one more game.” Hinegardner’s favorite moment during the experience

was during the last home game. “I was walking around the field before the game, getting things ready, and I had a couple of the players come up to me and give me a hug and say ‘we’re going to miss you’. It was great... To read more, visit veritas.bridgewater.edu

Season premiere part II By Nicholas Davies

In Which Summer is conferred upon and the termination of our rapport is prepared for

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he artificial luminosity that perforates this squalid corner conceals the fading summer, neigh Autumnal sun that lashes its waning heat and illumination upon the panes of my window. That freedom which is attributed to that season known as summer ebbs ever further from my congealed memories, replaced by an ever more repugnant blank page. In other words: The year of our discontent is upon us! Such trite farewells and well-measured handshakes must be abated for the time being, however, as the conclusion of those warm months precipitates the need for an appraisal of its proposed entertainment. Certainly, there is indeed much that I could chatter about that is exterior the realm of cinema, such as the re-coronation of Dan

Harmon as showrunner for “Community” following his less than convivial deposition just twelve months; or indeed, the announcement of Matt Smith’s departure from “Doctor Who” and the subsequent pronouncement of his successor Peter Capaldi. (Furthermore, I should probably state that I am officially unavailable on November 23rd, as I will be reclined in my most comfortable of chairs beholding the now labeled 50th anniversary special “The Day of the Doctor”.) Yet, arguably the preponderance of our shared tête-à-tête has been directed towards that most magisterial of realms: that of cinema. Sadly then, it is with a great despondence that I write the following lexis in order to state that it was not the grandest of summers. Perhaps it says all that some

of my favourite films of the summer were not actually films released during those tenuous three months, but rather films from the past two years that I have finally caught up. (If I haven’t already, I would highly recommend both “My Week with Marilyn” and “Silver Linings Playbook”.) This is not to say that some of those leviathans found within the air-conditioned multiplexes were not some of enjoyment; hitherto, the likes of “Iron Man 3” and “Star Trek Into Darkness”, though appreciatively aware of the type of films that they are, sadly suffer from various afflictions, whether it be laborious pacing and thinly drawn characters or a final third that undermines the rest of film by drawing upon a chronicle that it had duped its audience into believing that it

had left behind. There was also the usual mediocre faire (i.e. “Man of Steel”, which should have been better than it actually was, but could have been worse, as well as the mind-numbingly tepid “White House Down”.) as well as certain films (cough, “The Lone Ranger”, cough) that cause you to ponder the current state of the Hollywood system. Thankfully there was one film that raised my spirits greatly and currently situates itself as my favourite film of the summer. (Though that could change as I have still yet to see Joss Whedon’s adaptation of “Much Ado About Nothing” or Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg’s latest collaboration “The World’s End”) Though it confers upon ideals and thematic principles long discussed,

Nat Faxon and Jim Rash’s directorial unveiling “The Way Way Back” is blissfully embracing of those principals, utilizing them wholeheartedly whilst also fashioning an achingly funny film that features sublime work not only from Faxon and Rash, but Steve Carell, Toni Collete, Allison Janney, Maya Rudolph, as well as the piece’s stand out performers, Liam James and Sam Rockwell. I was literally prancing out of the cinema, such was the delight I felt at seeing such an assured and charming film. Thus another middling summer ceases its suddenly appealing autonomy, a frightful though left in its wake: that these, certainly less frequent ramblings will soon terminate. The end is upon us all.

...


SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Sports

11

Zach Malpass: lasting memories By Emily Higgins

Malpass said. His emphasis on the team aspect became more apparent when talking about the impact defense has on the game. As a defender, there are not many statistics that go in the record books. OfPicture by Timothy Leister, director of athletic media relations

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memory of soccer. he score is 1-0 going runs out as the team runs “The second year I ever into the last 10 mininto a huddle with overflowstarted playing, we won a utes of an intense ing excitement as many of championship. That was the soccer game. Every player them have just won their only time I have ever won is exhausted but continues first championship. to play their best. The opEveryone who plays sports a championship. It was just posing team has the ball at knows that incredible feeling a cool memory, especially when you are young like mid-field when it is kicked they get after winning their down the sideline. Both players run as fast as they can in order to win the ball. As they run by, one little boy’s father yells “Got to hustle, #3!” The little boy is too focused on the ball to hear his father but he knows his father is out there cheering him on. The offensive player reaches the ball first. In this pivotal moment in the game, the defender knows he must stop the other team from scoring. As the offense makes a mistake, the deZach Malpass (number 3) working defense. fender steps in and clears the ball. For the moment, he has saved the game. that,” said Malpass. first championship. It is a As time continues to tick Malpass started playing feeling that you will never away, the opposing team soccer in fourth grade and forget. Even if you do not has one more opportunity has continued to love the play sports you know that to tie the game. An opposfeeling of complete satisfac- sport throughout his life. A ing player has made it into main reason Malpass loves tion knowing you are the the penalty box and needs soccer is because it is a team best at whatever you do. to be stopped. The outside sport. This is the feeling senior defender steps in and blocks defender, Zach Malpass, de“I love being able to have the shot that could have teammates and have fun scribed to me when talking been the tying goal! Time about his favorite childhood playing this game together,”

fensive statistics are goals, assists, shots on goal, etc. However, there really are not any defensive statistics. That does not mean defense is not important for the team. “As a team everybody has to play defense. So if we get a shut out, we can’t really take credit for that as defenders because if the whole

team doesn’t play defense you won’t get a shutout. If they just leave the four defenders in the back that won’t happen,” said Malpass. Over the years, Malpass has succeeded as a defender. The past two years, Malpass earned third-team AllODAC honors. Malpass attributes his success not only to his teammates but also to his father. He is the one who has supported him the most throughout his career. “He was my first coach. He never really knew anything about soccer so we have learned together. He is always calling me before games or after games, telling me what to expect in this game and how I did in the last one,” Malpass said. Malpass has just begun his final soccer season at Bridgewater and looks to make more lasting memories. “Our team goal is to win the ODAC and I really think we can do that this year. But for me personally, my goal is just trying to work as hard as I can in each game, because I don’t have many games left, and just trying to encourage everyone else.” Maybe his career will start and end with a championship.

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Sports

12

SEPT. 25 - OCT. 1

2013

Aces high Abby Mills spikes the ball over the net.

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he 2013 volleyball season is underway and head coach Erin Albert feels confident in her young, but hardworking team. The team started off preseason “out of control” with how well everyone was playing and working to prepare for the season. “Volleyball is not all in the fall. It’s really a year round thing,” said Albert. This could not be more true for the Bridgewater Volleyball team as they pride themselves as hard workers who “can’t wait to

better themselves.” Senior Katie Long stated that this self-motivating team is always ready to hit the gym whether it’s for an extra practice or to get in the weight room. As you can imagine, the team has very intense practices that both coaches and players take just as seriously as games. By doing this, the team is prepared for tough and uncomfortable situations they will face in games because they have already seen and experienced them in practice. Also, unlike other sports teams, Albert revealed that

Picture by Timothy Leister, director of athletic media relations

By Caitlin Boles

they don’t watch a lot of film of other teams. “As soon as the ball crosses, it doesn’t matter what the other team is doing or what jersey they’re wearing; when the ball crosses, it’s still our ball to take care of,” said Albert This year there are four seniors on the team. Albert describes them as “very passionate players” whose footsteps she is proud to have her freshmen follow. “The passion they have for the game, this team and this program is something that is really conta-

The Eagle’s Scorecard By Jason Manago

Men’s Soccer- tied at Washington and lee, score 1-1

Women’s cross country1st place at Shenandoah invitational

Women’s Volleyballwon vs. Frostburg 3-0

Men’s cross country3rd place at Shenandoah invitational

Football- won vs. Ferrum 51-28

Women’s golf- 2nd at Hiwassee Fall one day shootout

Women’s soccer- win vs. Sweet Briar 10-0

Field hockey- win vs. Wilson 3-1

gious and the freshmen are already starting to pick it up,” Albert said. Katie Long is just one of the four seniors leading the team to success this season. Long earned 2nd team all ODAC honors in last year’s 2012 season and already clinched the ODAC Player of the Week honor for the first week of September. She is also leading the ODAC in total number of kills and second in kills per set. Long is very humble, contributing her success as a player to her teammates. “I really have only been

as successful as my team and I owe everything to them,” said Long. Right now the Eagles have a conference record of three wins and a loss to the Randolph Wildcats. Albert voiced how this loss only serves as a learning experience for the team with their motto of, “We win or we learn. Losing is not an option.” The team will take this to heart when preparing for their game against the preseason 2nd ranked team, Randolph-Macon this Wednesday, Sept. 25.

...

Veritas Issue 2, Fall 2013  

September 25-October 1, 2013

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