Issuu on Google+

One minute ... to think, to remember, to celebrate.

Photo by Bernardo H. Motta

Changing ourselves. Changing our community.

Sept. 20 - 26

2012


2

VERITAS

Sept. 20 - 26

Actions and reactions By Corley Tweedy

T

up to you. (It’s scary, when I think about it, that people might look up to me...) For the students who vandalized the baseball field, there are freshmen out there who look up to you. Now, they see the consequences of your poor

As per my editorial last week, “I am afraid that far too often, we as Americans see people for their races, instead of as individuals.” Our Islamic community here in the Harrisonburg area is not responsible for the actions of those in the Middle East. Why then were they the target of this vandalism? I’m saddened that some people still have their blinders on; I’m disappointed that they see the horrible actions of a select few in the Middle East, and are so quick to blame the entire creed. But most of all, I just don’t get it. Why vandalize? First of all, it is rude. One of the most basic human principles is respect, which no one should be denied. Vandalizing is disrespectful, especially when the targeted group is not directly responsible for the actions. Second, it is illegal. So you are a fanatic about an issue, and you decide to vandalize a building--then what? You can’t exactly brag about it, because then you get in trouble with the law. So what’s the point of going to all that effort to “fight your cause,” if you can’t even claim your work? Photo by Joanna Caples

his week, as both a campus and a community, we faced a series of unfortunate events. We lost two BC community members (a student and a staff member). We extend our love and sympathy to the families and friends of Steven Grove and Rasheda Alestock. We also faced two issues of vandalism. First, on our very own campus, some students acted as a result of very poor decisions and badly damaged the baseball field. Second, in our community, the Islamic Center of the Shenandoah Valley was vandalized. Now, being off campus for a long weekend, I know rather little about these actual events; I know only what I have heard from students and a few faculty. But what I do know is how I feel about these two incidents of vandalism. Obviously, I don’t like it. I’m sad that students would vandalize their own campus. (Please don’t misunderstand-I don’t think that vandalizing someone else’s campus would be a good idea either, but come on, this is your campus; why would you tear it up?) No matter who you are, you have people who look

choices-- if nothing else, they see how not to be. But is that really what you want? To be remembered as someone not to emulate? I would hope that is not how any BC student wants to be. I’m also sad that people would be so intolerant of other races and creeds as to vandalize their place of worship.

2012

Veritas Veritas is a student-run newspaper of Bridgewater College serving the Central Shenandoah Valley area.

If you have any tips for news, letters to the editor or advertising inquiries contact us at our e-mail:

veritas@bridgewater.edu MAIL Veritas Campus Box 193 Bridgewater College Bridgewater, Virginia 22812

Brandy Brode | Executive Director Katheryne Rivera | Creative Director Corley Tweedy | Editor Katheryne Rivera | Managing Editor Joanna Caples Nicholas Davies Lacey Naff Rebecca Heine Katie Matherlee

| | | | |

Photography Editor Section Editor Section Editor Section Editor Section Editor

Sarah Rico Sarah Conner Cassandra Clark Katherine Bradford

| | | |

Public Relations Manager Advertising Manager Finance Manager Distribution Manager

Brooke Thacker | Layout Artist

Printed by: Daily News Record

Even if you do claim it, and get fined or sentenced to serve time, then what? Are people supposed to look up to you? Yeah, that’s a role model I want to follow... At the rate things are going, I feel that we all just need to take a minute. We need to take a minute to think--to think about how our actions

affect us and those around us; we need to take a minute to remember--remember the lives that were lost this week. But in the face of all of this adversity, we also need to take a minute to celebrate--to give thanks for all the good we have left in our lives.

...


2012

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

3

Solidarity in the face of Vandalism

By JJ Krehbiel

A

midst the wave of horrendous violence sweeping across the Middle East, violence in our own community can become easy to ignore. However, members of the Islamic Association of the Shenandoah Valley came face to face with such festering violence as they headed to prayers last Friday. The Islamic Association, a mosque and learning center located in Harrisonburg, had been defaced with vulgarly offensive graffiti likely in response to the Muslim riots happening abroad. The graffiti used expletive language, insulted “Irakees,” and used a derogatory term for African Americans. It also stated, “This is America.” This act of vandalism almost seems like the farcical image of “stupid Americans” enthusiastically shouting “Uh-Merica!” But sadly, this is no joke. This is real hatred in our local community. The America represented in this graffiti is not the America that I live in, a country founded by immigrants on the principles of religious freedom. America is the most religiously diverse country in the world despite the political claims that we are a “Christian nation.” Our pluralistic society consists of

millions of people who bring their native religions to our cultural landscape. However, the vision for America that these vandals tried to promote is a country of xenophobes, racists, and ignoramuses. Fortunately, Harrisonburg and people from the surrounding area demonstrated last Sunday that individuals with such a vision are nothing but a miniscule minority. Leaders of the mosque invited the community to express their support for the mosque and to come to a presentation to discuss the vandalism. As I drove to the mosque on Sunday evening to attend, I had to park along the shoulder of the street as their parking lot was already full. While walking to the door, I was greeted by several members of the mosque thanking visitors for their support. Although the program was starting at 6:00, when I arrived at 5:35 all the seats in the main purpose room were already taken, so I sat on the floor of the prayer room where I could still hear the presentation. That room also quickly filled up and people who could not find a place in the prayer room simply stood in the foyer. Over 650 people had RSVP’d on the program’s

Facebook page and from my estimate the mosque received at least that many people. The audience consisted of a wide range of community members from Harrisonburg and individuals who travelled from Charlottesville, Staunton, and Northern Virginia. Students, faculty, and staff from Bridgewater College as well as students from EMU were present. Many parents were there with their children. Even the mayor of Harrisonburg, Richard Baugh, sat in the audience. Speaking at the event were Muslims and Christians alike. Brian Augustine, chairman of the board of a Christian school in Keezletown which suffered a similar act of vandalism spoke on the need of practicing the “golden rule” in light of all the religious violence happening around the globe. Myron Augsburger, former president of EMU discussed the importance of “turning the other cheek” when faced with bigotry and hatred. City Councilmember Kai Degner expressed his gratitude for the event’s turnout. Referencing the crowd of people he stated, “This is overwhelming but not surprising knowing who we are in Harrisonburg […] This is America inside here.”

The most prominent speaker at the event was undoubtedly Nihad Awad, the executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) who drove down from Northern Virginia. CAIR is the largest Muslim civil rights organization in the US. Awad, who had travelled earlier this year to Wisconsin, the site of the Sikh temple shooting, and Missouri where a mosque had been burned down discussed how the narrative of community support represented by the outcome of the program was a stark contrast from the image of religious intolerance that we often see portrayed on the media. “This is the story that should be told about us in America. I would like to see CNN reporting on this. I would like to see Fox New covering this story,” he stated. Awad also spoke of the common bond, our constitutional rights, which unite all Americans regardless of their creed. “Whether you are a Christian, Jew, Muslim, Buddhist, or have no faith you are protected by this constitution.” Awad referred to the high esteem that Americans place on the constitution as a “civil religion.” He claimed that this religion transcends our

religious differences. Despite differing dogmas, Awad claimed we are all Americans united by our faith that every one of us is equal under the law and therefore, a valued citizen. Despite the pain caused by this vicious and irrational act of vandalism, I left the mosque with a much greater sense of healing and community attachment. What occurred in Harrisonburg on Sunday is a powerful alternative to the violence that dominates media images of the Muslim world. The people who expressed their support to the Muslim community in Harrisonburg gave a powerful response to the bigots who spray-painted the hateful statements on the mosque. That message is one of acceptance, of embracing diversity, of solidarity, and a strong renouncement of those who would rather divide our society with hate.

...


4

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

The Little Rock Nine Fighting for freedom

dents in that school who stood by and did nothing while the Nine were harassed, the “silent witnesses.” Brown told us how she pitied the students who didn’t act because they couldn’t think. “We all have a steel spine ready when we need it,” Brown said, “so why be afraid?” Brown implored the students of Bridgewater College not to stand by and let life happen without us. “We have everything at our fingertips; we don’t need to be ignorant ever again. But it doesn’t always look like that. Sometimes it looks like we are more ignorant than ever.” Brown told the students to take advantage of the education available to us, working hard to make the most of the opportunities before us. Brown asked a poignant question of her audience that I will leave you to ponder, especially comparing our own circumstances to that of the Little Rock Nine: what is the American dream? Is it having the things we desire, or is it fighting for them in the first place? Photo by Kaitlyn Wiltshire

O

television both in America and around the world, and the commemorative statues of the Nine are the first civil rights statues in a southern capital. Although Minnie Brown told us that she herself is in no way particularly brave or courageous, each and every day she walked into a school where a hundred kids literally tried to kill her. She was hated

because she went against everything bigotry said she should be; rather than fitting the prejudiced stereotype of the “inferior” black race, Minnie Brown was smart, talented and possessed the most beautiful smile Little Rock had ever seen. She used the gifts she had to stand up for her rights, citing that the whole concept of civil rights pertains to all our rights. As a parting thought, Brown told us about the 1,800 stu-

Rob Ritchie speaks on Fair Vote By Abigail Blair

By Rebecca Heine

n September 12, Cole Hall was packed to the brim with almost 700 members of the student body and the community at large. All eyes were fixed on the short, energetic 71-year-old woman who took the stage. Minnie Brown, one of the brave and famous Little Rock Nine, addressed the crowd with passion and humor as she shared her remarkable experiences. The Little Rock Nine were a group of AfricanAmerican students who were instrumental in desegregating the public schools of Little Rock, Arkansas, overcoming tremendous hatred from their white peers. “The Little Rock Desegregation Crisis was American terrorism at its finest,” Brown said solemnly. She explained to us that the Little Rock Nine were not purposefully antagonizing their community in order to make a statement. “We were children. We wanted to go to school.” The fact remains, however, that the story of the Little Rock Nine is a story about students who shifted this country. They were the first black children seen on

2012

...

F

air Vote is an organization that works to reform our election process to respect every vote through bold approaches to increase voter turnout and fair representation. Executive Director of Fair Vote, Rob Ritchie, joined us here at Bridgewater College on September 17, on the 225th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution, to speak to the students here on campus about what Fair Vote really means. Fair Vote focuses their research on three major topics. The first is fair access to participation. There are many inconsistencies in the voting process in different states across the nation. Ritchie pointed out that areas such as Philadelphia, where public transit is the most popular means of transportation, people don’t always have the correct photo IDs, such as a driver’s license. Considering the fact that these people only have one chance to vote, if they do not have the correct form of IDs there is no second chance. According to Ritchie, this situation leaves out huge numbers in ballot counts. The inconsis-

tency can be repaired with Fair Vote’s action towards support of a universal voter registration, a constitutionally protected right to vote. The second topic that Fair Vote focuses on is fair election. “We support a national popular vote for president, instant runoff voting for single-winner offices and more transparent and accountable election administration.” Ritchie informed us that they engage in a spirit of investigating these roles and seeing what may need to be changed within them throughout election processes. Fair representation is the final focus of Fair Vote. They support choice voting and other methods of proportionate voting for local, state and national elections. They have done research on potential redistricting to avoid further abuse from gerrymandering; insiders believe this to be very powerful for elected officials to have in order to protect friends and undermine opponents. They also work steadily to venture from winner-take-all elections, potentially creating VOTE - TO PAGE 5 :


2012

Sept. 20 - 26

Times they are A-Changin’ BC music professors speak about the “new” music department

VERITAS

VOTE - FROM PAGE 4 :

By Bethanie Glover

B

major and minor courses. He, along with the new chair of the department, Dr. Larry Taylor, and the director of the instrumental ensembles, Dr. Christine Carrillo, plans to add a new spice to the music department. Dr. McCarty plans to start a new spark in the hearts of major and non-major vocalists by introducing new repertoire, as well as new traditions to carry out through the years. “I hope that we can continue so many of the great traditions that we have going,” said McCarty, “but I think that we can also expand around those traditions.” All of the change in the music department has the three professors casting their hopes into the future, making plans for a larger musical fingerprint on BC. They hope to increase the number of majors and minors in the music department within the next ten years, as well as

Photo by Bethanie Glover

increasing the number of nonmajor music participants. -Dr. Carrillo has an idea of what the department will be like in the next decade: “I would like to see the department twice the size, and being able to offer more courses to more students, increasing the number of ensembles that we have, as well as the number of fine arts GenEds that we offer.” Although Dr. Taylor feels that the music department will not ever be a large department in comparison with the size of the school, he does have hopes of increasing the number of majors in the department, as well as introducing new world music ensembles for cultural diversity. “We have a lot of people who come with musical experience to the school, but they never participate in musical things at the college,” said Taylor. “We’d like to try to get Bridgewater students involved in more musical activities.” Dr. Taylor is hopeful that the fresh, young faces in the department, Drs. Carrillo and McCarty, will kindle a new passion for music among Bridgewater students, and that the large amount of “stressful” change in the music department will be for the better.

...

Photo by Rebecca Heine

ridgewater has seen a wealth of changes in faculty recently with the resignation of President George Cornelius and the many retirements last semester. The BC music department has been no exception. BC Music recently said goodbye to two full-time professors: Dr. Jesse Hopkins, long time director of the choral ensembles, and Dr. K. Gary Adams, professor of music history. Also, there has been a loss in adjunct professors teaching piano, voice, and other musical concentrations. However, the department has also welcomed many new professors and adjunct teachers. Dr. John McCarty has joined the music department this year at BC, taking the helm as director of chorale, concert choir, and oratorio, as well as teaching music

more fair grounds for the election process. Rob Ritchie provided the students with information on Fair Vote, as well as explaining differences in the Virginia election role as a swing state in comparison to other states. He explained to us that this is why we are very focused on campaigning during each election year due to our lack of a predetermined party bias. Ritchie also explained to us areas where our nation collectively has a lack of

representation, particularly in one of the largest majorities of our nation: women. He and his colleagues were an educational delight to have on campus and are quite successful in spreading their mission through Fair Vote.

...

5


6

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

2012

History is quietly made By Joshua Trupo ack on January 1, President Obama signed the National Defense Alliance Act for the Fiscal Year 2012. It is an extensive bill filled with all sorts of different rules and regulations. The bill, according to a statement made by Obama shortly after signing, addressed the authorization of “funding for the defense of the United States and its interests abroad, crucial services for service members and their families, and vital national security programs that must be renewed. In hundreds of separate sections totaling over 500 pages, the Act also contains critical Administration initiatives to control the spiraling health care costs of the Department of Defense (DoD), to develop counterterrorism initiatives abroad, to build the security capacity of key partners, to modernize the force, and to boost the efficiency and effectiveness of military operations worldwide.” When talking about the development of counterterrorism activities, Obama was referring to the infamous Section 1021, giving the government the power to detain anyone, regardless of citizenship or location, indefinitely and without trial, if suspected of connections or sympathy toward any form of terrorist group. Later on in that same Statement by the President

B

released on the White House website, Obama claimed, “The fact that I support this bill as a whole does not mean I agree with everything in it. In particular, I have signed this bill despite having serious reservations with certain provisions that regulate the detention, interrogation, and prosecution of suspected terrorists... Moving forward, my Administration will interpret and implement the provisions described below in a manner that best preserves the flexibility on which our safety depends and upholds the values on which this country was founded.” Many, including New York Congressional hopeful David Seaman, remained skeptical at Obama’s promises, but because the NDAA really did include so many other absolutely necessary authorizations, we were forced to take him at his word. The passage of this bill went largely un-protested, and only reported on by small podcasts and web shows dedicated to the spread of truth. Almost a year passed with cases of individuals finding tracking devices, such as Yasir Afifi finding an FBI tracker under his car which was reported by Wired.com; or being visited by FBI agents, such as 16 yearold Justin Hallman for his Ron Paul support video reported on Examiner.com; or in some cases American Citizens being

straight up abducted by the government, such as the case of US Marine Brandon Raub being held against his will due to his Facebook comments expressing discontent with the government after having fought in two wars, which was reported on by InfoWars.com. Despite these documented and clear breaches of freedom, major media networks such as Fox, CNN, or MSNBC continued to fail to report, instead deciding to focus on the newest update in the Kardashian family or the freshest round of pandering being fed to us by the two most popular candidates. Only a few citizens decided to fight back, among them Tangerine Bolen, referred to as one of the Freedom Seven responsible for securing a Permanent Injunction on Section 1021. Only a few days ago, on September 12, Tangerine along with six other plaintiffs was able to convince Judge Katherine Forrest of the unconstitutionality of Section 1021 and of its clear breaches of the First and Fifth Amendments. The verdict reached by Judge Forrest marked an amazing day for America, displaying that the system really can work while also putting a stop to government officials overextending their reach. This was an historic day in America, yet its only mention in large-scale media was an

obscurely titled blog post on the Huffington Post website. Luckily, many smaller news podcasts, blogs, and web shows spread the word of humanity’s latest victory. Among them, the aforementioned David Seaman’s podcast on iTunes even hosted Tangerine Bolen so as to better understand the national implications of this court case. Yet toward the end of the interview, Tangerine shared some distressing news. Less than 24 hours after the Permanent Injunction against Section 1021 of the NDAA, Obama and his administration filed an appeal. For a man who claimed not to want and promised never to use the power to detain citizens without trial, this seemed an odd move. Stranger still, it has been days since Obama’s appeal, and national news networks still have yet to touch upon it. I don’t know what surprises me more— National Media’s blatant disregard of responsibility and dedication to the truth, or the average American citizen’s lack of interest at events that will end up shaping the outcome of this Nation. It is a sad day in America when our freedoms can be taken away, unnoticed, by the scribbling of a pen, and even sadder yet when those freedoms are fought for, returned, and the hard work put in by valiant men and women is never

noticed. Until a date is set for the appeal, Americans once again live in a land where Due Process is Law. Whether or not that will remain so, has yet to be seen; but many hope to bring up new cases against the government, setting more precedents and making it easier for Plaintiffs across the US to win. Hopefully citizens will begin to open their eyes, and realize that our freedoms really are being cut, and that the only way we shall ever lose them completely is if we sit back and allow things like this to happen one breach of freedom at a time. Americans need to step up, educate themselves, and not be afraid to voice their discontent. For almost a year, openly confronting the government could have led to one’s mysterious disappearance. Well, ordinary men and women like Tangerine Bolson, and honest Judges like Katherine Forrest have bought us some time. I urge you to make use of it, to get out there and demand the facts. I urge you to spread the truths that some work so hard for us not to know, to get out there and be the change we wish to see in America.

...


2012

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

7

Critical Encounters

A very personal global perspective By Bernardo H. Motta Ombudsman

There’s so many different worlds So many different suns And we have just one world But we live in different ones” - “Brothers in Arms” by Mark Knopfler (Dire Straits) “War. War never changes,” the rough voice of actor Ron Pearlman announces in the very beginning of the videogame “Fallout,” a dystopian post-apocalyptic “Mad Max” world filled with mutants, religious fanatics, and other cheerful-like characters first released by Interplay in 1997. For some reason, that quote from 15 years ago still resonates in my head every time I see some group of people lashing out their “revenge” for some sort of insult, usually of religious or economic nature, against another group of people who had nothing to do with it in the first place. And, of course, that other group of people, feeling victimized, lashes out their retaliation against yet another group of people who also had nothing to do with it in the first place. After last week’s events, when a movie portraying the Prophet Muhammad in an offensive way caused many violent protests around the world leaving many dead and injured, none of whom had any connection with the movie’s production, other groups of people decided to retaliate by desecrating local

mosques (see JJ Krehbiel’s opinion article in this issue of “Veritas”), members of which also had absolutely no relation to the attacks to American embassies and consulates. Today, the New York Times reports that France is evacuating many embassies and consulates because a French magazine published cartoons mocking Prophet Muhammad. Maybe people in Quebec should start running for their lives, after all, they speak French, right? “War never changes.” Not too long ago we launched an attack against Iraq after a group of Saudi Arabian terrorists hiding in Afghanistan and Pakistan flew airplanes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Sikhs in New York were attacked because they wore turbans that really do not resemble anything those terrorists wore during the attack. Last week I wrote about how our brains help cause this confusion, but understanding that something is harmful doesn’t make us stop doing it. In my public relations class yesterday, we discussed a case where research showed that the great majority of teenagers who smoke know very well about the harmful effects of chemically-laced tobacco in cigarettes. They just didn’t care. The public relations strategists that worked on that campaign had to find a way to move them from “Yeah, I

know, so what?” to “It’s my body and I should care about it” in a relatively short amount of time. So, how did they do it? They didn’t. Instead of telling the teenagers that they should stop smoking or that cigarettes were bad for their health, the strategists simply asked the teenagers to take over the campaign and figure it out for themselves. It not only worked, but it has spread from its original location to the entire country now. You may have seen the campaign on TV or other media; it’s called “Truth.” As we need to actively have a critical supervision of the processes that our brains go through to stereotype and categorize, likewise, the PR strategists for this campaign decided to make the teenagers supervise their own process. Once they were empowered, they started to dig deeper, find more useful information, and come up with a creative plan to convince their peers to start doing the same. Not only did they become independent critical thinkers, but they also propagated the message of “go find out for yourselves” to their peers. What does smoking teenagers and angry mobs have to do with each other or anything else for that matter? If you look at an angry mob, the main characteristic of the mob is “herd thinking.” Wherever the leader points, the mob follows. Yet, if you look at the individual level,

most people in that mob are perfectly able to think and realize that an extremist or a terrorist has little in common with anyone else but for other extremists in his/her own group. Moreover, every single person in that mob is able to come to the conclusion that beating up a guy who is wearing a simple red t-shirt just because they are mad at someone else who likes the color red is probably wrong and morally indefensible. Nonetheless, they do it anyway. Once they enter the mob mentality, they stop being critical thinkers and become part of a “righteous vengeance.” Or simply put, they know it is wrong to attack someone who has not caused them any harm, but if it looks close enough to their completely distorted mob perception, they don’t care. Like the teenagers, they intellectually know that there will be consequences, but they are emotionally detached from that consequence because they are stuck in the present action. They simply don’t think they have control of what is happening to them as part of the mob. They are angry and they need to do “something,” and being reasonable is not part of that “something.” “War never changes,” many of us still believe; many of us also always assumed that it is part of being a teenager to “rebel” against something or everything. This case shows that what teenagers

need is not to rebel, but to be in control of something meaningful in their lives. That works for adults, too. The more people lose their ability to control their lives, to make their own choices about the things they enjoy, do, learn, care about, eat, or have access to, the more they become frustrated and apathetic, and the more they become prone to retaliate or rebel when a chance presents itself as a desperate form to regain some control of their lives; even if that means making a bad choice. That’s why crisis managers learn that the first step in any crisis is to give people something that they can be in charge of, even if it is barely useful. To change the roots of conflict, we first need to empower people to make better choices by giving them back some responsibility over their own lives, in that specific case, an active role in building relationships with those that are perceived as “different.” I think it was Quintus Ennius, the Roman writer and poet, who said “The idle mind knows not what it is it wants.” Any philosophy, religious or not, which preaches blind obedience and unquestioning loyalty, fundamentally sows the seeds of violence. After all, change always starts with us questioning our own choices, knowledge and beliefs.

...


8

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

2012

Baseball field vandalized ByLacey Naff

G

“It’s always frustrating when someone tears up something that belongs to your program; in this case it was our field,” Head Baseball Coach Curt Kendall said. Kendall is also the Athletic Director here at Bridgewater and said how he’s been around for a while and knows that college kids will make stupid decisions like this one, but it’s

Photo by Bernardo H. Motta

otta take care of it and move on The surprising destruction of the baseball field on the night of September 8 by a few Bridgewater athletes left the Bridgewater Community disappointed, but it’s an incident that will be handled and moved on from without intentions of bringing any added attention to it.

Photo by Bernardo H. Motta

something you just have to take care of then move forward. “It makes it tougher for us to practice because we aren’t at our usual facilities, we have to go to Turner Ashby to practice every day and some kids get there late because it’s a further drive when they get out classes,” said senior baseball player Johnny Mason. Even though the team is a little inconvenienced by having to practice off campus, Coach Kendall said that it’s less of an issue for the team since it’s the fall instead of spring when their scheduled season starts, and it’s not re-

ally keeping them from doing what they want to do. “It is unfortunate though when your freshman players can’t play on their field in the fall to get a feel for it and instead have to practice on a high school field, but it will be fine,” said Kendall. The field was left in pretty bad shape, and almost the whole surface will have to be re-done because sod cannot be placed on one part and not the other. The infield, which will have to be completely re-done, is the most important part of the baseball diamond which is sure to be a pricy repair.

Kendall said that the biggest inconvenience is that, “we have a prospect camp in October where we bring next year’s group in to see if they like Bridgewater College and let them see how we do things and let them get a look at the campus, so you don’t want to hold that camp off campus.” The temporary plan is to try to do something makeshift in order to make the field safe to run that camp on until they make permanent repairs that will have the field ready to use by spring. Situations like this occurring on campus are highly unforDRESSES - TO PAGE 9 :


2012

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

: DRESSES - FROM PAGE 8

tunate but they can be a lesson learned at the same time. Coach Kendall stated that, “when somebody’s going to make a bad choice and do something destructive, whether it is to themselves or property, typically there are other people around that know it’s going to happen and you would think those other people would kind of deter those people from making those decisions. Somebody’s got to have a level head in those situations.”

He said that it’s not worth somebody getting a misdemeanor or felony charge because of something stupid, especially because they are under the influence of alcohol, which is typically what happens on a college campus. When a friend is going to make a stupid decision, we must do our best to stop them and make them realize that it could do more damage than it means to do. Kendall ended with, “The lesson learned is that if you’re

a friend of a person or a team mate, you’re going to talk some sense into them and not let them make these kinds of decisions that can hurt them in the long term.”

...

9

Bridgewater Mourns Rasheda Steven Alestock Grove By Rebecca Heine

T

his past weekend, the community of Bridgewater College suffered a shocking and painful loss. Rasheda Alestock was a business administration major in her senior year here at Bridgewater. Rasheda was a commuter student who lived in Staunton, a smart and energetic member of the community. Rasheda died under tragic circumstances, and we here at Bridgewater are deeply saddened by this loss. Our thoughts, prayers and deepest sympathies are extended to Rasheda’s family and friends; we will miss her presence on campus and we will strive to honor her memory. “One of Bridgewater’s greatest strengths is the compassion of its people,” interim president Roy Ferguson stated, “and I know that you will support and care for one another as our community mourns.”

...

By Morgan Alexander

S

teven Grove worked at the KCC since 1997, taking food trays, loading dishes, and removing the trash. Not only was Steven a dedicated worker, but he was a compassionate individual and a joy to his co-workers. “He always had a smile; he was never mad. He was a people-person,” Patsy Fifer, the Supervisor of the KCC, said. The employees, as well as many other community members of Bridgewater, will miss Steven Grove, who passed away September 11, 2012 at the age of 32. Steven went into cardiac arrest at the Outback Steakhouse in Harrisonburg, and the EMTs at the scene were unable to resuscitate him. Yet despite his tragic death, Steven Grove will be remembered as a friend to all, the man with the upbeat personality who daily brightened Bridgewater College.

...

Graphic by Christopher Michael

For Support and Counseling Robbie Miller, Chaplain Office: Rebecca Hall Room 207 Phone: 540-828-5383 rmiller@bridgewater.edu Randy Hook, Director of Counseling Services Office: Rebecca Hall Annex 218A

Phone: 540-828-5358 rhook@bridgewater.edu Amy Ghaemmaghami, College Counselor Office: Rebecca Hall Annex 218B Phone: 540-828-5379 aghaemma@ bridgewater.edu


10

VERITAS

Sept. 20 - 26

2012

CYMBELINE The Avengers: A review A review/critique/general rambling

By Nicholas Davies

By Nicholas Davies

Editor’s Note: This particular review was written following a screening I attended over the summer vacation and is now being published in advance of the films release on DVD/BluRay on September 25th. Enjoy!

W

hen the works of of what makes him such a the Bard are dis- “genius,” for even the lightcussed in those est of comedies are prone to dark rooms by those who moments of darkness while have dedicated their life to his tragedies can be lightened study his musings—giving up, even if just a scene, with them I imagine a strange a hint of farce. Indeed, even and ultimately grotesque the titles of his plays can be figure that would fright even misleading; for instance, it the hardest of heart—I am could be argued “1 Henry sure that numerous words IV” is actually not about the and phrases are tossed and titular king but rather his son batted around in order to Hal who would later become somehow confine and define Henry V. his legend in such a way that It is under this particular the modern audience can umbrella that one may find comprehend them. Words, Shakespeare’s “The Tragedy one may presume, such as of Cymbeline” as it is not at “genius,” “indefinable,” and all a tragedy, save for a few “unfathomable”. There is one deaths which would really be word, one word concealed stretching the term “tragedy,” from the sight of many that nor is it really about Cymultimately, at least in some beline, the king of Britain. cases, sum up Shakespeare Indeed, despite the outstandas a writer, for he is a master ing performances from the of the “misdirection” or cast, there is no singular “misrepresentation”. If one main character upon which were to simply judge the the plot revolves around, for complete works of William just as a character such as Shakespeare upon the titles Innogen appears to rise to or the brief blurbs used to the forefront, Shakespeare fruitlessly summarize the seems to immediately, for plays in just a few meager lack of a better term, “sidesentences, then the reader line” them in order to draw would not be able to truly attention to another chargrasp the full breadth of acter and their changing what Shakespeare is able to circumstances. “Cymbeline” within five acts. The range then not only uses the classic of emotion and genre is part CYMBERLINE - TO PAGE 14 :

A

master plan is usually associated with a deliciously evil supervillain who ultimately fails to complete said plan due to a combination of being outwitted by the hero and usually some comically bad setback of his own doing. There are, however, other definitions of what a master plan can be and one can certainly argue that “The Avengers” is Marvel Studios’ master plan; in other words, this is the film that they have been building towards since the release of “Iron Man” four years ago. This is their moment to cement themselves in the realm of great, mainstream entertainment. Whether or not they should be crowned though is certainly debatable, although, those who debate the quality of this film were obviously not watching the same film that I was. Plot wise, “The Avengers” is nothing special, safe for the usual “get the band together” plot arc that defines

so many films that revolve around a team or a group or a conglomeration of some sort. Where “The Avengers” excels then, is in its intercharacter dynamics as it slowly morphs from an action film into a dysfunctional family comedy into a horror pastiche back into an action film whilst still maintaining its heritage as a comic book and its own wondrous sense of adventure and humor. Much of this comes from the chemistry between the ensemble cast, as well as their individual performances. I’ve already spouted many superlatives in the direction of one, Robert Downey Jr., so it would be slightly redundant of me to continue on that particular track. But how can I not when he continues to steal every single scene he is in with his trademark witticisms (“Make one move reindeer games…”)? The rest of the cast are all obviously enjoying themselves and the roles that their characters are slowly evolving into, whether its Chris Evans as Captain America, the natural leader, or Scarlett Johansson who is given much better material to work with here than she was in “Iron Man 2”; her character finally has depth and a human centre, not just an excuse to

see her kicking bottom in a tight leather outfit. Chris Hemmsworth continues his act as simply being there to look good while also being much more comfortable in his role as Thor, a confidence that was perhaps sometimes lacking in his first outing as the god of the thunder. Loki, Thor’s brother and principal villain this time around, is supplied an exquisitely evil performance from Tom Hiddleston, giving much needed Shakespearean gravitas to the role. (Excuse me for a moment while I fantasize momentarily about a Kenneth Branagh directed version of “The Avengers”…) Samuel L. Jackson is…well… Samuel L. Jackson; I don’t really think there is any other way to describe him. The performance that will have no doubt surprised the initial wave of audiences and the ones that follow me will be Mark Ruffalo, finding the line between woeful dichotomy and world-weary humor and striding confidently along it. His jolly green giant alter ego is also more intriguing to watch as it is a much more tangible incarnation helped by some, naturally, solid craftsmanship from ILM as well as Ruffalo’s own motion AVENGERS - TO PAGE 14 :


2012

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

Faces of the Past

Spirit Matters

The Mary Early house: A forgotten legacy By Chris Conte The tired old honor house at 305 East College Street sits quietly between the street and the soccer field. Students and faculty have walked and drove past it for years. It has stood there for ages, longer than anyone can remember. This house, however, has had quite an intriguing past.

“Shoes“ By Chaplain Robbie Miller

$850 in March of 1900, Bridgewater was a very different place. Both sides of the dirt street were lined with white picket fencing, which was removed in 1914 (Francis Fry Wayland, “Bridgewater College: The First Hundred Years), and the college was composed of just several small buildings dotting the hillside to the east. Mrs. Early was also a devoted member of the Brethren community, remaining “active in church work” long into her old age. She was also deeply devoted to the importance of education, gifting “of little means” to the college a sum of $650 in 1916. According to her will, Early also possessed a large collection of books, religious and otherwise, which she bequeathed to her nephews. A modest sum was to be left to help educate a nephew, and the remainder of her estate to the Church to educate young girls abroad in Africa, China and India. In 1931, Early deeded her home on East College Street to Bridgewater College, under the premise that Brethren missionaries be housed there when home on leave. The town icon, usually of remarkable health and cheer, suddenly fell ill around Photo by Chris Conte

According to property records from the Rockingham County Court House, the land to the south of East College Street was owned by Jacob Wynant, who sold the empty, one-quarter-acre lot to Charles and Nora Wine in 1896. When Mr. and Mrs. Wine sold the property in 1898, they had constructed on the lot the modest T-shaped house present today. Mary Early had been a lifelong resident of Bridgewater since her birth in 1846, according to her obituary in the Daily News-Record. In 1898, she married Samuel L. Early of Pleasant Valley, whose death left her widowed just several months later. The union bore no children. When Mary F. Early purchased her house for a mere

11

Christmas of 1933. She was confined to bed-rest, where she died on Sunday, Jan. 7, 1934. She was one of the oldest and most beloved of the Bridgewater community. Her funeral was held in the sanctuary of the College Street Church of the Brethren, today the Stone Chapel of the Carter Center. She was laid to rest in Oak Lawn Cemetery on Main Street. As stipulated in the deed transfer in 1931, Early’s house was indeed retrofitted to accommodate missionaries following her death. The house served its intended purpose for several decades, earning the nickname, “Missionary House,” before housing students. According to an anonymous alumnus, students occupied the house intermittently between 1964 and 1980, though mostly male students have occupied the house continuously since 1980. While she never financed a gymnasium or donated an academic building, Mrs. Early still manages to emblemize the close relationship the college bears with the community. We are a proud college, enshrouded by a supportive, tightly-knit community that we should be expressly grateful for.

...

L

ast week, one or more individuals spraypainted vulgar hate graffiti on the buildings of the Islamic Center of the Shenandoah Valley in Harrisonburg and the Redeemer Classical School in Keezletown. The intent, I assume, was to create confusion and fear within those communities. Ironically, what it created instead was a gathering of over 600 people at the mosque on Sunday who came to express their support for those communities and their rejection of those hateful acts. Having been personally greeted by members of the mosque, we made our way inside and removed our shoes out of respect for their religious practice. And as we sat and listened to the host greet us with a warm “Salaam alaikum” (Arabic for “Peace be upon you”), I marveled at this amazing collection of people who had gathered in a simple yet profound act of solidarity that crossed religious, ethnic, political, sexual, and socioeconomic lines. This dramatic turn of events reminds me of a story in the book of Genesis. After the death of the patriarch Jacob in Egypt, his sons feared reprisal by their powerful brother Joseph whom they had earlier sold into slavery. But Joseph, recognizing the futility of revenge and the power of forgiveness, said, “You plotted evil against me, but God turned it into good, in order to preserve the lives of many

people who are alive today because of what happened” (Genesis 50:20). History repeats itself. Something intended for evil turned into something good by a God and people who understand that what unites us as human beings is far more fundamental and important than what differentiates us as citizens of different nations, adherents of different religions, members of different political parties, persons with different sexual orientations, et al. As the program at the mosque concluded and we searched for our shoes by the door, I was reminded that like the sea of footwear before me, we too come in every conceivable color, shape, and style and we too are more alike than different in the ways that matter most. (Coincidentally, our upcoming Spiritual Exploration Mini-Retreat will focus on the theme of “Understanding Islam.” Scheduled for Friday evening, Sept. 28 through Saturday morning, Sept. 29 at nearby camp Brethren Woods, the retreat will include video material and a presentation by BC professor Bill Abshire. Transportation is provided and all expenses are covered so if you’d like to meet some other students and learn more about the religion of Islam in a beautiful camp setting, please be in touch at rmiller@ bridgewater.edu).

...


12

VERITAS

Sept. 20 - 26

2012

Baked eggs breakfast recipe Story and photo by Katheryne Rivera

Message in the Music Daryus Beale: “Virginia Virgos” By Morgan Alexander

M

ost inhabitants of the Bridgewater College campus, certainly those who regularly follow the college’s multiple athletic programs, know Daryus Beale either as the starting Free Safety on the Bridgewater College football team or the guy who broke the school record in the 16-meter hurdle last year in indoor track. Regardless of how you may know Daryus Beale, however, you probably do not know he is a musician. “For right now, music is secondary,” Beale said. Though focusing on sports and college has decreased his time spent towards his music, Beale is aiming to have an EP come out by the end of the month entitled “Virginia Virgos”. On the EP, Beale collaborates with childhood friend Sean Eager, who goes by the stage name Bravo, as well as Marcel Wilson, who attended Park View High School with Beale. Though Beale appears in six of the eight R&B/ hip hop songs, including the catchy and upbeat feature “Still Fighting,” “So Bad” and “That Special” are two tracks on the EP which solely feature Beale.

“I’m lookin’ for my wife, but I’m havin’ fun lookin’,’” Beale said. Though love and relationships are predominantly the subject of his songs, Beale does not excessively rely on past relationships as inspiration for his lyrics; that being said though, Beale’s solo tracks allude to the two long-term relationships Beale had in high school, one of which Beale referred to as his first love, though ending in her infidelity. “I try to stay positive in my music. There is so much negativity out there nowadays. I don’t want to fall into the same category,” Beale said. “Virginia Virgos” will certainly expose Daryus Beale as more than a football or a track star. He will now also be seen as a musician.

...

Ingredients: Olive Oil Red Onion Parmesan Cheese (grated) Tomato Bacon 2 eggs

B

reakfast is one of my favorite meals of the day, though being a college student it also tends to be one of the meals I eat the least. There are so many things that come to mind when you think ‘breakfast.’ Immediately, eggs and bacon jump to my mind. Baked eggs are delicious and an easy way to get breakfast done without having to spend too much time in the kitchen. Best of all, while they bake you can get ready for the day. Start by preheating you oven to 350 degrees. While that heats up you can start on the bacon. Now, this recipe can also be used with ham or other lunch meats that don’t require cooking, but you just can’t get any better than bacon--it’s definitely worth the extra time. For those of you who like your bacon crispy, resist the urge to overcook it. You want to cook your bacon just enough; don’t overcook it because it will continue to bake in the oven with your eggs. Next are the onions. You want a nice fine mince, otherwise you will be biting into large chunks of it later.

When you are done with those set them aside and chop your tomato. Again you want to give a fairly fine chop on your tomatoes, but I wouldn’t worry too much about them, since they will break up more in the skillet. Once those are done, heat up a skillet and add a couple drops of olive oil. Sauté your onions until they are slightly translucent before adding your tomatoes--a couple of minutes on the stove and you should be done. Mix in your bacon and spoon your mixture into small baking dishes. Ramekins work best, but since I didn’t have any I used small glass servers instead. Don’t forget to grease them before adding in your ingredients. Once they are about a tablespoon full, sprinkle a little cheese over them. Next comes the fun part. Crack an egg over each one, make sure that the yolk is broken, but do

not stir it, just let it run down on its own. Since we are using such small dishes its easiest if you place the baking dishes on a cookie sheet before putting them in the oven. It will make your life much easier and you will also avoid any unfortunate spills. Let them cook in the oven for about fifteen minutes. Allow for a little extra time if the egg whites are still a little runny, but you don’t want to overcook them. The runny yolk makes it all so scrumptious. Once they are done, sprinkle a little salt and pepper on top, and for you cheese lovers, a little extra parmesan never hurt anyone. A breakfast is as easy as that. This will make two baked eggs, but it’s a simple meal to make for a large number of people as well. Enjoy. For more recipes visit veritas.bridgewater.edu

...


2012

Sept. 20 - 26

This page in partnership with:

VERITAS

13

Open house: Harrisonburg Community Health Center By Melina Norman

I

square feet. Their new location is 21,000 square feet and has 16 patient examination rooms--separate pediatric and adult waiting rooms-a full service lab, dental suite, community meeting room, and an independently operated pharmacy called the Williamson Hughes Pharmacy. The center is also equipped with an environmentally friendly design. The office hours on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday are from 8:00am to 5:00pm. On Tuesday and Thursday the hours are from 8:00am to 7:00pm, but the center stresses that their hours are prone to change. Thanks to some funding from the Health Resources and Services

Administration, Rockingham Memorial Hospital, and the Virginia Health Care Foundation, the Harrisonburg Community Health Center has been able to acquire their new location. If you need a doctor the center encourages you to attend their open house or if you already have a place that suits your medical needs please keep the center in mind.

...

Photo by Tayseer AlSafara

f you are looking for a place to go to get your annual check up, check out the Harrisonburg Community Health Center at their new location on September 20 from 4 to 7 p.m. They are located at 1380 Little Sorrell Drive, Suite 100 Harrisonburg, VA 22801. This is the center’s first open house and it’s a good opportunity for the community to come out and see them at their new location. “We really are a practice that has the ability to serve everyone,” said Ashley McWilliams who has been working with the company two years. The purpose of the open house is to have people come out for a tour of the new facility, get acquainted with staff, and learn about the services the center offers. The center is very accommodating to people of all different socioeconomic backgrounds. They take all different types of insurance and even serve those that don’t have insurance. On an average day the center can serve about 80 to 100 patients, but they are always willing to accept more. The size of the center has greatly increased from their last site which was only 3,900

Community in Action: upcoming events and opportunities Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community Get excited for active adult week: September 24-29 Anyone age 50+ can use The Wellness Center at VMRC free through September 24-29. There will be prize drawings. New members will receive half off their application fee when they sign up September 22Oct.15. Cat’s Cradle “Cat Tales: An introduction to Cat’s Cradle.” Come out for an evening of fun with Cat’s Cradle on the 4th Wednesday of the month. Learn about our mission, organization, and services. Meet others interested in animal welfare and find out what projects are going on in your community. Cat’s Cradle volunteers will be on hand to meet with the public. Please feel free to invite a friend and learn about our organization. Help us get the word out. RSVP to ryclark@verizon. net Rockingham/Harrisonburg SPCA Saturday, September 22 at 1:30 -4:30 p.m. Turner Pavilion- Grassy lot across from the Daily NewsRecord. $5 admission. Join fellow pet lovers for the

R-H SPCA’s first annual Woofstock event! There will also be contests, $2entry fee for pets. The Arts Council of the Valley – Art in the Park September 22 at 9 a.m.12p.m., Art in the Park is free and all are welcome. Community Resource Center – BINGO To benefit the Boys and Girls Club of Harrisonburg & Rockingham County. Every Thursday at AM Vets Social Hall, Harrisonburg at the corner of Route 33 and Waterman Dr. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. For more information call (540) 2713361 Massanutten Regional Library Sep 21 - Book Club at Shenandoah Community Library at 4 p.m. Sep 25 – Mystery Book Club at Village Library at 7 p.m. For more information, please contact: The Community Foundation of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County 540-432-3863 www.the-communityfoundation.org United Way of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County 540-434-6639 http://www.uwhr.org


14

VERITAS

Sept. 20 - 26 : AVENGERS - FROM PAGE 10

: CYMBERLINE - FROM PAGE 10

problem of being too silly, threatening to become a pantomime complete with shouts of “Behind you!” and “No, don’t go, you’re very funny!” Maybe that was the point, but it can be at times ever so slightly distracting, especially if one actually intends to care about the characters that Shakespeare crafted rather than see them molded into larger than life (or stage) imitations. Thankfully, Warren has a very adept cast that are able to keep the ship from capsizing as it were; in other words, John Harrell’s hysterically madcap Cloten is allowed to be loud, obnoxious, and attention getting in all the right as James Keegan’s Cymbeline is able to provide the necessary gravitas to ground it. As I have said before, the ASC is not my favorite theatre company in the world (I was after all bought up on the Royal Shakespeare Company), but it is certain that their production of “Cymbeline” is a fine way to spend an evening at the theatre, that is if one enjoys over-zealous sons and swooning romance with a brief cameo from a headless body. What more could one ask for from a night at the theatre? Photo by Taylor Dukehart

idea of the ensemble, but its plot feels like a hodgepodge of multiple plots coalesced into one single entity in the way that only the bard can, with one part comedy, one part romance, with a hint of political stirrings, and completed by a literal deus ex machina near the end of the piece. Yet, for all that analysis, I freely admit that I have not seen “Cymbeline” performed by any other theatre company in an alternative venue. This particular production of “Cymbeline” then, via the American Shakespeare Center, will certainly become distinct in the caverns of my memory for it allows the play to feel almost like a Grimm fairy tale, certainly in its costume design, whilst still mining the story for laughs. In fact, at times, the production, directed by Jim Warren, almost runs into the

2012

...

capture. (Incidentally, if any of the major studios happen to be reading, I would pay good money to see Ruffalo and Downey together in any sort of buddy film.) A film such as this has many moving parts and when viewed on paper there is simply no way to look at it without getting a very bad feeling in the pit of one’s stomach. The rest of the credit for the success of this film, then, lies within the creative talents of writer-director Joss Whedon, whose script is tight and the dialogue sharp and often witty. It also breathes fresh life into the characters while maintaining a sense of humor, something that is lost upon so many comic book films, also contextualizing what is going on for the viewers that may not have viewed all the films leading up to this. I would be more than happy to watch an entire film of just the avengers engaging each other in conversation with no action and be just as thrilled as I was by the end product. His direction is just as crisp, understanding that the action sequences, even the giant half-hour battle at the end of the film, are driven by the plot and not the other way round. Indeed, one of my great concerns going into

the film was how the balance between story and character and the “justification” would play out. Whedon has once again demonstrated great ability in directing those action sequences while giving the audience time to breathe, whether it be through necessary exposition

or through brief comedic interludes. Yet, no matter how much I prattle on about how “epic”, as the young people seem to say these days, this film was, there are a couple of small things in relation to the film that have been nagging and gnawing their way at me since I left the screening. Partly, this was due to the fact that Jeremy Renner’s character

was under-developed, often marginalized in favor of some of the other heroes. This, of course, is not necessarily Whedon’s fault as Renner was only seen briefly in “Thor” so that they could transition him into this film, but Renner is an exceptionally talented actor and I felt that more could have been done with him. Hemmsworth, on the other hand, while exuding confidence lacks the Shakespearean gravitas provided by Branagh in his previous film. The other thing that has been bothering me is the longevity of “The Avengers.” Now I do not mean financial longevity because the film is already proving its worth in this area of the market in droves. What I am referring to is where it resides in the pantheon of comic book films and whether people will consider it in the future to be worthy next to pieces such as Richard Donner’s “Superman” or the Christopher Nolan “Batman” films. I am not trying to say that “The Avengers” is not an entertaining comic book film because it most certainly is; I am debating whether it is a GREAT comic book film. As with so many things, however, only time will tell.

...


2012

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

15

Upcoming Sports Schedule Sept. 22: Football vs. Shenandoah 1 p.m. Sept. 22: Women’s Volleyball at Rochester (N.Y.) 1:00 PM Sept. 22: Women’s Volleyball at Elizabethtown 3:00 PM Sept. 22: Women’s Soccer vs. Emory & Henry 4:00 PM Sept. 22: Women’s Volleyball vs. Roanoke 7:00 PM Sept. 22: Women’s Soccer at Shenandoah 7:00 PM

gcgcg S C O R E V gcgc C A R D Men’s Golf finished 2nd in the Tom Kinder Memorial Men’s soccer win 3-2 vs Randolph wildcats Women’s field hockey 3-1 vs Wilson sept 15, 3-2 vs Sewanee sept 16

Women’s soccer win 10-1 vs emu, win 1-0 vs Guilford Women’s volleyball lose 3-0 vs Randolph macon, win 3-1 vs Emory& Henry, win 3-0 vs Guilford


16

Sept. 20 - 26

VERITAS

2012

Huge wins boost confidence By Emily Higgins

T

teams. The first half ended in a 0-0 tie. The Eagles scored a total of three times, all scored by senior midfielder/forward Kevin Gorman. His first two goals came within just 26 seconds of each other. Gorman said, “The hat trick kind of just came, just because of my team’s hard work.” Gorman was also named the ODAC Player of the Week after his recent strong performances. After the two wins on the road, the Eagles returned home to face the defending ODAC champions, Randolph College. Despite an early lead by the Wild Cats of 2-0 the Eagles battled back. Derek Newsome electrified the

Photo by Arianna Christopher

team after a 40 yard free kick goal to cut the lead to one 30 seconds before the half. The Eagles came out the second half and tied the game at 2-2 with a goal from Daniel Visone. With just under 15 minutes to go, the game winning goal came from freshman Ricky Capuano. When asked how scoring that goal felt, Capuano replied, “It felt amazing. I have never been that excited about a goal before. I didn’t even know how to handle it so I just kept running after I scored until the guys tackled me to celebrate.” The game against Randolph was the first game in the ODAC and a very important win for the team. Capuano said, “We had to get the win in order to make a statement and prove the wins earlier in the year weren’t just a fluke. It was crucial for the team’s confidence.” Capuano is part of the freshman class who has made an impact on the team already. As a veteran, Gorman said, “The young talent has performed really well. They have stepped up, stepped in, and

Photo by Tayseer AlSafara

his week the Bridgewater Eagles men’s soccer team continued their current winning streak of five games. They first beat Salisbury, the twelfth team in the nation, by a score of 2-1 with goals from Kevin Gorman and Zach Hosler. This game was a definite confidence booster for the team who came back to campus and rang the victory bell. On September 12 the team headed up to Maryland to play Stevenson, another tough team. After beating the twelfth team in the nation, the goal was to stay focused and realize if they can beat a team as good as Salisbury, they could get those results against other

worked really hard.” Bridgewater is currently ranked No. 9 in the latest South Atlantic Ranking. Gorman said, “It’s definitely a huge step coming from a few seasons where we won a total of five games to being ranked in the region. It is a huge step in just a couple of years.” There is a lot more to come with this team who has a positive outlook on upcoming games. They will go into upcoming games with the

mindset “of confidence, but at the same time humility. We need to have confidence in ourselves that we can win but also that we need to respect out opponents”, said Capuano. The Eagles will host Randolph Macon College at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 22.

...


Veritas Issue 3, Fall 2012