Page 1

Graphic by Christopher Michael

Democracy at work Page 8-9 Changing ourselves. Changing our community.

Nov. 8 - 14

2012


2

VERITAS

Nov. 8 - 14

2012

Veritas Veritas is a student-run newspaper of Bridgewater College serving the Central Shenandoah Valley area.

Bundle up, y’all By Corley Tweedy

I

strong and brave men. I hope you learn a lot from both of them.” One thing I should hope we all have learned by now is that we don’t always get our way in life. For instance, some people thrive in the winter, while some would love nothing more than to

Photo by Joanna Caples

t’s cold; way too cold. Yours truly is not a fan of the cold. I know, I’ve heard arguments up one side and down the other for which is better: hot or cold. Subscribers to the cold camp say that it’s so much easier to layer and bundle--”you can always put on more clothes,” they say. However, my fellow thermophiles and I say that we would so much rather be hot than cold—”when your core gets cold, no amount of time by the heater will thaw you out,” we adamantly assert. Similarly, especially this election season, I have heard so many people get into political debates. “The Republican party is so much better because such-and-suchand-thus,” says your staunch conservative, while your Democrat tells you why being Republican is so incredibly wrong. But no matter your preferred temperature or political affiliations, you are guaranteed to experience some “seasons of change” that you don’t care for. Instead of griping about how the other side is wrong, what if we all just respected each other’s opinions? Blogger Emily Ley wrote the following in a letter to her young son Brady, hoping to leave good advice for him as he grows up. She writes, “Those men who we voted on [Tuesday], they are so brave. Even if we don’t agree with them, they are very

huddle up next to the fireplace and hibernate all season long; some people are ecstatic that President Obama will be in office another term, while others are heartbroken that Governor Romney lost the election. But the important thing to note is that while we don’t always get our way, it is crucial that we make the best of our current situation. Yes, I could fuss all day long about how bitterly cold it is outside, and how uncomfortable I am (oh

wait, I pretty much do that...) or I could slip some thermals on under my jeans, grab a scarf and gloves and make the best of things as I venture out of the cozy comfort that is my room. And, going the extra mile, I could be happy for those who are enjoying the cold. The “fate of our nation” is more serious than whether or not I need a jacket today—I realize that. I know it is not always easy to be happy for the winning team, if you’re not on it. But sometimes, going that extra mile can be as simple as not saying that rude comment on the tip of your tongue. Ley also writes, “See, sometimes when things don’t go our way, it’s easy to make a fuss and say things that hurt other people. But God asks us to respect “authorities” who govern us and pray that they make good decisions. So in our family, that’s what we do. We shake their hands (just like you’ll learn one day when your tee-ball team loses a game) and show them respect. Even when we’re sad or angry, we treat others the way we’d like to be treated. It’s called the Golden Rule.” Ley encourages Brady, “And if your team doesn’t win, I hope you shake the other guy’s hand. I hope you pray hard and that you do good work and give lots of LOVE to make change. I hope that you watch the way these brave men live their lives

If you have any tips for news, letters to the editor or advertising inquiries contact us at our e-mail:

veritas@bridgewater.edu MAIL Veritas Campus Box 193 Bridgewater College Bridgewater, Virginia 22812

Brandy Brode | Executive Director Katheryne Rivera | Creative Director Corley Tweedy | Editor Rebecca Heine | Managing Editor Alyssa Pennington Joanna Caples Nicholas Davies Lacey Naff Morgan Alexander Katie Matherlee

| | | | | |

Copy Editor Photography Editor Section Editor Section Editor Section Editor Section Editor

Sarah Rico Sarah Conner Cassandra Clark Latisha Branch

| | | |

Public Relations Manager Advertising Manager Finance Manager Office Manager

Brooke Thacker | Layout Artist Printed by: Daily News Record

and decide how you want to live yours. I hope that you remember President Obama and Governor Romney and see how two little boys (just like you!) grew up with big dreams to create change and to help people.” So, as I wake up in the morning for the next few weeks, dreading leaving the comfort of my toasty room,

I will endeavor to be happy for those of you who love the cold. I ask that you please enjoy this brisk air for me, and know that, next time the seasons change and you are sweltering in the summer sun, I will be enjoying it for you.

...


2012

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

Not your average lab

Future educators get hands-on learning

3

Story and photo by Lauren Johnson

E

nter Moomaw 100 and you will find colorful cubbies filled with book bags, letters of the alphabet, a plastic play kitchen, shelves full of toys, rugs for playing, a comfy couch for reading, pictures on the walls, musical instruments and much more that create the perfect playschool. Most importantly in Moomaw 100 you will find about sixteen three to five year olds playing by themselves, with each other and with Bridgewater College students from the Family and Consumer Science 400 Class who are learning about physical, socioemotional and cognitive development from infancy to adolescence. Their professor, Dr. Donna Hancock Hoskins; is really pushing her students to go above and beyond with an applied approach to learning developmental and theoretical concepts while using research based practices. Moomaw 100 is much more than just an environment for children to be entertained every Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to noon. It is specifically called the Child Development Lab/Playschool for students of Dr. Hancock to come in and observe how various theoretical frameworks and course concepts can be applied while facilitating the learning of children. More specifically,

students learn more about theoretical concepts from Piaget and Albert Bandura by observing the development and completion of tasks from children in the lab. Along with observing behavior, Dr. Hancock will have the children perform tasks to illustrate theoretical frameworks the students are learning in the classroom. Dr. Hancock performed a “conservation task” with a child named Adriana to observe her cognitive development and illustrate one dimensional thinking which is common for children during early childhood. Using water, coins and play-doh, she tested for example whether Adriana would notice that the same amount of coins were in a row even if one line was much more spread out than the other. They both contained 5 quarters, but she chose the longer line as having more. “At that age, the children do think one dimensionally. Their cognitive development does not allow for much insight on volume, mass or quantity,” Dr. Hancock said. “There is a mutual benefit for the children and the students. The students get to

observe firsthand what we are learning in class and the children are being exposed to developmentally relevant instruction. Each year, there

are children on the waitlist for this program,” Dr. Hancock explained. While the FCS 400 class meets every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, they are split in half to participate in the lab with the children on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The students are assigned a role each time they have the lab. Some of those roles include research observational tasks,

classroom facilitator and lead teacher. For each lab, a student is the lead teacher for the day and is required to come up with a lesson plan and themed activities. “This week I was a greeter. Last week I was lead teacher and my overarching theme was leaves. We went on a leaf hunt,” Steve Wolfe, who participates in the Thursday lab, said. The parents are informed of what activities their children are participating in because they are provided with a newsletter. The newsletter contains the topic for the day and how it will be applied in all areas of learning such as math, science and physical education to name a few. It also contains a section called “Parenting Corner” where students in the class are responsible for finding researched based parenting information for families. During the lab, Dr. Hancock explains to the students different course concepts that can be seen while observing the children. There are ample opportunities for college students in the lab to learn

about child development while operating the lab/ playschool. A student is assigned to sit and watch the children from a small room with a one-way window called the “observation deck.” From that vantage point, the student can answer questions about the activities without disturbing them. Michelle Caron, an FCS major and social work minor, was answering questions in her lab report such as, “Using the Social Learning Theory, describe the ways in which children have been socialized and how this influences their play?” on her day in the observation room. She had pages of notes that included entries about course concepts such as “pretend play,” where the children talk to themselves, and “side by side play,” where the children do not work together to play and gender roles. “The lab is definitely my favorite part of the class,” Caron commented after observing the children for over an hour. “It does help us learn a lot! A lot of people who take this class are teachers so it gives them good experience.”

...


4

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

Dinner with Tarzan Story and photo by Melina Norman

T

his past weekend a handful of students and Bridgewater faculty received the opportunity to sit down to dinner with actor Denny Miller, the Tarzan of the late 1950s and 1960s. Professor Galloway, as a great fan of Miller and the instrumental figure in bringing the whole Tarzan convocation event together, was of course present at the dinner. “It’s the most exciting thing that’s ever happened to me here at Bridgewater,” Professor Galloway said. As staff served dinner, students began to ask Miller questions about his career and life as an actor. One of the first questions asked of Miller was how he liked being on Bridgewater’s campus. “I envy Bridgewater for its size,” said Miller, who attended the University of California, in Los Angeles. Jessica Singh, a junior, asked Miller about how he felt when he was first discovered as an actor. “I never thought I would be in show business,” Miller said in response. He had been involved in sports in

high school and in college; he was admitted into the UCLA on a basketball scholarship. Miller even played a little football in the army before getting into acting. When asked what the film industry was like when he was in his prime, Miller said, “If you weren’t a big name then it was about trying to get credit.” It was important to have a good agent to get you exposure. As Professor Galloway said, “Miller obviously had a decent agent because he got the chance at acting with prominent actors like Dean Martin, Betty Davis, and Humphrey Bogart.” As an interesting note, Miller mentioned that his favorite role was his appearance on the old television show Gilligan’s Island. As dinner came to a close, everyone present received a photograph of Miller that he had signed. The company was grateful for the opportunity to meet such a prestigious guest, and to Professor Galloway for organizing such a special weekend.

Faces of the Past By Chris Conte

I didn’t particularly feel like writing an article this week, so I’ve compiled some photographs to poke some holes in your thought. Contrary to what we’ve always been taught, the Victorians had quite the humorous side!” Photos courtesy of: Picture 1: ruralidyll.blogspot. com; 1900’s Picture 2: polarbearstale. blogspot.com; 1900 Picture 3: anonymousworks. blogspot.com; 1880’s Picture 4: stumbleupon.com; mid-late 1880’s; “I know what I’m doing next time gas peaks $4.00” Picture 5: pinterest.com; 1890’s

4

5 1

...

3 2

2012


2012

Nov. 8 - 14

What is fair: science edition

VERITAS

Alexander Mack Library hosts discussion on science and fairness By Rebecca Heine Photo courtesy of Alexander Mack Library

I

n 1951, Henrietta Lacks passed away at the age of thirty-one from stage one cervical cancer. The cells from her tumor, however, were used to create the HeLa cell line, making her immortal. When Henrietta was first diagnosed, she was treated with radium tube inserts and released from John Hopkins hospital with instructions to return for X-rays. After a full month in the hospital, receiving multiple treatments and blood transfusions, she died of uremic poisoning. Her autopsy further showed that the cancer had metastasized throughout her body. During her radiation treatments, however, two samples of Henrietta’s cervix were removed—one healthy sample and one cancerous— without her permission. These cells were passed on to Dr. George Otto Gey, a researcher who discovered that Henrietta’s cells were unique. Her cells could be kept alive and still grow, whereas before cells that were cultured from other cells could only survive for a few days. Scientists attempting to perform experiments actually spent more time trying to keep cells alive than conducting their research. Gey was able to isolate a specific cell from Henrietta’s

tumor sample, multiply it, and start a cell line which he dubbed HeLa. These cells are the first immortal human cells to be grown in a lab, meaning that they do not die after a few cell divisions, and their contribution to science has been invaluable. Demand for the HeLa cells quickly grew as they were used for medical and biological research, and since the beginning of their mass production these cells have been sent around the globe for use in researching cancer, AIDS, the effects of radiation and toxic substances, gene mapping, and much more. Scientists have successfully grown around 20 tons of HeLa cells, and there are almost 11,000 patents

involving her cells. In the 2010 book, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”, Rebecca Skloot discusses the history of both the HeLa cell line and the Lacks family. Henrietta’s family was unaware of the existence of the HeLa cell line until 1976, twenty-five years after her death. Given this, many question whether or not it is fair and ethical for her cells to have been used without her consent or the permission of her family. True, the HeLa cell line has proved to be absolutely priceless in the pursuit of medical research, but does

this justify the creation of the line in the first place? As Bridgewater College asks the question, “What is Fair?” this year, the Alexander Mack Library will be hosting a discussion on Skloot’s book to debate this very question. On Friday, November 16 at noon, students, faculty and staff will have the opportunity to gather, bring their lunches, and casually relax on the first floor couches to talk about the life of Henrietta Lacks, both as an individual and as a research paragon. Anyone interested in learning more about this event is welcome to contact Cori Strickler at cstrickl@bridgewater.edu. ...

Show your support! Come to the Veritas table in the KCC lobby on November 15 & 16 from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 5 -7 p.m. to write a thank you to our troops overseas.

5


6

VERITAS

Nov. 8 - 14

2012

Help after hours Writing Center offers tutoring through Facebook By Katie Matherlee

I

t’s 10:30 on a Wednesday night and you’ve just remembered that you have a wellness paper due tomorrow morning at eight. Even though you’ve already written it, you know it’s bad, and you know for a fact Dr. Kearney is going to chew it up and spit it out. You can’t ask your roommate for help; he’s a math major. Normally you would dash to the Writing Center, but it’s too late; they closed a half hour ago. You find yourself curling up in a ball on your bed, wishing the Writing Center was always open. Once you finally fall asleep, your dreams are filled with giant red F’s chewing on your toes and flying around your head, screeching. If only you had remembered about your paper an hour earlier. Actually, you could have easily been saved from this horrible fate, and lucky for you it was only a hypothetical scenario. While the writing center does in fact close at ten Sunday through Thursday, tutoring is also available online through Facebook until midnight. Online tutoring through Facebook is really helpful, especially if you have simple questions with simple answers that can be conducted through Facebook chat. However, what if you want to know how well you stuck to your topic throughout your paper? What if you’re concerned that your

sentences are choppy or hard to read? Sure, you could copy and paste your paper into a Facebook message and then chat back in forth, but this could easily get confusing without the ability to point at exactly what you want them to see. It could be done, but there are ways that are faster and easier. Since coming into the writing center isn’t an option, Google Docs is the next best thing! Here’s how you do it: Step One: Contact the online tutor through Facebook by messaging Bridgewater-College WritingCenter. If you’re not friends, don’t worry. You should still be able to send them a message. Step Two: After asking them nicely if they would be willing to help you through Google Docs, ask them for their school email. You will need this in order to share your paper with them. Step Three: Log into your school email account, click on the Documents link at the very top of the page (it’s on a black bar). You’ll find it right next to the Mail link. Step Four: On the left of the page, you’ll see a big read button that says “Create”. Click the smaller button next to it. Click on files, and then choose the document you want to

share with the tutor. Step Five: You’ll notice that the document you just chose is now under the “My Drive” section in the middle of the page. Click on it. Google Docs should open the document in a new tab. This version is only being viewed. You will not be able to edit it from here. Step Six: At the top right of the page, you’ll notice the title of the document. Underneath it, you’ll find the “File” button. Click it, and then go down to “Open With”. Select “Google Documents” (this should be the only option). Step Seven: Now you’re able to edit your document in any way you please. In order to get the tutor in on it, click “Share”, which can be found in the upper right hand corner of the page. At the bottom of this window, there’s a box in which you can add people. Enter the email address of your tutor here. Hit “Share and save”, and then hit “Done”. Now your tutor is also able to view, comment, and edit the document. Your tutor should receive an email once you’ve shared the document with them. They will be able to get to your document through a link in the email. While your tutor is reading your paper, you have the option to chat with him or her.

A small, colored notification will appear in the upper right hand corner that shows you your tutor is viewing the document. If you click on this, a chat box will pop up, and you’ll be able to chat back and forth. You can also highlight a specific portion you would like your tutor to look at, right click with the mouse and select comment, and then ask him or her about the highlighted section through the comment. You will be able to see any changes your tutor makes to your paper, and your tutor will also be able to see any changes you make. Once you’re finished, you can “unshare” your paper with the tutor if you like. This can be done by clicking on the “Share” button, which is located to the top right of the page. Simply hit the “X” that is next to their name, and they will no longer be able to edit, comment, or even view the file. That’s it! Now that you’ve learned the secret of online tutoring, don’t be afraid to use it to your advantage! Just remember that online tutoring is only available from 6 p.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday, and Facebook chat is always good for short, simple questions. With these tools in hand, you’re sure to conquer all your papers, and may your dreams be filled with A’s and cake!

...

Shop for your Christmas presents in a new way this year! Rather than buying a present for a family member or friend that will eventually go to waste, put the money to good use and send it to local charities. The Alternative Christmas Fair gives you a chance to help someone in need, and, after all, isn’t this the season of giving? The Fair will be held at the Bridgewater Church of the Brethren this Saturday, November 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Swing by and celebrate the true spirit of Christmas!


2012

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

7

Higher expectations for local middle and high school students

Photo courtesy of http://teachingunderground.blogspot.com/2012/03/bottom-10-things-about-virginia-sols.html

By Rachel Coon

I

n Virginia public schools, students are required to take assessments called the Standards of Learning, more commonly known as “SOLs.” These assessments are given as early as third grade and cover the core areas of study including English, math, science, and history. They are cumulative tests that provide useful information on individual student achievement. Starting in 2011, the Virginia Department of Education decided it was necessary to implement “more rigorous English, math and science standards and expectations” in order to better prepare the students for life after high school. Almost three months into the 2012-2013 school year and students are well on their way to preparing for their upcoming SOLs. However,

when asked their opinion on the idea of the increased rigor of these tests, most students were clueless that this was even taking place. Renae, an eighth grade student at Beverley Manor Middle School, said, “Our teachers mention SOLs every day, but they have never said anything about them getting harder this year.” Kaitlyn, Renae’s classmate was in agreement: “Yeah, our teachers are like, we’re going to have an SOL for this and an SOL for that, but that’s all they ever talk about,” she said. However, Reagan, a tenth grade student at Buffalo Gap High School, said her math teacher did in fact mention the more rigorous standards to them at the beginning of the school year. “She actually used those exact words,” Reagan said.

Photo by Rachel Coon

When questioned on the current difficulty of these assessments, the students gave a mixed response. While the middle school students responded quickly with “they are easy,” the high school students were more reluctant and not as quick to answer. “I think they are kind of hard actually, depending on the class,” one student admitted. The point was also made that the tests change drastically from the middle and high school levels. Reagan said, “In high school the tests are worded differently than they were in middle school, and that alone makes them harder. Plus the subjects are different and the classes are more difficult. I think they are just like trying to challenge us more or something.” While there is a slight difference in opinion on the level of difficulty of the previous tests they have taken, the students at both

the middle and high school levels are in agreement that the Standards of Learning assessments are important to their education. Sydney, a middle school student from Beverley Manor insisted they are important because, “if we didn’t have SOLs then the teachers would have no reason to teach.” Lauren, a student at Buffalo Gap High School claimed they were important due to the fact that “they allow us and our teachers to see what we have or have not learned over the course of the semester.” The teachers play an important part in preparing their students for the SOL tests. In response to the question of whether or not the more rigorous standards create more pressure on her as

a teacher, Mrs. Brill, an algebra teacher at Buffalo Gap High School said, “I am working harder every year revising and updating and assessing my students to determine readiness. Sometimes it feels like we are constantly testing.” She admitted this puts more pressure on the students too. “The students need verified credits to graduate. For some average and most below average students this will be a challenge. They feel this constant testing as well.” So far, the changes in the assessments have only taken place at the middle and high school levels. Mrs. Brill gave her opinion on the matter. She agreed that the increased standards are necessary. However, she said, “They SOL - TO PAGE 14 :


8

VERITAS

Nov. 8 - 14

Election Results By Josh Trupo

A

ccording to the Associated Press and NPR as of 3 p.m. this Wednesday, President Barack Obama has won the 2012 Presidential Election with 303 electoral votes and more than 59 million popular votes against Mitt Romney’s 206 electoral votes and approximately 57 million popular votes. That’s right folks, for better or for worse we’re in for four more years of Democratic reign. After Romney taking an early lead throughout the day, it became apparent just how close this race really was. Yet things started to look up for Obama supporters when he won New Hampshire, the first of many important swing-states to fall. Shortly thereafter, CBS’s Election Day coverage was reporting rumors of Wisconsin swaying Obama, though those weren’t proven true until much later. In the end, Obama ended up with absolutely crucial victories in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Washington and Oregon. Even Virginia and Florida ended up favoring Obama by small margins and giving the president more than the required 270 electoral votes for victory. Despite Mitt Romney’s last minute campaigning in Pennsylvania, reported on by CNN, Obama still managed to secure about 52% of the state’s popular vote. The statistical specifics of

Obama’s victory will be discussed widely, to be sure. Now that the election is over, media will have nothing to talk about other than the results. Regardless of how he won, Obama did it. He has managed to attain a second term. Now, there were many promises made throughout this grueling campaign; promises we expect our president to keep. Here are some things to look for during a second Obama term, according to what he has said in his commercials and on the national debates: Obama has already brought about health-care reform, but he himself said at the first debate that the work is not done. We can expect more healthcare reform these next four years in the name of making healthcare available to all. Obama has also promised to lead us towards becoming an energy independent country, while cutting our debt. He has spoken time and again about how national security is highly important, and that anyone who attacks us will be met with swift retribution; so we can expect another chase for the parties responsible for the attack on the American embassy in Benghazi. College costs should drop, allowing higher-education for all who will make use of it. Obama has promised to balance the budget, raise the economy, all while creating an environment

for the middle-class to flourish. Our president has preached time and again the importance of improving our education system, because our children are the future and our future deserves the best. In the past, particularly after Vietnam, veterans have been treated terribly. Well, the president has made a strong case for making sure those veterans receive the hero’s treatment they deserve for protecting our freedom. The president has sworn to cut out the loopholes in our flawed tax system so that we may champion small businesses. It will be interesting to see just how genuine these promises are throughout the course of Obama’s presidency. Will he be able to balance the budget without raising taxes on the middle class? Will he be able to create jobs, end our wars, and keep us safe? One thing is for certain, America has spoken. Obama has been given another chance to help fix this nation. We can only hope that he’s up to the challenge.

...

2012

The life of a reporter on Election Day By Cassandra Brown Freelance Journalist

I

t was 4:15 a.m. on the coldest day of the year. Frost coated the ground like snow. It was a balmy 28 degrees when I left the house at 5:45 a.m., but I was determined to report on the polling precincts for Election Day. This was how my day started off, covering the local polling places for FauquierNow.com, my local online newspaper, around my hometown in Fauquier County, Virginia. Due to the rural locations of each polling precinct, it took about a half an hour drive to reach each location. I visited a total of seven polling precincts in the southern half of Fauquier County on Election Day, spending about 30 minutes at each location. My editor, Lou Emerson, covered the northern section of Fauquier County. The state of Virginia has specific legal ground rules for reporters on Election Day. Reporters must wear media credentials and identify themselves to the chief officer of election at each polling place. Interviews must be conducted outside the 40 foot prohibited activi-

ties area, according to Alex Ables, Fauquier County registrar. The Code of Virginia (§24.2-604) says that media can come into the polling place for a reasonable and limited period of time to film or photograph. The media must ask a voter’s permission to take their photograph, cannot reveal how a person voted in the photo, and cannot film precinct materials to reveal voter names. Once I knew the ground rules, I planned out my day according to the location of each polling place. My goal for each location was to capture scenes at the different polling places around the county. Diversity, old and young voters, first time voters, and traditions at the polling places were scenes I looked for throughout the day. Photos were a very important aspect of the day. I wanted to focus on humanitarian type stories that bring people together, instead of the politics of the day. My day started at Liberty High School in Bealeton, ELECTION - TO PAGE 9 :


2012

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

: ELECTION - FROM PAGE 8

Virginia at 6:15 a.m. There had been a long line stretching outside when the polls opened at 6 a.m. according to poll workers. From there I traveled to Kettle Run High School and found my first in-depth story. A 33-year-old lady had brought her four-year-old son with her to vote. This was only her second time voting her entire life because she had been nervous about the whole process. She has now taught her son that voting is an important right by bringing him to the polls so when he is old enough to vote it will come naturally to him. At Cedar Lee Middle School, where some poll workers have been working for 10 years, the atmosphere was full of excitement and the workers felt like a family. They always plan a potluck meal where everyone brings their favorite dish to share. Several poll workers I talked with enjoy working the entire day just to see old friends and connect with the community. At my own polling place, I met an 18-year-old high school student who voted for the first time. He had started a young democrat club at his high school and his car was decorated in patriotic window paint. For the most part, I was allowed to take photos of people walking to the voting booth and checking in at the registration table without any problems. Most voters were friendly and put their political differences aside,

agreeing to speak with me about why voting was important. The only challenge became finding unique stories readers would find interesting. Throughout the day, I realized how much Election Day brings people together, regardless of their choice of candidate. In a small town, you see people from the community you have grown up with your entire life. For one day, everyone stops their regular jobs to come together and vote, to have their voice heard. One 93 year old man shared his wisdom by saying, “Voting is not only a privilege, but a duty.” There was a record turnout of 35,399 or 82 percent of voters who cast their ballots yesterday in Fauquier County, more than the 2008 election. For a sample of my work, visit: http://www.fauquiernow.com/index.php/ fauquier_news/article/asmany-as-35000-will-votetoday-in-fauquier

...

China’s democracy

9

By John McCann

What is democracy?” “What is voting?” In the 2007 documentary film titled “Please Vote for Me,” a group of third grade students in Wuhan, China are asked these questions and they had no answer, only puzzled looks. In the film, the government has allowed the position of “class monitor,” basically the second in charge under the teacher, to be a democratically elected position as a social experiment. As the film began the teacher, Mrs. Zhang, described this process to her students by saying, “You are the master of your own choice,” and remarked, “Isn’t this new?” This third grade democracy works with three candidates, selected by the teacher, running for class monitor. Each candidate has two helpers for their campaigns, and candidates compete for their peers’ opinion in a talent show, a debate between two at a time and individual speeches detailing why they should be monitor. Luo Lei, Cheng Cheng and Xu Xaiofei—the only female candidates—all employ tactics that are not totally dissimilar to those of many American politicians. The film primarily followed the lives and campaigns of the two boys, Luo Lei and Cheng Cheng. Luo Lei had been the class monitor for the past two years while Cheng Cheng and Xu Xiaofei were new contenders. Each candidate was aided a great deal by their parents, who essentially controlled their child’s tactics. However, the kids did have their own opinions which

they expressed to their parents rather liberally. When pushed by his parents to rule the class with a heavy hand, Luo Lei replied, “I don’t want to control others, they should think for themselves.” On the other hand, Cheng Cheng expressed his unsolicited opinion that he would enjoy being class monitor because he would get to boss people around. The talent shows consisted of Luo Lei and Xu Xiaofei playing the flute and Cheng Cheng singing. The class was pleased with each candidate’s performance and the hope and desperation of securing the position of monitor grew in each candidate. Naturally, they pointed out their opponents faults and pitted them against their strengths, much like American politicians today. The two boys encouraged the rest of the class to ridicule Xu Xiaofei’s musical performance and when they did, she left the classroom crying. Mrs. Zhang scolded the class and many more tears were shed in remorse over the humiliation of Xu Xiaofei. The parents of Luo Lei and Cheng Cheng pushed their sons to succeed with hours of reciting speeches and preparing for debates. Cheng Cheng’s mother told him to boo Luo Lei off the stage, while Xu Xaiofei’s mother told her to “be civilized and reasonable.” These parents took this class election very seriously. Luo Lei’s father was head of police in Wuhan and treated the whole class to a monorail ride—something

very rare in central China. The role these parents had was remarkable. They told their kids what to say in their speeches; Xu Xiaofei’s mom wrote her speech for her. All of the campaigning hinged upon each candidate’s speech to the class, saying why the class should elect them class monitor. The speeches were the climax of the film. Cheng Cheng said things like, “We’re all equal” and concluded with the question “Do you support me?” and went on to say that if they do not, then, “Take pity on me” and vote for him. Each candidate poured over every detail of their speech, fine-tuning it to perfection. They all displayed themselves as stronger than their opposition. Luo Lei emerged as the victor and the other two candidates were reduced to tears at their loss. Xu Xiaofei’s mother consoled her daughter with the statement “The result is not so important, but the experience is.” That’s certainly not the way Americans think. Amends were made between the candidates and all returns to normal, but Cheng Cheng captured the spirit of all three candidates when he cried out at the end of his speech with “Please vote for me.”

...


10

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

2012

Intent to Murder The Bucky Brewster Story, part II By Matthew Staton

A

fter a hard day spent reading and re-reading his lines for the loan and car repair commercial, Bucky dragged himself home, turned on the television, and beheld a large woman who was forcibly stuffing her young daughter into an ill-fitting, garish dress. “Get yer sweet behind on in there, Sugar Sugar Spice,” shouted the woman, pushing down on her offspring’s curly head while she hiked up on the dress with her other hand. “We gots to get you pretty-fied a’fore the pageant starts.” “I wants to take a poop!” screamed Sugar Sugar Spice, squirming like a maggot beneath her mother’s roughhanded ministrations. “I wants to take a poop! I wants to take a poop!” Jumpin’ sassafras, thought Bucky, it’s almost enough to make you want to kill someone. Meanwhile, the woman was offering Sugar Sugar Spice some fresh-dried possum jerky. The child refused the food, though, and continued to scream “I wants to take a poop!” When the mother turned around to put away the jerky, the red-faced child popped out of her dress like the wet, white heart of a

ruptured zit and ran, naked and howling, out of the room. The woman whirled around, a large piece of jerked possum sticking out of her mouth. “Sugar Sugar Spice!” she bawled. “Don’t you dare take another shit on mommy’s rug!” She barreled out of the room after the child (who could be heard screaming in the next room) and the cameraman followed in hot pursuit. The show went to commercial and Bucky called his granddaughter and asked her to Google the show—“Ready or Not: Here Comes Sugar Sugar Spice.” The mother was making 1.2 million dollars per episode. The daughter (who ended up defecating on the rug despite the efforts of the mother to stop her) was being paid upwards of 5 million dollars. And then there were the merchandizing rights and the inevitable interviews on every network news show that would have her. That settled it for Bucky, who had never been paid more than six dollars and a pack of smokes during his heyday. He was going to murder the both of them or die trying. Ever since his decline into

ill-deserved anonymity had begun after his role as Johnny America, Bucky Brewster had killed six people—one of them had deserved it. Each of his murders was precipitated by his viewing some spoiled, talent-less blob making a killing on television or in the movies for doing nothing (other than being spoiled, talent-less, and a blob) when he had worked for hours on his dance with Lucy Little, paid an exorbitant amount of money to a voice coach to learn to speak like a burglar, and had fondled a real octopus to prepare for the sensation of fighting one in space. It was the tangle with the octopus that inspired his first murder, in fact, of the celebrity animal grabber-and-holder, the Alligator Hunter. Bucky caught him in the bathroom of a sushi joint, a real seedy place with stains on the walls, and impaled him through the throat with a frozen sword fish. Then he wrote a salacious message—“Bloomers”—on the sick green tile wall in the dying reality star’s blood. The next three murders were all former child stars like himself who had, either through luck or by knocking boots with certain Hollywood big-wigs behind closed motel room doors, managed to

sustain an upward trajectory with regard to their film rolls. Robert “Bobby” Albrite, Dana “Hurley” Henderson, and James “Little Jimmy” Baroque had been killed in equally gruesome, quasi-ironic ways. Little Jimmy (the one who deserved to be killed for peeing in Lucy Little’s lemonade on the set of Ain’t It Grand?), for example, turned up eviscerated in a dumpster behind a cheap motel. The killer had choked him with half of a urinal cake before peeing in both his eyes and knocking him out an open bathroom window, to fall to his doom in a dumpster carefully lined with the jagged shards from 47 lemonade glasses (which resulted in the aforementioned evisceration and mass loss of viscera and vital material that ultimately killed Little Jimmy and brought all 72 stray cats that lived in the neighborhood yowling and poking about for the source of the smell). As with all things that start out novel and interesting, however, Bucky’s next two murders were wholly uninteresting and not worth describing at all. They involved, as instruments to violate the traditional sanctity of human life: two taxi cabs, an ice pick, five gallons of rat poison,

and a femme fatale named “T” who worked for clandestine government agencies in at least five countries (two democracies, one presidentfor-life-of-such-and-suchplace, one dictatorship, and an anarchist’s dreamland recently become leaderless following an incident with a sniper rifle and several dozen angry members of the working class). “Thus unto Sugar Sugar Spice” became Bucky’s mantra after watching the credits roll on the freak show far too many critics were hailing as quality entertainment. He took a lint roller to his sweater vest, plucked his little white mustache into shape, and thought about shoving that frozen swordfish through the Alligator Hunter’s neck. Technical difficulties- the program will resume momentarily.

...

See next week’s edition of Veritas for the third installment of “Intent to Murder.”


2012

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

You Lucky Girl! A review

N

Classically folk: Choir presents “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass” By Melina Norman

By Nicholas Davies

ostalgia is, has, and will forever be arguably one of the most powerful agents available to the human cognitive process. That yearning for the forever-lost can, when used correctly, be a most powerful tool in the creation of an illusion; Woody Allen was able to mine an hour and a half ’s worth of material out of the conception for his wondrous “Midnight in Paris.” In those relatively early moments, this particular production of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “You Lucky Girl!” with the nostalgic ideals of what the film industry that I so love used to be, was brandished upon the stage;

11

in an age full of constant and, let’s be honestly frank here for a moment, unnecessary overstimulation, how lovely it was to see that bygone escapism re-appear for one brief moment, complete with the lovely live organ music that I wish could have lasted throughout the entirety of the performance. But the conceit of the silent film, and its subsequent transition into its offspring the “talkies,” is not simply for show and it is in the execution of that juxtaposition of the visual and auditory, or lack thereof, and the sliding social concepts towards women that the play really finds it footing. The lack of auditory stimulation

Photo By Joanna Caples

was slightly jarring at first, but much indeed the same way as one does with the beautiful language found in a Shakespearean production, one is able to adjust and within a few minutes I was overcompensating, my eyes straining to catch every brief movement. Here then I must pause this review briefly to ladle more applause and adulations upon the play, specifically to the ensemble and director Scott Cole as their work in the first two acts of the play is splendid as, so caught up was I in their physicality and perhaps over physicality, that I was not necessarily concerned with the dialogue being presented on the screen as everything was being beautifully conveyed with the simple adjustment of one’s posture. The transition from silent to “talkie” was only handled with aplomb and I would like to tip my hat to whoever dreamt up the idea of essentially LUCKY - TO PAGE 14 :

T

his past Sunday in Carter Center, the Bridgewater campus was treated to a performance by of the Concert Choir, the Chorale, and the Oratorio Choir, directed by Dr. John McCarty and accompanied by Bluegrass musicians. They presented “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass” by Carol Barnett. The first group to perform was Chorale, starting with a piece they performed during homecoming called “In a that Great Gettin’ Up Mornin’” and finishing with a piece called “Love is Little,” with a solo from Jordan Haugh. The Concert Choir performed next, starting with a song called “Simple Gifts.” After their performance the Oratorio choir along with the Bluegrass musicians started their performance. The performance mixed classical music with bluegrass sound. The members of the Bluegrass band got their chance to shine throughout the program, with several members singing solos in particular songs. The choir as a whole ended with a song called

“Hard Times Come Again No More,” and Dr. McCarty encouraged the members of the audience to join in with the choir in singing the song. When asked which song was his favorite, Jonathan Trejo chose “Hard Times Come Again No More.” For this song, the choir lined up on the sides of the pews to sing the song surrounding the audience. Dr. John McCarty, the director of choral music, shared his plans for the future of these choirs. “We are in the process of planning a tour in the spring,” McCarty said, mentioning that he is always looking for new members to join the choir. “We also were thinking of doing a Holiday Extravaganza,” McCarty added. He hopes to bring all of the groups in the music department together to perform around the holiday time. When asked how he’s enjoying his time directing at Bridgewater College so far, McCarty had nothing but positive comments. “It’s been fantastic, I have a great group of students,” he said with a smile.

...


12

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

2012

Monday night with the quartet Review By Sara Heflin

B

to impress as it journeyed through time. Enrique Granados’ piece “Spanish Dance No. 2 Orientale” was played with such fluidity and grace that it put audience members in an almost trance-

Brian Smith, the group took the audience through yet another journey. Composer Brian Smith said that the inspiration for his piece, “Freight Train,” came from his frequent summer trips up

from Domenico Scarlatti to Heitor Villa-Lobos, they inspired the audience to feel the music and even imagine themselves in the time period of its composition. Just before intermission, the group surprised the audience with the popular piece “Linus and Lucy”—from Charles M. Schulz’s popular cartoon series “Peanuts”—written by Vince Guaraldi. Their arrangement was playful and exciting and left the audience wondering what they would hear next. The second half of the performance continued

like state. As the musicians worked their way through each piece you couldn’t help but be impressed by how precisely they hit each note in time with one another. As they would play, each member would take their cues from one another and they would hit staccato notes at the perfect time, and this helped to portray the story that each of these songs was telling. The group made their impressive and difficult techniques look seemingly effortless to the members of the crowd. In an exclusive original composed by member

through the mountains in the Highlands of North Carolina. He would travel up the steep mountains in his beat up, old, un-air-conditioned van and felt as though he was in a freight train as his van struggled and chugged along to make it up the mountain. The ending of his piece portrayed the relief he would experience when he reached the top of the mountain and felt the cool air as he traveled back down. I was truly impressed and ultimately envious of Brian’s ability to take such a distinct memory in his life and

Photo by Tayseer Al-Safar

ridgewater College played host to the Georgia Guitar Quartet on Monday night. The group consists of four University of Georgia alumni, each of whom has been involved in music since their childhood: Kyle Dawkins, Brian Smith, Phil Snyder, and Jason Solomon. The quartet started off the night with Dawkins’s original composition entitled “Flight.” This was the perfect piece to start their concert off with; it set the tone for the group’s unique and distinct style and gave the audience a glimpse of what was yet to come. As they flowed through the song, they kept the listeners on edge by implementing musical techniques which one would not usually expect to hear when thinking of classical music. Pick scrapes and taps along with percussion elements truly characterized the musicians as a group and their multi-toned opener set up the unique nature of their remaining performances that night. It was inspiring to see the looks of passion and true joy on their faces as they played the music with such heart. The Quartet began the first half of their performance by taking their audience members on a musical journey through time, starting out in the early

renaissance period with composer Michael Praetorius and, later, ending the journey with a modern take on an Irish traditional piece. As the quartet moved through various arrangements

transfer it into a song which perfectly portrayed it. As the piece began and continued to crescendo the audience could picture his van trying to get up the mountain and when the piece came to its climax, audience members were able to feel the sensation of relief similar to that of what Brian must have felt. The piece was thrilling and many audience members wished it would have lasted longer. Next, the group performed a piece by Alberto Ginastera, and then concluded the night with a presentation of a traditional Irish song, which Kyle Dawkins so intricately arranged. The quartet showed their levels of mastery as they played their individual parts at different rhythms but then managed to come back together as a group and hit their notes with extreme accuracy. As the song continued on I couldn’t help but feel like I was back in an old pub in Donegal, Ireland; one of the most impressive parts of the night was the musician’s ability to evoke emotion and transfer the audience into the story which each piece told. The George Guitar Quartet’s level of talent is clear in their passionate performances and in their astonishing levels of musical ability.

...


2012

VERITAS

Nov. 8 - 14

13

This page in partnership with:

HRCDCC: care for all Story by Rebecca Heine

Way, we are able to offer a sliding fee scale which allows parents to pay a weekly tuition based upon how much money they earn.” The Center was established in 1971 and has been providing high quality childcare for 41 years. As a non-profit organization, HRCDCC is dedicated to serving the community over a bottom-line. As Jameson put it, “I do what I do because I love children and I love being able to work in a business that is well known in the community for providing high quality childcare.” Through the tire-

Photo courtesy of hrdaycare.org

H

RCDCC—quite a mouthful. It stands for the Harrisonburg Rockingham Child Day Care Center, a center dedicated to providing child care and learning opportunities in a safe and nurturing environment. During the school year, HRCDCC provides childcare for children of two to five years, with additional summer programs for children up to age eight. The Center, located in downtown Harrisonburg, is committed to serving the community by providing child care regardless of a family’s situation, including finances, race or religious affiliation. Delores Jameson, the Executive Director of the Center, explained that “because of our partnership with United

Photo by Rebecca Heine

less efforts of its teachers and staff, HRCDCC has been able to care for the children of the Harrisonburg community regardless of a family’s financial status, mainly due to its partnership with United Way and various fundraisers. One such fundraiser is the upcoming “Dancing with the Stars of the Burg” event, taking place this Sunday, November 11, at 6pm in the JMU Grand Ballroom. Jameson said that “the community has been extremely supportive of this fundraiser,” and the event has already raised $37,281 in donations. Events such as these are fun ways for students to get off campus and be involved in the community while supporting a great cause.

...

Upcoming events and opportunities Did you know that over 1.6 million people are diagnosed every year with Type 1 diabetes? November is Diabetes Awareness Month, so come to Staunton for Injecting Hope: Staunton Walk to Cure Diabetes on Saturday, November 10 at Gypsy Hill Park. Registration begins at 8:30am and walk begins at 9. Contact Cami Lockhart 540-255-3738 or email:injectinghope@ yahoo.com. For further information, http://www. jdrf.org/teamjdrf Interested in the environment? The Harrisonburg Green Expo will take place on November 10th from 9am-4pm at the Eastern Mennonite University Commons. Come spend a day with workshops, exhibits, food, and activities to learn about clean water, clean air, healthy living, renewable energy, and green building. Contact 540-4370012 for more information, or visit http://www.harrisonburggreenexpo.com/ On Sunday, November 11th, the Annual Veteran’s Day Parade in downtown Harrisonburg begins at 2pm at the Rockingham County Administration Building and will travel south on Main Street to the City Municipal building. Following the parade at 3pm, a veteran’s honorary ceremony will take place at Memorial Hall, South

High Street, Harrisonburg. A concert by Harrisonburg High School Band will follow at 4:00 pm. A $25 entry fee is required to participate in the parade. Call 540-4328936 for more information. Into Zumba®? Check out the Waynesboro YMCA Zambathon® Fundraiser benefiting Waynesboro YMCA. November 16th from 7:00 – 9:00 PM. Nearly 2 hours of Zumba® fitness dancing along with door prizes, snacks, and drinks included. Registration beginning at 6:30pm, $15 for members and $20 for non-members. Participants must be 13 years or older. Pre-registration encouraged 540-942-5107. Time to get your dancing shoes on! The Blazin’ Bluegrass Benefit for the Stanley Volunteer Fire Department will take place Saturday, November 17 from 1-9pm at Page County High School. Bands featured will be- The Bluegrass Brothers, Dark Hollow Bluegrass Band, Ronnie Good & Family and Greg Lam & Friends. Food, a silent auction, 50/50 drawing, raffles, and a bake sale will all be available. Adult tickets $10 in advance, $12 at the door. Age 13-17 $5 advance, $6 at door and children under 12 are free. Contact Ricky Foster 540778-1377 for more information.


14

VERITAS

Nov. 8 - 14

: LUCKY- FROM PAGE 11

contextualizing the actual scenic transition. That evolution is reflected to a lesser extent in the third dimension that the scenery seems to finally find in the final third, as well as more perceptibly in the sudden appearance of auditory tones; suddenly the “new woman” has a voice, no longer forced into silence by the maledominated society in which they function, nor indeed by the sparse dialogue provided by Burroughs that appears on the screen during the first two-thirds of the production which incidentally is straight and thorough in conveying its intended ideas. With such an intriguing conceit as found in this production, there are perhaps going to be issues that will present themselves, namely in how long to keep the game going. Does one have the entire play portrayed as a silent film? When is the best moment to allow voice to be heard? At the end of the day, it’s going to be an issue that is completely subjective to every individual that views the performance; for me, the introduction of the voice should have been earlier, emphasizing the very last line of the second act in such a way that not only makes that moment infinitely more powerful but also provides an ideal path for the audience to follow into the next act. Ultimately though, it is always going to be a personal issue. There is also of course one small caveat within Burroughs text present in the third act

: SOL - FROM PAGE 7

that old enemy of the writer the exposition sequence wherein everything has to be explained and ultimately it felt too rushed and too neat as if Burroughs hurried through it so as to reach the play’s conclusion and get to what obviously interested him much more in the relationships that define the piece. One could even go so far as to say that it comes with the territory, as one may be able to define “You Lucky Girl” as a romantic comedy a genre that is satiated with conveniences, which also brings up the final issue as to whether or not a comedy is enjoyable if one does not laugh. Usually I attempt to follow the rule laid down by my hero, film critic Mark Kermode, who uses the Five-Laugh rule wherein if a comedy does not make the audience laugh five times or more then it does not fundamentally work. There are, however, exceptions to the rule and this particular production would indeed fall into that category: a play that did not leave grasping for breath but was enjoyable nonetheless. In the end, “You Lucky Girl!” is a tremendous visual and slightly nostalgic triumph, a production that is able to capture the social situations within the larger context of a reallocation in popular culture, even with the slight niggling problems that are ultimately more defined by personal preference rather than any noticeable issues with the production itself or the various aspects of performance.

...

should be implemented in elementary, then middle, and finally high schools. We are teaching higher level concepts, especially statistics, to students who have not been exposed to even the basic concepts so we have to take time to teach the topics from the beginning.”

assessments are important to their education. While some students feel the tests are already quite challenging, others feel they have no need to worry. The teachers and schools in general are doing what they can to help better prepare students for these tests, and for their future.

Photo courtesy of http://sbo.nn.k12.va.us/sol/solgrad.html

Even though most of the students were unaware of the changes, Mrs. Brill said the school is doing their best to help students become accustomed to these changes. “We are trying to get students to think more in generalities and connections instead of just solving the problems. We are revising the curriculum to cover the new content and tests to better mimic SOL questioning,” she said. “However, this is very difficult since the state has released only 12-15 problems as examples for each SOL.” Whether or not the students have been made fully aware of the more rigorous standards that are being implemented for their English, math, and science SOLs, they still seem to grasp the idea that these

While current college students may be unaffected by these changes, the new incoming freshman are well aware of these more intense requirements. This may not seem like a pressing issue, but as time passes the incoming freshman classes may in fact be better prepared for what lies ahead of them. Upperclassmen will need to work hard in order to compete in a more challenging job market in the future.

...

2012

Corrections Last week we experienced technical difficulties with our publication folder and thus the story “Ladies: tee up for a new coach” by Maria Best was mistakenly printed. Also, we apologize to the Comitatus club for the omission of the club’s name and to Dean Sheppard for the mispelling of her name in the article “At the center of medieval lives Dean Scheppard delivers lecture on medieval monasteries.” As a student-run newspaper, please bear with us as we strive to improve our process and avoid mistakes such as these.


2012

VERITAS

Nov. 8 - 14

15

A proud season By Lacey Naff

Comradery between generations By Katie Robinson, Elizabeth Ashworth, and Jordan Mitchell

A

s Bridgewater’s fall sports come to a close, the anticipation for success turns to our winter athletes. The basketball team is happy to fulfill BC sports fan’s needs for a stellar and exciting season. After last year’s season of only six wins, the boys are anxious for improvement and excited to show that hard work in the off-season significantly helps their game. The freshman said the upperclassmen and coaches really led them to success. “The upperclassmen made it so we’d all come together, we’re like a big family,” freshmen Justin Riefe said. “Everyone has each other’s back.” The comradery of such a young team builds relationships on and off

the courts. The only concern voiced by the underclassmen is the team’s ability to stay healthy. “Last year a lot of people got hurt which directly affected how successful we were,” Riefe said. The upperclassmen explained how they keep up the intensity among the younger players. “We take the younger players who play the same position as us and take them under our wing to show them what they need to do,” junior David Larson said. “I want to see us make it to the top six”, said junior Ronnie Thomas, “that way we can have home court advantage during the playoffs.” Coming in with his 5th season here at Bridgewater College, head coach Don Burgess is very excited for this upcoming season.

“When the curtain folds back and the lights turn on, I want my team to go out there and remember their positions and know what to do,” Coach Burgess said. Assistant coach Alvin Green also believes this season will be victorious. “If they practice hard and practice often then this can be a successful season,” Green said. Although the men may face a tough game schedule this season, the coaches have no doubt in their mind that the men can win. With all the optimism from the team, fans wait in anticipation to support the team at their first home game on Nov. 24 against The College of New Jersey.

...

B

ridgewater’s field hockey team ended their season when they fell 2-1 to Randolph Macon in overtime in the ODAC semifinal round. It was a season to be proud of, though, as they ended with an 11-8 overall winning record, which is also the highest total wins for the program since the 11 wins back in 1998. Even though the last game didn’t work out in favor for the Eagles, some staple records were broken at the game. Freshman Taylor Prillaman scored the only goal for the Eagles that game, which was her fifteenth of the season and added to her team-high for the Eagles. That record is also the program’s highest single-season output of the twenty-first century. Also, sophomore Caroline Augsburger, who assisted Prillaman’s goal, made her ninth assist of the season which marks the highest total assists for a Bridgewater player since 2003. Junior Megan Gould said that a great part of their season was beating Eastern Mennonite University because they haven’t done that since 1982. That game was an exciting 2-1 victory for the Eagles and really boosted their confidence for the remainder of the season. “Our field hockey season was definitely the best we’ve had, at least since I’ve been

here. We made it to the semifinals this year, which we haven’t done in four years, which is great,” Gould said. According to junior Colleen Dickson, when the girls really started to play as a team, they clicked and started winning and that just kept going. “The season started off kind of rocky. We had nine freshmen on the team and a lot of new blood, but towards the end of the season we really started to mesh,” Dickson said. “We ended our season on an awesome note—we had a winning season. We were third in the ODAC and that’s a bright note for next year starting off on a good foot.” Gould said that this year they are losing two contributing seniors, Joan Burleson and Kelly Ryan, one who is a key defensive player and one who is a center-mid. “Next year we will really have to find someone to replace them which is going to be tough. They were definitely an essential part to our team so we’ll just have to build around that and bring some new freshman in and have some other returning players step up to take their place,” Gould said. We commend the field hockey team on a successful season and wish them luck to have yet another successful season next year.

...


16

Nov. 8 - 14

VERITAS

2012

Intramural’s crowns 2012 football champions Story and photo by Dustyn Miller

Men’s Summary #1 Seed Peyton Man Things defended their men’s flag football championship by defeating #2 Seed Swangas 33-18. The PMT’s overcame a short-lived first half deficit with their stellar defense, led by Chris Baird’s three interceptions and some timely offensive production from their quarterback, Christian Armstrong. Armstrong was able to elude some intense pressure from the Swanga’s to guide the PMT’s to victory. Baird started the scoring with a pick-6 on the first play from scrimmage. However, the Swangas came back with two scoring drives to take a temporary lead of 12-7. QB Preston Isner threw two short scoring strikes to Stacy Collins and Eugene Cummings respectively. However, Armstrong led the charge to retake the lead with a 15-yard pass to Connor McCullough and then skipped into the end zone on a short run with only two minutes remaining to take a 20-12 lead into the half. The Swangas came back one last time in the second half as Isner threw a 70-yard catch and run to Stefan Brown to close within 20-18 with 13 minutes to go. However, Armstrong then closed the deal with touchdown passes to Tyler Staton and Jacob Kroko. Armstrong was named offensive player of the game and Baird claimed the defensive award. Flag Football All-Stars

Men’s Offense Christian Armstrong Stacy Collins Adam Utz Brian Lynch Tyler Staton Taylor Boyers Cassidy Burns

Coulter Maxey Chris Gallet Ed Reddick Ryan Carder Stefan Brown Men’s Defense Scott Fike Chris Baird Michael Dean Stefan Vessels Damien Whindleton Tyler Slanovec Connor McCullough Casey Regetz Kodero Thompson Tom Kinder Ryan Pigg Sam Krone

Co-Rec Summary #6 Seed Swangas 2 grabbed a huge halftime lead and then overcame a second half surge by defending champs #1 Seed FIAGS to pull off the upset 4635 in the co-rec flag football championship. The game

started out as a defensive struggle, but quickly became a shootout. Quarterback Stacy Collins started the scoring with 12 minutes to go in the first half for the Swangas with a short touchdown pass to Olivia Mason. In CoRec, female TD’s count nine points so both teams used this strategy to their advantage. FIAGS’ Quarterback Beau Cassada then took off on a run play from 35 yards out and lateralled to Jessica Mullin to score nine points and tack on a two point conversion to give the FIAGS a temporary

11-10 lead. However, the Swangas came storming back with two more female touchdowns to take a seemingly insurmountable 28-11 halftime lead. Collins connected with Quita Cooper for a 10-yard strike and then with only two minutes left in the half, connected with Mason once again on a fiveyard pass. The FIAGS awoke in the second half when backed up to their own oneyard line on their first series and less than a minute into the action, Kevin Chandler threw a bomb to Cassidy Burns for a 79-yard pass play. Chandler then connected with Cassada on a short pass to close within 28-25 and the game was on. The game then went back and forth with Collins’ passing to Stefan Brown for a short 10-yard pass play and Chandler hitting Jess Mullins with a five-yard pass play. With the conversion, the FIAGS took the lead for the first time since early in the first half 35-34. Collins then drove the Swangas down the field and hit Damien Whindleton with

a short pass to regain the lead with less than a minute to go. With one last gasp effort, Chandler’s last second pass was intercepted and returned for a touchdown by Ahmere Ware to close the deal and the scoring. Stacy Collins was named the offensive player of the game with five touchdown passes. Jessica Mullen led the defenses with three sacks and was named the defensive player of the game. Flag Football All-Stars Co-Rec Offense Kevin Chandler DaMario McFadgen David Frizzell Olivia Mason Quita Cooper Preston Isner Rob Gallet Trevor Walzl Sam Churchill Kelsie Floyd Ashliegh Monogold Molly Colman Co-Rec Defense Jessica Mullen Beau Cassada Ronnie Monogold Stacy Linthicum Peggy Russell Kelly Hughes Kyle Harris Ahmere Ware Mick Hicklin Paul Rachner Chris Eby Mike Dandridge


Veritas Issue 9, Fall 2012  

November 8-14, 2012

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you