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WEEKLY, NOVEMBER 20 - 26, 2013

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Serving Bridgewater and surrounding communities BRIDGEWATER COLLEGE bridgewater.edu

“Changing Ourselves and Changing Our Community”

VERITAS.BRIDGEWATER.EDU

Making smart choices for finals How to overcome the anxiety “freeze” and get the job done By Dr. Studwell, Ed.D., LPC Photo by Tayseer Al-Safar

Lend a Paw food drive. SEE MORE ON PAGE 5.

Field hockey wrap-up. SEE MORE ON PAGE 10.

Bridgewater students prepare for final exams occurring in December.

Like the new layout? Check out the new website! veritas.bridgewater.edu

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ith many important assignments, papers and tests due in a short time, there is a high likelihood for heightened anxiety. In fact, anxiety can be the biggest

inhibitor to learning. While it can be typical for people to clean their rooms and do other organizing activities as a response to stress or anxiety, be mindful if your symptoms are becoming too

debilitating – difficulty with sleeping or sleeping a lot; concentrating; restlessness; marked moodiness; crying easily; or feeling immobilized and unable to function academically.

Seek a resource: Counselors: Randy Hook, 828-5358, rhook@bridgewater.edu Amy Ghaemmaghami, 540, 828-5379 Aghaemma@ CONTINUES ON PAGE 6.


Editorial

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NOV. 20 - 26

2013

Looking like Christmas in July The holidays come to the stores too early By Brooke Thacker

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f there is one thing that I do not understand, it is why people overlook Thanksgiving to skip ahead to Christmas. It happens with people’s choice of music as well as the stores that we shop at on a day-to-day basis. As soon as Halloween is over, up comes Christmas! Two months in advance, I may add. I know that Christmas is when people spend the most money out of all the holidays, but why start it so early? According to an article on the Daily Press website, “Christmas in September: Retailers bring out holiday merchandise early,” by Nicole Paitsel, retailers lose out if they do not put Christmas items out early enough. Paitsel writes that, “Since the holiday season can account for 20 percent to 40 percent of annual sales for most retailers, the motivation is strong to make that season last as long as possible.” The Quad City Business Journal article, “It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas ... on the shelves,” by Doug Schorpp also discusses how early retail stores put out Christmas items. They do it so that they can earn a profit, mostly because some

people like to shop early. The stores’ layaway option helps customers budget their holiday shopping, according to Schorpp. These stores must also hire more help to put out all these holiday items so early. Kohls plans to hire 50,000 seasonal employees nationwide for the holiday season, according to Paitsel. This is the one positive aspect of all this hectic retail shopping: people who may not have a job can get a temporary job. If people get this one job, and do well, retailers may keep the person on full time. That would probably be the best gift someone could get during the holidays, especially in our current economy. Despite the extra employment option of the holidays, people must also think that this year is different than most. Thanksgiving comes late this year, leaving only 25 shopping days between the two major holidays. This is all the more reason for stores to have out holiday items shortly after putting up Halloween items. However, it is still annoying to see the holidays blend together. In both of the aforementioned articles, people who were interviewed com-

plained about the retailers putting out holiday items too early. No, they are not being Scrooges, but they just want time between the holidays to enjoy each of them fully. I definitely agree with these people. I want to enjoy Halloween and Thanksgiving before I start thinking about Christmas. However, I do understand why retailers put out the items so early. They need to make money just as much as we need to buy gifts for our loved ones. And it is beneficial for those over-eager people who start shopping for Christmas months in advance. I do not see how people can plan that far ahead, especially for children. Children grow out of clothes and shoes so quick, and they want the newest toys every year; there’s no way to plan that out in August. As much as I wish I had my holiday shopping done already, I am glad that I have not. I want to be able to enjoy my Thanksgiving meals with my family and friends. After that, then I will stress out over Christmas presents. I hope y’all do the same. Happy holidays!

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Veritas is a publication manged and produced by students of Bridgewater College. As a news organization serving the Bridgewater and surrounding communities, Veritas publishes regularly opinion articles and letters submitted by members of the community which do not reflect the opinion of the Veritas staff or of the Bridgewater College’s administration. We encourage members of the community to submit information, opinion, and critiques in order to promote a healthy dialogue. The Veritas Editorial team also reserves the right to edit, modify, or exclude any submissions containing offensive or innappropriate language or remarks. To reach the newsroom, contact the advertising team, or submit articles and letters, please send us an email at:

veritas@bridgewater.edu Executive Director: Brandy Brode Editor: Brooke Thacker Business Team: Advertising Manager: Kate Hutton Public Relations Manager: Emily Nowak Social Media Manager: Victoria Wilson Marketing Associates: Emily Heacock Office Manager: Latisha Branch Accountant: Cassee Clark Editorial Team: Managing Editor: Lacey Naff Head Copy Editor: Alyssa Pennington Layout Editor: Tayseer Al-Safar Content Editors: Emily Higgins Melina Norman Sub-Editors: Jason Manago Megan Ford Rianna Hill Senior Staff: Chris Conte, Christopher Michael, Abgail Blair, Ellen Morris, Nicholas Davies, Cyndi Wibe, Katie Matherlee, Sarah Conner, Morgan Alexander Printed by the Daily News Record in Harrisonburg, Va.


NOV. 20 - 26

Campus

2013

Veterans Day display Fallen soldiers’ boots display on Campus Mall By Emily Nowak

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any Bridgewater students and community members took notice when a man in a camouflage jacket started to set up boots on the Campus Mall last Monday. Students who took a closer look at these boots found that each had a tag which displayed a name, an age, a rank and a town in Virginia. Some boots were decorated with flowers, and some had photos of the men who used to wear the boots. Each pair of boots represented a fallen soldier from Virginia. The white boots symbolized solider suicides, and there were also shoes that symbolized the deaths of Iraqi and Afghan civilians. Two-hundred boots in total were lined up on the sidewalk. The man in camouflage was Evan Knappenberger, president of Vets for Peace in Charlottesville, Va. Knappenberger is a war veteran himself; he served four years as an enlisted man before becoming a philosophy and theology student at EMU. He sets up the Eyes Wide Open exhibit every year in areas around Charlottesville and Harrisonburg. This year

he chose to set up the exhibit at Bridgewater College on Veterans Day. The display of boots is a project created by an organization called the American Friends Service Committee. This organization created the veterans exhibit in 2004 and named it Eyes Wide Open. The Eyes Wide Open exhibit “is a memorial to honor lives lost in the Iraq War and to call attention to the human and economic cost of the war as it is borne by individuals, families, communities, states, and our country as a whole,” as stated on the America Friends Service Committee website. The exhibit is a visual representation of the casualties of war and is meant to show the cost of war. “[The] boots are meant to be seen as people who are no longer with us,” Knappenberger said. Knappenberger notes that this exhibit is one of those “rare projects that gets people on the same side” because it is meant to bridge any gap there might be between people with different points of view.

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A Winter Wonderland

Relax and enjoy a variety show before exams By Sam St. John

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hat time of year is upon us once again--a time filled with anxiety, cramming for finals, and eating pounds of junk food. However, a convocation called Winter Wonderland is designed for students to release the pre-exam jitters and enjoy the talents of fellow Bridgewater students, faculty and staff. “It’s a tradition that will hopefully carry on,” said Dr. Jeffery Pierson, director of convocations at BC. In the week of Winter Wonderland, there are three separate convocations planned to celebrate the Christmas season: the Christmas campus worship, Winter Wonderland and the holiday extravaganza, the last convocation of the

semester. Bridgewater senior Bashar Murad, and president of the Mass Communication Organization here on campus, is heading up the Winter Wonderland convocation and is excited for the upcoming event. Winter Wonderland started in 2011 as a variety show for students and then turned into a convocation. The event is mainly a student-led variety show with a Christmas theme. Bashar said there are several surprises to look forward to. “So far we have nine acts signed up,” said Murad. “There will be a live broadcast of the event on BC Spark radio.” Bridgewater College is steeped in tradition, and

Winter Wonderland is one of the newest here on campus. Bashar is hopeful that someone will take a leadership position next year after he graduates and that the tradition of the Winter Wonderland convocation will continue. Winter Wonderland will take place December 4 at 7:30 p.m. in Cole Hall. To sign up to participate in the Winter Wonderland convocation, contact Bashar Murad at bsm005, or email the Bridgewater convocation address at convo@bridgewater.edu.

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Paws for a Cause

Bridgewater students raise awareness for animal neglect and abuse By Cyndi Wibe

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ant your dog to be walked for free? Want to meet other dog lovers? Stop by the Bridgewater College campus Mall Saturday, Nov. 23 between 12 p.m. and 3 p.m. to have students from PDP 150: Dog Is My CoPilot, walk your dog. The PDP 150 class studies the interactions between humans and animals. They examine the changing roles

of animals in society and assess the bonds that people form with animals. Not only do they look at the U.S., but also across cultures to the role animals play in other places. Particular attention is paid to the social construction of animals, anthropomorphism and human tendencies to be androcentric. Students from this PDP class will be hosting the Paws for a Cause dog walk

to raise awareness for animal neglect and abuse. There will be an opportunity to donate money or pet food at the event. These donations will be going to the Mosby Foundation. If there are any questions contact Dr. Harriett Hayes at hhayes@bridgewater.edu.

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Campus

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NOV. 20 - 26

Postcards for soldiers

Writer’s Block

Giving thanks to those who sacrifice

By Jess Snellings

Photo and story by Kelsey Velandria

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Emily Nowak and Kate Hutton host Postcards for Soldiers Table.

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very day that goes by is another day that hundreds of soldiers have to spend separated from their family, friends, and loved ones. These soldiers choose to sacrifice their lives every day in order to defend their nation, and to allow us to have normal lives. The nobility, courage, and bravery that these soldiers possess is truly honorable, and for which we as citizens owe thanks. For the second year in a row, Bridgewater College’s newspaper, Veritas has hosted their holiday event Postcards for Soldiers that allows students, faculty, and staff to pick a card, and write a personal message to

soldiers overseas. These cards are sent through the American Red Cross Foundation to overseas active service members. This year, Veritas was able to collect 124 cards over just a two day period. Though a card may not seem to be incredibly significant, it is the gesture that counts. Being overseas in war zones and or just thirdworld countries, especially during the holidays, can be very difficult and emotional. “The cards and personal messages, sent by tens of thousands of Americans, provide a welcome ‘touch of home’ for our troops during the holiday season,” said the “Holiday Mail for Heroes”

page from the American Red Cross website. Any small reminder of life back home, no matter how small, can mean the world to someone who is serving overseas. These cards serve as a reminder to soldiers as to why they are doing what they do. They are also a way for us to say ‘thanks’ for all that they do for us. It is a small way for us as a campus, a community, and as civilians, to thank all of the men and women who are putting their lives on the line for us everyday and sacrificing everything, so that we can sleep soundly at night.

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2013

Slowing down

his past week, I met with a new friend. One of the first topics of discussion was the dreary and bitterly cold day. She said a friend told her: the world is slowing down, ready to sleep; our ancestors slowed down with it, and maybe that is a sign that we should, too. That thought really struck me, and it gave me something to think about since then. A topic I have touched on before is the fast-paced world in which we find ourselves daily. The statement above provides another stone along the thought-path crossing the stream of consciousness. Back in the day, when survival hinged upon working the land, during the spring, summer and fall, mankind grew and harvested crops to eat and preserve for the dead period, i.e. winter. When winter hit, people had nothing they could do with the soil, so they had to slow down with the earth beneath them. So why not us, too? In a world run by technology, travel, constant business calls, etc., we have no time to dilly-dally. We go from sun up to sun down and very often we continue during the time between. We fill our days and nights with so much to do and keep up with that

we do not even take the time to live. We do not stop to let the cool water of the stream rush around our fingertips and sting our sense of touch. We do not make a point to step away from the streetlight long enough to see the billions upon billions of natural light (how many people try to count the stars these days?). What would happen if people took the winter as a time to slow down? What if we took the first few weeks of cooler weather to prepare for the bulk of the winter, and as the bitter months set in, we, like the bears, went into a sort of hibernation? The nights grow longer to remind us we need more time to rest. The days grow colder to convince us to stay indoors. What would happen in the world if we went with the seasons instead of trying to make time work for us? We have no idea what we are missing when we pass up the opportunities life gives us to value, to cherish. What is the point of living if we do not live? Whether or not we choose to slow down or keep a high-strung life is entirely up to us. Personally, I think we would all benefit to let ourselves slow down with the earth as we were originally designed to do.

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NOV. 20 - 26

Lending a paw Pet food drive

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Matherlee’s cat hides under a blanket.

Instead of being forced to get rid of their animals, pet owners are able to take better care of them through The Mosby Foundation’s assistance. Between Nov. 18 and Dec. 6, Lend a Paw will be raising money and collecting pet food to donate to The Mosby Foundation. Bins will be located in Nininger Hall, the KCC lobby, and in McKinney. Any brand of pet food is okay, whether wet or dry. Just make sure the package is sealed (dog and cat food are the most needed). Money donations should be made out to The Mosby Foundation and given to Dr. Gano-Overway or a member of Lend a Paw. If you have any questions about the fundraiser or Lend a Paw, you can email Gano-overway at lgano@bridgewater.edu. For more information on The Mosby Foundation, check out their website: www.themosbyfoundation.org.

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Bright, tasty, and local The apple orchards of Rockingham County

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Photo and story Katie Matherlee

ant to help a household pet get the food it needs this holiday season? Then lend a helping paw in Lend a Paw’s pet food drive! Lend a Paw is dedicated to bettering the lives of local animals, and the pet food drive that they are coordinating shows just how much they care. “Lend a Paw is a group on campus where students [who] are interested in animal welfare issues get together,” Dr. Lori GanoOverway, the group’s advisor, said. “And one of the big things that we’re doing this semester is that we’re going to raise money for The Mosby Foundation.” The Mosby Foundation raises money for its pet version of a food bank, which runs out of the Verona food bank, located in Verona, Va., which is 15 miles south of Bridgewater. The Mosby Foundation gives both food and medical service help to pets whose owners are in need of financial support.

Community

Campus

2013

By Jessica Reynolds id you know Photo courtesy of Sh later’s Orchard that Rockingham County is one of the largest apple producing counties in Virginia? When settlers first settled on our land the law required that for every 500 acres granted to them, settlers were to Freshly picked apples from Showlater’s enclose and fence a quarOrchard. ter of an acre of land near The exhibit entitled The their home to plant apple Apple in Rockingham, will orchards to serve as a food be an educational event source. Apples were a very where guests can come in important crop for the new and learn all about the apple settlers. They provided cider and its many uses through(the beverage of choice), out history. There will be feed for the livestock, and many different food sources hard apple cider tasting, pictures, newspaper clippings for baking and cooking. about apples dating back to Thus, the Virginia apple the 1900’s, and artifacts such industry was born! as the cider press, old tools, Showalter’s orchard in Timberville, Va. has teamed and of course tasty apple treats. up with the Heritage muBonnie Paul is a volunteer seum to open up their new helping to set up this new never before seen exhibit.

exhibit. “Apples have had a huge part in the settling of this area. They just grow well here,” Paul said. Apples have been used in many different ways all throughout history, and are still prevalent in today’s world. The list of things apples can be used for goes on and on. We have apple cider, hard apple cider, applesauce, apple juice and many more. Bonnie laughed as she said she was a firm believer in the old cliché saying, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” This exhibit opened up in the Heritage museum in Dayton, Va. on Nov. 19 and will run for about nine months.

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Harrisonburg holiday parade Getting into the holiday mood this season

By Emily Townsend he highly anticipated Downtown Harrisonburg Holiday Parade will take place on Friday, Dec. 6 at 7:30 p.m. This year’s theme is “Peace on Earth.” Before the parade starts, Classic Carriage will be offering carriage ride tours of downtown for $5 for adults and $3 for children ages 4-7. This activity will be offered starting at 5 p.m. and will continue until 6:30 p.m. The rides begin in front of the Massanutten Regional Library and will go

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all throughout downtown, providing the chance to see the city in a different view. At 7:30 p.m., the parade will start on the corner of Grattan and Main Street and will continue up to the Rockingham County Office building on Gay Street. Following the parade Mayor Ted Byrd will hold a tree lighting ceremony in the Court Square. After the parade, the JMU Marching Royal Dukes will hold a holiday concert. The following day, Dec. 7, there will be a candy cane

hunt in downtown Harrisonburg. Prizes will be rewarded for finding the few hidden candy canes that will be scattered throughout trees and bushes. The event will begin at 10 a.m. and continue until 2 p.m. and is open to all elementary-aged students. Downtown Harrisonburg provides many opportunities to get into the holiday mood for people of all ages and the weekend of Dec. 6 and 7 is full of fun events to start off the holiday spirit.

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Main Focus

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bridgewater.edu Director of Academic Support: Dr. Chip Studwell, 828-5370 or cstudwel@bridgewater. edu. Tips as you prepare for exams: 1. Check with your professors to see what grade you have in your classes right now. They can let you know what grade may be possible, given remaining assignments and tests. If you have had F and D grades all semester and need an A on the final cumulative exam to earn a D in the class, it may make sense to leave it and concentrate your efforts on your other courses and repeat the class later. Get this information from your professor first. Then, make a definite decision. 2. Write down all the things you have to do for the next week. Include classes, study sessions, papers and tests, along with the steps leading up to the test/paper. It is important to get this out of your head and on paper where you can see it to keep it out in front of you and stick to it. Your stress wants to say, “Worry about it,” which impedes work completion, while what is needed is to “act” on it.” Put the days of the week across the top of a page and the times of the day along

the left margin and get this done. 3. Make learning active. One way to enhance concentration is to make learning more active – talk it, hear it, do something with it. This is a reason study groups are so effective. Meet with your professor, a tutor or someone else knowledgeable on a regular basis – starting now. Studying six hours the night before the exam are not like six hours spread across three to six days. 4. Reading to yourself, particularly when stressed, is ineffective. You do not learn by spending time with a book because your mind wanders. Do not read pages on end thinking this is contributing to your learning. To be effective, read a little and then summarize in your notes what you read. Again, you need to be active. 5. Your professor, a tutor or Academic Coach and the Writing Center are all resources to assist you. Please contact me if you want to reduce that mountain before you. Furthermore, please do not remain alone in your stress. It is not going to get better if it is getting in the way already. You can schedule a time to come by the Academic Support Center by calling 8285660 or Email: cstudwel@ bridgewater.edu I wish you my best.

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NOV. 20 - 26

2013

Mind(fulness) over matter Tips for coping with stress By Amy Ghaemmaghami, MA, LPC Counseling Services college counselor

Illustration by Brooke Thacker

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his time of year you might find yourself stressed out by the aftermath of mid-terms, the coming finals, and family expectations at the holidays. Unfortunately, many of us waste mental energy by trying not to worry about our to-do list: we complain to friends, peers and faculty and get ourselves even more worked up. Instead, Dr. Susan Ortillo, PhD and

author of The Mindful Way Through Anxiety suggests that we “take a meditative break.” Find ways to be present in the moment. You might take a few minutes off from your schoolwork, your friends and calls from family, to find a quiet place to stand and actively observe the world around you. Feel your own breath as you peacefully and non-judgmentally look around you. Those precious

moments of mindful activity will leave you feeling renewed and rested with a new perspective. More Tips to Decrease Stress: Pop a Peppermint. A WVU study showed that pumping peppermint – scented air into cars decreased commuter stress and anxiety. Take a Break from Social CONTINUES ON PAGE 7.


NOV. 20 - 26

Main Focus

2013

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6.

Photo by Tayseer Al-Safar

Media. The Active Minds club on the BC campus recently sponsored “Real Face Time� in which 100 students voluntarily gave up social media for a day to demonstrate the benefits of in-person interaction. Snack like a Hiker. Eat food that sustains you and gives you extended release protein throughout the day. Nuts and dark chocolate in trail mix are winners! Remember to Breathe. A Columbia University study found that people tend to hold their breath when sitting at the keyboard checking e-mail. There are many different types of breathing techniques, but the key is

to pay attention to your breathing. If you find that you are holding your breath, then take a break to inhale, exhale and stretch. Banish a Bad Thought Before it Takes Over Your Life. We all have negative thoughts once in a while, but if they are based on bad perceptions or bad beliefs they can get you stuck. Try to un-stick those thoughts by quitting the habit of falling into stressed thinking. Be realistic and focus on the small victories in your daily life. Sources: http://www.oprah. com/spirit/Find-Peace, www. mindfulwaythroughanxietybook.com and Think GoodFeel Good, by Paul Stallard.

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Commununity in Action

NOV. 20 - 26

2013

Blue Ridge Legal Services Free legal assistance to low-income residents By Katie LaBranche hen people are law is defined as “disputes in legal trouble, between individuals, organithey often turn to zations or between the two, professionals for help. Some in which compensation is people or families, however, awarded to the victim.” are not able to afford such BRLS deals with many difhelp, and that is where Blue ferent types of cases and is Ridge Legal Services (BRLS) always open to consideration steps in. Their team of atfor a type of case that they torneys provides free civil le- may not have worked with gal assistance to low-income before. residents of the Shenandoah “The most common types Valley and Roanoke Valley of Virginia. Overall, the goal of BRLS is to reduce poverty-based prejudices in the civil justice system by providing highquality legal advice and representation to people who would otherwise be Photo courtesy of Blue Ridge Legal Services unable to receive legal help because of their financial situations. of situations [we deal with] As with any business, would be consumer and fithere are many people nance cases, landlord/tenant involved with keeping it up cases, family law cases (parand running, and at BRLS it ticularly domestic violence), includes John Whitfield, the public benefit cases, wills Executive Director, and a and powers of attorney and staff of attorneys. elder abuse and exploitation “I manage the four offices cases,” Whitfield said. “Typiof [BRLS], provide legal cally, we close in the range supervision, work with the of 2,000 or more cases a board of directors to devel- year.” op policies and budgets and In order to be qualified I’m also the chief fundraiser for these services, hopeful for the organization,” Whit- patrons must meet certain field said. requirements. As a free legal service, “They have to be low BRLS only works with civil income, that’s that main cases, not criminal. Accord- thing. Generally, they have ing to www.diffen.com, civil to be below 125% of the

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federal poverty guidelines,” Whitfield said. “Basically, they have to be really, really poor.” Some cases might take priority over others, depending on the severity of the case and the needs of the people involved. “We also [take into consideration] what kind of case they have,” Whitfield said. Overall, BRLS has made it their goal to help the people in the surrounding areas of Virginia have a better chance of being successful in court. Without their assistance and advice, many people would be in unwanted debt or without their homes, cars, custody of their children and other important parts of their lives. Depending on the needs of the client and the type of case, legal assistance from BRLS includes advice, brief service and ongoing representation in state and federal courts and administrative agencies (www.brls.org). They have offices throughout Virginia in Harrisonburg, Winchester, Lexington and Roanoke and can be reached on their website or toll free at (800) 237-0141.

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This week’s events and opportunities Community in Action is a partnership between The Community Foundation, United Way and Veritas. The 2nd Annual Weihnachtsmarkt (German Christmas Market) will be held at Bluestone Vineyard, 4828 Spring Creek Road. This event will take place on Dec. 7. Come out and enjoy a festive market atmosphere featuring local vendors, artisans, food and wine. Bring your Christmas list or get inspired by the selection. Call 540828-0099 for more information. The Valley’s most beloved family holiday tradition for 45 Years will be back Dec. 7 through 8 in Harrisonburg. “Holidayfest” will be held at James Madison University’s Forbes Center for the Performing Arts, 147 Warsaw Avenue. This event will feature the Shenandoah Valley Children’s Choir, JMU Symphony Orchestra, Madison Singers and Chorale, with a special guest. Call 540-5687000 for more information. One of the country’s most acclaimed hand bell choirs will be performing Sunday, Dec. 8 at the Turner Ashby High School Auditorium with all proceeds benefitting Second Home. This is hand bells like you have never seen them before! Tickets are $20 for adults, $16 for youth 16 and under, and a group rate will be offered at $15 per ticket for groups of eight or more. With Christmas sneaking up on us soon, it’s time to start getting those gifts. Spend the day on Saturday, Dec. 14 helping out your community while getting major discounts from many vendors selling skin care and nutrition products, jewelry, and much more! If this is something you’re interested in come out to The 2013 Spa-Lidays Celebration Benefit For The Blue Ridge Area Food Bank. The cost is $10 per person or 10 non-perishable food items. This day features relaxing massage & spa services and deeply discounted holiday spa gift certificates from Massage by Betty with 50% of all sales donated to The Blue Ridge Area Food Bank.


NOV. 20 - 26

Arts & Style

2013

Roots and boundaries

Richmond Symphony will come to BC A contemporary and traditional orchestra By Rachel Meeks

Poets Robinson and Butler visit BC By Abigail Blair n Monday, Nov. 12, students gathered in the Boitnott Room to hear from two published poets, Sara Robinson and Jenna Butler. Professor Stan Galloway opened the convocation with a response poem of his own. He then proceeded to read one of Robinson’s own poems to welcome her to the stage. This was Robinson’s return to Bridgewater as she had been visiting the community to participate in the International Poetry Festival. Originally from the area, specifically Elkton, Robinson’s poetry often relates to her roots and tells why she has chosen to put a little distance between her and the area. Common themes that Robinson finds in all poetry and continues in her own include love, death, war, and one’s own self. These themes were evident in the poems read from her published books Two Little Girls in a Wading Pool and A Cruise in Rare Waters. Robinson surprised the crowed with a special reading of an unpublished poem called “Why I Drink,” expected to be seen in the spring of 2014 in her book Stones for Words. Following her readings, Robinson introduced Jenna Butler with one of Butler’s

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own poems. Most of Butler’s poetry comes from stories of her own very eclectic background. Also here for her second time after the International Poetry Festival, Jenna read from her published book Seldom Seen Road. This book has poetry relating to familiar territory for the author’s homeland of northern Canada. With a focus on life there and many of her memories, she produced very powerful prose as she performed by both reading her poetry as well as telling a story. Butler also read a poem from her new book Testing the Boundaries. The question of “What is home?” was a common theme in her poetry and there were a lot of poems derived from stories that she knew from her own experiences or that had been told to her. The way that Butler writes both reviews and preserves the history of the stories that she has been told and the places that she has been. These two authors spoke with audience members after the convocation and even had books available for purchase. Both of them impressed the crowd with their stories as well as their poetry, and overall, the program brought new, enlightening perspectives on poetry to all those who listened.

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he Richmond Symphony Orchestra will strike Bridgewater College on Nov. 25. The event will take place in Cole Hall and will be considered a convocation for Bridgewater College students. It will begin at 7:30 p.m. and run until 9 p.m. The event is free and open to the public as well. It is suggested to come early as the event is expected to be crowded and popular. The Richmond Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1957 and debuted on Oct. 28, 1957 under the music director Edgar Schenkman. Schenkman was the music director until 1971 and other music directors have followed after him: Jacques Houtmann (1971- 1987), George Manahan (19871999), Mark Russell Smith (1999-2009) and Steven Smith (2010-present). The group is dedicated to their music by achieving excellence in both the traditional and contemporary symphonic repertoire. They have a series of

shows such as Altria Masterworks, Genworth Financial Symphony Pops, Metro Collection, and Lollipops. Altria Masterworks is to prep the minds of the audience in classical music and performed in the Carpenter Theatre. Genworth Financial Symphony Pops is the series at Carpenter Theatre where the orchestra play the holiday favorites that people love, traditional songs, and more. Metro Collection is a set of intimate, engaging chamber concerts at the Randolph-Macon College and allows for an up-close and personal experience with the musicians. Lollipops is not the candy, but is a concert for children at the Carpenter Theatre and allows for a perfect atmosphere for families. Their vision statement inspires all: “Leading with artistic excellence, the Richmond Symphony will inspire and unite our community through the power of live music.” The Richmond Symphony Orchestra’s mission

statement is “The Richmond Symphony performs, teaches and champions music, to enrich and entertain communities throughout Virginia.” (“Richmond symphony,” 2006-2013) The Orchestra has a swell reputation through education programs, statewide touring, and weekly radio broadcasts on the radio station of 88.9 WCVE-FM. Furthermore, they produce gala concerts, give seasonal performances, and perform in productions each year with the companies of the Richmond Ballet and the Virginia Opera. The Richmond Symphony Orchestra should be a great show to experience. Source(s): Richmond Symphony. (2006 2013). Retrieved from http:// www.richmondsymphony.com/ meetrso.asp

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Visit veritas.bridgewater.edu for the full online experience


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Sports

Solid ending

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2013

Moving forward

With a season of difficulties, the Eagles still found a success

Wrap-up of field hockey season

By Taylor Prillaman he field hockey team “I know we have imhad a stellar season proved over all. We gained this year, ending with more confidence as the seaa 12-7 overall record. In ad- son went on and established dition to their great record, ourselves as a contender four players from the team within the ODAC,” Meghan received All-ODAC honors. Stocks, assistant coach said. Caroline Augsburger was According to Caroline named to the first team, Augsburger, Stocks had Taylor Prillaman and Jenan impact on the winning nifer Tompkins both earned season. second team hon- Photo courtesy of Athletic Media Relations ors and Rachael Loy made the third team. “I wouldn’t have gotten any ODAC recognition with- The 2013 Bridgewater Eagles field hockey team. out any of [my] teammates. In order “Our new assistant coach to get goals, the team has to had a big effect on how far work the ball up. It’s basiwe went in ODACs this cally a team effort,” Rachael year, especially her help with Loy said. defense,” Augsburger said. Another player recognized This season, the team from the team was Colcompeted on the new turf leen Dickson, who received field and it potentially conODAC/Farm Bureau tributed to some of their Insurance Scholar-Athlete. success. Her 3.946 GPA stood out “The turf field is a lot among other athletes in the easier to execute skills on, conference, making her the and I feel like we were a lot recipient of this prestigious more prepared this year with award. playing on turf rather than The team as a whole grass,” Loy said. worked hard this season Although the team did not earning a fourth-seed finish win the ODAC championin the ODAC. With most of ship, they still accomplished the starting lineup returning some tremendous goals in from last year, the Eagles their 2013 season. were ready to go from the “Out of all the teams in first game. the ODAC we were the

NOV. 20 - 26

only team to keep Lynchburg scoreless for a half and have Lynchburg trail at halftime. With this, I think that we were able to change their perspective on us … we gave them a game both times, and that is something we’ve never done before. It is a step in the direction where we want the program to

go,”Augsburger said. With seven seniors and six starters graduating, which account for almost half the people on the field, the team will have to endure a lot of discipline, especially for the underclassmen who are going to be filling those starting positions for the upcoming year. The 2013 season was a solid one for the Bridgewater field hockey team. The team will work extra hard in the offseason to look to continue their streak of winning seasons for next year.

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By Caitlin Boles ll sports teams have Photo courtesy of Athletic Media Relations difficult situations that they are faced with. However, this year’s volleyball team faced a slightly tougher challenge when they had to forfeit three ODAC wins. But the Eagles still found their way back to the top. “We finished the season Lindsay Kallam and Megann seventh and then we went Grimes go up for a block. into the [ODAC] tournawas just like everything comment and ended up with ing together and we were all third. We fought, it wasn’t fighting for the same goal,” just give up and roll over,” junior Megann Grimes said. Grimes said. The Eagles faced LynchBridgewater volleyball did burg in the semifinals, but just that – they were able to ended up losing 3-2. fight the setbacks they faced “I think the Lynchburg and were better because of game could’ve gone betit. ter; we lost to them in the After the forfeited games, semifinals. I think we kind the Eagles came back to win of overlooked them a little six out of the nine ODAC bit and were more focused games left on their reguon the next match – which lar season schedule. This was the Washington and Lee included being the only match,” Kallam said. conference team to defeat The team was able to Washington and Lee this make an impact on the Allseason. W&L would go on ODAC teams though, with to be the 2013 ODAC volGrimes earning first team leyball champions. honors. Seniors Lindsay KalLindsay Kallam attributes lam, Mara Hogan, and Katie the team’s success to hard Long each earned second work and working together. team honors. “I think we played as a The Eagles will take a team more than we’ve ever short break before returning done in all my four years of to the court for their spring being here,” Kallam said. season which gives the Going into the ODAC team more time to focus on tournament, the team was position-specific work, while focused and ready to play. also working on conditionThey upset Randolph Maing. con 3-2 in the quarterfinals. “You can never have too This led the Eagles to their much conditioning. Betsecond straight trip to the tering yourself, I think, is ODAC semifinals. what’s crucial,” Grimes said. “Everything just conHard work is the team’s nected that normally somemotto, and they’ll start pretimes during other games we paring for next season now. would lack in… This game

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NOV. 20 - 26

Sports

2013

11

Ringing the bell A tradition at BC

Old picture of Memorial Hall after a snow fall.

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n a chilly night about 120 years ago, students around the small Bridgewater campus could hear the sound of the bell ringing on top of “Stanley Hall” telling them it was time to lay in bed after a long day. The old building’s belfry, which sits on top of what is now known as Memorial Hall, has overseen Bridgewater’s campus for almost 123 years. With such an age comes a rich history. The bell was once rung in celebration of the Armistice in World War I on Nov. 11, 1918. It rang again on Jan. 27, 1973 when several Bridgewater students began ringing the bell after the local fire siren stopped sounding when the news of the cease-fire in the Vietnam War reached the town. In the words of Dr. John

W. Wayland of the class of 1899 “it has always seemed to me that the old college bell now silent most of the time, has the sweetest tone of any small bell I have ever heard.” Even though the bell does not ring as often as it once did, that does not mean the bell’s resonating sound holds any less significance. Today, the bell rings to welcome new students into the Bridgewater family, to send off graduating students with best wishes, and to inform the community of a Bridgewater team win. This fall, Bridgewater teams including football, men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s soccer, field hockey, volleyball, swimming, and women’s basketball have a earned a total of 61 victories so far. Football runs to the bell

right after a victory where they meet as a team with family, friends, and fans to celebrate. While this did not happen too often this season, football players still got to wrap their tired hands around the bell’s handle and pull with the energy they had left. “Ringing the bell brings a feeling of great energy because our team, coaches, fans, and families gather together to celebrate our success. I would say that this short moment is a good snapshot of how our school is tied into the Bridgewater community and how important of a role our team plays for the school,” sophomore, center Sean Douglass said. Other teams also get the chance to display their victories by the loud ring created by the bell no matter what time it is when a team earns a victory and arrives back on campus. “It feels like a special occasion because our coach has to call the campus police to let us up there to ring it and sometimes we won’t even get back till real late like 12 a.m. or 1 in the morning,” freshman soccer player, Jenny Conner said. One night, the volleyball team rang the bell around 12:30 a.m. announcing their quarterfinal victory to the entire campus. “The most memorable bell ringing this year for sure was after the win against

Randolph Macon in quarsonally I didn’t want to stop terfinals. This was the best ringing the bell. I hoped the win we had all year not only day would last forever,” Matt because the odds were com- Denlinger said. pletely against us, but also Whether ringing the bell because it showed that hard for the first time or the last work and determination time, as a freshman, sophopays off,” freshman Meghan more, junior or senior, and Lookabough said. no matter how big or small Field Hockey contributed the win, the bell still makes to 12 of the total 61 wins the same sound and spreads ringing the bell over and the same message. Every over after each win. time that bell rings and “You race up the stairs someone’s ears hear it, there of Memorial, get in line, is a mark left in history. grab hold of the handle and pull. It takes more muscle that you think it will, just like winning a game does, it takes heart … You can’t hear the bell while ringing it but the feeling of pulling on a cord and knowing that the world can hear you and knows of your victory is amazing. Each pull and ring is a victory in and of itself,” Jessica Balsano expressed. This season was especially historical for the men’s cross country team and they got to add to the history by taking their turn in ringing the bell. “It was awesome. We accomplished something that had never been done before. Claiming our first conference title and then ringing the bell Students enjoying the outdoors while made the victory even learning outside of Memorial Hall. sweeter … for me per-

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Photo courtesy of Special Collections of Alexander Mack Library

Photo courtesy of Special Collections of Alexander Mack Library

By Emily Higgins


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Lines and contrast Paintings and description by Ellen Morris

As an experienced drawer, painting is something I rarely experiment with. These two pieces however, are a result of the independent study that I have been taking this fall semester. They both represent my interest in the contrast of horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines and shapes. I used the paint in Untitled 1 like the way I would use a pencil. The way I felt when creating this painting reminded me of the admiration I have when drawing. Following Untitled 1, I created Untitled 2 that incorporates my love of drawing with my new love of painting. As I am a senior art major, this is the direction I plan on pursuing for my senior art show in the spring.

Inspired

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2013


Veritas Issue 9, Fall 2013