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DON’T GET LEFT BEHIND

Finish OSHA 30 Training by December 31, 2008, Or You Might Miss Out

The stringent requirement was brought to the bargaining table by BCANJ, and heartily endorsed by the Laborers. “The safety, health and wellbeing of our members will always be our No. 1 concern,” said Raymond M. Pocino, LIUNA Vice President & Eastern Regional Manager. “We are one of only a few unions to mandate OSHA 30

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Right Place, Right Time First Aid training comes in handy at job site.

OSHA 30 Training Boosts Your Safety IQ OSHA 30 training will give Laborers a better overall understanding of job safety.

Sign Up Today OSHA 30 training will be offered at the Training Center in four-day sessions, eight hours a day, and will cover a lot of ground [see box on right]. OSHA 30 training will also be offered at Local union halls, if classroom space is available, or as night and weekend classes upon special request from a Local. “These classes are serious business,” said Donald Howard, Director of the New Jersey Building Laborers Training & Apprenticeship Fund, “and they represent a tremendous responsibility for both Laborers and the Training Center. “We have more than 6,000 Laborers who need to take OSHA 30 in the next two years; that’s 180,000 hours of training,” Howard said. “To put that in perspective, consider this: in 2006, we amassed 40,000 hours of training at

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the Center. For the next two years, just to meet OSHA 30, the Training Center needs to offer 90,000 additional hours of training per year – on top of the 40,000 we’re already offering. “The Training Center is preparing to meet this task head on,” Howard said. “I’m urging all journeymen to do the same by registering for OSHA 30 training as soon as possible.” To learn more about OSHA 30, or to register for the training, call the Training Center at 732-521-0200

Making Us Proud Six Laborers’ kids win $10,000 college scholarships.

“The more information you have, the better you’ll be at making decisions on the job that can impact you and your co-workers,” said Donald Howard, Director of the New Jersey Building Laborers Training & Apprenticeship Fund. “Those who successfully complete OSHA 30 training will walk away with a good, broad understanding of what has to happen for a job site to be safe.” OSHA 30 training will cover these topics, among others: s Introduction to OSHA and the Code of Federal Regulations s Electrical Hazards s Scaffold Safety & Fall Protection s Ladders s Confined Space s Excavation s Hazard Communication s Understanding Signage and Labels s Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

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Under the new contract, all Laborers, including shop stewards, journeymen and apprentices, must have OSHA 30-Hour Construction Industry Outreach Training Program (OSHA 30) certification by Dec. 31, 2008. Those who don’t could find themselves missing out on jobs because once the deadline passes, anyone holding an OSHA 30 card will get first preference for referrals by the Hiring Hall.

training. Some might say we’re being extreme, but we’re not,” said Pocino. “The construction industry is constantly changing, and we will always make it a point to stay ahead of emerging trends.”

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he new five-year contract between the New Jersey Building Laborers Union (NJBLU) and the Building Contractors Association of New Jersey (BCANJ) signals the dawn of a new day for Laborers, one that places the strongest emphasis possible on job site safety.

Quarterly Training Update Were you there?


CHAIRMAN’S COMMENTARY

IN THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME


Train ing Ce nter Teams With A meric Concr an ete In s titute Offer To A Sho t At To Certif p icatio n: Con Flatw crete ork Fi nishe r/ Techn ician

Think you know all there is to know about concrete work?

Increase Your Marketability

Here’s your chance to prove it.

“This should be considered an essential next step by anyone specializing in concrete work,” said Bob Paterson, the Training Center’s ACI-certified examiner. “Laborers who earn this certification will be considered the cream of the crop when it comes to concrete work, and will be in that much greater demand among contractors.”

The Training Center is teaming with the American Concrete Institute (ACI) to award highly skilled Laborers with a top-level, nationally recognized certification: Concrete Flatwork Finisher/Technician. You are eligible to participate in the five-day evaluation and performance review if you can document 1,500 to 4,500 hours of on-the-job experience in concrete (you’ll need payroll records to prove your hours, and letters from your employer(s) stating the job tasks performed), and are knowledgeable on these topics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Basic concrete technology Concrete materials and mix proportioning Concrete control tests Proper use of finishing tools Placing, consolidation, and finishing Edging, jointing, curing, and protection

That attitude alone represents quite a departure in the industry, Paterson said. “When I started pouring concrete, the work was considered unskilled labor, and the prevailing attitude was that anyone could do it. Nothing could be further from the truth,” Paterson said. “As anyone who works with concrete knows, the work is physically demanding, requiring you to be on top of your game at all times.” To learn more about earning certification as a Concrete Flatwork Finisher/Technician, or to register for the five-day evaluation and performance review, contact Bob Paterson at the Training Center.

What’s required?

1. S core 70 or higher on a two-hour, closed-book examination. 2. Show excellent technique and confidence with the tools during a hands-on demonstration. You’ll be asked to place, consolidate, finish, edge, joint, begin curing and provide initial protection for a concrete slab – all under the watchful eye of an ACI-certified examiner.

“Laborers who earn this certification will be considered the cream of the crop when it comes to concrete finishing, and will be in that much greater demand among contractors.”

TRAINING WORKS I Q3 2007

To earn certification through the Training Center, you need to do two things:

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claSS oF

2007

Each year, the New Jersey Building Laborers Training & Apprenticeship Fund reviews applications from dozens of talented high school seniors – all the children of Laborers – who plan to attend college. Narrowing the applicants down to six is always difficult, and this year proved no different. But here, at last, are the winners. Each of these students has been awarded a $10,000 scholarship – $2,500 each year – for use at the four-year college

ScholarShip Tiago M. Martins

ariel lee Shortino

naquell Karryn Stephenson

Parent Miguel Martins, Local 325

Parent Joseph Shortino, Local 592

Parent Nathanial Stevenson, Local 594

High School East Side High School Newark, NJ

High School Westwood High School Township of Washington, NJ

High School Bernards High School Bernardsville, NJ

Career Goal Personal trainer

Career Goal Teacher

Career Goal Neuromarketer

College Rutgers University New Brunswick, NJ

College Monmouth University West Long Branch, NJ

College Cornell University Ithaca, NY

Scholarship awarded in honor of Conrad Hall, late president of Hall Construction

Scholarship awarded in honor of the late Diane Viola, head of collections for the New Jersey Building Laborers Benefit Fund

Scholarship awarded in honor of the late Adolf Schulz, president of Seacoast Builders

This first-generation American (his parents hail from Portugal) plans to pursue a degree in exercise and nutrition science, so he can “help people meet their goals, whether it’s losing fat or building muscle. Not only to look good, but to feel good and live a long and healthy life.” While in high school, Tiago wrestled all four years, and played football for one. His hobbies include working out, cooking, reading (mostly business and self-improvement books), playing sports and surfing the Internet. TRAINING WORKS I Q3 2007

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His teachers describe him as an exceptional student with superior intellectual ability, energetic, inquisitive, humble and hard working.

Ariel has three passions: art, cheerleading and working with children. She picked up a paintbrush before she could write, joined cheerleading in 3rd grade, and coached young cheerleaders in grades 3-8 for the last four years. In the spring, Ariel traveled to Italy as part of the Young Artists in Europe, where she visited Rome, Florence, Venice and Milan, and created wonderful works of art. Ariel believes that becoming a teacher would be a perfect match for her, as it would allow her to combine her passions for art and children into a fulfilling and rewarding career. Her teachers describe her as cheerful, compassionate, enthusiastic, hard working – in short, “an outstanding representative of the best of today’s youth.”

Naquell has been fascinated with humans and their behavior ever since she was a child. Unlike her friends, a trip to the mall isn’t for shopping, but people watching. Naquell plans to study psychology and sociology – she’s eager to learn all she can about human interaction and the thought process – and hopes to someday help expand the field of neuromarketing. Throughout high school, Naquell took part in a number of community activities, as well as the school newspaper and varsity sports, earning three varsity letters in softball and two varsity letters in basketball. Her teachers describe her as intellectual, assertive, inquisitive, openminded and dedicated, and believe she will “conquer any obstacle and achieve great heights just because she wills it that way.”


of their choice. Every last one of these kids was on the Honor Roll, so we won’t mention that here. Instead, we’ll focus on their hopes and dreams, and the really cool things they did in their spare time. Congratulations on a job well done, graduates, our hats are off to you! You’ve made your parents, and their brothers and sisters in the union, proud!

WinnerS

Six laborers’ Kids Win $10,000 each For college

christina lynn Gianfrancesco

Victoria russo

Stacey holloway

Parent Michael Gianfrancesco, Local 594

Parent Anthony Russo, Local 415

Parent Jimmie Holloway, Local 222

High School Academy of Allied Health and Science Neptune, NJ

High School Toms River High School Toms River, NJ

High School Williamstown High School

Career Goal Surgeon

Career Goal FBI agent

College Tufts University Medford, MA

College Rutgers University Newark College of Arts and Sciences

Scholarship awarded in honor of the late Carmen Perry, business manager of Laborers Local 593

Scholarship awarded in honor of Ralph Wilson, retired business manager of Laborers Local 595

Christina can’t remember a time when she didn’t want to be a doctor. Her highly competitive high school prepares students for medical studies in college, and as a result, Christina has been able to go on hospital rotations, watch open-heart surgery, earn 22 college credits, and complete an eight-week mentorship in a surgical intensive care unit. And, she’s a member of the Freehold First Aid Squad.

Victoria has always been good at putting pieces together to figure anything out. Add to that her drive to be a leader, and it’s no wonder she hopes to someday join law enforcement – specifically the FBI.

Christina credits her father and grandfather, both active members of the NJ Building Laborers’ Union, with teaching her the “value of hard work and the satisfaction of performing a job to the best of one’s ability.”

Her teachers describe her as having an excellent work ethic and superior drive, and as an excellent role model for her peers, one who’s respected by students and teachers alike.

College Centenary College Hackettstown, NJ Scholarship awarded in honor of the late Larry Simpson of Simpson Construction Designing clothes has been Stacey’s dream since age 11, and since then, she’s never been without her sketchbook. She hopes to become a successful fashion designer who travels the world, and has retail stores of her own. She was so inspired by the show “Project Runway” that she found a way to meet one of the show’s featured designers. During high school, Stacey was active with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Christians Being Creative. Her teachers describe her as academically talented, outgoing, and with an insatiable thirst for knowledge.

TRAINING WORKS I Q3 2007

Her teachers describe her as highly motivated, kind and intelligent, with a work ethic that makes her “work until she gets it.”

Victoria played field hockey and lacrosse throughout high school, and as a senior served as co-captain of the varsity field hockey team.

Career Goal Fashion designer

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2,000-Plus Attend Sixth Annual Construction Industry Career Day One of Joe Zipfel’s favorite things about the annual Construction Industry Career Day (CICD) is the chance to watch the looks on people’s faces as they take it all in.

H

e takes pleasure in the pride his fellow Laborers exhibit when they attend CICD to show their children what they do for a living. He smiles when he notices the dawning comprehension – the ‘aha!’ moments – as teachers and guidance counselors begin to understand the vast career and earning potential the union construction industry offers. And, he enjoys connecting with the students who look as though they’ve just discovered a new world filled with possibilities they hadn’t considered before. “To us, construction means Laborers, but it also means all the trades, as well as accountants, architects, lawyers and engineers,” said Zipfel, coordinator of the New Jersey Construction Craft Laborers Apprenticeship Program. “The first day of the fair is when we invite high school students to attend, and it is truly a transformational day – selling the ideas and concepts of construction, and really changing people’s attitudes.”

for the NJ Laborers Union to showcase the diversity of its work. Interactive exhibits explained scaffold building, concrete stamping, pipe fusion, laser levels, environmental remediation and jackhammering, among other skills. “The teachers really enjoyed the laser level exhibit,” Zipfel said, “because it showed students how the math skills they’re learning in school can be applied to a real job.” This year’s CICD, the sixth annual, was held Friday, April 20, and Saturday, April 21, at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft, and attracted visitors from throughout the state. On Friday, about 1,500 ninth graders attended, and on Saturday, the crowd numbered about 750, mostly adults looking to change careers or join a union. All in all, the event was a huge success, Zipfel said.

DID YOU kNOW?

With all the trades – carpentry, electric, plumbing, pipefitting, engineering, masonry and ironwork – represented at CICD, it was an ideal time

The construction industry is the country’s second largest industry, after retail, and employs 8.9 million workers nationwide. (Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics.)

500-Plus Members Make Tra

Training Works recognizes the men and women who have sharpened their skills during the last quarter.

TRAINING WORKS I Q3 2007

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Local 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030

Student SEGUNDO ALVARADO BERY ANAYA RIGOBERTO ARANDA LUIS ARELLANO JAVIER ARENAS JUAN AREVALO SAMUEL AREVALO ARCADIO E. AVILA CARLOS AVILA ROSA J. AZCARATE EIDER BALCAZAR IVAN BANDA MARIO E. BANDA MIGUEL BANDA NESTOR BANDA ESIO A. CANTOS JORGE CARDONA DORIAN CARPIO JOSEPH COTTONE HULBIO CRUZ GABRIEL DELGADO CARLOS FAJARDO JOHN H. FERGUSON TYRONE FLORENCIA ELVIRA GARCES JESUS GARCES GLADYS GARCIA JOSE GARCIA PATRICIO GARCIA PEDRO GARCIA RAUL GARCIA ROSA B. GARCIA PAULO GILER LUIS F. GOMEZ MANUEL GOMEZ CHARLES GRUBERMAN JULIO GUEVARA GALO IDROVO RONNIE JONES DAVID LAWSON BEATRIZ LEFEBRE SALOMON JR LEGARDA OSCAR LICONA MARIA LLUGUAY WILLIAM LOPEZ MARIA C. LOZANO RAFAEL MASABANDA JUAN MAZLYMIAN YOLANDA MEJIA GUILLERMO MIESES WILSON MORALES MARCO F. MOYA GREGORY T. NICHOLS ROBERT OWENS DANIEL QUEEN JORGE RAMIREZ LUIS RAMIREZ JESUS M. RAMOS

1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1030 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 172 172 172 172 172 172 172 172 172 199 199 199 199 222 222 222 222

ANGELINA RODRIGUEZ HARRY RODRIGUEZ NAPOLEON RODRIGUEZ LUIS RUBIO CARLOS A. RUIZ GARY R. SALVA EDGAR SANDOVAL ALBERTO SANTANA DANIEL SENDRA MARIA SIERRA GILBER TOLEDO LUBINDA R. TUNQUE DIEGO URENA VICTOR VACA WILSON VALLADARES JOSE VILLARROEL WILLIAM D. WALKER RONALD WOMACK RICARDO ZAMBRANO JOSEPH AUGHEY LOUIS M. BRUNO JR. ANGELO D’’ARGENIO JR ALFREDO V. DASILVA MICHAEL DIVIVO ROBERT FOSTER JAMES R. GAVIN JAMES GRANT WILLIAM T. HALL JULIUS HAMILTON EDWARD LEMKUL JAIME M. MACHADO ANTHONY MADONNA FREDERICK MCKIE M MIELE VICTOR M. PALAGUACHI HAROLD PRICE MICHAEL I. RENTA ROBERTO REYES CHARLES WALDON,JR JAMES WYNNE CRAIG K. YARBOROUGH WILLIAM J. ANDERSON RAY A. COLON KENNETH M. FAISON-WASHINGTON MICHAEL J. FOCHT JEFFREY P. HENDERSON JOHN MOLEWICZ EVERETT E. MOORE DARRICK J. SMITH JEFFREY T. YEOMANS JR. SCOTT F. COOPER SU-LAYMAN T. ELLIOTT DONALD J. THOMPSON, JR. CLARENCE N. TRAVIS MIKE AULETTO ANTHONY W. BALKMAN MANUEL BETANCOURT RONALD P P. BIRDSONG

222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222

TYRONE BIRDSONG AARON BURCH ROBERT BURNHAM GEORGE H. CLARK ROBERT CONWAY GENE CURRIE JR JAMES DANCE TROY DIETRICH ONIE L. DUNSTON ANTWAN T. ENGRAM SHELIA R. FLUELLEN ANTHONY J. FOSTER TERRENCE D. FRAZIER VASHTI L. FREDERICK JAMES FREEMAN MICHAEL T. GIBSON TOMMY L. GILCHRIST EDWIN GONZALEZ JAMES F. GRUBB. JR. ALAN R. HALL PERCY NATE HARMON MICHAEL A. HARRIS JERON HAYES JEFFREY K. HILL HAL G. ISRAEL IAN O. ISRAEL BRUCE JACKSON MICHAEL H. JACKSON LAWRENCE JOHNSON JAMES D. JONES BERNADETTE LAND LINDA LANE WILLIAM H. LANGFORD DENISE LEWIS GLORIA LOMAN CRAIG MARSHALL JAY B. MASHAW MARCEL MAYNARD KEVIN MOORE SHAAHEEN MUHAMMAD BRIAN R. P. PIERCE BRUCE PIERCE BRUCE W. W. PIERCE LEROY PIERCE JOHNNIE PITTS ELWOOD POLLITT RONALD ROLLERSON SHAHEED H. SALEEM WILLIAM B. SEALS VINCENT D. SHAW YVETTE THORNTON LOUIS TUCCI LEVI TYSON JOHN C. VOLL STEVE J. WALSTON ALLEN WHITE ALVIN WILLIAMS KEITH WILLIAMS FORREST R. WOODARDS

222 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394

DERRICK WRIGHT AILTON ALCANTARA WILLIAM BOYLE THOMAS BRITTEN ROBERT BURT JOSEPH CALVO JOSE CORDOVA VICTOR DONGUILIO ANGELO I. FELIX RICHARD A. GALVEZ EDDIE GRANT ELLIOT HARRIS SAMUEL L. JONES ROGERS LEE MICHAEL MERGEL FRANK PUGLISI DUSTIN P. RAISCH JORGE RAMOS STANLEY REBISZ THOMAS ROMAIN CHRISTIAN L. SIMMONS GEORGE M. STAMOS THOMAS SYKES JOSEPH VERNOLA ANTHONY J. WALSH LAMONT WIGGINS SR JAMES M. WILLIAMS PETER ABITANTO ANTONIO ALVAREZ GIUSEPPE ANTONACCI GUADALUPE APONTE ARTURO BALDEON CARL BOWERS JIMMY BRANTLEY, JR FRANK BRAVO MARK BUECHLER ALLAN BURNETT LUIGI CAPUTO JOSEPH CASCARELLI ALFRED CASTAGNA SALVATORE CATERINI CHIA JOHN CLEMENS A COLLETTI CHARLES COLLETTI DOMENIC COLLETTI GIACOMO COLLETTI JIMMY COLLINS PAULO CUNHA VITO D’’ANNA M DASILVA JOHN DELGADO JOSEPH DEMARCO TERRANCE DEMPSEY THOMAS DEROSE JON DIAZ CHRIS ERRICO CALOGERO FARINA D FARMER

394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394

BARRY FENNELL HENRY M. FERNANDES ALLEN FISH HOWARD FISH RODERICK FISH EFRAIN FLOREZ VICTOR FLOREZ DON FORLEO DANIEL FREEMAN GIOACCHINO GATTO ED GONCALVES RAMONA GONZALES FRANCESCO GUARRACI JOSEPH GUARRACI GERLANDO GUARRAGGI JOSEPH GULINO W HARRIAT BERNISE HARRIS K HARRIS JOHN HEDDEN ARTHUR HENDERSON ABRAHAM HERNANDEZ ERNESTO V. HERNANDEZ JOSE HERNANDEZ JOSE L. HERNANDEZ JR. CARMEN INSALACO JAMES JACKSON RICHARD JACOBS ROBERT JAKUBOS JANI KOLOVANI L KORNMEYER ALEXANDER S. KRAWEC JACK LABRUTTO HOWARD LECKY DWAYNE LEE M LEE MAJOR LEE MARIO LEGUEN EDDIE LONG FORTUNATO LUCIA MICHAEL MACNAMARA ACCURSIO MARGIOTTA JOHN MARTIN CARLOS MATUTE GERARD MCEVOY JOE MIRABILE RICHARD MOLINA ESPEDITO MUNIZ VERNON K. MYERS GEORGE NICHOLAS RICHARD NIERATKA RONALD NIERATKA JOSEPH NUGENT CESAR NUNEZ MATTHEW ORLANDO ROCCO PALI C PATTI WILLIAM PRESLER JOSEPH RAGUSA

394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472

TODD K. RHODES MICHAEL RIZZO WILLIAM ROACH, JR B ROSONE W RUFFINI NICHOLAS L. SANTILLO DWAYNE SHARPE MODESTO SIERRA SALVATORE A. SIGNORELLI TYRONE SMITH NOEL SOLIS FORTUNATO SORTIZZA TIM THORN VINCENZO TORRETTA ANTHONY TRUNCALE S VAZQUEZ HECTOR VELASQUEZ ANTHONY VENEZIANO OSCAR VILLATORO PETER VITABILE BETH WHITE PERRY WILLIAMS DERRICK WOODYARD EDGAR WRIGHT JONATHAN WRIGHT MARK DICICCO RAYMOND KATES ROBERT KRYWY KENNETH LOWE LEROY L. LUDECKE ABDUL-KARIM SHARIF LOMAR STEVENS JOHNATHAN TIGGETT MATTHEW BERGIN MICHAEL G. BUNERO JAIME F. CARVALHO DONALD J. CHAFE ORLANDO D. COELHO SAMUEL CRUZ JR. MICHAEL DIAMANTINO KYLE K. DILIONE THEODORE D. ENOCH BRUNO C. GRACA MICHAEL H. HARRIS DANIEL L. HAYES DAVID M. HIBINSKI VICTORIA M. HIGGS PURNELL L. HOLLOWAY MICHAEL D. KING KEVIN W. KOLODZIEJSKI MICHAEL LAUBAUSKAS DANNY LOPEZ JR JOSEPH E. MANNINO ELISA MARTINEZ PABLO MARTINEZ CHARLES M. MC BRIDE MARK W. MEICKE MATTHEW F. MOORE, JR DAVID S. MURRAY


THE FINISHING TOUCH Joseph Galeani of Local 595 edges a concrete pad in a Concrete Specialist Class. NOW IN THE K ess 53 busin Local 11 d Osborne agents E anzella M and Joe General a s s re d d a ss. tion Cla c u Constr

STEADY NOW Anthony Roberts of Local 59 carefully sets a load of bl 2 ock on a scaffold in a Roug h Terrain Forklift Class.

EW DEMOLITION CR Participants in an ral Apprentice Gene t ge s as Cl Construction e nc rie pe ex on s hand in demolition.

aining Work for Them. Can It Work For You? ANTONIO J. NARCISO ELIA PEREZ JOSE P. PURIFCACAO JOAQUIM M. QUINTANEIRO RUFUS J. ROBERTS JOSE A. RODRIGUES MICHAEL J. SCARPA KELLEN C. SHINE MILQUIADES SOTO WALTER SOTO GARY W. THOMPSON LARRY E. VORDERER VINCENT WESTON KEVIN R. WOOD JACK WOOD JR PATRICK BECK DAVID A. BIRTH DENIS BOCAGE JAMES DEMPSEY RICHARD DOUGLAS WILLIAM FOUNTAIN DANIEL GIORDANO BUJAR GORICA RIGELS GORICA HUBERT HARRISON ANTHONY LEONE JOSEPH LEWICKI ALBERT LEWIS THOMAS LUTERZO ERJON MANI COREY MC COY RAFAEL MIRANDA EDWARD MONAHAN ARIANIT MUCKA GIUSEPPE OCCHIPINTI SALVATORE PARISI RICHARD POWELL SALUSTIANO ROMAN ALBERT SARAGUSA GASPER SARAGUSA HOWARD STEWART ARTAN M. VEDRA MUHARREM XHYDOLLARI VICTOR YANIN ROBERT YOUNGHANS PETER ZUCCARO OCTAVIANO ZUNIGA JOSE M. ALMEIDA VINCENT BENINATI NEIL BRENNAN KEVIN EGELAND CHARLES P. EVANS LAWRENCE D. FELDMAN KENNETH FRANCIS JOSEPH E. GILL EDWARD M. HARCARIK JR WAYNE HARRISON ARTHUR J. HILLIKER III

593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595

WARREN JAQUES MERLE L. LOCKHART ALBERT MAIORINO MARCIO MARTINS RICHARD MILAK FRANK MORAHAN SCOTT E. OSTERBERG JONAS A. PEREZ MOROVES JAMES REARDON BART REID CHARLES P. RINGENBACH HARRY SULLIVAN GIUSEPPE E. TETA TY WOLFE EUGENE BINI CAMILLO V. CAIOZZO MICHAEL DEVINE WALTER M. DUNMIERE JR FRANK ESPOSITO CHANTEL FENTER RON GALLART ANTONIO JIMENEZ JESUS JIMENEZ ERIC KLERK ROBERT KONZ KEVIN KOPKO BRIAN G. LAUL FREDERICK LUBCZYNSKI WILLIAM C. MAIER JR NICK MAKAJEW JOSEPH MARTIN ROBERT MASKO JR ROCKWELL MAXWELL JR EDWARD MOROZ MARK E. MUNZING JOHN M. NOVELLO DARIUSZ PUCHALSKI JEFFERSON M. QUINTAO JESSE RINKERMAN MIGDOEL RODRIGUEZ JR DANIEL SAWYER JR SCOTT SCHLOTTFELD ERNEST R. SEARIGHT CARMEN SORCE HENRY P. SOSNOWICZ EUGENE P. SULLIVAN BRIAN J. WARD JAMES H. WRIGHT III TODD D. BENNINGFIELD ERROLL BURNETT LISA CHILDS DARCY B. COLLAZO CURTIS DALTON CEDRIC L. DASH JOHN J. EISENHOWER MYRON E. ENYART SAMMY R. ESPINOZA JAMES M. FERGUSON

595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595

KEVIN FISHER GEORGE GARBARINE PIOTR GASIOR ERNEST GRAHAM DARRYL GREEN LARRY GREEN TIMOTHY GREEN THOMAS GRIGGS SALVATORE A. GUZZO BRIAN HARDWICK KIMBERLY A. HEMPHILL EDELINTON HENRY KEN F. HICKS DAVID HILL JR DANNY R. HUNT JOHN C. JENKINS, JR WILLIAM JOHNSON SHELTON JONES ROBERT KIRKLAND GUSS LANE FREDERICK W. LAUX GLENN LAVENDER HERMAN LAWRENCE ROLLIE LIVINGSTON RENE C. LOPEZ REGINALD D. LOVE RICHARD S. MAC DUFF OSCAR MAYHUE ALBERT MCKNIGHT DONALD MYER ELLIS J. NEAL, JR. SEAN P. O’’CONNOR MARCELO P. OLIVEIRA LARRY POLLOCK ROBERT RADO MILO RAINEY ERNEST REEVEY CARLOS REID ANGELA RICE CLIVE RICHARDS RODNEY RILLER MAHABIR SAMUEL KARL SCARBOROUGH PAUL SCHMUTZ DAVID SCOTT, JR KALEEM A. SHABAZZ TYRONE H. SHIELDS FIKREE SHU-AIB DAMIAN SILLETTI DON E. SMITH MICHAEL THOMAS MICHAEL WEINELT JOHN H. WHITTINGTON JOSEPH M. WOLVERTON

FAST FACTS

During the first three months of 2007, the Training Center offered 28 different training courses. Taking a close look at the numbers, we can tell you that: There were just under 15,000 training contact hours 521 members completed training 75 members completed OSHA 30 21 members completed an 80-hour Hazardous Waste Worker Class

81 members completed the yearly Hazardous Waste Worker Refresher 185 members refreshed CRP and First Aid training, or took it for the first time 21 members received Rough Terrain Forklift Three-Year Re-Certification

TRAINING WORKS I Q3 2007

472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593

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TO REGISTER, CALL THE BUILDING LABORERS’ TRAINING CENTER AT 800-657-NJBL OR VISIT WWW.NJLABORERS.ORG

JUL 07

AUG 07

9 – 13

6 – 10

10 –14

80 HR. APPRENTICE CONCRETE / MASON TENDING WEEK 1

80 HR. APPRENTICE GENERAL CONSTRUCTION WEEK 1

80 HR. APPRENTICE SCAFFOLD / SAFETY WEEK 1

16 – 20

11

11 – 14

80 HR. APPRENTICE CONCRETE / MASON TENDING WEEK 2

ASBESTOS SUPERVISOR REFRESHER *

30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

11

15

17 – 20

CPR / AED / FIRST AID *

30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) REFRESHER *

21

11

CPR / AED / FIRST AID *

LEAD WORKER HOUSING PUBLIC BUILDINGS (WHPB) REFRESHER *

EXPERIENCED ROUGH TERRAIN FORKLIFT OPERATOR *

21

13 – 17

HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) REFRESHER *

15

15 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PART I *

80 HR. APPRENTICE GENERAL CONSTRUCTION WEEK 2

21

SEP 07

(YOU MUST ATTEND ALL 3 CLASSES [PARTS I - III] ON CONSECUTIVE SATURDAYS TO GET CREDIT)

LEAD WORKER COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS & SUPER STRUCTURES (WCSS) REFRESHER *

14 – 17 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

17 – 21

24 – 27

15

30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

CPR / AED (NIGHT CLASS 5PM - 9PM) **

80 HR. APPRENTICE SCAFFOLD / SAFETY WEEK 2

31 – August 3

16

17 – 21

30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

FIRST AID (NIGHT CLASS 5PM - 9PM) **

* Saturday Class

27 – 31

ROUGH TERRAIN FORKLIFT / SKID STEER LOADER

** Night Class

CUTTING & BURNING

28 – 31 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY * Saturday Class

** Night Class

Te osha 30 sT Comple u m s D r a n!!! shop sTeW rTifiCaTio in Their Ce To mainTa

r

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ill also Be g CenTer W n inDusTrY The Trainin nsTruCTio o C 0 3 a h s go lasses ConDuCTin program C g in in a r T CT Your ouTreaCh ase ConTa le p . ls a C nD DaTes. onsiTe aT lo r DeTails a fo r e g a n a Business m

REMINDER: If you would like to take a class that is not scheduled here, please contact the Training Center and inquire about having it added. Check with your Local or visit our website for additions to the schedule.

TRAINING WORkS Co-Chairmen Raymond M. Pocino Jack Kocsis Trustees Jose Colon Robert Epifano Robert Garlepy Ralph Gianfrancesco Paul Natoli John Sartor Stanley Thompson John Viola

Director Don Howard 732-521-0200 Phone 732-521-3117 Fax njbltc@njlaborers.org Produced by Verge180 www.verge180.com

22 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PART II *

To register, call the Building Laborers’ Training Center at 800-657-NJBL or visit www.njlaborers. org. CONTRACTORS: Need specific training? Call to request a course at 800-657-NJBL. Schedule is subject to change. NEW JERSEY BUILDING LABORERS’ TRAINING CENTER 31 MOTT AVENUE, MONROE TOWNSHIP, NJ 08831

(YOU MUST ATTEND ALL 3 CLASSES [PARTS I - III] ON CONSECUTIVE SATURDAYS TO GET CREDIT)

24 – 28 BLUEPRINT READING

25 – 28 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

25 CPR / AED (NIGHT CLASS 5PM - 9PM) **

26 FIRST AID (NIGHT CLASS 5PM - 9PM) **

29 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PART III * (YOU MUST ATTEND ALL 3 CLASSES [PARTS I – III] ON CONSECUTIVE SATURDAYS TO GET CREDIT)

29 CPR / AED / FIRST AID * * Saturday Class

** Night Class

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID NEWARK, NJ PERMIT NO. 424


Training Works Q3 2007