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1,2 ,200 of your fellow ,2 labore bbore orers have completed the osha os 30 class. s ss.

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Have you adjusted your OSHA attitude lately? Page 2

The Name Game. Did you make Honor Roll?

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Tips for avoiding back injury.

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What’s Your Back IQ?

Read It Here First. 2008 Apprentice Training Schedule


CHAIRMAN’S COMMENTARY


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ADJUSTMENT class as available as possible. It is now up to the individual. Register sooner rather than later, because the closer we get to the deadline, the harder it will be to find an open class.”

Hate At First Sight We’ve been wondering why there’s such hesitation when it comes to registering for OSHA 30, so we started asking around. We talked with instructors, Laborers, contractors and our own executives, and in listening to their experiences, have come to the conclusion that OSHA, right from the beginning, got an unfairly bad rap. And, that bad rap has been hard to shake. We’re about to set the record straight. Formed in 1971 to protect the interests of employers and employees, OSHA was immediately distrusted – and detested – by many contractors. Think of it as hate at first site, an unfortunate attitude that has taken years to reverse. “There were contractors who wanted us to believe that OSHA was the enemy and would, without cause, shut job sites down,” said John Phelan, a Training Center instructor who carries the additional title of Authorized Outreach Trainer for OSHA. Reflecting on his early days as a non-Union employee, Phelan said, “We were brainwashed to believe that you never wanted to see OSHA on the job site, that you should never, ever, talk to a compliance officer, and that you should especially never tell them if anything is done wrong.” Attitudes like that, when they’re hammered into you time and time again, are hard to change. “Have you ever tried explaining to someone who’s been working 20 or 30 years that something’s

unsafe because it says so in a book? It’s next to impossible,” Phelan said. “There is, unfortunately, a culture of believing that the whole premise of the Code of Federal Regulations, on which OSHA 30 is built, is a bunch of garbage – stuff that can’t be used in the real world.” But times have changed, and for that Phelan is thankful. “The apprentices coming into the field now believe in training, see the value in it,” Phelan said. “And, more and more contractors, regardless of size, care about the safety of their workers. People are beginning to understand that OSHA is not the enemy. OSHA works hard to keep the workforce healthy and safe so workers can enjoy their retirement, and contractors can spend less on insurance. They’re there to keep us all safe, and to keep jobs running efficiently and profitably.” Today, OSHA is the construction industry’s proactive partner, tirelessly advocating safety and health standards that benefit employers and employees alike. And that’s a good thing.

Safety Is A Two-Way Street At the Training Center, Howard thinks back to the days when he was still in the field. It was the mid90s, and an OSHA inspector was at his job site interviewing him. Standing directly behind the OSHA compliance officer , and maintaining steely eye contact with Howard, was the job site supervisor. “I felt intimidated by my employer,” Howard recalls. “I felt compelled to skirt the truth and protect the company because I was the foreman.”

He also remembers how everyone working that particular job site never wore protective headgear, but the day of the OSHA visit, boxes brimming with new hard hats were delivered and distributed. “Hopefully, we can say those days are long gone,” said Howard. “Now, both sides of the team – the workers and the contractors – understand that safety is a two-way street, and that we need to work together to keep the job site as safe as possible.” It was a hard lesson, and one that took longer than some would like to sink in, but eventually contractors came to understand that it cost more to avoid training – and foot the bill for injuries, lost work time and higher insurance premiums – than to contribute to a training fund. “It all boils down to cost,” said Jack Kocsis Jr., Co-Chairman of the New Jersey Building Laborers Training & Apprentice Fund. “The labor cost is often 50 percent or greater for a commercial project – don’t forget, Union labor is high quality and well trained, so it costs a little more – and the insurance burden for that high a payroll is enormous.” When the contractor can document that workers are well trained, however, insurance costs go down, and when that happens, contractors can bid more competitively on jobs. “Sure, OSHA got a bad rap at the beginning because of the extra attention they gave the construction industry, but the extra attention was well deserved,” said Kocsis. “This is a dangerous industry.”

TRAINING WORKS I Q1 2008

( more OSHA 30 on pages 6 and 7 )

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BACK IN

SHAPe The spinal column is the only bony support for the body between the ribs and the hips. All other support comes from the muscles and ligaments of the abdomen and lower back, which makes it especially important to keep the muscles of your back and abdomen strong, supple and flexible. This area is part of what’s commonly called the “core” – everything from nipples to knees, some experts say – and there are plenty of books, videos, exercise classes and news stories dedicated to the topic core strengthening. (One recent piece is “Twist and Ouch,” which ran in the New York Times’ Play Magazine on Oct. 28, 2007.) You shoul d check them out. Beyond that, if you’re not exercising regularly but would like to, talk to your doctor about a reasonable plan. If you are exercising regularly, make sure your routine includes stretching, warming up (especially during cold weather, when muscles are less flexible), strengthening and stretching. Yes, that’s right, stretching is mentioned twice because it’s that important.

TO INCReASe STReNGTH AND FlexIBIlITY IN YOuR BACK: WHIle STANDING 1. Stretch your arm over your head, and slowly bend to the opposite side. Alternate sides. Repeat. 2. Tuck in your chin, and turn your head slowly from side to side. Repeat. 3. Raise both shoulders as high as comfortable toward your chin. Alternate sides. Repeat. 4. Bring your elbows to chest height. Press them gently backwards to a comfortable stretch.

BACK TO WORK PROCeeD WITH CAuTION STOP! 1 Lift with a straight back.

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HeRe ARe e FOuR GReAT WARmS uPS:

3 Hold what you’re lifting close to your body.

5 If you’re lifting items stacked on a pallet, is the pallet as close to the destination as possible?

2 Keep the curve in the small of your back straight as you lift.

4 Use your leg muscles. (They’re a lot bigger and stronger than back muscles.)

WHIle lYING ON YOuR BACK 1. Extend your arm over your head. Alternate sides. Repeat. 2. Pull your bent knee toward your chest, keeping lower back and other leg pressed against the floor. Alternate. Repeat. WHIle lYING ON YOuR STOmACH 1. Lean on your forearms and raise your upper body while keeping your head straight and your hips and abdomen pressed against the floor.

Think about what you will be lifting. Is it heavy, light, bulky? Ask yourself, “What lifting techniques will I use?” To minimize the chance of injury, be sure to:

6 Don’t rely on a back support belt to protect you. They give you a false sense of security and don’t really protect you.

Special thanks to Washington Corbo and Ernesto Diaz of Local 394 for demonstrating techniques

Walk in place with an exaggerated arm swing.

Back stretch: using your hands to support your lower back, slowly bend backwards, while standing, to a comfortable position.

Jumping jacks.

Standing knee bend: raise your bent knee to a comfortable position toward your chest, cupping your hands beneath your bent knee.


As Laborers, your day is filled with tasks that put you at risk for back injury: lifting, squatting, carrying heavy objects, shoveling, bending over, using a jackhammer and climbing scaffolds, to name a few. In fact, you might work without incident all day long, and at the end of the day, drop your safety glasses and strain your back while bending over to pick them up. It can happen as simply as that. OK, so that’s the bad news. The good news is that you can take steps to help prevent back injuries. That’s what this section is all about: tips for stretching and exercising your back and abs, employing safe practices at work, and being mindful at all times – even when you’re home – that there might be a safer way to do what you’re doing.

Accidents can happen to anyone, regardless of age or fitness level. To minimize the chances of accidental back in injury, remember to Stop, Look and Listen! Taking a few seconds to assess a situation before proceeding can save you weeks of back discomfort.

lOOK!

look around and ask yourself l some important questions:

Do I have to twist my body to lift? (Never twist your body while lifting.)

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Am I on uneven ground or in a cramped spot?

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If you feel awkward when you are lifting, don’t do it.

If you need help from a co-worker, ask for it. (And return the favor if you see a coworker in need.)

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If you’re like the average American, you spend about an hour each day commuting to work. So you’re either sitting still in a car or on a bus, or getting jostled about on a train or in the subway. Every one of these situations can be troublesome to the back. If you sleep to the last possible minute, you’re adding to the problem by not allowing yourself enough time to warm up the muscles before diving into your work.

BACK FACTS

listen isten to your body, to your co-workers and your brain about proper lifting techniques.

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A better approach, Labrador suggests, is to wake up a little earlier and take time to stretch your body awake. Go for a walk or a jog, or do some exercises to warm up the muscles and prepare them for the workday ahead.

Am I able to get where I am going without tripping?

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According to Ben Labrador, an instructor at the Training Center, “that’s where we get into trouble. Our body is not prepared for what we’re going to ask of it.”

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Rest occasionally to give your muscles a chance to recuperate.

Back injuries cost workers and employers 93 million lost work days every year, and about $9,000 per injury, not including lost wages. According to the Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America, pain in the back and joints is leading factor in forced retirement from the construction trades and for workers switching to occupations that are less physically demanding. You can take steps to prevent back pain and injury 24/7, not just while you’re at work. The American Chiropractic Association offers these helpful tips: • Maintain a healthy diet and weight.

WHeN SHOvelING, velING, vel velING Remem ememBeR THeSe PROPeR PROCeD DuReS: 1. Never twist your body 2. Keep your feet wide apart 3. Keep your front foot close to the shovel 4. Put your weight on the front foot 5. Shift your weight to the rear foot 6. Keep the load close to your body 7. Turn your feet in the direction of the throw

OH, mY Y ACHING BACK According to the American Chiropractic Association, one-half of all working Americans admit to having back pain symptoms each year. In fact, back pain is one of the most common reasons for missed work, and the second most common reason for visiting the doctor’s office. (Upper respiratory infections come in first.)

leARN mORe

Back safety and preventing injury are two topics covered extensively in many training session. To learn more, call the Training Center today.

• Warm up or stretch before exercis exercising or other physical activities, such as gardening or housecleaning. • Maintain proper posture. • Wear comfortable, low-heeled shoes. • Sleep on a mattress of medium firmness to minimize any curve in your spine. • Stop smoking. Smoking impairs blood flow, resulting in oxygen and nutrient deprivation to spinal tissues.


Terrance Gilliam-Stephens of Local 222 in Camden, and Joseph Rettig of Local 592 in Edgewater, put the finishing touches on a guardrail during an Apprentice Scaffold Building Class at the Training Center.

A Contractor’s Point of View U S T

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Robert Epifano, Chairman of Epic Management Inc., is a Trustee on both the New Jersey State Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund, and the New Jersey Building Laborers Training & Apprentice Fund.

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Epifano has held a seat at the collective bargaining table for 30 years. To say that the environment has changed in that time is putting it mildly.

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“Thirty years ago, Labor and management were almost always at odds. It was polarized, very combative and confrontational,” Epifano said. “Now, there’s more cooperation in understanding each other’s issues, problems and needs, and that helps to better serve the industry. It’s really been a coming together of the minds.”

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Case in point: 2007’s notable decision to require all Laborers to complete OSHA 30’s Construction Industry Outreach Training Program. Norberto Gallardo of Local 1030 in Passaic takes part in a confined space exercise during a Spanish-language Hazardous Waste Worker Training Program at the Training Center.

“That is a great achievement,” Epifano said. “If we don’t have a safe workplace, contractors’ insurance costs skyrocket. That affects our ability to compete, and ultimately affects the workplace for Laborers. If we don’t work, they don’t work.”

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Lloyd Harris of Local 415 in Pleasantville works the controls of a rough terrain forklift at the Training Center.

Epifano is curious to see how things will unfold. His guess? “More and more owners and contractors will insist that Laborers show their course completions cards for the OSHA 30 training, and in my opinion, they’ll have every right to insist on that.” In fact, Epifano plans to count himself among the contractors who require OSHA 30 training. “Millions of dollars are wasted each year on avoidable workplace accidents, and that’s just staggering,” Epifano said. “The safest guy in the world is the guy who knows how to act, and who thinks before he acts.” Smart Laborers, Epifano suggests, will read the writing on the wall and get themselves enrolled in OSHA 30 as soon as possible.

Training Center instructor John Phelan takes his show on the road to Edgewater Local 592, where OSHA 30 training was offered as part of a six-night class.

“There will come a time when the guy who refuses to move forward will be left behind,” Epifano said.

Q3 07

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Local Student 1030 WILMER AGUINAGA 1030 RIGOBERTO ARANDA 1030 ZENON ARANDA 1030 LUIS ARRATA 1030 CARMINE CRINCOLI 1030 ROBERT DEBOIS 1030 LORENA DIAZ 1030 JOHN FERGUSON 1030 TYRONE GADSDEN 1030 NORBERTO GALLARDO 1030 MOSTAFA KHATKHAT 1030 BENITO LABRADOR 1030 JORGE LOPEZ 1030 WILLIAM LOPEZ 1030 GREGORY NICHOLS 1030 TRANSITO QUINDE 1030 JORGE RAMIREZ 1030 CARLOS RECALDE 1030 CARLOS REYES 1030 WILFREDO RODRIGUEZ 1030 JOHN RUEDA 1030 DARWIN SAMANIEGO 1030 RODRIGO VILLAGOMEZ 1030 RONALD WOMACK 1153 MARCO COSTA 1153 GREGORY DAVIS 1153 JOHN DIMILIA 1153 DOMINICK DIPAOLA 1153 GEORGE FADDOUL 1153 EDWARDO GUTIERREZ 1153 JOHN JOHNSON 1153 JOSE LABAGNARA 1153 EDWARD LEMKUL 1153 FRANK LOUNGO 1153 CRAIG MURPHY 1153 WILLIS NERO 1153 JABBAR PENDER 1153 DANNIE PERRY

1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 1153 172 172 172 199 199 199 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222

Training Works recognizes the men and women who have sharpened their skills during the last quarter. JOSEPH PURNELL JEROME REED MICHAEL RENTA DEVAN SARGEANT AHMAD SHAREEF DESMOND SPEIGHT ANTHONY WRIGHT DARRIN ADAMS JOVEL AVILA JOSEPH ZIPFEL PEDRO COLON MANUEL SANTIAGO CHARLES WALLACE DEBORAH ADAMS RAYMOND ANDERSON JR. KENYETTA ARTIS DARRICK ASHBURN EMANUEL AYALA ROBERT BLACKSON JR. BUTLER MITCHELL BLEVINS SR. TROY BUNDY COREY CAMPBELL MICHAEL COCO DARWIN COLEMAN SR. TEVIS CONLEY BOBBY DAVIS KIM DIGGS WALTER DORITY JOHN EGRAS JOHN A. EXUM JR. ANTHONY FIELDS SHELIA FLUELLEN TERRENCE FRAZIER VASHTI FREDERICK JAMES FREEMAN TIMOTHY FUTCH JAMES GAMBLE TERRANCE GILLIAM-STEPHENS SR KENDALL GOLDEN

222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 222 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325

400-Plus Members Make

ELROSS HARRIS BERT HAYNES JR. KHARY HIGGS RONNIE HILL JOHN D. HOUSER LAWRENCE JOHNSON JAMES JONES DWAYNE KIDD AUGUSTUS LAWRENCE HUBERT LEMON QUINTONIUS LINEAH, BEY CRAIG MARSHALL SHAWN MARSHALL JOHNELL MC COY GILBERT MONTGOMERY RANDY PALMER WILLIE L PALMER JANICE PARRIS KENNETH PINNEY JAMES SAULTERS HAKEEM SHAW NATHANIEL SMALLS CLYDE SMITH JOSE SOTO JOSEPHINE THOMPSON EDWARD S. TUTEN ERIC WILCOX SR. KENNETH WILSON DERRICK WRIGHT JAMES YOUNG RAYMOND BOCCASSINI ROBERT BURT IVAN CORTES ANGEL DE JESUS JOSUE DIAZ CHARLES DOMBROWSKI WILLIAM ECKER EDWARD HALTNER CARLTON HILL

325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394

JOHN IVANCIC ROGERS LEE DONALD LYNCH AARON MANNING MICHAEL MINARICK LUIS PILLCOREMA JORGE RAMOS RICHARD STESNER ERIC THOMSSEN FRANK VALENTE ANTHONY VASQUEZ JR. KEITH WRIGHT FRANCESCO ACQUAVIVA ANTONIO ALVAREZ GIUSEPPE ANTONACCI DWAYNE ARRINGTON WAYNE AUSTIN CARL BOWERS DALE BROTHERS MARK BUECHLER JAMES CALAVANO JOHN CANTALUPO HELAMAN CARDENAS AHMED CARTER GREGORY CARTER JOSEPH CASCARELLI ALFRED CASTAGNA ANTHONY CASTAGNA E CAVERLY ANTONIO CERBONE ANTHONY COCUZZA ILIR COLLAKU A COLLETTI JOSEPH CRINCOLI LEO CROSS ARTURO CUADRADO PAULO CUNHA ROOSEVELT CURRY PASQUALE D’ANNA

394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394

VITO D’ANNA VICTOR DAFONSECA JOSEPH DASILVA M DASILVA SEAN DEAN JAMES DEGAETANO THOMAS DEROSE WILLIE ELEAZER ERIC EPPS ALLEN FISH EFRAIN FLOREZ JOHNSON FLOREZ DON FORLEO MARK FULLMAN WILLIAM FULLMAN JOHN GABRYSZEWSKI CHRISTOPHER GARGANO ANTHONY GAULT EDUARDO GONZALEZ EDWIN GONZALEZ L GONZALEZ TERRANCE GRAHAM JOSEPH GUARRACI SAL GUARRACI STEFANO GUERCIO JOSEPH GULINO K HARRIS JOHN HAYDUK JOHN HEDDEN ABRAHAM HERNANDEZ JOSE HERNANDEZ LAZARO HERNANDEZ NORWOOD HILL CARMEN INSALACO RICHARD JACOBS WINZEL JACOBS ROBERT JAKUBOS DENNIS JOHNSON JOSEPH KLEISSLER

394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394

JANI KOLOVANI ALEXANDER KRAWEC PEDRO LABANDEIRA JACK LABRUTTO JOHN LARESCA J LAROCCA JODY LARSON MAJOR LEE I LETTS PEDRO LOPEZ ROBINSON LOYOLA FORTUNATO LUCIA WILLIAM LUEDDEKE MICHAEL MACALUSO PAUL MACALUSO J MANNING CARMINE MARABELLA JOHN MARTIN CARLOS MATUTE DAVID MCGOVERN JAY MOON ESPEDITO MUNIZ RICHARD NIERATKA JOSEPH NUGENT CESAR NUNEZ MARK NURSE MATTHEW ORLANDO FRANK POLUKORD WILLIAM PRESLER GREGORY RHODES TODD RHODES MICHAEL RIZZO ERIC ROBINSON NICHOLAS SANTILLO DWAYNE SHARPE LINO SILVA G SMITH TYRONE SMITH NOEL SOLIS


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Folsom Training Center Call 609-567-1959 to register Jan 14 – Jan 25, 2008 Mar 3 – Mar 14, 2008 Mar 24 – Apr 4, 2008 May 12 – May 23, 2008 Jun 9 – Jun 20, 2008 Jul 7 – Jul 18, 2008 Jul 21 – Aug 1, 2008 Sep 8 – Sep 19, 2008 Sep 22 – Oct 3, 2008 Oct 6 – Oct 17, 2008 Oct 20 – Oct 31, 2008 Dec 1 – Dec 12, 2008

We asked Ramsey and Meyers to tell us about their experiences. Here’s what they had to5k say:

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Question: Were you reluctant A to take the class?

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Ramsey: No, I’m always excited when it’s time to go to school. I love to go to the Training Center. It’s enlightening. You always learn something new, something you should’ve known but didn’t.

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80 Hour Scaffold/Safety 80 Hour Pipe 80 Hour Concrete/Mason Tending 80 Hour Line & Grade/Asphalt 80 Hour Scaffold/Safety 80 Hour Pipe 80 Hour Concrete/Mason Tending 80 Hour Line & Grade/Asphalt 80 Hour Scaffold/Safety 80 Hour Pipe 80 Hour Concrete/Mason Tending 80 Hour Line & Grade/Asphalt

Jamesburg Training Center

Meyers: Not at all. I’m working toward getting certified as a Shop Steward, so I needed to take it. But I liked it so much I signed up for other sessions at the Training Center as soon as OSHA 30 was over.

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Call 732-521-0200 to register Jan 7 – Jan 18, 2008 Feb 25 – Mar 7, 2008 May 5 – May 16, 2008 Jul 7 – Jul 18, 2008 Sep 8 – Sep 19, 2008 Oct 27 – Nov 7, 2008

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Question: What did you learn from the class?

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Larry Ramse

Larry Ramsey, a member of Local 415 in Pleasantville, and Thomas Meyers Sr., a member of Local 592 in Edgewater, recently completed OSHA 30 Construction Industry Outreach Training. Ramsey trained every day for a week in Pleasantville, and Meyers took his training on three consecutive Saturdays at the Training Center.

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Apprentice Class Schedule 2008

Laborers Weigh In on OSHA 30

Ramsey: I learned a lot that I didn’t know before, especially about chemicals and exposure levels. It was very useful information. It’s not a hands-on class, but that’s fine. Anyone who works in the field already has that. We need the book theory, which is why this class was so good.

80 Hour Scaffold/Safety 80 Hour Concrete/Mason Tending 80 Hour Scaffold/Safety 80 Hour Concrete/Mason Tending 80 Hour Scaffold/Safely 80 Hour Concrete/Mason Tending

Aberdeen Training Center

Meyers: I learned that OSHA is really on our side. When you first start, you think they’re the bad guys ready to give us a fine, but once I took the class, I realized they’re really the good guys who don’t want us to get hurt.

Call 732-583-6235 to register Mar 10 – Mar 21, 2008 Apr 21 – May 2, 2008 Jun 9 – Jun 20, 2008 Jul 21 – Aug 1, 2008 Sep 29 – Oct 10, 2008 Dec 1 – Dec 12, 2008

Question: What do you like about your job? Ramsey: I’m a supervisor for Art Anderson, a building company. We build schools. It’s a good job, and when the project is done and you stand back and look, it makes you proud. I’m happy to be part of it. Question: Were you worried about taking the class?

80 Hour Line & Grade/Asphalt 80 Hour Pipe 80 Hour Line & Grade/Asphalt 80 Hour Pipe 80 Hour Line & Grade/Asphalt 80 Hour Pipe

You must register at the Local Training Center for all classes. Classes with less than five (5) participants will be cancelled. You must complete one 80 Hour Class for every 1000 hours you worked to be eligible for your next pay increase. Please notify the contractor where you are working that you will be attending classes on the dates specified.

Meyers: I kind of dreaded it. I work outside, so I’m not inside very often. To think about sitting in a classroom 10 hours was kind of intimidating for me because it’s been so long since I’ve been in school. I was afraid it would be a long and boring class, but it wasn’t. The time really flew by, and the material covered was very interesting. There were presentations, slides, videos, tests. I learned a lot, I really enjoyed it.

college scholarship reminder!

Also, the instructor was excellent. People should take advantage of all the classes they can. They’re paid for. We should take advantage and better ourselves.

The deadline for high school seniors to submit applications for the New Jersey Building Laborers Training and Apprenticeship Fund’s $10,000 college scholarship awards is Friday, March 21. For eligibility, rules and applications, please contact the Training Center.

Training Work for Them. Can It Work For You? FORTUNATO SORTIZZA PAUL STOUCH AL TRIANO ANTHONY TRUNCALE CARLOS VARGAS MARCELO VIDAL OSCAR VILLATORO ARMANDO VILLEGAS PETER VITABILE GEORGE WALKER BETH WHITE BASHKIM YONUSLLARI JACK ADAMS KEVIN BERTUZZI LAWRENCE BERTUZZI FRANCIS BEU ANTHONY BROOKS KIRK BROWN PAUL CARMAN ARTHUR CATLING THOMAS CORLISS ROBERT DRYAR FRANK DURNAN FRANK ESPOSITO KENNETH FAISON BRUCE GARRISON LAWRENCE GREEN LLOYD HARRIS REGINALD HARVEY DARRELL JAMES EVERETT JOHNSON PAUL KABALA OLIVER KIRSCHMANN DONALD LEE EDWARD LONGSTRETH DAVID MILLER GARY MING FRANCIS MOREHEAD

415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472 472

KENRICK MORRISSEY GEORGE MORTON YVETTE MOSES MUSTAFA MUHAMMAD KENNETH PARENT ALVIN PIERCE JR. THOMAS PITALE ROBERT PORTER LARRY RAMSEY TARHIK RICHARDSON JOHN ROBBINS MATTHEW ROBBINS NICK ROMANISHIN HENRY SCURRY ANTHONY SERRA JOHNNY SHIGGS BRYSON SHOPE SR. LUTHER STUKES GEORGE VANDEVENDER EDWARD WEATHERS CHARLES WOODY ALEXIS ANDERSON GEORGE ANDRIANOPOULOS DANIEL BAPTISTA PATRICK COUNTS ROY ERICKSON MICHAEL FERNANDEZ ALLAN FULGINITI THOMAS GILLIGO ANDREW HART EDSON LIMA SEAN MIREK KENNETH RIEDINGER JUAN RIVERA RICHARD SILVA CORY SKILLMAN JOSE SUERO FLAVIO TELLINI

472 472 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592

THIJS VAN BEEK RAYMOND YORCZAK GIOVANNI ANDRISANI ANTHONY BARBEE GIROLAMO BUSCIO JOHN CARLO ERJON COCKA ERMAL COCKA OLTJON COCKA PAUL COLIANNI FELICIANO CRISTOBAL JR. JOHN DEMEROUKIS RONALD DESANTO FONE DONE RICHARD DOUGLAS DAVID ELLIOTT NATHAN FINN CARLOS GOMEZ FRANK GROSSO JOHN GURNARI DEVON HARDING ANTONIO IACONO DARREN IAFELICE THOMAS LUTERZO DAMON MASTRANGELO ALVIN MCCONNEY JULIO MEDINA THOMAS MEYERS SR. JULIAN MUCKA LARRY MYRIE JOHN ORIANI VINCENT PAONESSA JOHN PHELAN ANTHONY RAMCHARAN JOHN REED CARLOS RESTREPO JOSEPH RETTIG ROBERT RICE

592 592 592 592 592 592 592 592 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 593 594 594 594 594 594

STEVE SCHULTZE DARRYL SMITH JAMES TARABOLA CARMINE VENEZIA NECHO WALLS ANTHONY WATSON PERRY WILSON PETER ZUCCARO JAMES BOHN MICHAEL CASENDINO NORBERT CHARRON ROBERT CONTE FRANK DELELLO JOSEPH GILL WALTER HUFF BRIAN KESOLITZ PAT LEONE MICHAEL LEVINE JOHN LISAY MERLE LOCKHART JAMES MASON ROBERT PETTY NICHOLAS SENA JR MICHAEL SERGE MICHAEL SOMMERS JOSEPH SORIANO CHRIS SRAMEK ROGER STAHL JAMES STEINARD BRIAN TOWNSEND POUL VATNE LINO VAZQUEZ FRANK YACOVONE PETER ALLAIN JORGE ARAUJO ANDREW BAUSCH MARK CANUSO JOHN CAREY

594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594 594

JESTON CARTER CHRISTOPHER CHRISTIE KEITH DADETTO NICHOLAS DECCICO DAVID FABIYAN SHANE GATHY EDWARD GAYDAS JOSEPH GOLASZEWSKI CHARLES HARTOBEY JR. EVAN HOHWEILER JERRY IORITO CHARLES KEENAN JOSEPH KOLAS GREGORY KONYA KYLE LUDWIG PETER MAC DONALD WILLIAM MAIER JR. GARY MAJOR JOSEPH MARTIN RICHARD MCCOLLEY KEITH NEMETH ERIC OLSEN MICHAEL PANETTA JOSEPH PANICK JR. JOSEPH PETTI JR. GORDON PIRIGYI RANDALL POLINY STEPHEN POSELL JOHN REILLY JOSEPH RENTER TIMOTHY RICCIO ALFREDO ROSARIO MICHAEL SALEH SURUJ SINGH KEVIN SMITH PAUL SMITH JOHN STACHOWSKI LEONARD TERRELL

594 594 594 594 594 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595 595

EDWARD VAN TASSEL BRIAN WARD GARY WRIGHT THEODORE WRIGHT CARL ZIMMERMANN NICKY BAVARO BRIAN BECAR ROLAND CHESTNUT JAMES CHRISTENSEN NATHANIEL CRUDUP LLOYD DARIEN NICK (P) DOOGAH SARRAN DOOGAH JOHN EISENHOWER STERLING FIELDS EDELINTON HENRY MICHAEL HIGHTOWER SHELTON JONES PEDRO LAGO FREDERICK LAUX GLENN LAVENDER WILLIAM LIVINGSTON RENE LOPEZ CHARLES MANNING LEROY MINCIE JR. JUNIOR REID PHILIP ROJAS DAMIAN SILLETTI M TURPIN CLARENCE WALKER SLY WALTON STEVE WATTS JOSEPH WOLVERTON

TRAINING WORKS I Q1 2008

394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 394 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415 415

7


TO REGISTER, CALL THE BUILDING LABORERS’ TRAINING CENTER AT 800-657-NJBL OR VISIT WWW.NJLABORERS.ORG

Co-Chairmen Raymond M. Pocino Jack Kocsis Trustees Jose Colon Robert Epifano Robert Gariepy Ralph Gianfrancesco Paul Natoli John Sartor Stanley Thompson Patrick Viola

Director Donald Howard 732-521-0200 Phone 732-521-3117 Fax njbltc@njlaborers.org www.njlaborers.org Newsletter Produced by Verge180 www.verge180.com

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** Night Class

5k

attention!

4k

OSHA

30

4k

5k

NEW JERSEY BUILDING LABORERS’ TRAINING CENTER 31 MOTT AVENUE, MONROE TOWNSHIP, NJ 08831

To register, call the Building Laborers’ Training Center at 800-657-NJBL or visit www.njlaborers.org. CONTRACTORS: Need specific training? Call to request a course at 800-657-NJBL. Schedule is subject to change. NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID NEWARK, NJ PERMIT NO. 424

LIUNA

OSHA

all members must participate in an osha 30 construction outreach training program by december 31, 2008.

** Night Class

RemINDeR: If you would like to take a class that is not scheduled here, please contact the Training Center and inquire about having it added. Check with your Local or visit our website for additions to the schedule.

TRAINING WORKS

U S T

2k

* Saturday Class

OR

1k

** Night Class

R N AT I O N

ON

ION

* Saturday Class

H

* Saturday Class

v SATuRDAYS 2/2, 2/9, 2/16 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III

THe TRAINING CeNTeR WIll Be CONDuCTING OSHA 30 HOuR CONSTRuCTION INDuSTRY OuTReACH TRAINING PROGRAm ClASSeS ONSITe AT lOCAlS. PleASe CONTACT YOuR BuSINeSS mANAGeR FOR DeTAIlS AND DATeS.

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v mONDAYS 1/28, 2/4, 2/11 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III

YOu muST ATTeND All THRee 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRuCTION SAFeTY ClASSeS PARTS I - III ON CONSeCuTIve mONDAYS OR SATuRDAYS TO GeT CReDIT (NO mIxING OR mATCHING OF ClASSeS).

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YOu muST ATTeND All THRee 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRuCTION SAFeTY ClASSeS PARTS I - III ON CONSeCuTIve mONDAYS OR SATuRDAYS TO GeT CReDIT (NO mIxING OR mATCHING OF ClASSeS). H

YOu muST ATTeND All THRee 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRuCTION SAFeTY ClASSeS PARTS I - III ON CONSeCuTIve mONDAYS OR SATuRDAYS TO GeT CReDIT (NO mIxING OR mATCHING OF ClASSeS).

RememBeR... SHOP STeWARDS muST HAve AN OSHA 30 & CuRReNT CPR/AeD/FIRST AID TO mAINTAIN THeIR CeRTIFICATION!!! GT

RememBeR... SHOP STeWARDS muST HAve AN OSHA 30 & CuRReNT CPR/AeD/FIRST AID TO mAINTAIN THeIR CeRTIFICATION!!!

v SATuRDAYS 3/1, 3/8, 3/15 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III v SATuRDAYS 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III

N

v mONDAYS 1/28, 2/4, 2/11 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III

1v ASBESTOS WORKER REFRESHER * 1 CPR / AED / FIRST AID * 3–7 80 HR. HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) WEEK 2 3–7 80 HR. APPRENTICE CONCRETE / MASON TENDING WEEK 2 8v EXPERIENCED ROUGH TERRAIN FORKLIFT OPERATOR * 10 LEADERSHIP CLASS / V.O.I.C.E. 11 – 14 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 12 CPR / AED (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** 13 FIRST AID (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** 15 HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) REFRESHER * 25 – 28 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 29 v LEAD WORKER HOUSING PUBLIC BUILDINGS (WHPB) REFRESHER *

UN

v SATuRDAYS 1/12, 1/19, 1/26 SPANISH 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III

mAR 08

E

v SATuRDAYS 1/12, 1/19, 1/26 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III

2v ASBESTOS SUPERVISOR REFRESHER * 2 ASBESTOS WORKER REFRESHER * 5–8 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 9 CPR / AED / FIRST AID * 9 LEAD WORKER COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS & SUPER STRUCTURES (WCSS) REFRESHER * 11 LEADERSHIP [ONLY THE LEADERSHIP COMPONENT] (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** (YOU MUST BE REGISTERED BY YOUR BUSINESS MANAGER FOR THIS CLASS) 11 – 15 ROUGH TERRAIN FORKLIFT / SKID STEER LOADER 12 – 15 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 19 – 22 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 19 ROUGH TERRAIN FORKLIFT OPERATOR RECERTIFICATION 19 CPR / AED (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** 20 EXPERIENCED ROUGH TERRAIN FORKLIFT OPERATORs 20 FIRST AID (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** 21 EXPERIENCED SCAFFOLD BUILDER 22 SCAFFOLD USER / FALL PROTECTION 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) REFRESHER * 23 ASBESTOS WORKER REFRESHER (SPANISH) * 25 – 29 80 HR. HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) WEEK 1 25 – 29 80 HR. APPRENTICE CONCRETE / MASON TENDING WEEK 1

L

v mONDAYS 1/7, 1/14, 1/21 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY PARTS I, II & III

FeB 08

3k

7 – 11 v 80 HR. HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) WEEK 1 7 – 11 80 HR. APPRENTICE SCAFFOLD / SAFETY WEEK 1 8 – 11 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 9 FIRE / HEAT WATCH (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** 12 v HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) REFRESHER * 14 – 18 80 HR. HAZARDOUS WASTE WORKER TRAINING PROGRAM (HWWTP) WEEK 2 14 – 18 80 HR. APPRENTICE SCAFFOLD / SAFETY WEEK 2 19 CPR / AED / FIRST AID * 21 LEADERSHIP CLASS / V.O.I.C.E. 22 – 25 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 23 CPR / AED (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** 24 FIRST AID (NIGHT CLASS 5PM-9PM) ** 26 ROUGH TERRAIN FORKLIFT OPERATOR RECERTIFICATION * 28 – 2/1 v LEAD WORKER COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS & SUPER STRUCTURES (WCSS) INITIAL 29 – 2/1 30 HR. OSHA CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

3k

JAN 08

30

Training Works Q1 2008  

TW_Q1_2008

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