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Issue #278 – February 21 to February 27

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defying the odds Old Man Luedecke pushes the envelope almost a movie star Brent Butt talks latest comedy tour 3 days to kill + 7 boxes Films reviewed­

Photo: courtesy of artist’s facebook


contents

this weeks feature:

old man luedecke

On defying the odds 16/ feature Photo: courtesy of Scott Munn

NEWs + Opinion

almost a movie star bring it back The art of the podcast. 8 / Editorial

Brent Butt talks latest tour. 4 / Local

building your tribe

comments

The art of the podcast. 6 / Local

Here’s your say about cops on cameras. 10 / comments

culture

Q + A with pack a.d. Do not engage. 12 / Q + A

take me downtown

delicious delivery

Lady Antebellum tour preview.

We visit Mi Hong Restaurant.

14 / Arts

18 / Food + Drink

marriage of opposites Kimball + King

Silent Sea, Tebey + Cher.

present first joint exhibit

Music 19 / music

15 / Arts

entertainment

listings Local music listings for February 21 through March 1. 20 / listings

3 days to kill + 7 boxes

on the bus Weekly original comic illustrations by Elaine M. Will. 30 / comics

The latest movie reviews. 22 / Film

Nightlife Photos

Games + Horoscopes

We visited Outlaws + Eastview Bowl.

Canadian criss-cross puzzle, horoscopes, and Sudoku. 31 / timeout

24 / Nightlife

vehicles The Kia Soul, Chevy Silverado + more

verbnews.com @verbsaskatoon facebook.com/verbsaskatoon Please recycle after reading & sharing

32 / vehicles

Editorial

Business & Operations

Publisher / Parity Publishing Editor in Chief / Ryan Allan Managing Editor / Jessica Patrucco staff Writers / Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson Contributing writer / Jeff Davis

Office Manager / Stephanie Lipsit account Manager / nathan holowaty sales Manager / Vogeson Paley Financial Manager / Cody Lang

ART & Production

Comments / feedback@verbnews.com / 306 881 8372

contact

Design Lead / andrew yanko graphic designer / bryce kirk Contributing Photographers / Patrick Carley, Adam Hawboldt + Jeff davis

advertise / advertise@verbnews.com / 306 979 2253

music

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design / layout@verbnews.com / 306 979 8474 General / info@verbnews.com / 306 979 2253

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Almost a movie star

Brent Butt talks about his stand-up tour, film noir, and No Clue by ADAM HAWBOLDT

A

man sits alone in his office behind a desk. He’s minding his own business. The minutes bleed into each other. Then, out of nowhere, there’s a knock at his door. “Come in,” says the man. The door creaks open and in walks a woman. A damsel in distress, in need of assistance. Anyone who has ever read a Raymond Chandler novel or seen any old-time detective movies knows that this is the way it begins. This is how the

time and time again. It’s one of my favourite movies.” Butt is also a big fan of Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot and Miss Marpole, of Sherlock Holmes and of movies like The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep. So when the opportunity arose to write a full-length screenplay, he decided to create something along those lines. Something classic, that started with a guy sitting at his desk and a woman coming in looking for help. That was the first scene he wrote. The second was the same guy talking to his buddy, and his buddy saying something along the lines of, “You didn’t think to tell her it was the wrong office?” “I thought that would be a good and interesting premise for one of

twisty, turny action starts — with a knock at the door and a beautiful woman asking for help. Brent Butt knows this. He knows it because he’s a big fan of film noir and who-done-it detective movies. “I remember I saw Double Indemnity when I was just a kid,” says Butt. “And for whatever reason it intrigued me. I’d seen old movies before that, but there was something about that film that really grabbed me. It’s still one of those movies that I’ll sit and watch,

these movies,” says Butt. “A story about a guy who is mistaken for a detective and decides he may be able to help this girl because, well, because he’s attracted to her. Not realizing that there’s more to it than meets the eye.” Speaking of more than meets the eye, Butt encountered a bit of that himself while writing the script for his movie, No Clue. For Butt, the dialogue, characters, jokes, and atmosphere of the script came easy. But when it came to structure, it was a different story. “Before you get to all that stuff, before you start the scripting part, you have to sit back and break the story down,” says Butt. “That’s where the actual labour comes in. That’s where the banging your head into the wall comes into play. With

any script, it has to make sense. But especially with a murder mystery like this, with all its twists and turns, it’s easy for it not to make sense. You have to plant clues, lay the pipe. You think you’re doing something right, then you realize it’s a mistake and you have to go back and cover up this piece of evidence or that piece of evidence or it won’t be a surprise.” And in a movie like No Clue, a dark murder mystery with a sense of humour, the element of surprise is key. So Butt stuck with it and eventually churned out an engaging, funny, twisty-turny script. The next step was finding people to help get it made.

Brent Butt was somewhere in Sudbury, Ontario when he calls.

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For the past couple of weeks, the creator and star of hit sitcoms like Corner Gas and Hiccups has been on the road doing stand-up comedy. His tour, the “Almost A Movie Star” tour, began in January in Ottawa. From there he went to Vancouver, Regina, Thunder Bay, Kingston, and Toronto. He’ll do twelve more shows (including one in Saskatoon on March 3rd) before ending things in Lethbridge, Alberta, in early March. “I haven’t done a month-long tour since pre-Corner Gas days,” he says. “This is very unusual for me. I think I only get home for, like, three days over the span of a month.” But outside of missing his wife and his dog, Butt loves it. He loves being on the road, loves visiting a new city every few days. Above all else, Butt loves getting up in front of a live audience and performing. “For a lot of comics, being on stage, it’s not just something we do,” says Butt. “It’s who we are. When I’m doing that, that’s when I’m most myself. It’s very attractive, very comfortable. It’s the one hour a day I know what I’m supposed to be doing. The other 23 hours are just a jumbled mess.” So night after night, he takes to the stage and tells jokes. Just a guy in front of an audience trying to be funny, as he puts it. Before each show he airs the trailer for his new movie. Once the performances are over, he goes to the lobby and signs postcard-sized versions of the No Clue movie poster.

“I always knew that when I finished this film, I was going to go out on the road,” says Butt. “So I thought, well, why not promote the movie while I’m at it? Doing this gives me the opportunity to talk about the movie and increase awareness. You know, you don’t have a $10 million advertising budget when you’re making a Canadian movie.” Not even if that movie includes some top-notch talent.

“It’s the old Lawrence Welk thing,” says Butt, talking about how Carl Bessai, and not him, ended up directing No Clue. “There’s the story about how Welk wanted to hire Myron Floren to be on his show and someone said, ‘Are you sure you want to do that? He’s a better accordion player than you.’ And Welk says, ‘If he wasn’t, why would I hire him?’” That’s precisely why Butt wanted Bessai to direct his movie. Sure, Butt spent time in the director’s chair on Corner Gas and Hiccups, but for his first full-length feature he wanted to hire someone better than him to make the movie. “I believe in hiring talented people and letting them do their job,” says Butt. “You get a guy like Carl who knows how to make a film, how to tell a visual story, and that’s what you want him to do. So I stayed out of the way, let him do his thing. I would only step in if there was

something that was kneecapping the comedy. That’s it.” Otherwise, Butt would let the people he hired do what they’re best at. People like Amy Smart (Road Trip, Crank), who plays the film’s heroine, and David Koechner (Anchorman), who plays Butt’s character’s friend. “I didn’t ask any of them to conform to my vision of the movie,” says Butt. “I wanted them to bring their vision to it. I wanted the team to build a movie using their unique, individual skill sets.” And according to Butt, his team pulled through — in a big way. “I remember there was a bit of a technical glitch and I didn’t see the dailies for two days when we started shooting,” says Butt. “I didn’t know what we were getting. I was kind of nervous. But when I saw it, I did everything but squeal with glee in my trailer. It was so good. It was raw, wasn’t even colour corrected yet, but it had the exact tone and feel we were looking for.” A dark, gritty tone. A tone set by dramatic lighting, harsh ratios, stylized shots. A tone that reminded Butt of the film noir movies he grew up watching. The ones he still loves watching to this day.

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Building your tribe Musician turned marketer, Farideh Caesar, talks about creating her podcast by ADAM HAWBOLDT

S

hen you’re making a podcast, the first thing that they tell you to do is figure out a theme and a format. Everything starts from there. Figure out what type of podcast you want to make, and run with it. For Farideh Caesar, this was the easy part. As a touring musician, part of the band known as Rosie and the Riveters, Caesar knew the importance of creating a connection with the audience. A connection that is intimate and lasting. A connection that makes the audience feel like they’re a part of the experience. “I noticed that creating that connection, building a tribe, was something people were talking about,” says Caesar. “Not just musicians and artists, but entrepreneurs too. People were wondering, how do I create social media engagement? How do you get people to come out to your yoga studio or to your show or to buy your book? And not just that, but how to keep them coming back for more. So I decided to create a podcast that would help people like that, people who I met along the way, build that lasting connection.” She called her podcast Tribe Finder — a new marketing series that focuses on the “finding your tribe” method. That’s the theme she chose. As for the format, Caesar decided to go with five episodes of eclectic interviews with local and international entrepreneurs. People who had created connections and communities with their clients, customers and fans. People like yoga instructor Ryan Leier, and beloved

children’s performer, Fred Penner, who had built loyal tribes and were willing to share how they did it. That was the first step. The next step was to make her idea a reality.

“At first I kind of dragged my feet a bit,” says Caesar. “When you’re looking at taking on a new project like this, you have to ask yourself if it’s going to be worth it. Do you really want to do this, commit to this?” When Caesar asked herself these questions, the answer was a resounding yes. So she set up shop in the old house that she calls home and moved on to the next step of creating her podcast — the preparation stage. In this step, they tell you one of the main things you have to figure out is your timing. How long do you want your podcast to be? For Caesar, she knew her podcast wouldn’t be too long, not one of those hour-long formats that are so popular these days. “For myself, one of the things that I did [was] I specifically chose the podcast to be 30 minutes,” says Caesar. “I’m not much of a talker. I’m very succinct. When it comes to things like writing songs, I call myself the two minute wonder. I like things short and sweet. So that’s the kind of podcast I wanted to make.” Once that was all sorted out, she moved on to the next step: recording. A born entertainer, Caesar was at home behind the microphone. She knew how to connect with her audience. But it wasn’t as easy as you may think. “The first podcast was just me, talking about my own experiences, building my own tribe, niching Continued on next page »

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Photo: Courtesy of maki fotos

myself, lessons I’ve learned … that kind of stuff,” says Caesar. “I needed a lot of water to talk for those first 30 minutes, but other than that it was great.” She pauses, thinks for a second, and then says, “The nerve-racking part was in the next podcast, asking the questions. I’ve the musician answering questions. So to interview someone at first I was super nervous. But the good thing is I started with people who were very kind and encouraging. So it ended up being fantastic.” After the recording portion came the editing. And again, with her background in music, this came easy to Caesar. “What I learned in my years as a musician is that it’s not always about sounding perfect,” says Caesar, “it’s the spirit of the thing. As long as that’s there, people can be moved. I used that same rule when editing my podcast. I live in an old home where the pipes like to bang because of the water, so I’d edit that stuff out. But everything else, all the real interactions, you leave that stuff in. You don’t want to edit too

much or it comes out synthetic. Just doesn’t feel right.” Podcasts recorded and edited, it was time for Caesar to bring her product to the people. This step, she soon learned, was a little bit trickier than the others.

After your podcast is recorded, and the editing and post-production portions are complete, the next few steps are all technical. Steps that involve exporting and uploading and indexing. Steps that Caesar didn’t know how to take — in the beginning. But after turning to the Internet for answers, she slowly figured it out. “The great thing about online media — Google, YouTube, things of that nature — is that a culture of helpfulness is emerging,” says Caesar. “There are people online who have quite a few videos on how to set up a podcast. And thank goodness they do! If they didn’t have a start here, go there, do this, then that … I wouldn’t have known what to do. Things like how to sub-

mit it to iTunes and stuff like that, I had no idea.” But Caesar stuck with it, figured it out and these days her Tribe Finder podcast — which debuted earlier this month — is charting on iTunes and appears in the new and noteworthy section. Her work didn’t end there, though. The last step in creating a successful podcast is all about marketing. It’s a step that, at times, Caesar feels is more challenging than any of the others. “You really have to put yourself out there,” she says. “You have to be seen and heard, and that can make you feel a bit insensitive at times. Like, am I taking up too much room on social media? Am I bothering people?” And even though this is a bit outside of Caesar’s comfort zone, she plugs on. Spreading the word about her podcast and building her tribe in the process. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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Bring it back

The Immigrant Investor Program worked for SK, and we want it reinstated

B

ack in 1986, the federal government of Canada founded the Immigrant Investor Program. In 2014 they axed it across the country, with one exception — Quebec. And we think the program should be brought back on a province-by-province basis — like, say, to Saskatchewan. First, a little background. For those who don’t know, the Immigration Investor Program was essentially a cash for citizenship kind of arrangement. It offered permanent Canadian residency in exchange for a three-year investment of at least $150,000. Over the years the numbers and fabric of the program changed to the point that, up until recently, the program offered permanent resident visas to investors with business experience, a net worth of at least $1.6 million and an investment of $800,000. Certainly not pocket change, any way you want to slice it.

See, from the jump, the program was controversial. Some claimed it was crooked and unfair, that it essentially allowed rich people to buy their way into Canada. Others said it was creating “Canadians of convenience” — people who seek citizenship, but live abroad. Most recently, people were saying the program was outdated and useless. A meaningless relic from a bygone era. And while in some provinces the program didn’t operate to its full potential, in others it has been rather successful. Take B.C., for instance. Since 2007, the program has lent somewhere in the neighbourhood of $400 million for the development of 21 infrastructure projects — everything from schools to hospitals. Here in Saskatchewan, the program attracted upwards of $160 million in investments. Investments that led to the creation of the HeadStart on a Home project, which has built more than 1,300 houses in the province. And that, you know, is

And we’re not alone. Premier Brad Wall has expressed frustration over the axing of the program, telling reporters “[the Immigrant Investor Program] works very well here. We’re being responsible with the dollars and with the principles of the program.” So let’s look at the Immigrant Investor Program on a province-by-province basis. After all, if Quebec is permitted to carry on with it, then we believe we should also have the option to do so. It worked well here, it contributed to our provincial economy, and we want to see that carry on. These editorials are left unsigned because they represent the opinions of Verb magazine, not those of the individual writers. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon feedback@verbnews.com

Here … the program attracted upwards of $160 million in investments. verb magazine

But in 2012, the federal government put a moratorium on the program. Rumours swirled that the moratorium would eventually give way to extinction. And two years later, just a few weeks ago in fact, those rumours came true and the Immigrant Investor Program was axed. Now, we do understand some of the reasoning behind the federal government’s move. See, when a foreign investor would offer up their $800,000 loan to a provincial government, the idea was that the funds would be invested productively (ideally, it was to create more jobs). However, rather than invest the money, some provinces would simply bank the cash.

basically a good thing considering the housing shortage and our growing economy. So from a strictly monetary standpoint, according to the Wall government, the IIP worked here in Saskatchewan. Which is all fine and dandy, but we understand that what worked for us didn’t work for everyone, and that is why the feds pulled the plug on the program. Well, mostly. See, the government permitted Quebec to keep the IIP, which we think is unfair. If the door to continuing with the IIP remains even slightly open, then we want to continue operating the program in Saskatchewan, too.

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On Topic: Last week we asked what you thought about putting cameras on police officers. Here's what you had to say: – If cops have cameras at all times, we should be able to do the same thing and film it too! With no hassle or violence needed! What ever happened “Peace for Peace”

– I think cameras on cops is a good idea but there should be more than just 30 seconds of stored material before they turn it on. It still seems like it could be manipulated by cops if they needed to. Maybe we should all get dash cams like in Russia ;)

– Having the police record all movements seems dangerous and a huge infringement on personal rights. What about my right to privacy as a citizen? If the cops are coming to my house for some reason I don’t want them taping the inside of it and then having that

– While I can see why you would be enamoured with outfitting our police force with recording devices, bear in mind that this permits those in control yet another opportunity to be watching you. We are getting closer and closer to a CCTV nation all the time. Soon we won’t be able to go anywhere without being recorded. Perhaps there are other alternatives to having police officers who are out in the community all the time and could be recording any time and you wouldn’t even know necesarily, wearing cameras. Just something to think about.

text yo thoughtsur to 881 ve r b 8372

information stored on a server for who knows how long. This smacks of big brother and I think it’s a dangerous idea to endorce.

– Anything that would work towards improving police interactions while protecting them and the public is okay by me. I think our police force here is actually really good for the most part, but this seems like a move the benefits us all. Let’s do it

– I think putting cameras on police officers is something our city officials have talked about for a while. Can’t see why they wouldn’t want to do something that would protect officers unless they wanted to cover something up (which I doubt). Money probably. Payoff sounds good though, so let’s bite the bullet (heh) and do it.

– It is astonishing how well the police experiment with cameras worked in that trial in California. Only positives. I can see why some cops might not want it but this seems like a logical move. Let’s do it!

– Yes, we should definitely have cameras on cops. Wasn’t a young man shot recently, and there was

video footage from people watching, but nothing that showed what the cops were doing before they killed him (or what he was doing to provoke it) Would have been nice to know what was going on.

liked some more useful tips from Tammy! In response to “Better safe than sorry,” Local, #277 (February 14, 2014)

– Good for Tammy! More people should do the basics to be ready in case things go bad for whatever reason.Our kids are counting on us.

– Heads up to Tammy the Prepper at a party a few weeks ago a guest who does a lot of fishing on Lake Deifenbaker told me that if the Gardnier Dam were to collapse a twenty story wave would take out every bridge in Toontown and one need acanoe all the way up 8th Street.

In response to “Better safe than sorry,” Lo-

In response to “Better safe than sorry,” Lo-

cal, #277 (February 14, 2014)

cal, #277 (February 14, 2014)

OFF TOPIC

– Sure wish I had not read the story about Tammy the Prepper... her comment on the mega volcano in Yellowstone has me worried.

– Great to see Zakk Wylde out and doing stuff still. He’s such a funny personable guy, can’t wait to see his show!!

In response to “Better safe than sorry,” Lo-

In response to “Bringing metal to the chil-

cal, #277 (February 14, 2014)

dren,” Q+A, #277 (February 14, 2014)

– There is LITERALLY something called a “supervolcano” and it is nearby and if it explodes it will wipe us out? Great. Guess I can spend the extra day off freaking out about dying in an ash cloud and molten lava.... :(

– Zakk Wylde is one of the best guitarists in the world! He’s pretty funny to apparently was laughing through the whole thing. Glad your still out doing you wylde! In response to “Bringing metal to the children,” Q+A, #277 (February 14, 2014)

In response to “Better safe than sorry,” Local, #277 (February 14, 2014)

sound off

– Being prepared for a natural disaster is something many people do in areas of the world that are subject to earthquakes, tornadoes, etc. Fresh water, an emergency plan, food that won’t go bad - all a good idea to have. Not everyone who prepares for this kind of stuff is crazy with a dugout under their house for the apocalypse or end of days. Nice to see a different side to the movement. Would have

– If you feel like nobody understands you and that you’re life is spiraling out of control, if you’re afraid of people finding out your sexuality and putting you down because of it, if you feel like you have nobody in this world and want to end it all, i say this to all of you, don’t give up, there’s always light in the tunnel, things will get better!

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– Kudos to the bus drivers for putting up with all the crap that they do such as fare evasion and drivers cutting them off. I see all of your efforts to keep those buses on schedule and I think bus drivers need to be commended on all of their efforts.

– Hope the individual who characterized mandatory vaccinations as the first step to the camps remember the twenty million who perished in 1919 flu epidemice

– I Called my new kitten kit kat because snack bar seemed like a dumb name for a cat

– If you think bus drivers are playing games, you must be playing along?

– To the one who texted about the shivering dog in a car at sobeys, leaving any animal in any car for that length of time in those conditions is grounds to call the spca Truth Is Power-Try It

– Spelling is power-try spelling correctly.

– There is an element of the ridiculous in living in SK in the winter.

– Electricity is power-try it

– Loving how quiet the library is with everyone gone.

– A WARM long weekend? What is this madness? Should I hope that spring is here for good?

– Common sense is power-try it

– Tender years Won’t you wash away my tears How I wish you were here please dont go Tender years...

– Some a-hole cut me off last night i had a green and he had a yellow that turned red but he ran it anyways. So dangerous! Just because you have a green light doesn’t make it ok to go check people

– The way we treat old people in this country is appalling. We pretend that they are disposable. It is sad and awful. Other cultures take their elderly family members in, here we just dump them in a nursing home or hospital or leave them to fend for themselves.

– Interest in something other than money is often mistaken as talent by those who do not have such.

– Why are so many landlords in the low rent bracket weasely slimy crooked and weird a lot of the time? Thats just so strange bizzare???

– If Canada loses to Finland in hockey i am going to laugh my ass off at all the upset morons who take it so seriously

– Verb missed connections make it happen I texted already you can’t stop me from saying it!

– If you think the Olympics aren’t mostly just a bunch of fixed sporting “events” you are wrong. Most winners are determined before they even get there (in most sports, with the exception of hockey etc) OPEN YOUR EYES PEOPLE

– Remembering to have a little patience when you get behind the wheel will go a long way, trust me.

– We get it everyone we all live in a really cold province. Winter happens here. Instead of complaining, why not get out and do something?

– Who even cares about the Olympics anyways?

Next week: What do you think about reinstating the Immigrant Investor Program? Text in your thoughts to Verb to get in on the conversation: We print your texts verbatim each week. Text in your thoughts and reactions to our stories and content, or anything else on your mind.

– The situation in the Ukraine is tremendously sad. My thoughts and prayers go out to all affected. We have an enormous Ukrainian community here, which must be devestated by what is happening in their home country. The loss is unspeakable.

– Police shooting into protestors in Ukraine. Unbelievable. Civil war is just around the corner

– ATCR was amazing! Great show loved to see those guys. Would go again anytime they are here.

– Friendliness is power-try it

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Do Not Engage

Photos: courtesy of Rebecca Blissett

The Pack A.D. lets the music speak for itself on a new collection of fractious garage rock anthems by Alex J MacPherson

M

aya Miller and Becky Black have spent the last eight years releasing music almost without pause. Between 2007 and 2011, their garage rock duo, the Pack A.D., recorded four albums of blistering garage rock — stripped-down songs that cast Miller’s instinctual drumming against Black’s industrial-strength guitar riffs. Last month, the group released Do Not Engage, the product of more than two years of writing and their first album since moving from Mint Records to the much larger Nettwerk. At its core,

band’s typical brand of fuzzedout rock and roll madness. But these are just details, and the Pack A.D. have succeeded in building an international fan-base by ignoring details and concentrating instead on crafting the most visceral experience possible. Produced by Jim Diamond, who also worked on 2010’s We Kill Computers and Unpersons, Do Not Engage is essentially another Pack A.D. record — another great collection of euphoric rock songs shot through with the raw energy of two musicians at the height of their powers.

Do Not Engage features the same skeletal yet almost incomprehensibly powerful rock arrangements that made the Pack A.D. the darlings of Canadian garage rock. But the new album also marks a slight change of direction from 2011’s Unpersons by incorporating more pop influences (exemplified by the driving “Airborne” and the washed-out “Loser”) and a few dark and oppressive ballads (“Needles” is one of the best songs the band has ever written, and proof that Black and Miller have a much deeper playbook than many critics suggest) into the

Alex J MacPherson: Do Not Engage came out more than two years after your last record, Unpersons, which is uncharacteristic for this band. What took so long? Maya Miller: Yeah, that was weird. As you say, we don’t really take breaks. Every single record we’ve pretty much done one after another. I think we released in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 — God, every year. So this was a change. I think it was a good one although it was weird to do it at the time. We did take our

time recording the album and then we decided to push the release date to have time to prepare for it. It was interesting essentially feeling that we had a year off in between, before the album release. AJM: Unusual because you had a finished record but couldn’t tour it or promote it? MM: It was very odd. I don’t know if we could do it this way again. But it’s something we tried. AJM: I understand you recorded Do Not Engage in two sessions, one in

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Detroit and the other in Vancouver. What was that like? MM: With this one, the reason why it got split up ultimately is we were not planning on recording an album per se in 2012. We had some time off and we’d be on the other side of North America, so we decided to go in and record some songs with our producer, Jim Diamond, in Detroit just for fun. We thought maybe we’d do an EP or have maybe just one song, just something to do — and we ended up recording four or five songs there. We didn’t really think about it being an album. Then we decided to record some more and then make it an album. It just came from coming up with stuff and then we decided to book [studio time] and then make it an album. AJM: Is it true that the Detroit tracks were cut in a creepy abandoned chicken processing plant?

with producers and the producer comes in and suddenly turns it into a completely different band, and no one’s happy. The great thing about how he does what he does is he doesn’t force anything that’s not us, that’s not already kind of there. He’s helping to push it along and accentuate it, but essentially he’s just working with what we have so it all kind of flows together. AJM: Which makes sense, considering how the band has evolved since the beginning. This record feels much more pop-influenced than any of the others, for example. MM: Yeah, I think you’re right. I think it’s a little poppy, it’s a little chorus-y, and we’re doing a lot of ooh-oohs — there’s definitely that element. But, you know, that’s all us, that’s not even Jim. I think that’s whatever we’re going through musically and whatever Becky’s going

…bringing that element of playing live to the recording is something we’re always trying to put at the forefront.

AJM: It’s pretty unusual for a band to make three records with the same producer, yet you and Becky have done exactly that with Jim Diamond. What about that partnership is appealing to you? MM: It’s great having him around, which makes it sound so casual, but really it is kind of that casual — he’s producing but first and foremost I think what’s making it work with the three of us together is that we’re friends that have ultimately the same opinions about things, which is really helpful. I’ve always heard nightmare stories of bands working

MM: For me, definitely, I was reading a lot of horror this time around, and primarily during the second half of recording I was reading Stephen King. I think it did make its way into the record — for instance, “Creepin’ Jenny.” And then a couple other places. Then also some movie things made their way in. 2001: A Space Odyssey — I won’t tell you how, but that made its way in. And another secret thing made its way in. That’s the funny thing, I guess: I suppose other musicians find themselves influenced by other musicians and that makes its way into an album, and for us it seems we’re influenced definitely by books that we read and movies that we see more so than music. AJM: It seems like immersion, whether it’s conscious or not, has a huge effect on the art that comes out.

maya miller

MM: Well it’s not so much abandoned; it’s occupied. But it was formerly a chicken processing plant, in the early 1900s I guess. We had many jokes about the ghosts of chickens past making their way into the music.

AJM: One thing that I’m interested in is how you and Becky incorporate literary and film references into your records. Unpersons felt dystopian, almost post-apocalyptic. What were you reading this time?

through riff-wise and stuff. There is definitely that element. And it’s enjoyable, it’s fun to play stuff that has that tinge to it, right? AJM: At the same time, this record feels just as aggressive and garage-y as Unpersons. How are you able to capture both sides of that coin? MM: For me, there’s a sense that the raw feeling can never really properly go away, and we definitely don’t try and get rid of it in the studio: we record our songs together at the same time. There’s no trying to be really slick about it because I think rock music, when it gets slick it turns into pop or a different form of rock, but not the one I’m necessarily interested in. I think bringing that element of playing live to the recording is something we’re always trying to put at the forefront.

MM: Oh yeah, completely. As far as musical influences, those are hard to qualify but I think we’re often influenced by not so much music that we like but musicians that we end up touring with, and their music. That can play a part. In the past we’ve done tours with No Means No, and I think that influenced some tracks on We Kill Computers without [us] even thinking about it. That’s the way those influences come in, whereas the literary and the film influences are just far more obvious to me, before the musical ones. They’re a big part of it and it feels appropriate because art should be interpretation and regurgitation of everything around you. The Pack A.D. March 2 @ Amigos $10 at the door, ticketedge.ca Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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Photos: courtesy of Joseph llanes

Take Me Downtown

Lady Antebellum head out on their biggest, most extravagant tour to date by Alex J MacPherson

L

ady Antebellum may sound like a conventional Nashville country act, but their stable of radio-friendly warhorses only hints at the depth of the band’s pop playbook. Currently on tour in support of their 2013 album Golden, Dave Haywood, Charles Kelley, and Hillary Scott have fleshed out their setlists with songs from both ends of the musical spectrum. At a recent show in Denver, Colorado, for example, the country trio covered Swedish electronic music visionary Avicii’s crossover hit “Wake Me Up” and tackled a pair of tunes made famous by the 2000 film O Brother, Where Art

Thou? — Dick Burnett’s “I Am A Man of Constant Sorrow” and Albert E. Brumley’s soaring “I’ll Fly Away.” Formed in 2006, Lady Antebellum lost little time. The band’s 2008 eponymous debut sent three singles rocketing up the American country music charts and laid a foundation for four more successful records, each defined by the intertwined lead vocals of Kelley and Scott (who is the daughter of country singer Linda Davis). The group has spent the last eight years perfecting their vocal technique, and the hard work paid off on Golden, which was released in the spring of 2013. From the funk-flavoured kiss-off “Downtown” to the summery pop anthem

“Compass,” Golden established the band as one of Nashville’s pre-eminent exports. After a brief hiatus during which Scott gave birth to a daughter, the band headed out on the road in support of Golden. The Take Me Downtown Tour, which comprises more than fifty dates, includes seven arena shows in Canada as well as an appearance at the Cavendish Beach Music Festival in Cavendish, Prince Edward Island. Although Lady Antebellum won’t head north of the 49th until March, reviews of early shows suggest Canadian fans can expect a variety of hits drawn from the group’s first four albums, a handful of songs from Golden, and a few unexpected covers.

More importantly, the band’s brief hiatus appears not to have affected their chops; early reviews suggest high-energy performances loaded with special effects, including trips into the crowd and GoPro cameras mounted on microphone stands and guitars, both designed to make a cavernous hall feel intimate — like a traditional country bar. But onstage antics projected on the thirty-foot screen that hovers above the stage should not detract from what people are there to see and hear — the songs. Lady Antebellum rank among the most popular acts to emerge from Nashville in recent years for a very good reason: their ability to craft lighthearted pop country songs that are at once recognizable (due

to Scott’s terrific vocal delivery) and universal, capturing themes people across North America can relate to. And by bridging the gaps between bluegrass, country, and straightforward radio pop, Lady Antebellum have ensured that their music — and their enthusiastic live performances — will be appreciated at every stop on the Take Me Downtown Tour. Lady Antebellum March 6 @ CUC $39.75+ @ Ticketmaster

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arts

Marriage of Opposites Jay Kimball and Karlie King present their first joint exhibition by Alex J MacPherson

J

ay Kimball and Karlie King operate the Flux Fine Art Studio in Mervin, Saskatchewan together. They are partners outside the studio as well. But the two artists have never exhibited their work together — until now. This year, the couple are presenting their first joint show — a collection of recent pieces that demonstrates how two artists living and making art in close proximity can produce startlingly different bodies of work. The show includes a number of works from Kimball’s collection Extravagant Illusion: Constructing a Praxis for Analogy, starkly beautiful ceramic works, and selections from King’s Allegorical Desktops series, which was constructed from

wooden desks salvaged from a condemned schoolhouse in Mervin. There are few obvious parallels between the works. Whereas Kimball’s ceramic vessels and dishes aspire to formal perfection, King’s carved and printed desktop stories revel in chaos. “We have rarely collaborated together,” Kimball says from the couple’s home in Mervin. “We kind of inform each others’ practices and we’ve worked on some art pieces together in collaboration, but we’ve never shown bodies of work together. [Void Gallery] thought it would be really interesting, showing our work together and seeing how it informs and feeds off each other.” Although these connections may not exist on a conceptual

Photos: courtesy of eric walsh

Jay Kimball, Blue Sky Over Reflection, porcelain clay platter.

level, King suggests that the thread tying the two bodies of work together is aesthetic. “It’s going to sound really simple,” she says, “but visually they go together, aesthetically they go together. Jay uses a lot of earth tone colours, these soft wood colours in his clay, that are the colours of the desktops.” Aesthetic similarities aside, the two bodies of work are radically different. Kimball’s ceramics demonstrate the enduring power of simple shapes and structural elements, as well as the contradiction between imperfect natural materials and the quest for architectural perfection. Saskatchewan has a strong ceramic tradition, and Kimball’s works — like those of many artists working the field — probe the grey area between fine art and fine craft. “Clay has historically been associated with craft and been a craft medium,” he says of the problem facing many artists working with media that cross the boundary between art and craft. “As soon as you start working in that medium, people are always going to make that association because of the weight of history behind. There’s thirty thousand years of it, right? But to put yourself in a contemporary context, which is what I’m trying to do, there’s this movement of, well, what is it? It still might read as a functional piece, but it might not be functional.” In other words, Kimball’s work challenges viewers to reorganize perceptions of form and function, beauty and usefulness. King’s Allegorical Desktops, on the other hand, challenges established art practices in an entirely different way. After salvaging almost seventy desks from a disused school, King was struck by the corrugated writing surfaces — smooth wood transformed by years of idle carving, presumably made using the tip of a ballpoint pen. She began to notice connections

between layers of markings, each created by a different student in a different year, and started adding her own marks using a print transfer process. One desk featured some mathematical equations and the name “Zenon,” which King discovered was also the name of a famous Greek mathematician; she added more problems and equations, creating in the process a work that explores artistic process, the use of found materials, and the concept of building on the work of others, whether or not the other “artists” are even aware of it. “I saw all these layers,” King says of the various desktops. “For example, one desktop had someone’s name that I knew in it. Basically him and his girlfriend at the time — this is, like, twenty-five years ago — had their entire relationship on this one desk. I thought these desktops are like layers of meaning, some quite literal and others not quite so literal. I decided to use them basically as canvases, and the impetus of the piece would be a carving in the desktop.” After a pause she says, “There’s such a rawness to it, and a pureness.”

It might seem incongruous to pair King’s explorations of messy, fractured narratives with Kimball’s commitment to formal perfection, but the show is not disjointed or fractured. Kimball and King approach their art-making from different perspectives, but both ask viewers to reconsider what they know — and what they think they know — about art and how art works. Perhaps more importantly, the exhibition asks people to connect with art objects. “Even though our subject matter and our purpose and our audience are all probably going to be different,” Kimball says, “the connections are going to be inherent, because we’re constantly feeding off each others’ ideas and we live together — those things are just going to happen.” Jay Kimball + Karlie King March 6-30 @ Void Gallery

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Feature

defying the odds

Photo: courtesy of Scott Munn

How Old Man Luedecke became one of Canada’s most versatile singer-songwriters by Alex J MacPherson

T

he story of a young man travelling the world and playing folk songs on a five-string banjo sounds more like a legend from the age of the protest singers than the career of one of Canada’s most talented songwriters. But Chris Luedecke has always defied the odds, and he has spent the last ten years establishing himself as a singer-songwriter of depth, integrity, and emotional intensity. Luedecke, who has been styling himself “Old Man” since the beginning of his career, has released six albums of tender songs about love and loss and redemption, most of them driven by the propulsive sound of his banjo. He won the Juno Award for roots and traditional album of the year in 2009 for the record Proof Of Love, and again in 2011 for My Hands Are On Fire And Other Love Songs; his most recent full-length record, 2012’s Tender Is The Night, was nominated for the same award. Since the release of Tender Is The Night, however,

Luedecke has been exploring other musical avenues. His latest release, a short EP titled I Never Sang Before I Met You, marks a shift away from the Nashville trio sound that shaped Tender Is The Night and toward the laid-back rock sound perfected by the songwriter J.J. Cale. Recorded with fellow Nova Scotian Joel Plaskett, I Never Sang Before I Met You

ers and producers to emerge from the Canadian east coast in a generation. “I love his music, you know? And I like the way his records sound. And I think that was mutual, I think that he was quite keen to work with me, too.” Luedecke and Plaskett recorded I Never Sang Before I Met You at Plaskett’s Halifax, Nova Scotia studio, New Scotland Yard. The four-song EP

I’ve tended to write songs for people who I think aren’t as certain of their success. Not the obvious winners. chris luedecke

is definitive proof that Luedecke — and his banjo — need not be confined to the world of folk music. “I guess I’d kind of wanted to work with Joel for awhile,” Luedecke says of Plaskett, one of the finest songwrit-

is bookended by two versions of “Baby, We’d Be Rich,” a cheerful and upbeat ode to the impecunious lifestyle led by most musicians. “If reading books was money / If spinning records was investing / If drinking was consultContinued on next page »

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ing / We’d be f**king rich,” Luedecke sings as a sparkling acoustic guitar winds itself around what he describes as “Joel’s wondrous drum machine.” The song captures the relaxed rock vibe perfected by Cale, one of the most relaxed guitar players ever to release a record and the man responsible for writing immensely popular songs like “Cocaine” and “After Midnight.” “That rock and roll aspect of it is something quite different for me, and I always wanted to get it right in the recording studio,” Luedecke says of the song, which he wrote on a guitar rather than a banjo. “Joel was the guy for that because he loves that stuff, too. And his drum machine is pretty groovy.” But while “Baby, We’d Be Rich” is an apt demonstration of Luedecke’s ability to translate his profound — and often profoundly simple — songs into a rock and roll context, it also shows how his music can transcend genre and style. Although the tracks that make up Tender Is The Night are different than those on the new EP or his older records, they are linked by the thread of relentless optimism. Tender Is The Night opens with “Kingdom Come,” a bluegrass-tinged song about loneliness and isolation (“I’ll belong when the kingdom come, when the kingdom come,” he sings in the chorus) that is nevertheless infused with an irrepressible optimism. Similarly, the allegorical “Jonah and the Whale” unfolds into a sunny ode to resilience in the face of disaster, and the hope that salvation lies just beyond the horizon. “It seems to me that the sad subject matter, in the end, becomes an opportunity for optimism,” Luedecke says, reflecting on the course of his career

Photo: courtesy of Scott Munn

as a songwriter. “Most songs are kind of fundamentally sad, I think. There’s lots of pop songs that aren’t like that, but I think the songs I write tend to be sad but the result is happy, I think, and happier than lots of other people’s

songs. People always say, your songs are so optimistic. I’m like, well that’s great. I’m often quite sad about them when I write them.” After a pause, he recalls an interview with the legendary banjo player and protest singer Pete Seeger, who died in January and whose immense body of work was an important influence for Luedecke. “They were talking about how he got involved with environmental concerns, and what he said was that his usual sort of work was singing to help the meek inherit the earth,” he says. “It seems like the thing that would distinguish songs that I am trying to write from regular sort of Top 40 stuff is that it’s a bit [more] real — it resonates more deeply with me than songs that come out and say everything is great. I think actually talking about how things are hard is what makes you realize things are great.” That hopefulness surfaces in every song on Luedecke’s new EP, although it is most visible on the staggeringly beautiful “Sorry If I Let You Down,” from which the title of the record is drawn. Framed as a heartfelt apology to an unnamed lover, the song can be interpreted as a catalogue of mistakes and a record of despair. But it is also shot through with the knowledge that things will get better. The song opens with a sparse, almost skeletal banjo lick reminiscent of Luedecke’s early records before unfolding into a celebration of textural folk-rock sounds captured in the interplay between the banjo and a series of rich, twelve-string guitar chords. Luedecke thinks the song represents a bridge between his early albums and the new sounds he has been exploring with Plaskett. “The whole song is built in the way most of my other songs have been recorded, almost completely around my performance,” he says. “All the music fits around that performance, which is right at the centre of it. I don’t know if it’s a typical song that I write, but I think with Joel’s direction on it, it’s pretty cool — a nice marriage of the two styles, the sort of stripped-down banjo approach, that directness which I really love, and then the sort of picture that was created with the [other approach].” And Luedecke has spent the last two weeks broadening his

horizon even further, this time on the stage. In the past, he toured by himself, with nothing but his banjo for company. This winter, he and the sublimely talented Australian singer-songwriter Jordie Lane are striking out with a three-piece band similar to the one that appears on Tender Is The Night. Luedecke’s relatively sparse solo performances are powerful and emotionally wrought, yet the presence of a band opens a new avenue through which he can connect with audiences. (Late last year, Luedecke and Lane toured Australia, where they became fast friends and reworked “A&W Song,” Luedecke’s hilariously accurate jeremiad about the perils of looking for greasy food after a boozy night out, into a touching international duet.) “I’m not sure how it came about, but it really works,” he says of his partnership with Lane, who is touring in support of a live album recorded in Adelaide, Australia last April. “We get along so well and I love his music and I love hearing him sing every night. It’s been one of those things that’s been a happy confluence. We had a blast in Australia and these five days in Canada have almost killed me.” After a pause he laughs and says, “and I’m still twenty days before I see the prairies.” After the tour concludes in March, Luedecke will almost certainly start thinking about making another record. Like most EPs, I Never Sang Before I Met You feels like the prelude to something more substantial — a collection

of songs that continues to expand on Luedecke’s folk-revivalist roots. But he isn’t entirely sure what his next batch of sessions will produce. “I’m sitting on a bunch of songs but whether they’re the right songs for that kind of approach or not, I’m not sure,” he says, referring to the collaboration with Plaskett. “I think I was so inspired by my time in Nashville that I have a bunch of songs that are quite well suited to an approach like Tender Is The Night. If there’s a happy middle ground between the two that would be great. I’d love to work with Joel again, and it seems like that’s a fruitful path.” But whatever direction Luedecke chooses, it is unlikely that he will give up the things that have endeared him to so many people — his earnest portraits of life and love, his breezy resilience, and his ability to craft songs that matter. “Maybe [I’m] doing it for people who aren’t served by complete confidence in what they’re doing,” he says, adding that he has struggled from self-doubt in the past. “I’ve tended to write songs for people who I think aren’t as certain of their success. Not the obvious winners.” Old Man Luedecke March 4 @ The Bassment $17/23 @ The Bassment; saskatoonjazzsociety.com Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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food + drink

Delicious delivery Photos courtesy of Adam Hawboldt

Mi Hong Restaurant has some of the best wonton soup and vermicelli bowls in the city by adam hawboldt

Y

ou ever have one of those days? You get home from work or school, exhausted and starving. But the idea of cooking food is about as appealing as a slap in the face. And to go out, well, that’s just not happening.

Not feeling like hitting up one of my usuals, I hopped on Urbanspoon, navigated to the delivery section and picked the highest rated restaurant — Mi Hong’s. Mi Hong’s is one of those Vietnamese, Thai, Chinese restaurant hybrids that you find everywhere in this city. Having never eaten there before, I decided to read the comments on Urbanspoon and see what was good. The two most talked about (and praised) dishes on the comment board were #33 (The Mi Hong Special) and #4 (wonton soup.) So I picked up the phone and that’s what I ordered. A half hour later they were at my door and it was time to dig in. The first thing I tackled was the Mi Hong Special. A rice vermicelli bowl topped with grilled BBQ pork, shrimp, lemon grass chicken, crispy spring rolls and BBQ beef, this is a dish you’ll find in most of these Asian

So what do you do? If you’re anything like me, you order in. Naturally. This happened to me not so long ago. After a long day at the office I went home and decided to order some food. But from where?

let’s go drinkin’ Verb’s mixology guide black stripe

Ingredients

Winter is slowly coming to an end, but the nice weather is still a long way off. To keep warm in the waning months of this winter why not give this classic cocktail a shot. It’s good for what ails ya!

2 oz dark rum 1 tsp honey hot water lemon twist cinnamon stick for garnish

Directions

Pour dark rum and honey into an Irish coffee glass (or a regular coffee glass if that’s all you have.) Drop in the lemon twist. Fill the glass with hot (read: boiling) water, garnish with cinnamon stick, then serve.

hybrid restaurants. Over the years I’ve had good ones, bad ones, and passable ones. But let me tell you, I’ve never had one like this before. The chicken was moist and full of sweet lemon grass flavour. The beef and pork actually tasted barbecued, and the shrimp was plump and juicy. After my first four bites — each bite featuring a different meat — I knew one thing was certain: the Mi Hong Restaurant has one of, if not the, best vermicelli bowls in the city. Same goes for the wonton soup. Chock-full of green onions, peppers, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, bok choy and dumplings, this soup is perhaps the tastiest thing I’ve eaten in weeks. Months. I kid you not. If I

were to face a firing squad tomorrow and were given one last meal, Mi Hong’s wonton soup would most certainly be one of the items on the menu. It’s sweet and savoury and oh so good. So good, in fact, that Mi Hong’s has rocketed to the top of my go-to delivery list. Can’t wait to order from there again. Mi Hong Restuarant 811 51st Street East | (306) 931-3355 Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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music

Next Week

coming up

Silent Sea

Tebey

Cher

@ Amigos Cantina Friday, February 28 – Cover TBD

@ Louis’ Pub Monday, March 3 – $18

@ Credit Union Centre Saturday, June 21 – $36.75+

Silent Sea started out as a solo project of Saskatoon musician Caila Ellerman. It was a project that didn’t last long. After being booked for a live, on-air performance Ellerman ended up scrambling to get a band together to help her perform. The guitarist and vocalist ended up going with Dan Holtsman (guitar/vocals), Ryan Richichi (drums) and Mike Morien (bass/ vocals). And the rest, as they say, is history. Inspired by musicians like Jack Johnson, Fiona Apple and City and Colour, the band has morphed into an up-and-coming indie/alt rock group. Playing a brand of ephemeral, catchy music, Silent Sea combines west coast vibes with modern rock, in the process bringing something fresh and exciting to this city’s musical landscape. Tickets will be available at the door.

Tebey knows how to write the hell out of a country song. He knows it’s not about chart position or sales, it’s about writing something that allows the audience to see a story happen, see themselves in it, and connect with what’s going on. These are the kind of songs that made up this Canadian country musician’s debut record, The Wait. They are also the same songs that populate his second album, Two — due to be released this March. But Tebey isn’t just a terrific songwriter — he also has a voice that was made for country music. Playing a pop/rockinfused style of country, Ontario’s Tebey has been steadily winning a loyal base of fans both here and south of the border. Tickets available through Ticketmaster.

The second you hear her contralto singing voice, there’s no mistaking who it is. That pitch, the distinctive tone — it can only be one person: Cher. With an inimitable voice and massive stage presence, the woman born Cherilyn Sarkisian has reached levels of stardom unseen by most. In a singing career that began in the ‘60s as part of the star duo Sonny and Cher, this enigmatic songstress has gone on to sell more than 100 million solo records (on top of the 40 million she sold with Sonny and Cher), filled arenas all around the world, and experimented with styles from pop to disco to New Wave. She’s one of the best-selling music artists of all time, so why not check her out when she rolls through Saskatoon this summer? Tickets through Ticketmaster. – By Adam Hawboldt

Photos courtesy of: the artist/ the artist/ the artist

Sask music Preview Submissions for the BreakOut West Festival, Western Canadian Music Awards, and Industry Awards are now being accepted. Musicians, fans and delegates will descend on Winnipeg October 2-5 for BreakOut West 2014, a weekend of information sharing, live music and, of course, the Western Canadian Music Awards. Artists are also encouraged to submit for the Artistic and Industry awards, which celebrate artists in all genres from across western Canada. For guidelines and more information, please visit breakoutwest.ca. The deadline is March 14.

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listings

february 21 » March 1 The most complete live music listings for Saskatoon. S

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Friday 21

1

House DJs / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs liven up the atmosphere at 6Twelve. 9pm / No cover Factor / Amigos Cantina — With Def 3 and Evil Ebenezer. 10pm / Cover TBD Piano Fridays: Maurice Drouin / The Bassment — Feel like taking in some smooth jazz stylings? Come check out Drouin tickle the ivories of the Kinsman Yamaha S6 grand piano. 4:30pm / No cover Fiddle Series: JJ Guy, James Steele, Celeste Smith / The Bassment — It’s fiddle tunes all night long. 9pm / $17/$23 Flashback Fridays / Béily’s UltraLounge — The best of the 80’s, 90’s & top 40 hits of today. 9pm / $5 cover Big Dave McLean / Buds on Broadway — Canada’s legendary bluesman. 9pm / Cover TBD BPM / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin electro/ vocal house music. 10pm / $5

DJ Eclectic / The Hose & Hydrant — Local turntable whiz DJ Eclectic pumps snappy electronic beats. 8pm / No cover DJ Stikman / Jax Niteclub — Kick off your weekend with all your favourite party hits. 9pm / $5 cover Children of Bodom / Louis — Melodic Finnish death metal. 7pm / $34.50+ (ticketfly.com) DJ Big Ayyy & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm Saskatoon Blues Festival / Park Town Hotel — The Downtown Lounge series. 5pm / Cover TBD Doug Boomhower Trio / Prairie Ink — A smooth jazz trio. 8pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests,from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / $5 Bryan Adams / TCU Place — Come see this Canadian rock legend on his Bare Bones Tour. 8pm / $55+ (tcutickets.ca) VIP Fridays / Tequila — Come tear it up on the dance floor. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Nick Ruston / Uncle Barley’s — Come and check him out! 9pm / Cover TBD Diatessaron / Vangelis — With The Department Heads and Alex Shenton. 9pm / $10

Saturday 22

House DJs / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes all night. 9pm / No cover Omfest 3 / Amigos Cantina — Royal Red Brigade, Fisticuffs + more celebrates Ominocity. 9pm / $15 (picatic.com) Piano Series: The Amina Figarova Sextet / The Bassment — Jazz from New York. 8pm / $20/$25 DJ Aash Money + DJ Sugar Daddy / Béily’s UltraLounge — These two DJs throw down a dance party every Saturday night. 9pm / $5 cover Big Dave McLean / Buds on Broadway — Canada’s legendary bluesman. 9pm / Cover TBD SaturGAY Night / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin exclusive dance remixes every Saturday. 10pm / $5 DJ Kade / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ Stikman / Jax Niteclub — Ladies night with DJ Stikman and the Jax party crew. 9pm / $5 cover The Official Jersey Jam / O’Brians Event Centre — Featuring Fire Kid Steenie and Infamous. 9pm / $20+ (tickets.obrianseventcentre.ca) DJ Goodtimes / Longbranch — Playing the hottest country music all night. 8pm / $4 cover DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your

friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5 Brian Paul Di Giuseppe / Prairie Ink — A singer/songer with heart. 8pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / $5 DJ Anchor / Sutherland Bar — It’s the world famous video mix show! 10pm / Cover TBD Saturday Night Social / Tequila — Electronic Saturdays will have you moving and grooving. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Thorpdeo / Uncle Barley’s — Spinning hot tunes all night. 10pm / Cover TBD  Jaymez / Vangelis — WIth Famine, Kool Hand Juke + more. 9pm / $10

Sunday 23

Industry Night / Béily’s UltraLounge — Hosted by DJ Sugar Daddy; this crowd favourite has always been known to break the latest and greatest tracks in multiple genres. 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff Variety Night / Grosvenor Park United Church — Local musicians playing the music they love. 2:30pm / Admission by donation DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover Datsik / Tequila Nightclub — Also appearing: Heroes X Villians and Sub Antix. 8pm / $25+ Blues Jam / Vangelis Tavern — The Vangelis Sunday Jam is an institution, offering great tunes from blues to rock and beyond. 7:30pm / No cover

Monday 24

DJ Audio / Dublins — Spinning dope beats. 9pm / Cover TBD Saskatoon Blues Festival / Buds on Broadway — Featuring John Studebaker. 8pm / Cover TBD Saskatoon Blues Festival / Earls — With Neil Roston. 7pm / Cover TBD

Tuesday 25

Gorgeous Blue Dogs / Buds on Broadway — Come rock the night away in style. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ SUGAR DADDY / The Double Deuce — Able to rock any party, this crowd favourite has always been known to break the latest and greatest tracks in multiple genres. 9:30pm / $4 cover DJ Nick Ruston / Dublins — Spinning dope beats. 9pm / Cover TBD Saskatoon Blues Festival / Earls — With Mykal Gambull. 7pm / Cover TBD Verb presents Open Mic / Rock Bottom — Come and rock the stage! 9pm / No cover Open Mic / The Somewhere Else Pub — Come out to show your talent. 7pm / No cover Solids / Vangelis — With Wizards. 9pm / $8

Wednesday 26

DJ Modus / 302 Lounge & Discotheque — Spinning all your favourite tracks. 9pm / No cover until 10pm; $3 thereafter Roots Series: Del Barber / The Bassment — Winnipeg-based singer/songwriter is ready to light up the stage. 8pm / $17/$23 Gorgeous Blue Dogs / Buds on Broadway — Come rock the night away in style. 9pm / Cover TBD Salsa Night / Béily’s UltraLounge — Latin music and salsa dance lessons. 8:30pm / Cover TBD DJ Memo / Dublins — Spinning dope beats. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Kade / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover Buck Wild Wednesdays / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Come out and ride the mechanical bull! 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff Saskatoon Blues Festival / Park Town Hotel — With Kelly Read. 5pm / Cover TBD Josh Palmer / Rock Creek (Willowgrove) — Alt rock/pop out of Saskatoon. 8pm / No cover

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Dueling Pianos / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / No cover Northcote / Vangelis — With Dave Hause. 9pm / $10(advance)/$12(door)

Thursday 27

Flat Black Pastic / Amigos Cantina — Featuring Charly Hustle, The Gaff, Dr.J and Mr. Fudge. 10pm / Cover TBD Saskatoon Blues Festival / Bon Temps — With Nick Longpre. 5pm / Cover TBD Charger / Buds on Broadway — A hard rockin’ good time. 9pm / Cover TBD Goo Goo Dolls / Credit Union Centre — World-class, melodic rock from Buffalo, NY. 7:30pm / $58.50 (ticketmaster.com) Throwback Thursdays / Earls — Come experience the best in retro funk, soul, reggae and rock provided by Dr. J. 8pm / No cover DJ Kade / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ Goodtimes / Longbranch — Playing the hottest country music all night. 8pm / $4 cover Saskatoon Blues Festival / O’Brians Event Centre — Featuring Omar and the Howlers + more. 7pm / $30 (tickets.obrianseventcentre.ca) Saskatoon Blues Festival / Park Town Hotel — Featuring Kat Danser and Morgan Davis. 7pm / $30 (eventbrite.ca) Thunder Riot w/Conky Showpony / Rock Bottom — Come dance the night away as this local DJ plays the kind of music that’ll get your feet moving. 9pm / $5 Triple Up Thursdays / Tequila — Featuring DJ Dislexic. 9pm / Cover TBD Solids / Vangelis — With Wizards. 9pm / Cover TBD Open Stage / The Woods — Hosted by Steven Maier. 9pm / No cover

Riff Raff / Buds on Broadway — Playing 80s big-hair rock anthems. 9pm / Cover TBD BPM / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin electro/ vocal house music. 10pm / $5 DJ Eclectic / The Hose & Hydrant — Local turntable whiz DJ Eclectic pumps snappy electronic beats. 8pm / No cover DJ Stikman / Jax Niteclub — Kick off your weekend with all your favourite party hits.. 9pm / $5 cover Saskatoon Blues Festival / O’Brians Event Centre — Featuring Lucky Peterson and Tommy Castro. 7pm / $30 DJ Big Ayyy & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm Saskatoon Blues Festival / O’Brians Event Centre — Featuring Michael Jerome Browne and Suzie Vinnick. 7pm / $30 (eventbrite.ca) Saskatoon Blues Festival / Park Town Hotel — With Marilyn and Randy. 5pm / Cover TBD Conor Coughlan / Prairie Ink — A British artist playing folk/rock/pop. 8pm / No cover Idle Rains / Stan’s Place — A rockin’ good way to spend a weekend. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and

Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests,from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / $5 VIP Fridays / Tequila — Come tear it up on the dance floor. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Nick Ruston / Uncle Barley’s — Come and check him out! 9pm / Cover TBD Sweet and Savoury Soiree / Unitarian Centre — Featuring Paul Gitlitz, Louisa Ferguson, Ryan J. Bradshaw + more. 8pm / $18

Saturday 1

House DJs / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes all night. 9pm / No cover Rah Rah / Amigos Cantina — With Foam Lake + Sydney York. 10pm / $10 (ticketedge.com) Piano Series: David Braid’s Octagon Chamber / The Bassment — An all-star octet from Toronto. 8pm / $20/$25 DJ Aash Money + DJ Sugar Daddy / Béily’s UltraLounge — These two DJs throw down a dance party every Saturday night. 9pm / $5 cover Riff Raff / Buds on Broadway — Playing 80s big-hair rock anthems. 9pm / Cover TBD SaturGAY Night / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin exclusive dance remixes every Saturday. 10pm / $5

DJ Kade / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ Stikman / Jax Niteclub — Ladies night with DJ Stikman and the Jax party crew. 9pm / $5 cover Skylab Records Launch Party Launch / Le Relais - Featuring DJ Izn, Danger Bay + more. 9pm / No cover DJ Goodtimes / Longbranch — Playing the hottest country music all night. 8pm / $4 cover Saskatoon Blues Festival / O’Brians Event Centre — Featuring The Twisters and Carolyn Wonderland. 7pm / $30 (tickets. obrianseventcentre.ca) Saskatoon Blues Festival / Park Town Hotel — Featuring The Silver Screen Scoundrels and Fruteland Jackson. 7pm / $30 (eventbrite.ca) DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5

Ian Martens / Prairie Ink — Local musician playing acoustic folk/rock. 8pm / No cover Idle Rains / Stan’s Place — A rockin’ good way to spend a weekend. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / $5 DJ Anchor / Sutherland Bar — It’s the world famous video mix show! 10pm / Cover TBD Full Circle / Tequila — Featuring AN10NA and Ricky Rock. 10pm / Cover TBD DJ Thorpdeo / Uncle Barley’s — Spinning hot tunes all night. 10pm / Cover TBD

Get listed Have a live show you'd like to promote? Let us know! layout@verbnews.com

Friday 28

House DJs / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs liven up the atmosphere at 6Twelve. 9pm / No cover Friends of Foes / Amigos Cantina — With Silent Sea. 10pm / Cover TBD Piano Fridays: Kim Salkeld / The Bassment — Feel like taking in some smooth jazz stylings? 4:30pm / No cover Vocal Jazz Series: Broadway Unplugged / The Bassment — Featuring The Saskatoon Summer Players. 9pm / $15/$20 Flashback Fridays / Béily’s UltraLounge — The best of the 80’s, 90’s & top 40 hits of today. 9pm / $5 cover

21 Feb 21 – Feb 27 @verbsaskatoon

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Photo: Courtesy of relativity media

For the love of Costner

Kevin Costner stars in new spy thriller, 3 Days to Kill by adam hawboldt

W

anna know a secret? Something I’ve never really admitted to anyone before? I have a serious man-crush on Kevin Costner. There, I said it. And I’m not ashamed of it, either. Ever since I saw him play Crash Davis in Bull Durham, way back in the late ‘80s, I’ve loved watching him on screen. Sure, he’s been in a few doozies (read: The Postman, Message in a Bottle, Dragon Fly), but Costner has also been in some absolutely terrific films: the aforementioned Bull Durham (still one of my favourites), Dances With Wolves, Field of Dreams, The Untouchables — to name just a few. But good or bad, one thing you can usually count on is Costner doing was Costner does best. Sucking up the air around him with a screen presence all his own. He plays the aw-shucks guy with arrogance better

since, he’s been traveling the world killing bad guys and foiling evil plots. But things take a turn when Ethan is diagnosed with cancer.

than nearly anyone in show biz. And after a busy year in which he took a few supporting roles — in Man of Steel and Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit — Costner has finally returned as a leading man in 3 Days to Kill. And to be honest, his return kind of made me happy. There’s just something about the guy I find intensely watchable. Now that’s not to say 3 Days to Kill is an excellent movie or anything. It’s not. Sure, it’s good, but it’s nothing special. But watching Costner (who is more grizzled and tired-looking than you’ve ever seen him) up there leading the charge — well, what more do you want? The film — written by Luc Besson and Adi Hasak, directed by McG — tells the story of secret agent Ethan Renner (Costner). Years ago he left his wife Christine (Connie Nielson) and daughter Zoey (True Grit’s Hailee Steinfeld). Ever

Is this a return to fine form for Costner? Nah. But it’s a step in the right direction. Adam Hawboldt

Deciding it’s time to reunite with his family, Ethan goes to Paris (where his wife and daughter currently live) to try and make amends. While there, though, a sexy agent named Vivi Delay (Amber Heard) asks for his help to take out a villain they call

the Wolf (Richard Sammel.) Ethan reluctantly agrees. What follows is a strange but entertaining movie that oscillates between high octane chases, shootouts, touching daddy-daughter moments and humour. Think Taken meets From Paris With Love, and you’ll get the idea. When Ethan isn’t ripping out people’s armpit hair with duct tape, he’s trying to deal with a teenager (no easy feat by any stretch of the imagination) and asking bad guys for parenting advice. And while this all may sound a little daft and mashed up, 3 Days to Kill is the kind of movie — a Luc Besson kind of movie — that moves so fast through European streets that it masks the fact that at times the film just doesn’t make sense. Is this a return to fine form for Costner? Nah. But it’s a step in the right direction. And something tells

3 days to kill Directed by McG Starring Kevin Costner, Amber Heard, Hailiee Steinfeld + Connie Nielsen 100 minutes | 14A

me that in his next movie, Draft Day (a football film due out later this year), we’ll see the charismatic actor hit his stride again. After all, is there a better sports movie actor than Costner on this planet? I think not.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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A bunch of boxes and a whole lot of thrills

7 Boxes a tense Paraguayan crime caper by adam hawboldt

T

he year is 2005. The place is Market #4 in Paruguay’s capital city, AsunciÓn. This is the setting for directors Tana Schémbori and Juan Carlos Maneglia’s excellent little thriller, 7 Boxes. As the film opens, we’re introduced to the open-air market in a very rapid, very real way. The camera snakes through its narrow streets and claustrophobic alleys,

haired 17-year-old named Victor (Celso Franco). Victor works in the market, transporting customers’ bags in his wheelbarrow. One day, going about his routine, Victor catches his first look at a cellphone with a camera (this is Paraguay in 2005, after all), and from that moment on he decides he must have one, by hook or by crook. Problem is, cell phones are expensive and Victor doesn’t earn

7 Boxes is one of those rare movies that’s able to take a … simple scenario and mold it into something tense and brisk… Adam Hawboldt

whizzing past stalls and vendors and customers. When the opening shot ends, the camera lands on a bushy-

nearly enough to get one. Part of it is because toting bags around doesn’t pay overly well. But there’s more.

See, Victor isn’t the only bagboy in the market. His main competitor Nelson (Victor Sosa) is there, cutting into his earning potential. This doesn’t sit too well with Victor. Then, to make matters worse, Nelson has a deal in the works to transport seven boxes for a butcher named Dario (Paletita). But then in a twist of fate (if you can call it that), the deal instead goes to Victor. Nelson, who needs the money to pay for his sick son, is furious. Victor, on the other hand, is elated. If he manages to transport all the boxes he will get $100 US . But the deal isn’t as straightforward as you’d think. No, there are rules. Victor must not open the boxes. He must not let the police, if they ask, open them. And he can’t lose the boxes. This doesn’t deter Victor and he sets off to make the delivery. What follows is terrific. A taut, high-speed thriller that has more twists and turns than the market in which it’s shot.

Using time-lapse photography, point-of-view shots and long tracking shots, Schémbori and Maneglia send the audience hurtling through the bowels of the market. There are chases, shoot outs and more than one bite-your-nails-to-the-cuticle tense moments. 7 Boxes is one of those rare movies that’s able to take a seemingly simple scenario and mold it into something tense and brisk and utterly engaging. Oh, and the acting is really good, too. As Victor, Celso Franco captures the essence of misguided youth. And as Nelson, Victor Sosa nails it with an increasingly intense and engaging performance. And while the running time is a tad bit long, 7 Boxes is one of those movies that will nail you to your seat, waiting to see what happens next. So

7 boxes Directed by Juan Carlos Maneglia + Tana Schémbori Starring Celso Franco, Victor Sosa + Paletita

100 minutes | NR

if you’re into those kind of films, you should probably head to the theatre and give 7 Boxes a watch. 7 Boxes will be screening at Roxy Theatre starting on March 7. Check their website or Facebook for more information.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon ahawboldt@verbnews.com

Photo: Courtesy of breaking glass pictures

23 Feb 21 – Feb 27 /verbsaskatoon

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friday, february 14 @

Outlaws

Outlaws Country Rock Bar 710 Idylwyld Drive North (306) 978 0808

Check out our Facebook page! These photos will be uploaded to Facebook on Friday, February 28 facebook.com/verbsaskatoon

Continued on next page Âť

24 Feb 21 – Feb 27 entertainment

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Photography by Patrick Carley

25 Feb 21 – Feb 27 @verbsaskatoon

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Photography by Patrick Carley

26 Feb 21 – Feb 27 entertainment

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saturday, february 15 @

eastview bowl

Eastview Bowl 2929 Louise Street East (306) 373 4333

Check out our Facebook page! These photos will be uploaded to Facebook on Friday, February 28 facebook.com/verbsaskatoon

Photography by Patrick Carley

27 Feb 21 – Feb 27 /verbsaskatoon

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Photography by Patrick Carley

28 Feb 21 – Feb 27 entertainment

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comics

Š Elaine M. Will | blog.E2W-Illustration.com | Check onthebus.webcomic.ws/ for previous editions!

30 Jan 17 – Jan 23 entertainment

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timeout

crossword canadian criss-cross 25. Expand 27. 11th Greek letters 29. Pertaining to tenths 32. Dull yellowish brown 36. Gone by 37. Bear down on 39. Pot top 40. Coffee makers 42. Mad cow disease 43. Religious ceremony 44. Happen to 46. Old sayings 48. Tightly stretched 49. Unfounded stories 50. Barbiturates 51. Concert ticket

A

1. Flings here and there 2. Feeling of discomfort 3. Old card game 4. Collar extension 5. Weapon of the 15th and 16th centuries 6. Undivided 7. Bits of fluff 8. Senile person 9. Eyelashes 11. Recess for a statue 12. Place for a clapper 14. Web-footed bird 17. Transparent plastic domes 20. Painful tightening of a muscle

21. Puts in water for a long time 24. Samuel’s teacher, in the Bible 26. Fine volcanic dust 28. Children’s game 29. Paint unskillfully 30. White wading bird 31. Meet for discussion B 33. Dismount 34. Bad cheques 35. Mid-month, in old Rome 38. Weakest parts of a garment 41. In their right minds 43. Pro __ 45. Hallucinogenic drug 47. Turn to a different colour

1 3 2 7 9 4 5 6 8 4 9 6 5 8 1 7 2 3 5 7 8 2 3 6 9 4 1 2 4 9 6 1 7 3 8 5 8 5 7 9 4 3 6 1 2 6 1 3 8 5 2 4 7 9 7 6 1 3 2 9 8 5 4 3 8 4 1 7 5 2 9 6 9 2 5 4 6 8 1 3 7

1. Having a specified height 5. Not let escape 9. Pulverized chocolate 10. It has a negative charge 12 . Chess piece that stays on the same colour squares 13. Soup legume 15. In addition 16. Flow back 18. Folded Mexican treat 19. Say one thing and mean another 20. Crossword puzzle necessity 22. 17th Greek letter 23. Tool that creates a strong light beam

© walter D. Feener 2014

sudoku answer key

DOWN

9 7 4 1 2 5 6 8 3 6 8 5 7 3 4 1 2 9 3 2 1 6 9 8 7 5 4 2 6 9 3 5 1 4 7 8 8 1 3 2 4 7 9 6 5 5 4 7 8 6 9 3 1 2 1 9 2 4 8 6 5 3 7 7 5 8 9 1 3 2 4 6 4 3 6 5 7 2 8 9 1

ACROSS

Horoscopes february 21 – february 27 Aries March 21–April 19

Leo July 23–August 22

Sagittarius November 23–December 21

A minor conflict may arise with a loved one at some point this week, Aries. Whatever you do, don’t blow it out of proportion.

Your aesthetic sense will be in overdrive this week, Leo. Engage in something creative, no matter how busy you are with other things.

This is a perfect time to enrol in a class, Sagittarius. It doesn’t matter what — the people you meet will become a big part of your life.

Taurus April 20–May 20

Virgo August 23–September 22

Capricorn December 22–January 19

Your intuition, imagination and insight will be operating at high levels this week, Taurus. Embrace them: they will serve you well.

If you find yourself having extra energy this week, Virgo, try to focus it on others rather than yourself. The payoff will be worth it.

Normally, you’re very intuitive, Capricorn. This week, though, you’re going to misread things left and right. Be careful with any conclusions you make.

Gemini May 21–June 20

Libra September 23–October 23

Aquarius January 20–February 19

You may find yourself feeling warm and sensual near the end of the week, Gemini. Try to spend some time with a loved one.

Don’t be surprised if, at some point this week, it feels as though someone is reading your thoughts. Your connectivity to others is at an all-time high.

Let your imagination roam wild and free this week, Aquarius. It may help you solve a problem you’ve been struggling with for awhile.

Cancer June 21–July 22

Scorpio October 24–November 22

Pisces February 20–March 20

Pay close attention to matters of health this week, Cancer. If something is bothering you, it’s best to get it checked out.

You’re usually a down-to-earth person, Scorpio, with your feet firmly planted on the ground. But this week your head is going to be in the clouds.

You should try to be kind to all those you meet this week, Pisces. You never know what another person is dealing with behind the scenes.

sudoku 9 4 1 2 8 3 5 2 6 8 5 4 6 9 1 4 7 1 3 7 5 6 9 2 6 3 7 8 1 2 4 3 5 7 8 9

crossword answer key

A

3 2 9 4 5 8 1 7 2 7 8 4 2 4 9 6 1 7 3 8 5 4 6 1 7 6 3 2 9 8 5 3 1 9 6 5

B

31 Jan 17 – Jan 23 /verbsaskatoon

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Hi Ho SIlver!

Chev’s signature pickup pulls ahead of the pack by jeff davis

all Photos: courtesy of jeff davis Continued on next page »

32 Nov 15 – Nov 21 vehicles

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H

ere in truck country, a full redesign of a perennial classic is bound to get lots of attention. This time it’s the 2014 Silverado, which has, in Chev’s words, been totally redone “from hood to hitch.” The results are indeed impressive, with a number of elegantly commonsense standard features that put it well ahead of the competition’s current models. To start with, it’s a handsome beast. In fact, it takes design cues from the Corvette, having been designed by the same fellow. Air dams under the front bumper, for example, are borrowed from the ‘Vette, and aim to reduce drag from air blowing under the truck. The double-stacked headlights look great, and the hood has a deep centre trench that helps both the aerodynamics and the looks. The

windshield is swept back at a rakish angle, and the whole thing is taller and wider than its predecessor. Good looks aside, this is a worker’s truck at heart, with features to make a day on the job that much easier. The tailgate is now incredibly light, so you can easily open and close it with one hand. It’s also fitted with a “no-slam” mechanism to keep it from crashing down when opened; now, it eases itself down, silently and gently. Also standard on all models is a step, built into the bumper, large enough to fit even the biggest boot. Pair this with a handle on the box, and stepping up into the flatbed is a snap. Lastly, Chevy has cleverly included lights located inside the box, and behind the cab also. With a flick of a switch on the dash, you’ll have

plenty of light when rummaging around the box at night. On the rear-view mirror, you’ll find a rounded fisheye mirror in the top corner, which allows you to see things in your blind spot. This is another simple fix to an old problem, and will be especially helpful when towing. These may seem like small things to an all hat, no cattle city dweller, but will help to immediately endear the new Chev to real working men (and women). Features like these alone could push buyers to Chev, and the 2014 Silverado will likely be adopted as a fleet standard for many construction and natural resources companies. The range of configurations for the Silverado is nearly endless, and really depends on your budget. A base model work truck with two wheel drive, standard cab and a 4.3 litre V6 engine starts off at a shade over $28,000.

From there, the sky’s the limit, with fully decked-out Silverados going for as much as $64,000. These crew cab editions come with virtually all the comfort features you’d find on a luxury sedan, such as leather everything, sunroof, heated and cooled seats, navigation systems and all that. The highest trim level even comes with smart driving assist technologies that warn of potential crashes and produce a rumbling sensation on the steering wheel when you veer out of your lane. The back row of the crew cab is generously proportioned, so the Chev can comfortably seat four large men for long drives. And better yet, the back seats fold up, creating a large cargo space that — unlike the box — is protected from the elements. Smaller passengers, meanwhile, will appreciate a lower step up than

2014 Chevrolet Silverado Class 2 Pickup Truck $28,000 transmission: 6 speed automatic Fuel Capacity: 98.4 L Fuel Economy (4.3 L): 11.9/8.4 Cargo Volume: 1728 L CLASS:

Base price:

seen on previous models. The steering wheel is also telescoping and fully adjustable, so smaller drivers will be able to find a comfortable driving position. As for power plants, you can opt for the V6 or a variety of V8s, which come in 5.3, 6.0 and 6.2 litre sizes. In an effort to save fuel, Chevy has inserted a clever “cylinder deactivation” system into the 4.3 and 5.3 litre engines. This means that only four of the six cylinders will go bang when the going is easy, but all six will come online when the going gets tough.

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This is a nice-and-simple approach to the problem of gas guzzling pickups, and eliminates the need for a turbo, which are prone to malfunction. The standard interior is a subdued black vinyl, without anything too ostentatious or distracting. The extra width really pays off in the form of a large and roomy driver’s seat, and a very wide armrest. All the buttons and switches on the dash are large, and described by Chev as “glove friendly.” This is

a small feature with a big payoff in Saskatchewan winters, especially for workers who wear work gloves day in and day out, all year round. There are three cup holders on the centre console, and two more on the front doors. A touchscreen runs the radio and displays stats. Higher trim levels have a nice set of electrical plug-ins. These include three USB slots, a cigarette lighter jack, and even a full size 120 volt plugin for your power drill … or hairdryer.

On every door there is tons of storage space, provided by six or seven little slots. If you’ve ever seen a contractor’s truck, you’ll know these nooks are a favourite place to keep screwdrivers, tape measures and other random tools. This extra storage space will be appreciated, though it will eventually make it look like a bomb went off in your truck. Right now the Silverado is the reigning top dog of trucks, boasting the best looks, best interior finish, highest standard tech and best towing capacity. The Silverado will be hard for the competition to beat, and we’ll likely see Ford and Dodge emulating many of its features. But since these are both some time away from a full redesign, the Silverado will likely be king of the hill for some time to come. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon jdavis@verbnews.com

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Hanna’s Hot ’82 Rabbit

Antique VW hatchback performs like a champ with retro style by jeff davis

I

n the past months since Hanna McKinney bought her 1982 Volkswagen Rabbit off Kijiji, some weird things have been happening. At stoplights and even while driving, other drivers are pulling her over and doing their best to buy this vintage gem off her at premium prices. “I’ve had a truck follow me all the way downtown and the guy said ‘How much do you want for that? I’ll buy it from you right now,’” she says. “I also had a neighbour offer me too much for it.” At first glance it’s plain and boxy, but to the cult of classic Volkswagen lovers, this is unmistakably a first generation Golf. Despite a few good offers, Hanna will not be parted with her Rabbit. “A friend took me driving in his Rabbit one time, and ever since then I’ve always wanted one,” she says. “I’ve always cruised Kijiji and one day I found this.” Hanna purchased this little beauty for $1,400 off a commercial pilot, who scrupulously maintained it and stored it in a heated, indoor Quonset during the winter. As a result, it’s in great shape without a speck of rust, even on the underbelly. It performs like a champ even on the highway, despite having 200,000 kms on the odometer when she purchased it. She’s since put another 30,000 on it without any mechanical problems. It’s even got her to Calgary in six hours, and handles

1982 volkswagen rabbit CLASS:

Compact

purchase price:

$1,400

engine: 1.7 Litre 4 Cylinder

4 Speed Manual 74 kilometers driven: 231,000 average cost to fill: $35 transmission: horsepower:

great in snow, although the ride is a quite loud. Even on the coldest winter days, Hanna’s Rabbit springs to life. “When it gets really cold the gearshift locks up a little bit, but other than that this thing starts no matter what,” she says. Also dope is the “Cashmere White” paint job with “Royal Red” interior, she says, plus the seats — even the back row — are pretty darn comfy. Hanna, 20, is from Saskatoon. She’s also a collector of antiques, and says she’s been able to fit tons of stuff in the back, especially when the seats are laid down. The most awesome thing about the Rabbit, Hannah says, is that it’s totally analog (except for the aftermarket stereo). It’s got a zillion gauges and even a weird clock next to the speedometer. “The analog clock is one of my favourite things about this car,” she said. “My friends kill themselves laughing when they see it.” Over this winter, the Rabbit has taken some abuse. A burly bouncer from the Hose unintentionally ripped the passenger door handle off, and some hooligans ripped

all Photos: Courtesy of jeff davis

off the antenna. “I don’t know if they took it and walked away or what, because it was nowhere to be found,” she says. “But the radio totally still works!” When it comes time to sell her beloved Rabbit, Hanna thinks she

might be able to make a good profit on the sale. “To have one that has no rust can be pretty valuable,” she says. “I could sell this as a parts car or a restoration project for a fair bit of money.”

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon jdavis@verbnews.com

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After the smash

Our post-crash, step-by-step guide by jeff davis

I

f any young drivers have never been in a crash, and aren’t sure what exactly to do in the event of a smash-up with another vehicle, never fear. Thankfully, we’re looking out for you! We spoke with Kelley Brinkwoth, a spokeswoman for Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI), for some car accident pro tips to get you back on the road with a minimum of stress and confusion.

cops to your smash up. If anyone is injured or killed, Brinkworth says, the police must be called. The same goes for any hit-and-run situation, or if you suspect the other driver is drunk or otherwise impaired. Such situations are potentially criminal matters, and in some cases police will send a crash reconstructionist to gather evidence before the vehicles are moved. If either vehicle is busted up to the point it can’t drive away and must be towed, the cops must get involved. Any collision with an out of province vehicle also requires contacting the police.

Call the Cops (Maybe) There are a number of situations in which you have to, by law, alert the

Move your vehicle

Appraise the Damage

In the case of minor fender benders where no one is injured and the cars still drive, you can pull off to the side of the road and let the normal traffic flow resume. In the event that your ride is totally smashed up, you’ll need to get it towed away. In this situation, the tow truck will bring it directly to the nearest SGI Claims Centre.

Exchange Info After an impact with another car, the first thing you need to do is get out and do a quick survey of the damage. If it’s a minor fender bender, the most important thing is to take down the other driver’s name, driver’s licence number and licence plate number. You’ll need this later. While it is also a good idea to exchange phone numbers, Brinkworth says this is not a must if you’re feeling creeped out.

and someone has to pony up before insured repairs can begin. Whoever is at fault in a crash must pay the deductible for both cars, Brinkworth says. In a single vehicle crash, you’re on the hook, since there is no one else to blame. Unfortunately, if it’s a hit-andrun and you don’t know who did it, you’re also stuck covering the deductible yourself. If you’re at fault you’ll also get demerit points in SGI’s Safe Driver Recognition Program, and you could lose an up-to-20-per cent discount on your insurance.

Once you report the crash to SGI, they’ll book a time for you to come by and meet with a vehicle damage appraiser. This appraiser will look over your vehicle, assess the damage, and determine the expected repair costs. If the crash was very severe — and the ride might be a total loss — you’ll be assigned an insurance adjuster who will determine how much you will get for the writing off of the car.

Talk to Witnesses If there are any witnesses to the crash, you’ll want to get their information as well so you can stay in touch. This is particularly important if you feel the other driver was at fault, and may try to worm out of taking responsibility. “Witnesses can be really, really crucial in determining who’s at fault in a crash, if it turns into a he-saidshe-said kind of situation,” Brinkworth says. Witnesses can be other drivers who saw the action, or any random passersby, so be sure to get the contact info of people that you know saw the moment of impact. In the case of smaller fender benders, you’ll have to act fast. “If it’s a really serious crash, people usually pull over for those,” Brinkworth says.

Get Repairs Once the deductible is paid, you can bring your ride to a body shop of your choice for repairs. Most have relationships with SGI, and will send the final bill for repairs to the insurer.

Report the crash to SGI All crashes must be reported to SGI, and you can do this online or by calling the claims centre nearest to your home. There are three in Saskatoon: downtown on 2vd Ave North, at the East Claims Centre on Taylor St East, or the West Claims Centre on Fairmont Drive.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

Pay the Deductible SGI’s standard plate insurance deductible is $700, Brinkworth says,

@VerbSaskatoon jdavis@verbnews.com

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vehicle

A boar with a backpack Kia Soul’s quirky style very intentional by jeff davis

Continued on next page all Photos: Courtesy of jeff davis Continued on next page »

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Compact 6-speed manual or automatic Fuel Capacity: 59 L Fuel Economy (1.6 L): 6.6 L/100 KM Cargo Volume: 1402 L CLASS:

transmission:

A

round Saskatoon lately you’ve likely been seeing more and more Kia Souls on the road, and you’ve got to admit, they look different than anything else tearing up the highway right now. It’s tall, upright and boxy — like a hatchback that ends in a quirky square instead of tapering toward the rear bumper. This odd look is definitely on purpose. The designer tasked with dreaming up a new car for Kia came up with this shape based on a wild boar wearing a backpack (for utility, naturally). Look at it from the side and you can sort of see it…almost. Since it’s release in North America in 2010, the Soul has been

this Soul, not just the young drivers of years past. That said, it has retained lots of quirk. The door ajar and seatbelt-not-done-up sounds are weird trills, like 8-bit ringtones from an old flip phone. The interior also has some funny looking elements, particularly the combination speaker/vents that protrude from the dashboard. While it may have an “Urban SUV” look, make no mistake: this is a small car. It’s footprint is both short and narrow, and the extra height makes it feel a little top heavy. The driver’s seat felt quite narrow, like my shoulders were an inch or so too wide to sit comfortably. I also found my knees resting against the door as well as the centre console, although there was sufficient headroom. The backseat is suitable for children and smaller adults, but the rear half really comes into its own when you drop the rear seats down. This makes for an impressive cargo space nearly the volume of a standard truck box, and may be one of the Soul’s key selling features.

2014 Kia Soul

It would be a great car for a young family on a budget, or a smaller driver looking for an edgier look…

a very polarizing car. It’s got an iconic shape, and you’ll either love it or hate it. More attractive perhaps than the looks, however, is the price. The base model Soul LX starts off at $16,995, which places it very high in the affordability column. We drove the nearly-top-of-theline Soul SX GDI, which bore a stillreasonable price tag of $25,460. First impressions when you sit behind the wheel is that it has a very upright posture, and you seem higher off the ground than you might expect. The interior doesn’t have the splashes of bright colours the earlier models had, opting instead for a subdued matte black colour scheme. This seems a little more mature, and is a sign Kia is looking to capture an older audience with

With the standard 1.6 litre, 130 horsepower engine, the Soul is not a fast car. The optional 2.0 engine generates 164 horsepower, giving it a little more pick up, but it’s still nothing to write home about. The saving grace for the driver is the selectable ride mode option, which allows you to switch between normal, comfort and sport modes using a button on the steering wheel. This gives a sensation of increased control and makes driving the Soul more fun, since you can really feel the difference in stiffness between the ride modes. The higher end SX model we tested had a few nice features like heated leather seats, a heated steering wheel and a proximity key with push button start. But somehow this “luxury” package doesn’t quite hit the mark.

Continued on next page »

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It just lacks those finer details you expect at more expensive trim levels, making it seems more like an impression of luxury than the genuine article. For example, the surfaces are still plastic, and the screen for the backup camera is on the small side. But, after all, it’s a Kia. The Soul has enough redeeming features and utility to have been named the Canadian Automotive Journalists Association “best new family car of the year under $30,000.” It would be a great car for a young family on a budget, or a smaller driver looking for an edgier look, lots of space and good fuel economy. If you’re going to pick one of these up, save yourself the eight grand and opt for the base model. You won’t be missing much.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon jdavis@verbnews.com

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Verb Issue S278 (Feb. 21-27, 2014)  

Verb Issue S278 (Feb. 21-27, 2014)

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