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Issue #262 – October 18 to October 24

arts

culture

music

saskatoon

The Deep Dark Woods

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F

H READ & S

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Inside the adult

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sex sells

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SK

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services industry in Saskatchewan

VERY WE EE EK RE

the fifth estate + good ol freda Films reviewed­

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Photo: courtesy of jeremy Regimbal


NEWs + Opinion

contents

sex sells Inside the adult services industry in SK. 4 / Local VOICE OF THE PEOPLE SK filmmakers explore the Enbridge pipeline controversy. 6 / Local

heroin for the cure On the cover:

Our thoughts on prescribing heroin to chronic addicts. 8 / Editorial

Out of the wilderness. 12 / cover

Here’s what you had to say about political transparency. 10 / comments

the deep dark woods

comments

Photo: courtesy of Jeremy Regimbal

culture

Q + A with frank turner On Tape Deck Heart. 12 / Q + A

lunch and people watching We visit

always with you John Antoniuk remembers his mother on his latest album. 14 / Arts

Grandma Lee’s. 18 / Food + Drink

alice in translation

Music

Quebec theatre group adapts Carroll.

Young Benjamins, Chris Cornell + Said the Whale. 19 / music

15 / Arts

entertainment

listings Local music listings for October 18 through October 26. 20 / listings

the fifth estate + good ol’ freda

on the bus Weekly original comic illustrations by Elaine M. Will. 30 / comics

The latest movie reviews. 22 / Film

Nightlife Photos

Games + Horoscopes

We visited Jax and Rock Bottom.

Canadian criss-cross puzzle, horoscopes, and Sudoku. 31 / timeout

24-29 / Nightlife

Vehicles Winterizing your car, the new Ford Escape, and more! 32-39 / vehicles

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Editorial

ART & Production

Business & Operations

contact

Publisher / Parity Publishing Editor in Chief / Ryan Allan Managing Editor / Jessica Patrucco staff Writers / Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson contributing Writers / Jeff davis + Rhiannon Herbert

Design Lead / andrew yanko Grahpic Designer / bryce kirk Contributing Photographers / Patrick Carley, Adam Hawboldt, jeff davis + Ishtiaq Opal

Office Manager / Stephanie Lipsit account Manager / nathan holowaty sales Manager / Vogeson Paley Financial Manager / Cody Lang

Comments / feedback@verbnews.com / 306 881 8372 advertise / advertise@verbnews.com / 306 979 2253 design / layout@verbnews.com / 306 979 8474 General / info@verbnews.com /

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local

Inside the Adult Service Studio

Photo: Courtesy of Foxtongue

Shattering stigmas in the sex service industry by ADAM HAWBOLDT

W

hen you walk into the Lion’s Den Adult Service Studio, the first thing you see is a big white door. It’s locked.

To your left is a window. That’s where the introductions are made, where the women — who were hanging out in a lounge outfitted with couches, a fridge and computer — will stand. You’ll see them, meet

them, and then make your selection. If you don’t see any women to your liking, no problem. There’s no obligation to stay, no offense taken if you walk away. “It’s like going into a shoe store,” explains Lion’s Den owner Trish Fisher. “You don’t always find something you want. There’s no pressure to buy.” But if you do want to purchase the services of one of the women (and if you’re not unruly), Fisher will unlock the white door and let you in. What you see when that door opens isn’t what you expect. This isn’t some dark, seedy brothel from the movies. It’s a clean, well-lit place that’s both sterile and inviting. From the door, a grey-walled hallway in front of you shoots straight for a few feet, snakes right, then turns left. As you walk the hallway over new, even floors, the bedrooms where the women ply their trade are on your right. The green room, the red room, the purple room. All of them are freshly painted, with black-sheeted beds, showers, and sinks. Soft music plays in the background. After you’re escorted to a room, you and the woman you choose will negotiate a price (if it hasn’t already been set beforehand). Then she’ll take care of your needs and your desires — as arranged.

“What the girls charge for their service, I have no say in that,” says Fisher. “They run their own businesses out of my place. They basically just rent a room from me and the gentlemen pay a door fee. My job isn’t to set the price. These women do a very difficult job, so my job is to provide a very safe, clean and supportive place for them to do it in.” Another part of Fisher’s job, as she sees it, is to help shed certain stigmas attached to the adult service industry.

Getting the Lion’s Den up and running wasn’t straightforward or simple. When her other business, the Farmer’s Daughter massage parlour, closed its doors on January 31st, Fisher set out in search of a new location to set up shop. It wasn’t easy. “It took a long time to find a landlord that would rent to me,” she explains. “I bet you I talked to about 50 property owners or more and had three realtors working for me. When I’d call to say I was interested in their property they’d listen, and then I’d tell them this is what I’d be doing and they’d say no. Just like that.” Eventually, though, she found a landlord who had a property she Continued on next page »

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could use. Problem was, the property was occupied. “I met with him once, then didn’t see him again,” says Fisher. “We kept in touch by phone every once in a while, but that was it. Then one day I got a call from the landlord saying his current tenants were leaving and he’d be happy to have us. I was shocked and extremely excited. After [Farmer’s Daughter] closed down we tried outcalls, but it didn’t work. So by April we

off,” she says. “We’re talking businessmen, farmers, truckers, divorcees, widowers. There’s a lot of widowers.” And the girls who work there? They may not be what you think, either. “The perception that these women are drug-addicts or alcoholics, that they’re doing this to support a habit is just not true,” says Fisher. “That can be true in certain instances, but the women I have working for me are here because they choose to do it for

These women do a very difficult job, so my job is to provide a very safe, clean and supportive place for them to do it in. trish fisher

were done. I had girls working for me who were basically unemployed.” So after Fisher got her new property, she didn’t waste any time. The building, which used to be a tow truck company on Alberta Avenue, was gutted, an architect was hired, and walls, floors and rooms were built from scratch. And in June the Lion’s Den was finally ready to open its doors for business. Now Fishers’ aim, along with providing fully licensed adult services to people who want them, is to break down misconceptions about what goes on behind that locked door. “The idea that our clientele is gangsters, drug dealers, bikers is so far

a living. Two of them are currently in school … I don’t recruit them, they come to me.” And before they do, every woman who works at Lion’s Den must obtain a license from the city. According to the adult service bylaw that came into effect in the summer of 2012, agencies and individuals who work in them have to get a license to work legally. “This licensing thing is one of the best things this city ever did,” says Fisher. “As a business owner, by the time the girls come to me they’ve already been through the city, through the police service. They’ve been interviewed, I know they’re of-age,

they’re Canadian citizens. They’re doing this of their own free will.” So for the time being, everything is going well at the Lion’s Den. The women who work there are legal, they’re tested every three months, they have a clean, comfortable place in which to work. Yet the future is anything but certain. At the moment the Supreme Court of Canada is pondering whether brothels and other aspects of the sex industry in our country should be legal. If the answer comes out yes, it will mean serious changes to Canada’s prostitution laws. If it’s a no, Fisher’s business could be in jeopardy. “Right now, everything is well and good because of the city’s licensing bylaw,” says Fisher. “But if everything goes south, if the Supreme Court decides otherwise, if it’s ruled that I’m running a bawdy house and it’s illegal…” Fisher doesn’t finish her sentence. Instead, she takes a sip of coffee and says, “You know, I still can’t wrap my head around why people are offended. It’s just a business. Why can’t people set aside their perceptions, their pre-conceived notions? It’s education that’s needed. It’s understanding that there’s a very big difference between working the streets and working in a studio like this.”

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Voice of the people Photo: Courtesy of line in the sand

Saskatchewan filmmakers and photographers examine the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline from a new perspective by ADAM HAWBOLDT

S

ometimes, the media has a way of reporting only the most divisive voices on an issue. And that is all fine and dandy, but all too often it’s the middle folk — the people who exist in that fine shade of grey — that are lost in the shuffle. Or at least that’s how Tomas Borsa and Tristan Becker, two friends from Saskatchewan, saw it when news about the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline popped onto the public radar a few years ago. “I think it was late 2010 when the public really started to hear about the Northern Gateway,” says Borsa about the proposed 1,170 kilometre twin pipleline that will run from Bruderheim, Alberta to Kitimat, B.C. “Then by March 2012, we noticed that the reporting on the Gateway, to date, had been adversarial and antagonizing. It didn’t seem to be telling a full story. It seemed to just be environment versus the economy, First Nation versus non-First Nation, Alberta versus British Columbia.” This kind of reporting didn’t sit well with the two university friends. But unlike most people who are content to sit back, get their news, and simply complain about the message they were receiving, Borsa and Becker decided to do something about it. They decided to shed some light on the issues that weren’t being talked about. Enter Line in the Sand, a collaborative multimedia project (book and documentary) aimed at divulging nuanced opinions and personal stories of

people living along the route where the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline will travel. “We wanted to go into the field and speak with people, see if something slightly more interesting or a more balanced story would emerge,” says Borsa. To do this Borsa, Becker (who is a photographer) and Skyler Flavelle (a videographer from B.C.) packed up their car and set out for Alberta. What they found wasn’t what they expected.

“In Alberta there was total indifference,” says Borsa. “I mean, every now and then, sure, we ran into someone who opposed the pipeline. But even then, they didn’t oppose it on the grounds we expected, on the grounds that it would pose a danger to the environment.” So why did some of the people in Alberta oppose the pipeline? “Because they disagreed with the notion of shipping Canadian oil to the Asian market, unrefined,” says Borsa, matter of factly. Which makes sense. After all, the idea of having a pipeline running through their backyards isn’t a completely foreign concept for Albertans. Many of the people that the Line in the Sand team talked to had working pumpjacks on their property or they had pipelines running underneath their fields, hence the level of apathy the team encountered. “It seemed that they just didn’t care,” says Borsa. “It was definitely a battle for us in Alberta. There wasn’t

open hostility to us, but it wasn’t easy getting people to talk, either.” Things would be much easier for them in British Columbia. But there, things would also get a little more shady. And a lot more serious.

Dawson Creek is a sleepy little city located about 35 kilometres west of the Alberta-B.C. border. Nestled among the rolling hills that make up the southern part of the Peace River country plains, it is a city rich in agriculture. A city devoted to being innovative when it comes to exploring new methods of sustainable development. And it was here that the Line in the Sand project began to spin on its axis. “The experience in B.C., which all started in Dawson Creek, was totally, totally different,” says Borsa. “Quite literally, when we crossed the border people were lined up to talk to us. It was difficult to speak with all the people who wanted to talk to us in the time we had.” But they tried, and some of the people they met had less than savoury reactions when it came to the idea of a pipeline running through their community. “Some of the people we met in Dawson Creek immediately brought up the possibility of industrial sabotage,” says Borsa. “Even if the pipeline is built, their argument was that you can build a two-or-threewalled pipeline, but you can never really protect it against a determined human mind.” Continued on next page »

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After Dawson Creek the team got back in their car and kept moving west. It was in Smithers that their project experienced its first real hiccup. “It was a peculiar, conspiratorial incident there,” says Borsa. “It was during a joint review panel hearing. Originally the hearing was set to take place in Hazelton, but there was a perceived threat of violence looming, so they relocated to Smithers. When we got there, there was a very vocal protest underway.” But that didn’t deter the Line in the Sand team. They set up their gear and began to tape the proceedings. At one point they put their three recorders near a set of speakers and left for a bit. When they came back after the hearings had concluded, all their files had been wiped. “It would be presumptuous to say we know who was responsible for doing that,” says Borsa. “But we know that someone did

eign Wet’suwet’en territory from any and all proposed pipelines running through the area — whether it be from the oilsands in Alberta or the Hydraulic Fracturing projects in the Peace River Region. As long as this community stands, they vow no pipeline shall be built in the region. And before you get the wrong idea, no, it wasn’t the Unist’ot’en who erased the tapes. But it is a community of keen interest to Borsa and the Line in the Sand team. Now that the first phase of their project is over, Borsa will be leaving Saskatchewan this fall and heading back into the field, this time with JeanPhilippe Marquis — a photographer/ videographer/tree planter who has worked with Vice in the past. “We’re planning on going back to Smithers and Kitimat and a few other places that are either off the

Some of the people we met … brought up the possibility of industrial sabotage. tom borsa

it. It’s absolutely not the type of thing that can happen on its own. Those files, they needed to be wiped by someone.”

The Unist’ot’en Camp is a resistance community near Smithers, B.C. One of its main purposes is to protect sover-

map or unique,” says Borsa. “We’re also hoping to talk to the Unist’ot’en. Basically, they’re a slightly offthe-grid survivalist community that would like to stop any and all pipelines by any means necessary. They’ve set up road blocks, have begun digging up portions of the

road leading into their lands. They don’t hide the fact they advocate for direct-action tactics.” And how does Borsa plan on getting access to this group for the next round of filming and interviews? “Well, Jean-Philippe was tree planting in the area not long ago and the only people this Unist’ot’en camp was letting through were planters. They’re not friendly to outsiders,” says Borsa. “So he had to negotiate his way onto their land for a few months, he got to know them. So he’s the contact.” But all this traveling and filming comes at a cost, so to see it through to the end the Line in the Sand team has set up a Kickstarter project to help alleviate the fiscal burden. “If all goes well, Part Two will be finished when the government makes an official announcement about the Gateway pipeline. Hopefully sometime in December,” says Borsa. “After that, Part Three will be the follow up … that will demand a little more time to digest. We can’t just rush into these communities two days after the announcement. So we’re looking at, maybe, an August finish date. But who knows? The timetable is really out of our hands.”

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Heroin for the cure We should be prescribing heroin injections to help chronic addicts

I

t may have taken awhile, but after years of petitioning Health Canada, health officials in British Columbia have finally been authorized to prescribe heroin as a treatment for heroinaddicted patients. It’s an innovative step taken by the health community in B.C., and one that we think should be embraced in Saskatchewan in order to help chronic heroin addicts in our province. To be clear, we’re not talking about your everyday, run-of-the-mill addict

were classified as having a response, as compared with 47.7% of patients in the methadone group.” So it works the same way as a methadone treatment, which is already a widely supported option, but is scientifically proven to be more effective. If we’re going to help people treat their problems with addiction, why wouldn’t we want to do what works best? And while the sample from Vancouver is relatively small, that city is not the first to treat chronic addiction

If we’re going to help people … why wouldn’t we want to do what works best?

It’s not only in Switzerland that prescribed heroin programs are successful, either. Recently Britain concluded a four-year trial in which hardened addicts were given daily injections of heroin as part of a comprehensive treatment program. The results there were similarly positive, so much so that Britain is now on its way to becoming the second country in Europe to institutionalize a heroin therapy program. Prescribed heroin worked overseas and it worked in early trials here in Canada, so we think trials should continue with a goal of adding this method of treatment to the others already available. If we follow the other countries’ lead, and provide prescribed heroin along with counselling and other support programs, maybe we can do a better job of cutting down on street-drug use and give help to people who really need it. These editorials are left unsigned because they represent the opinions of Verb magazine, not those of the individual writers. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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here. We’re talking about addicts who have tried to quit cold turkey, who have tried methadone treatment, who have tried a variety of other therapies, but all to no avail. And it is these patients that a handful of doctors in B.C. are now legally allowed to treat with doses of heroin. The move to prescribe heroin might seem counterintuitive, and certainly faces major stigma from attitudes shaped by the (failed) war on drugs, but it’s actually extraordinarily effective. In fact, a study called the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI), published in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that “supervised prescribed heroin is a safe and effective treatment for people with chronic heroin addiction who have not benefited from previous treatments.” And the benefits are significant. The study, which examined the effectiveness of both heroin and methadone, found that there was “a reduction in illicit-drug use or other illegal activities.” Furthermore, “67.0% of the patients in the diacetylmorphine (heroin) group

with prescribed heroin. In Switzerland, there are already 23 clinics that offer heroin-injection therapy, under the supervision of doctors, to chronic addicts. Naturally, when these clinics first opened there was a lot of public skepticism. But last year 68% of the population voted yes in a referendum to permanently keep the clinics in Switzerland, funded by the state. Why? Because they work. According to Ambros Uchtenhagen, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Zurich who helped set up these clinics, the referendum was successful because the programs showed “highly persistent improvement [among the patients].” Treating around 2,200 chronic addicts (or 6% of Switzerland’s heroin addicts), the clinics keep patients in treatment for about three years, and less than 15% of these patients relapsed into daily use. When you consider the fact that the people in this group of addicts each averaged about 15 years of heroin abuse, that recovery rate becomes even more astounding.

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On Topic: Last week we asked what you thought about political transparency. Here's what you had to say:

– The federal and provincial governments should be the best run corporations in the land. The same should go for politicians especially the unelected senators and their spending scandals.

– The government will never be truly transparent because Harper has so much BS he has to keep covered up. It would make for a more effective and legitimate ruling organization, but I doubt true transparency will ever happen. What they spend would be a nice place to start, though.

– There needs to be some force that can make Harper and his cronies accountable to the actions they take.

text yo thoughtsur to 881 Ve r B 8372

OFF TOPIC

available for all elected and nonelected officials.

– Say what you will about politicians being accountable, if Mike Duffy still needs someone to do net research and little else for 65 grand…I am in.. I’ll even do booze runs forgood white wine and drive for him if he has hit the stuff to hard.. Could even cook up some PEI potatoes…

– The conspiracies surrounding Harper are so intense that there is no way the government will ever allow more transparency than the absolute bare minimum required to keep the masses sated.

– The first step to a responsible government is transparency. I completely agree that expenses should be tracked and made

– Dimey is way, way wrong. Even a geezer who could care less about getting high and having a laugh should be upset about Marc Emery being in a US prison. The guy was operating a business and paying taxes to Ottawa, but when the Americans wanted to try him the government did nothing to stop the extradition… In response to “Puff, Puff, Pass,” Local, #261 (October 11, 2013)

– In your Puff, Puff, Pass article it mentions Judy Emery. Jodie Emery is the wife of Prince of Pot, Marc Emery. She is a political activist that has fought so much for the Canadian cannabis community. CHECK OUT POT TV AND FREE MARC EMERY! -Samantha In response to “Puff, Puff, Pass,” Local, #261 (October 11, 2013)

– Greater financial transparency from politicians is important. Increasing SK Auditor access is critical. For more on this see SDAP.CA under menu “Accountabilty.”

– If I read the article on medical marijuana correctly, it suggested that CanniMed Ltd. Had a monopoly. But, articles in other media suggests that production is open to anyone who meets the require

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ments. Which is which? Inquring minds want to know.. In response to “Puff, Puff, Pass,” Local, #261

– Censorship an aversion to opinion and the truth Yeah! Thats Good Ole colonial Saskatchewan! Hasn’t changed much in 150 years.

Those ain’t the Mickey Mouse one yer mom used to destrroy her Monkees LPs.

plants in the basement for some cancer ridden friends deserves incarceration.

– Happy Thanksgiving!

– Ooooh. Why did. I open. A. Hamburger joint. In. India. Why. Why why. KRUSTY

(October 11, 2013)

– Medical marijuana is for those who need it! If you take it away it’ll be like taking away insulin or meds for mental illness! Shame SASK government SHAME!!! :-( In response to “Puff, Puff, Pass,” Local, #261

– Really when you get right down to it the only place where a questionaire with the old Male Female checkboxes isn’t sexist is a gov’t census and doctor’s office.

– Fall is such a beautiful season but far too short.

(October 11, 2013)

– Bring the ufo/immigration exhibit to the Mendel!!! :) In response to “Come one, come all,” Arts, #261 (October 11, 2013)

– Has free speech and open debate on a university campus ever been prorogued because the conclusion may not be to the chancellors liking? In response to “Express Yourself,” Editorial, #260 (October 4, 2013)

– Gotta love social media cause now shock jocks do not have a strangle hold on lying and spreading goofy theories

– I don’t understand why Halloween has to be celebrated for all its evilness. Kids would be better off having a fun night at their school or civic centre. There is enough blood and gore in the world. Do we rely need a holiday to celebrate it too?

– I WAS ALSO AT THE HANSON CONCERT AND IT WAS SO GREAT CAN’T WAIT TO SEE THEM AGAIN

– I’m pretty sure stupidity isn’t why I’m here, but I can guarantee it’ll be what takes me out ;)

– Ack no leaves are gone frost in morning cold nights and cooler days I’m not ready for you yet!

– Blowing your nose without a Kleenex is DOWNtown.

– Lol the person texting about people using crosswalks seems a little obsessive. Dude everyone knows to use crossworks no worries no worries things’l be ok just

– Kickbox ninja Fu – A pump squirt bottle filled with a little laundry soap and water makes a pretty good bug swatter. Don’t spray electric stuff or inhale a lot of the aerosols.

chill verb got your word out in the texts sall good just relax

– Kung Fu Panda is the greatest movie ever made. Except for Kung Fu Panda 2: The Reckoning

Next week: What do you think about prescribing heroin injections to chronic addicts as a form of therapy? Pick up a copy of Verb to get in on the conversation: We print your texts verbatim each week. Text in your thoughts and reactions to our stories and content, or anything else on your mind

sound off – Doubting vinyl roles and always will? check out the 400 dollar turntables at the big box stores.

– The current federal government has some goofy beliefs. Registering a gun is an affront to individual freedom, but growing ten pot

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Tape Deck Heart

Photos: courtesy of Tara Novak

Frank Turner digs deep on his latest album by Alex J MacPherson

F

rank Turner’s latest album, Tape Deck Heart, is about the delicate balance between innocence and experience. Turner is only 31, but he has already had enough experience to last a lifetime. After several years spent playing in hardcore bands, he abandoned his screaming amplifier for an acoustic guitar and began releasing edgy folkpunk records. His fourth album, a rousing and highly literate tribute to ancient Albion called England Keep My Bones, emerged as one of the strongest records of 2011. For Tape Deck Heart, which was released in April, Turner turned

Alex J MacPherson: Tape Deck Heart is much bigger and more expansive than England Keep My Bones. Is that what happens with all songwriters or did you plan on moving toward a bigger sound?

away from the grand themes that littered England Keep My Bones and concentrated on himself. Tape Deck Heart is a rock and roll record, loaded with some of the biggest and richest arrangements Turner has ever produced. It is also deeply, almost uncomfortably honest. Accusatory and confessional, triumphant and despairing, Tape Deck Heart is a chronicle of the two years Turner spent on the road with his band, the Sleeping Souls — and an anxiety-laden explanation for all the things he left behind. A few weeks ago, I caught up with Turner to learn more about the best record he has ever made.

Frank Turner: It was a bit of both, really. Part of it is just the natural evolution of touring with Sleeping Souls, playing with four great musicians. But also there’s a conscious part to it as well, in the sense that I’m interested in making bigger-sounding music right now, you know? Of course there are a couple of bits and bobs that strip it

back, like “Anymore” or whatever. But I feel like I’ve got this fantastic arsenal at my disposal, and it would be a shame not to use it. AJM: As for the songs, it seems like Tape Deck Heart is the most personal thing you’ve ever written. FT: I think England Keep My Bones is quite a loftily themed record, if you see what I mean. It’s about death and national identity, all these things. That’s fine, but if you go too far down that particular road you end up with Pink Floyd, essentially, which is not really what I wanted to do with my life. I wanted to wind it back in a little

bit on that level. I also think, again probably more subconsciously than consciously, I knew this was going to be a bigger record, what with the kind of record labels we were working with or whatever, and it seemed kind of interestingly counter-intuitive to me at that moment to write something that was more inward-looking rather than more expansive. AJM: I’m interested in this idea of permanent marks on the body, especially tattoos, that keeps cropping up in these songs. FT: The song “Losing Days” is where this comes in very much. I feel like

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the moment that you cease to be young is the moment when you start making irreversible decisions, and irreversible marks on yourself in a way. It’s an interesting thing: when you’re a kid life is full of possibilities and it can be anything you want it to be — in a way, obviously not literally. And then you get older and you’ve committed. There’s a line, “all these small ideas are suddenly commitments,” and for me now, I’m going to be a musician for the rest of my life, or at least working in and around music — that’s who I am, that’s what I do, and I’m fine with that. But it’s an interesting realization, that moment when I’ve chosen my path in life and I can’t un-choose it now — so let’s see where we go. AJM: At the same time, there’s a thread of redemption, or at least freedom, running through this record.

whatever, there are certain indelible things that make up character — some things you can’t get away from.

FT: Something I’m very keen on philosophically is the idea of self-creation, do you know what I mean? I wasn’t born as a good singer or a good performer or somebody who was particularly good at touring or anything else; it’s just something that I’ve worked at and I like the idea that by putting the effort in you can become something that you weren’t necessarily going to be in the first place. Almost in a way I

AJM: Speaking of miles traveled, you’re heading out on a long tour of North America. Do you feel like touring has changed or is it the same as it’s always been? FT: Without wanting to get overly melodramatic about it, Townes Van Zandt said living on the road will keep you free and clean, and there’s a

It’s more interesting to have to forge yourself, to really … work your ass off… frank turner

find the stereotype of Mozart, the kid who was born with this innate talent and all the rest of it, fully-formed and incredible, I find that slightly boring. It’s more interesting to have to forge yourself, to really have to work your ass off to be the thing you want to be. AJM: So you can in a sense reinvent yourself all the time. FT: Definitely. But within limits. There’s an interesting tension in the middle of this, actually. I think that you can up to a certain point of time, but at the same time, after a certain amount of miles traveled or years passed or

certain truth to that in the sense that there’s an inescapable, inevitable fact that is you’re leaving at the end of the day. You know what I mean? Regardless of whatever else happens while you’re there, you’re going to be gone in twenty-four hours. And I kind of like that, in a way. AJM: Changing gears, this is your most successful record in North America, which is significant considering how many great English bands — I’m thinking of the Libertines — struggled over here. Do you worry about writing songs that will appeal to people over here?

FT: It was something that I used to worry about before I’d done much touring over here. But the first thing is in North America there’s a pretty strong sense of Anglophilia, culturally, particularly within the punk scene. I haven’t quite tweaked how completely everyone thinks Joe Strummer is a saint. Don’t get me wrong: I like the Clash, I like Joe Strummer, he was a great guy. But people in the punk scene in North America hold him as this unimpeachable figure of goodness. It was like ‘wow’ when I first got here, and so that’s definitely played to my advantage. I remember before the first proper tour I did over here wondering if anyone’s going to get this in the U.S.A. but in the end they totally have done. So my fears on that subject have been assuaged. Not incidentally, I wouldn’t have done anything particularly different had that not worked out, because at the end of the day all you can do is make the music that sounds good to you and hope that it connects with the world — and it’s nice that it seems to have done that. Frank Turner October 25 @ Louis’ Pub $23 @ Ticketfly Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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Always With You

Photos: courtesy of Macarena Yanez(makifotos)

Saskatoon songwriter John Antoniuk remembers his mother on latest album by Alex J MacPherson

I

t’s been a year since John Antoniuk released a record. But the Saskatoonbased songwriter hasn’t been idle. After finishing Always With You, a collection of simple yet haunting alt-country songs written in the wake of his mother’s death, Antoniuk hit the road. He toured western Canada with his band. Then he trekked east with his wife, singer-songwriter Jen Lane. And then he did something radical. Instead of heading back into the studio to make another album, he recruited a fiery rock duo called Castle River for yet another tour. “We took it from Wilco to Weezer overnight,” says Antoniuk, who has been a fixture of the local music community for almost a decade. “I told them from day one, ‘listen to the record for some of the hooks, because you don’t have to write

when he started writing Always With You. The words poured out, song after song after song — the most personal and open he has ever written. “I only made it for myself,” he admits. “I hope people enjoy it, and I think what people enjoy about my music is that it’s for me first, it’s coming from a really pure, honest place.” Always With You is the most introspective record Antoniuk has ever made, a lifetime of experiences and memories bound up in eleven short songs. But it is also the most universal. From the Wilcoesque midtempo rocker “Good Girl Down” to the rolling country weeper “Chicago,” Always With You explores ideas that mean something to everyone. “Holding On (For Marlene)” is about his mother’s passing. But it is also about how families are always rising and falling, how the peaks and the valleys

new hooks, but really we’re not stuck with what the record does. We’re going to go with what we sound like. I’m not going to force us in any one direction.’” Interpreting and re-interpreting the songs on Always With You has become something of an obsession for Antoniuk. Over the last twelve months, he has played it in every imaginable configuration, from searing rock to solo acoustic. The only reason this works is because the songs are good. Very good. “It’s my own rule, that songs have to be super strong solo first,” he says. “It comes down to the song. It doesn’t have to be better than anybody else’s song, it’s not a competition; it’s only within yourself, creating the best thing you can.” In the past, Antoniuk wrote a lot of music, filling in the empty spaces with lyrics when he could nail down an idea. That changed

of life affect us all. “Take It Back,” on the other hand, is about the preciousness — and the pain — of memory. These are ideas anyone can relate to, ideas the live inside us all. Writing and recording Always With You was difficult for Antoniuk. Recording studios are about finality and preservation; making a record involves leaving the past on the tape and opening up an entirely new world. Antoniuk was reluctant to let go of the past. “It was hard to do it without breaking down sometimes,” he says. “Some songs would just kick me in the chest and I had to remember to breathe while I was playing.” Which is why he has spent the last year on the road, reinventing his own songs onstage every night. Live music is art in motion, and songs live forever under the bright stage lights. And that’s why they matter so much.

“When it started, it was about my therapy,” he says. “Now, it’s comforting to me to see people getting something out of the songs, whether they’ve lost a mom or a dad or a brother or a friend. I left that open for interpretation for people so it wasn’t all about death, but about the loss and something unrequited.” This is the essence of Always With You. Time slows when the music starts, and everybody in the audiences comes a little close to finding what’s missing, what’s lost, what’s been taken all too soon. John Antoniuk October 26 @ Amigos Cantina Tickets at the door Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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Alice in Translation

Photos: courtesy of Marc-Antoine Duhaime

Quebec theatre group adapts Carroll’s classic story for the French language by Alex J MacPherson

L

ewis Carroll’s Alice In Wonderland is one of the classics of English literature. First published in 1865, Carroll’s novel about a girl who falls down a rabbit hole and lands in a kaleidoscopic fantasyland is deeply ingrained in the popular consciousness. Characters like the Queen of Hearts and the Cheshire Cat, the Mad Hatter and the March Hare, have become synonymous with the ideas they represent. The degree to which Alice has penetrated our consciousness created a significant challenge for Hugo Bélanger when he proposed to transform Carroll’s novel into a French-language play. “It’s the kind of story that everybody knows, in the English community it’s a well, well-known story,” says Bélanger, who adapted and directed Carroll’s story for Théâtre Tout à Trac, a theatre company based in Quebec. “In the French community we know the story, but not as much as the English side of Canada. So when we created the show first in French, the challenge was about the wordplay and puns in Lewis Carroll’s novel. It’s impossible to translate it.” Translation has always been a thorny issue, particularly where classic novels are concerned. Recognizing that a literal translation

would neuter Carroll’s sparkling prose, Bélanger attempted to capture the spirit — rather than the precise language — of the novel. “To keep the spirit of Lewis Carroll’s novel, we had to invent new puns, new wordplay,” he says. “The playing with words, with the power of words and language, that was very important to me.” Because Bélanger’s adaptation will be seen by many people living in areas where French is not widely spoken, and because it will be presented in French with no surtitles, he also chose to make subtle changes to the story itself. In Carroll’s novel, Alice enters Wonderland through a rabbit hole; in Théâtre Tout à Trac’s production, she encounters the characters by opening books. “We want to talk about the power of reading,” he says, pointing out the increased emphasis on the source material. “It’s a classic novel. It’s not a movie, it’s not a play. The origin is a novel, so it was important for us to talk about that — the power of reading, the power of books, the power of words.” While Théâtre Tout à Trac’s Alice includes several departures from Carroll’s story, other elements, such as the fantastical set and the famous characters, will be familiar to everyone, regardless of what language they speak. Put another way, great stories transcend everything — even the

language in which they were written. “It’s about the power of imagination,” Bélanger says. “It’s playing with how we think. Each time we learn another language, we discover another culture and we think differently — and we can understand the other side, the other culture.” This is what Carroll was trying to impart when he wrote Alice In Wonderland — the notion that there is always another way to think about something. And it is what Bélanger’s French adaptation captures as well. “It’s great with this story,” he says, “because we teach the kids: you can think by yourself, you can ask questions, and your imagination can change things around you.” After a pause, Bélanger points out that imagination is more real than many people think. “We cannot fly in the sky because we are not birds — but we fly in the sky now, with planes, because somebody imagined that and dreamed about that. It’s about using your imagination to create new worlds.” Alice October 26 @ Remai Arts Centre $TBA Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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the deep dark woods Saskatoon band emerges from the wilderness with their strongest album to date by Alex J MacPherson

T

he Deep Dark Woods didn’t plan to recreate one of the most enduring myths in rock and roll. But after recording their latest album in a secluded cabin near Bragg Creek, Alberta, the band members agreed that it was a good idea. The history of popular music is littered with stories of bands emerging from the wilderness clutching masterpieces. The Band did it in 1968, when they rented a house in upstate New York and made Music From Big Pink. Four decades later, Justin Vernon of the baroque pop band Bon Iver contracted mononucleosis, retreated to a cabin in rural Wisconsin, and recorded For Emma, Forever Ago. All clichés contain a granule of truth, and the legend of the band in the wilderness is as strong today as it was in the heady sixties because it tends to produce results. But the Deep Dark Woods weren’t particularly interested in spending weeks or months away from their lives; the veteran alt-country band from Saskatoon just wanted to make a good album. “We actually had the Banff Centre booked to record in,” Ryan Boldt, the band’s lead singer and principal songwriter, says in his characteristic sleepy drawl. “We knew the guys there from playing there in the past, so it looked like a good idea.” The gorgeous

complex of buildings nestled in the Rocky Mountains promised to be the ideal setting for a band whose sound is rooted in rustic simplicity, traditional music played by generations of people in kitchens and on back porches. But it was not to be. When the band’s plan to record in Banff collapsed, they rented a cabin in the foothills, set up a studio, and went to work. “It was two weeks in the cabin, we were all living together,”

The Place I Left Behind. The record was an overwhelming success. It generated a string of positive reviews and carried the band across the continent, where they played their haunting songs to thousands of people. But making yet another record would not be easy. The departure of guitarist Burke Barlow, an integral part of the band’s sound since the very beginning, forced Boldt and his bandmates to make adjustments.

On a good record you can tell what the person’s listening to — and then they go ahead and play it in their own way. ryan boldt

Boldt says. “At the dinner table we’d be eating and then we’d have a little jam afterward. It was the perfect way to make music. Nobody felt any sort of pressure at all.” The Deep Dark Woods have been making music together for almost a decade. The core band members have known each other for even longer. In 2011, after three successful albums, the band signed a deal with Six Shooter Records — home to artists like Whitehorse, Amelia Curran, and Trampled By Turtles — and released

They turned to Clayton Linthicum, a fanatical student of music history, a formidable guitar player, and a fixture on the western Canadian roots circuit. “There’s a whole bunch of new types of songs we can play with Clayton,” says Boldt, who produced The Day Is Passed And Gone, a collection of gutsy folk interpretations Linthicum made with his cousin. “The guy’s only nineteen, but he’s a professional. He knows how to sit in there and not play. A lot of guitar players can be amazing guitar players and talented musicians, Continued on next page »

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Photo: courtesy of Jeremy Regimbal

but the best part about [playing with] Clayton is he knows when not to play and when to let everybody else play.” Linthicum, who traded his weatherbeaten Gibson acoustic for an SG and a Fender Deluxe, played an important part in ensuring that Jubilee sounds like nothing else the Deep Dark Woods have ever recorded. The undertones of distance and time that pervaded their earlier records have been replaced by the sort of urgency usually reserved for uptempo rock records. Jubilee captures the sound of five musicians playing loud instruments in a small room. And while the band’s gothic folk roots are

Photo: courtesy of Jeremy Regimbal

left intact, they are disguised by something more expansive. Jubilee opens with “Miles and Miles,” a spacey song that evokes the Besnard Lakes while smouldering with the sort of intensity found on the records Neil Young made with Crazy Horse in the seventies. Then there is “18th of December,” which casts Boldt’s solemn voice against a rousing backdrop of organ and electric guitar. “I really like English traditional music,” Boldt says of “18th of December,” “and you can tell the influence on

that [song]. But we were just playing it as the five of us would. It would be a completely different song if Burke was playing the guitar.” It should not come as a surprise that Jubilee reveals some of what inspired its creators. The Deep Dark Woods are committed students of music history, and their taste extends from seventies psychedelia to the ancestors of Elvis and Buddy Holly — seminal songwriters such as Howlin‘ Wolf and the Stanley Brothers. “You can definitely tell what we’re listening to,” Boldt says, “just like you can tell what the Band was listening to on the second Band record or what Dylan was listening to on Blonde on Blonde or what Bert Jansch was listening to when he made Birthday Blues. On a good record you can tell what the person’s listening to — and then they go ahead and play it in their own way.” Put another way, the album is the product of five musicians sequestering themselves in a tiny cabin and playing music. Sometimes, it’s really that simple. “It was just strung together, you know?” Boldt says of the album. “We put the arrangement on a piece of paper and pasted it to the wall, and then everybody just played whatever they wanted to play. We’d go through it two or three times, and you kind of have ideas, like we should do a melody solo here or whatever. But it’s just a bunch of people playing whatever the hell they want to play.” Unlike The Place I Left Behind, which was produced by the band themselves, Jubilee was overseen by Jonathan Wilson, who is known for his

work in experimental and psychedelic California folk. “I think it’s really important, especially when you’ve got five people that are giving their opinions on how a song should sound,” Boldt says of Wilson. “It’s important to have one person that has the final say, or that’s steering you in the right direction.” The thirteen tracks that make up Jubilee exude the sort of warmth and familiarity of an ancient analog recording. But Jubilee was not recorded onto long reels of two-inch tape: it was made using ProTools, the software normally associated with pristine-sounding radio hits. “Honestly, you just need somebody that knows how to work digital recording and make it sound good,” Boldt says. “And Jonathan does. You can barely tell the difference. That’s because Jonathan is amazing, same with Bryce Gonzales, the engineer. They know everything about recording.” Jubilee is the most relaxed record the Deep Dark Woods have ever made. It is also the best. An expression of the music they love and a reflection of their ability, Jubilee captures the Deep Dark Woods at their best — nostalgic for the past, excited about the present, and eager to create something that will expand long into the future. But Boldt isn’t particularly interested in combing through the songs for some deeper meaning. “When you’re writing the songs or rehearsing with the band, you’re not really thinking too much,” he confesses. “It just kind of falls out, and it is what it is, really.” At the same time, he seems to know that Jubilee marks another watershed for the Deep Dark Woods. But he’s already thinking about what comes next. “That’s the best way to make a record,” he says, referring to the myth of the cabin in the woods. “I think we’re going to try and continue to do that. The Deep Dark Woods November 2 @ Louis’ Pub $21 @ Ticketmaster

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Soup, sandwiches and people watching Photos courtesy of Adam Hawboldt

Grandma Lee’s a quiet spot to grab a quick lunch by adam hawboldt

P

eople watching is a lost art. In this chaotic age of instant gratification and handheld computers (read: smartphones), very few people take the time to sit back and literally watch life pass them by — even though it’s utterly relaxing and sometimes soothing. So earlier this week, on a cold, grey afternoon, I took a seat at Grandma Lee’s Cafe and Bakery on 8th Street and stared out the window at the people passing by. A bald man packing boxes into a shopping cart, a young girl crying in her father’s arms. A twenty-something woman walking into The Centre. Brown hair, neon green jacket, black Lululemons. Because of its atrium (which encompasses the entire dining area), Grandma Lee’s is an ideal place to

grilled chicken and so much more), a different variety of soups made fresh every day, not to mention salads and desserts, Grandma Lee’s has options for both meat lovers and vegetarians alike. Having eaten too much meat recently (long story!), I decided to go with something a little less carnivorous. What I chose was the World’s Greatest Egg Salad sandwich with a small bowl of Cheesy Pepper Pot soup. Both good choices. The egg salad had just the right ratio of potato-chunks-to-spread and was full of zip. The cheese bread it came served on was thick and fresh as all-get-out-of-here. Toss some sprouts and onions on that bad boy, and you have yourself a pretty tasty sandwich. Oh, and the soup? It was thick and cheesy with a subtle-yet-tasty peppery bite. All in all, a lunch well done. If I hadn’t been so busy people watching I could’ve easily been in an out in under 15 minutes. But c’mon, sometimes it’s fun to watch the world pass you by. Right?

sit and partake in the odd hobby of people watching. It’s also a pretty darn good place to grab a quick bite to eat for lunch. The place is clean and strip-mall quaint. Conversations about family and marriage and television shows drift quietly from table to table. And the service? Very attentive. The manager, Yanan, a former international student at the U of S who opened the restaurant last year, is quick to smile and quick to answer any questions you might have. You know what else is quick? The service. Set up cafeteria-style with the menu on the wall behind the counter, Grandma Lee’s gets you your lunch in under five minutes (provided they’re not too busy). With a host of sandwiches to select from (tuna salad, Reuben,

let’s go drinkin’ Verb’s mixology guide Cool Cucumber Cocktail

Ingredients

Sticking with the theme of quick and yummy, why not try this gin concoction that mixes cucumber (a serious antioxidant) with apple cider and cranberry juice for a tasty, (kinda) healthy cocktail.

1 1/2oz gin 1 oz apple cider 1 oz cranberry juice 1/4 cup diced cucumber 3 mint leaves 1 slice of cucumber

Grandma Lee’s Bakery and Cafe 3310 8th Street East | (306) 974 5201

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Directions

Muddle the diced cucumber and mint, then put in a shaker. Add ice, gin, cider and cranberry juice. Shake until frosty. Strain into a short glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with a cucumber wheel and serve.

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music

Next Week

coming up

Young Benjamins

Chris Cornell Said the Whale

@ Amigos Cantina saturday, October 26 – $TBD

@ TCU Place sunday, October 27 – $26+

@ Broadway Theatre wednesday, November 27 – $28

What do you get when you mix modern folk with indie/math-rock undertones and sweet, catchy lyrics? If you answered “Saskatoon’s very own Young Benjamins,” you’d be right. Consisting of frontman Neusha Mofazzali, Veronique Poulin (violin/vocals/ keys), Kuba Szmigielski (drums/ percussion) and Brynn Krysa (bass), this up-and-coming quartet plays a brand of infectious, honest music you can’t help but like. Sometimes upbeat and whistle-along worthy, other times slow and thoughtful, the songs the Young Benjamins play are well-crafted, accessible and catchy. Since releasing their self-titled EP, the band has been playing stage after stage, honing their sound and winning fans. Their latest album, Less Argue, was released earlier this year. Tickets at the door.

Chris Cornell is one helluva vocalist. With a four-octave vocal range and a belting technique that makes him stand out from the crowd, this hard rock/alt frontman was named the #4 best metal vocalist of all-time by Hit Parader, and came in at the #9 spot on Rolling Stone’s all-time best vocalist reader poll — just behind John Lennon and Eddie Vedder. So it’s no real surprise he is an in-demand frontman. From Soundgarden to Audioslave to his own solo projects, Cornell has been wowing audiences with his vocal stylings since the 1980s. A constant innovator, Cornell refuses to be pigeonholed by genre, playing everything from hard-charging rock to pareddown acoustic. He’ll be in Saskatoon performing his solo show in October. Tickets at www.tcutickets.ca

Man, Said the Whale is one busy band! Since songwriters Ben Worcester and Tyler Bancroft formed the group in 2007, this Vancouver quintet has released 10 EPs, four studio albums (their most recent one, hawaii, came out this year), toured Canada, invaded America, and played the SXSW Festival. Oh, and along the way they picked up an award for New Group of the Year at the Junos in 2011. Consisting of Worcester (guitar/vocals), Bancroft (guitar/vocals), Nathan Shaw (bass), Spencer Schoening (drums), and Jaycelyn Brown (keyboards), Said the Whale play an eclectic brand of indie folk rock that is simply infectious. Combine that with an engaging stage presence, and what you have is a show you shouldn’t miss. – By Adam Hawboldt

Photos courtesy of: the artist / eldh / the artist

Sask music Preview The application deadline for the SaskMusic Investment Program, which enables artists and industry professionals to enhance their careers and is funded by the Government of Saskatchewan — Ministry of Parks, Culture and Sport, is November 15. For more information please see http://www. saskmusic.org/index.php?p=Investment%20Programs. Artists wishing to apply for Marketing Initiatives and Travel Support can apply to the Creative Saskatchewan Investment Fund Grant Program. Please visit www.creativesask.ca for more information. Keep up with Saskatchewan music. saskmusic.org

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october 18 » october 26 The most complete live music listings for Saskatoon. S

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18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Friday 18

House DJs / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs liven it up. 9pm / No cover Orange Goblin / Amigos — With Holy Grail and Lazer/Wulf. 10pm / $18 Piano Fridays: Fred Ballantyne / The Bassment — Feel like taking in some smooth jazz stylings? 4:30pm / No cover Joe Fafard, Joel Fafard and Joel Schawrtz / The Bassment — High art meets deep roots. 9pm / $23/$28 Stuck in the 80s / Béily’s — Playing all your favourite 80s music. 9pm / $5 cover Big Dave McLean / Buds on Broadway -  Delta blues done right. 10pm / Cover TBD Reggae Party / Cosmo Senior Centre — Featuring the talents of the Oral Fuentes Reggae Band and the Jim Balfour Reggae Band. 8pm / $10 cover BPM / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin electro/ vocal house music. 10pm / $5

DJ Eclectic / The Hose — Local turntable whiz pumps snappy beats. 8pm / No cover DJ Stikman / Jax — Kick off the night with all your favourite party hits.. 9pm / $5 cover DJ Big Ayyy & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — Round up your friends. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm Kelly Read / Piggy’s — A local boy playing rockin’ blues. 9pm / No cover Doug Boomhower Trio / Prairie Ink — Cool tunes in a cozy setting. 8pm / No cover Charger, Pigeon Park / Rock Bottom — Start the weekend on the right note. 9pm / Cover TBD Urban Outlaws / Stan’s Place — A rockin’ good time guaranteed. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie + Brad King. 10pm / $5 Party Rock Fridays / Tequila — Come tear it up. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Nick Ruston / Uncle Barley’s — Come and check him out! 9pm / Cover TBD Kalle Mattson, Michael Feuerstack / Vangelis — Upbeat indie rock and laid-back folk. 10pm / Cover TBD

Jazz Singer Fest / The Bassment — Featuring Paulette Andrieu, Colleen Carr, Neil Currie and more. 9pm / $17/$23 DJ Aash Money + DJ Sugar Daddy / Béily’s — These two DJs throw down a dance party every Saturday night. 9pm / $5 cover Big Dave McLean / Buds on Broadway -  Delta blues done right. 10pm / Cover TBD SaturGAY Night / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin exclusive dance remixes every Saturday. 10pm / $5 DJ Kade / The Hose — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ Stikman / Jax Niteclub — Ladies night with the Jax party crew. 9pm / $5 cover DJ Goodtimes / Longbranch — Playing the hottest country music all night. 8pm / $4 Method Man + Redman / Odeon Events Centre — Two superstars of rap, one stage. 9pm / $50+ (theodeon.ca) DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman / Outlaws — Round up your friends. 8pm / $5 Kelly Read / Piggy’s — A local boy playing rockin’ blues. 9pm / No cover Richelle Andre / Prairie Ink — A mesmerizing singer/songwriter from rural Saskatchewan. 8pm / No cover October Sky / Rock Bottom — Alt-rock out of Montreal. 9pm / Cover TBD Urban Outlaws / Stan’s Place — A rockin’ good time guaranteed. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie + Brad King. 10pm / $5 DJ Anchor / Sutherland Bar — It’s a video mix show! 10pm / Cover TBD

Saturday 19

House DJs / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes. 9pm / No cover Savage Henry and the Infamous One Pounders / Amigos Cantina — Saskatoon kings take the stage. 10pm / Cover TBD Maurice Drouin / The Bassment — Tickling the ivories on the Kinsmen Yamaha S6 Grande. 5:30pm / No cover

Riff Raff / Sutherland Hall — Playing classic 80s anthems in support of the Children’s Wish Foundation. 8pm / $20 A Prairie Pops Spectacular / TCU Place — With Jeffery Straker. 7:30pm / $35+ Saturday Night Social / Tequila — You will be moving + grooving. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Thorpdeo / Uncle Barley’s — Spinning hot tunes all night. 10pm / Cover TBD  24th Street Wailers / Vangelis — Funky music from Toronto. 10pm / Cover TBD

Sunday 20

Martin Janovsky / The Bassment — Tickling the ivories on the Kinsmen Yamaha S6 Grande. 5:30pm / No cover Industry Night / Béily’s — Hosted by DJ Sugar Daddy. 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff Classical Variety Night / Grosvenor Park United Church — Talented local musicans play music they love. 7:30pm / Admission by donation DJ KADE / The Hose — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover The Pretty Reckless / Louis’ — New York rockers. New7pm / $18+ (unionevents.com) Blues Jam / Vangelis — The Vangelis Sunday Jam is an institution, offering great tunes. 7:30pm / No cover

Monday 21

DJ Audio / Dublins — Spinning dope beats. 9pm / Cover TBD

Tuesday 22

DJ SUGAR DADDY / The Double Deuce — He’s able to rock any party. 9:30pm / $4 DJ Nick Ruston / Dublins — Spinning dope beats. 9pm / Cover TBD Verb presents Open Mic / Rock Bottom — Come and rock the stage! 9pm / No cover Open Mic / Somewhere Else Pub — Come out to show your talent. 7pm / No cover

Wednesday 23

HUMP WEDNESDAYS / 302 — With resident DJ Chris Knorr. 9pm / $3 after 10pm DJ Aash Money / Béily’s — Spinning dope beats all night. 9pm / Cover TBD Open Air / Buds — A high-energy, hardrock throw back band. 10pm / Cover TBD Souled Out / Diva’s Annex — Featuring the spinning talents of Dr. J 9pm / $2 DJ Memo / Dublins — Spinning dope beats. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Kade / The Hose — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover SFNWG 2014 Cabaret / Odeon — With New Horizon + more. 9pm / $20

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Buck Wild Wednesdays / Outlaws — Come ride the mechanical bull! 9pm / $4 CJWW Karaoke / Stan’s Place — Your talent, aired on the radio! 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie + Brad King. 10pm

Thursday 24

Harpoonist and the Axe Murderer / Amigos — Vancouver rock. 10pm Jazz Jam / Bassment — Featuring The Kim Salkeld Trio. 8pm / No cover for jammers. Daybreak / Buds — A local hard-rock band with something to prove. 10pm / Cover TBD Pink / CUC — Come check out this world renowned performer. 7:30pm / $37.25+ Throwback Thursdays / Earls — With Dr. J. 8pm / No cover Hundred Mile House / Gillian Snider’s House — Alt-folk music out of Alberta. 8:30 / $10(advance)/$15(door) DJ Kade / The Hose — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ Goodtimes / Longbranch — Playing the hottest country music all night. 8pm / $4 Thunder Riot / Rock Bottom — Come dance the night away. 9pm / $5

Triple Up Thursdays / Tequila — Featuring DJ Dislexic. 9pm / Cover TBD Jordan Klassen / Vangelis — An intimate folk singer/songwriter. 9pm / $8 Open Stage / The Woods — Hosted by Steven Maier. 9pm / No cover

Friday 25

House DJs / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs liven it up. 9pm / No cover Delhi 2 Dublin / Amigos — A Vancouver band you gotta see. 10pm / $12 Rick Friend / Bassment — Check out some sweet jazz. 4:30pm / No cover Brad Johner and The Johner Boys / Bassment — Country tunesdone right. 9pm / $17/$23 DJ Aash Money / Béily’s — DJ Aash Money throws it down. 9pm / $5 cover Mr. Brownstone / Buds on Broadway — A Guns N’ Roses tribute. 10pm / Cover TBD Loretta Lynn / Dakota Dunes — An iconic country singer. 8pm / SOLD OUT BPM / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin electro/ vocal house music. 10pm / $5 DJ Eclectic / The Hose — Local turntable whiz pumps snappy beats. 8pm / No cover

DJ Stikman / Jax — Kick off your weekend with all your favourite party hits.. 9pm / $5 Frank Turner / Louis’ — A British folk/ punk singer. 7pm / $23 (ticketfly.com) DJ Big Ayyy & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — Round up your friends. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm It’s Too Late, Baby / Prairie Ink — James Taylor and Carole King covers. 8pm Johnny Don’t / Rock Bottom — Kick your weekend off right! 9pm / Cover TBD 0 Km 2 Empty / Stan’s Place — Come out for a rockin’ good time. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie + Brad King. 10pm / $5 Party Rock Fridays / Tequila — Come tear it up. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Nick Ruston / Uncle Barley’s — Come and check him out! 9pm / Cover TBD JD Edwards Band / Vangelis — Upbeat folk music from Winnipeg. 10pm / $10 Pistolwhips / Village Guitar and Amp — With Shoeless Joes. 9pm / Cover TBD

Saturday 26

Young Benjamins / Amigos — With The Elwins + John Antoniuk. 10pm / Cover TBD Ernesto Cervini + Turbopop / Bassment — With Joel Frahm. 9pm / $20/$25 DJ Aash Money + DJ Sugar Daddy / Béily’s — These two throw it down. 9pm / $5 Mr. Brownstone / Buds on Broadway — A Guns N’ Roses tribute. 10pm / Cover TBD Blaze of Glory / Dakota Dunes — A Bon Jovi tribute band. 8pm / $10 SaturGAY Night / Diva’s — Resident DJs spin exclusive dance remixes. 10pm / $5 DJ Kade / The Hose — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ Stikman / Jax — Ladies night with the Jax party crew. 9pm / $5 cover DJ Goodtimes / Longbranch — Playing the hottest country music. 8pm / $4 cover Sirvis / Louis’ — A local rapper throwing a CD-release party. 8pm / Cover TBD DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman / Outlaws — Round up your friends. 8pm / $5 Kevin Roy, Donovan Locken / Prairie Ink — A little bit of everything. 8pm/ No cover

Pandas in Japan / Rock Bottom — Get ready to rock! 9pm / Cover TBD 0 Km 2 Empty / Stan’s Place — Come out for a rockin’ good time. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie + Brad King. 10pm / $5 DJ Anchor / Sutherland Bar — It’s a video mix show! 10pm / Cover TBD Saturday Night Social / Tequila — Electronic Saturdays will have you moving and grooving. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Thorpdeo / Uncle Barley’s — Spinning hot tunes all night. 10pm / Cover TBD Halloween for Humanity / Vangelis — Featuring Shooting Guns, Bad Decisions + more. 10pm / $10(advance)/$15(door)

Get listed Have a live show you'd like to promote? Let us know! layout@verbnews.com

House DJs / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes. 9pm / No cover

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Don’t believe everything you see Photo: Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Benedict Cumberbatch shines in The Fifth Estate, but the rest of the movie is just ho-hum by adam hawboldt

I

f you’ve been anywhere near the Internet in the past few weeks, chances are you’ve read about the back and forth between actor Benedict Cumberbatch and Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. In case you’ve missed it, Assange wrote a letter to Cumberbatch, discouraging him from taking the lead roll as Assange in Bill Condon’s new film The Fifth Estate because he felt “DreamWorks [the film’s producers] has based its entire production on the two most discredited books on the market. I know the film intends to depict me and my work in a negative light … I believe it will distort events and subtract from public understanding. It does not seek to simplify, clarify or distill the truth, but rather it seeks to bury it.” Cumberbatch responded by saying he understood Assange’s concerns but planned on creating “a three dimensional portrait of a man far more maligned in the tabloid press than he is in our film to remind people that he is not just the weird, white haired Australian dude wanted in Sweden, hiding in an embassy behind Harrods. But a true force to be reckoned with.” As it turns out, they both had valid points. On the one hand, Cumberbatch gives a vivid, complex, and nuanced portrayal as Assange, the white-haired computer hack who runs a nonprofit, news-leaking website called Wikileaks. In the movie, things are going rather slow for Assange in the beginning. So he enlists the help of

Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl) to help with the tech side of things, as well as the publicity. Pretty soon they capture the public’s attention after they expose corruption at a Swiss Bank and put a video on the Internet of a Baghdad airstrike that showed American planes bombing civilians.

the fifth estate Bill Condon Starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Daniel Brühl, Alicia Vikander Directed by

124 minutes | PG

letter to Cumberbatch makes a serious point. In the beginning of the movie he’s portrayed as a hero and a noble Internet crusader. But as the plot thickens (and just as Assange thought), he is slowly transformed into the villain of the film. Sure, it works well on screen, and results in an edgy and, at times, compelling movie. But it’s as though Bill Condon made up his mind based on two books he’s read (one of them written by Domscheit-Berg himself) and decided to pass Assange off as somewhat of a sociopath while making DomscheitBerg the voice of absolute reason. How close is this to reality? We may never find out. Does Assange have a right to be justifiably pissed at the representation of himself on screen? Maybe. To be honest, I don’t know. All I know is Cumberbatch kills it as Assange, but without him the movie would be a humdrum, slightly too long docudrama without much heart.

Cumberbatch kills it as Assange, but without him the movie would be … humdrum… Adam Hawboldt

After that, they receive hundreds of thousands of U.S. army field reports that shed light on numerous other civilian deaths and ensuing military cover-ups. Needless to say, they plan to make this information available to the public. But there’s a hiccup. Assange forces (convinces?) Domscheit-Berg to publish the documents without protecting peoples’ identities. People whose careers and even lives could be jeopardized by the leaking of this information. The two butt heads on this issue about what’s more important, government accountability or personal privacy. And it’s here that Assange’s

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Behind the scenes with the Beatles

Good Ol’ Freda tells the story of the Fab Four’s secretary, but how much of a story does it tell? by adam hawboldt

S

ometimes, landing your dream job is simply a matter of being in the right place at the right time. For Freda Kelly, that place was the Cavern Club in Liverpool, England. The time? 1962. Back then, Kelly was a gangly 16-year-old working in a typing pool. One day after work she was coaxed into going to the Cavern to watch an up-and-coming band that was making waves in Liverpool. Their name? The Beatles. Soon as Kelly heard the Fab Four she was hooked and, like many other 16-year-old fangirls at the time, went back to the Cavern to see the Beatles, again and again. Eventually, she got to know the band — Paul, John, George and drummer Pete Best — while hanging out with them after their shows. She started working as the head of the band’s fan club, and soon the band’s manager, Brian Epstein, asked Kelly if she’d like to become the Beatles’ secretary.

Photo: Courtesy of PBS International and Cinetic

She talks about the fans who were heartbroken by Paul ‘s marriage, about how Ringo’s mother would invite her over for eggs and chips, about how the “moody” John once fired her, but the other three Beatles changed his mind and he begged her to come back. Kelly also tells stories about the fangirls who flocked to the Beatles. She reminisces about how,

…ultimately, Kelly’s unwillingness to dish any kind of dirt will leave most moviegoers feeling slightly unsatisfied. Adam Hawboldt

Naturally she said yes, and so began her journey, from the meteoric rise to the heartbreaking demise, with one of the most famous bands in history. Directed by Ryan White, Good Ol’ Freda is a full-length documentary that offers an insider’s view of what life with the Beatles was like. Sitting on her plaid couch, as archival footage flashes across the screen and Beatles’ cover songs play, Kelly tells quaint little anecdotes about her time with the Fab Four.

in the early days, fangirls would leave their hair rollers in until just before the Beatles would take the stage at the Cavern. She even gives glimpses of what it was like to run the fan club. Of how she’d follow the guys to the barber to procure locks of hair for fans who asked, of the cutting of old, discarded clothes to send to fans. And while all this is interesting and adds a previously unknown dimension to the Beatles’ mythol-

good ol’ freda Ryan White Starring Freda Kelly Directed by

86 minutes | PG

ogy, Kelly never really divulges any juicy details about her 11 years with the band. When someone off camera asks if she ever hooked up with one of the guys, she simply replies, “There are stories, but [that’s] personal.” And that, in a nutshell, is what you get from Good Ol’ Freda. An interesting, tantalizing, yet all-too tight-lipped account of what it was like to be behind the scenes with the Beatles. As a documentary, it still works. It still shines a light on a side of the Fab Four that few have seen. But, ultimately, Kelly’s unwillingness to dish any kind of dirt will leave most moviegoers feeling slightly unsatisfied. Good ol’ Freda is currently being screened at Roxy Theatre.

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friday, october 11 @

jax

Jax Niteclub 302 Pacific Avenue (306) 934 4444

Check out our Facebook page! These photos will be uploaded to Facebook on Friday, October 25. facebook.com/verbsaskatoon

Continued on next page Âť

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Photography by Patrick Carley

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Photography by Patrick Carley

Continued on next page Âť

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nightlife

saturday, October 12 @

Rock Bottom

Rock Bottom 834B Broadway Ave (306) 665 7479

Photography by Patrick Carley

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Continued on next page Âť

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nightlife

Check out our Facebook page! These photos will be uploaded to Facebook on Friday, October 25.

Photography by Patrick Carley

facebook.com/verbsaskatoon

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Š Elaine M. Will | blog.E2W-Illustration.com | Check onthebus.webcomic.ws/ for previous editions!

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timeout

crossword canadian criss-cross DOWN

28. Howl like a wolf 30. Egg-shaped wind instrument 33. Choose by vote 37. Vessel for hot drinks 38. Trodden track 40. Group of three musicians 41. Winder on a fishing rod 43. Itchy swelling on the skin 45. Excited activity 46. Indian snack 48. Rough-skinned apple 50. Unimportant 51. Control a car 52. Give over 53. Take in sounds

1. Like raccoons 2. Mischievous child 3. Desirous look 4. Place to have kimchi 5. A breakfast cereal 6. Force into place 7. Share a boundary 8. Apply incorrectly 9. Orchestra member 11. Shut out 12. Part of a three-piece suit 14. Prepares fabric for clothing 17. Fill with air 20. Sullen 22. Single musical sound 25. Move out of place

27. Strengthened seam sudoku answer key 29. Not notified A 30. Belonging to us 31. Butter is made from it 32. Pale and not looking well 34. Pencil part 35. Apple beverage 36. Drinking binge 39. Unpleasant to the ear 42. Solitary B 44. Instrument shaped like a pear 47. Turf 49. Expanse of salt water

9 2 4 3 6 1 7 5 8 7 8 5 2 4 9 6 1 3 6 1 3 8 7 5 9 4 2 8 9 2 4 5 6 3 7 1 5 4 7 1 9 3 2 8 6 1 3 6 7 8 2 5 9 4 3 6 9 5 1 8 4 2 7 2 7 1 9 3 4 8 6 5 4 5 8 6 2 7 1 3 9

1. Source of butter, cheese, and cream 5. Light weight 9. Brief appearance by a famous actor 10. Fanatical 12. Evening star 13. Keeps pleasantly interested 15. Moose relative 16. Bridle attachment 18. Toothpaste container 19. Vehicle pulled by huskies 21. In a little while 23. Familiar saying 24. Commotions 26. They have pistils

4 9 3 2 5 8 1 7 6 1 5 6 3 9 7 8 4 2 8 2 7 1 4 6 5 9 3 9 7 8 5 6 3 4 2 1 2 4 5 8 1 9 3 6 7 6 3 1 4 7 2 9 5 8 3 1 9 6 2 5 7 8 4 5 8 2 7 3 4 6 1 9 7 6 4 9 8 1 2 3 5

ACROSS

© walter D. Feener 2013

Horoscopes october 18 - october 24 Aries March 21–April 19

Leo July 23–August 22

Sagittarius November 23–December 21

Your energy is going to peak around mid-week, Aries. Channel it into work or school or something productive, and you will see the reward.

You may feel preoccupied with something this week, Leo. Don’t let it distract you too much. You have things to do.

Happiness will reign supreme this week, Sagittarius. Enjoy the next few days, because no matter what you put your mind to, all will work out.

Taurus April 20–May 20

Virgo August 23–September 22

Capricorn December 22–January 19

Feeling restless this week, Taurus? If so, do yourself a favour and exercise those jitters out. You may make an unexpected acquaintance.

Take some time this week to learn or try something new, Virgo. A little bit of self-improvement can go a long way.

It’s a good idea to take stock every now and then, so at some point this week, sit back and look at all you’ve accomplished in your life. It’s more than you think.

Gemini May 21–June 20

Libra September 23–October 23

Aquarius January 20–February 19

Your ability to communicate efficiently and effectively with others is going to be excellent this week, Gemini. Make sure what you say should be heard.

Your luck is about to change, and that secret desire may soon be a reality. You excited about that, Libra? You should be. This looks to be a good week.

An interesting call or email could come your way this week, Aquarius. Chances are it will arrive bearing some good news.

Cancer June 21–July 22

Scorpio October 24–November 22

Pisces February 20–March 20

If you’ve been craving attention, you’re in luck this week, Cancer. The universe’s spotlight will be shining right on you.

You should listen to your intuition more, Scorpio. Sure, it’s led you astray before, but this week will be different, so pay attention!

If you’ve been feeling run down lately, Pisces, good news. This week you’ll be your old self again. Take some time to get centred, then take on the world!

sudoku 4 2 5 1 1 9 8 2 8 7 4 9 8 6 2 4 5 8 6 7 3 4 2 5 3 1 9 5 7 7 3 6 9 6 1 3

crossword answer key

A

9 4 3 5 9 1 3 6 1 7 5 2 6 3 7 5 4 7 9 2 6 7 8 4 8 4 2 1 9 8 5 8 6 2 1 3

BB

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Ground clearance on the cheap Mitsubishi RVR a decent entry-level crossover by jeff davis

ance. The basic RVR also comes with a handful of nice perks well suited to a Saskatchewan winter, namely heated seats and defrosters on the side mirrors. The local dealership also throws in a block heater, tougher floor mats and remote

as a chimp is to a rhino. In fact, it shares its 140 horsepower, 2.0 litre engine and chassis with Mitsubishi’s crowd-pleasing Lancer sedan. Due to this, the handling in the base RVR is responsive and tight, thanks in part to a short wheelbase.

W

hile test driving the 2014 Mitsubishi RVR, I took it out to The Willows to snap some photos against the backdrop of some nice late-season golf. And it wasn’t until a golf cart drove by that I realized how small this made-in-Japan crossover really is. The crossover category is exploding all over North America, but nowhere more than here in Saskatchewan. After suffering through an old-fashioned winter last year, and the potholes that followed, local drivers are rightly looking to put a little more space between themselves and the pavement. RVR stands for “Recreational Vehicle Revolution,” though it offers little that’s truly revolutionary. That said, it is an affordably priced little tyke with the ground clearance and traction to help you through a Saskatchewan winter. At a base price of roughly $21,500, the RVR is the cheapest path to a few extra inches of clear-

…something about the steering just feels right, making you feel very in control and really connected to the road…

starter for free on their vehicles, a major perk when it’s -40 outside. At 6’4” I was a little skeptical at first whether I would even fit into the RVR’s driver seat. It was tricky sliding in — ­ my knees caught on the steering wheel — but after adjusting the wheel all the way up and the seat all the way down, I settled into a reasonably comfortable driving position. The RVR’s DNA is about as closely related to a true off-road vehicle

But something about the steering just feels right, making you feel very in control and really connected to the road. The power and acceleration on the stick shift were neither too hot nor too cold, but just right for an entry level crossover. Very odd, though, is the engine sound. Save for a silver-hued centre console, the RVR’s interior is monochrome black. Nothing really

excited me too much about it, but that’s not always a bad thing: it’s the sort of colour scheme you could live with over the long term. The seats are comfortable, but the control switch for the heated seats is hidden somewhere behind the driver’s hips, which makes them a bit tricky to get at. This is inexplicable, and turning them on and off is a significant distraction. There are also four cup holders within the driver’s reach, in case you need multiple hot and cold beverages simultaneously. The stereo looks a little retro with its prominently-placed CD player, and the base model doesn’t have a USB plug to play your music or charge your iPhone. Instead of a

single stereo mini plugin for your iPod, it has the two red and white audio plugs like you see on the back of your TV. But weirdest of all were the tiny knobs on the radio volume control. They’re roughly the size of mini marshmallows and distracting to operate. As for the backseat, it is mostly suitable for children or stowing materials, but a little cramped for adults. A major benefit is Mitsubishi’s warranty, which is the longest lasting of any major car manufacturer. With drivetrain coverage to 160,000 km or 10 years, this is way ahead of the competition, although the warranty covers less than shorter-lasting ones from the likes of Volkswagen. Continued on next page »

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Photos: Courtesy of jeff davis

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After a spin in the base model, I hopped into a fully-decked out version called the RVR GT Premium, priced tagged at around $34,500. This model comes with a selectable all-wheel drive automatic transmission, which allows you to drive with two wheels to save fuel, or turn on all four when the going gets tough. It also comes with a navigation system, decent leather seats, back-up camera, cruise control, an awesome panoramic glass

roof, Bluetooth and a USB port to play your music. The upgraded RVR has an impressive Rockford Fosgate stereo, and the centre touchscreen swivels back when you press open to reveal a CD player. There are also ports for SD cards, so you can load up additional maps or songs. With an eye on fuel economy, the RVR has an energy efficient continuously variable transmission. While I’m not sure what this means

technically, I can tell you it’s not much fun. Even when stomping the gas, there was a significant power lag that left me feeling unsatisfied, as if the RVR wasn’t listening to me. The silver lining to this is that the RVR burns just 8.5 litres per 100 km on the highway, and only 6.7 in town. I got around the power lag by using the paddle shifters located, intelligently, on the steering column instead of on the steering wheel itself. This allows you to rev the engine high enough to have some fun, and is in fact one of the best paddle shift systems I’ve used to date. But that fun was severely limited by the fact that the upgraded RVR has the same 140 horsepower engine as the base model. While this level of power didn’t bother me at the $21,000 price point, I really expected more power in the upgraded version. After all, more power is the one indispensable ingredient in the recipe for a better, more exciting user experience. Down near the Beaver Creek Conservation Area, I turned on the XM

radio and headed for home. I couldn’t for the life of me figure out how to operate the quirky touchscreen. This left me driving to the strains of “The Safety Dance” by Men Without Hats, on a channel I’m sure was called Most Brutal Songs of the 1980s. All in all, the RVR is better suited to Saskatchewan winters than most cars, though it was clearly made with the challenges of all-season driving in Japan, not Saskatchewan, in mind.

The RVR is doubtlessly well made and is backed by a bulletproof 10 year warranty, but left me with a lingering impression that it’s mostly hat, not cattle.

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Tips from Jerry

Winterizing your ride will save you stress and cash by jeff davis

A

fter decades of owning and operating the Lubrication Station, Jerry Lupul has learned an awful lot about what makes cars succeed or fail. I sat down with this maintenance guru for some choice tips on how to keep your car healthy and safe during the winter months.

2

While it can help you get rolling on a cold winter morning, plugging in your block heater draws about $1 worth of electricity per night. This can add up pretty quick, so get a timer for your heater and set it for about an hour before you intend to head out.

3

1

Full synthetic oil can help you get started on the coldest days

7

8

7

2

4

It’s best not to use an autostarter

3

This may seem a little obvious, Jerry says, but for god’s sake put on some winter

Make sure you have the right antifreeze mix

Plugging in your block heater draws about $1 worth of electricity per night

Put on some winter tires

Getting stranded on an isolated country road in the dead of winter can be a life or death situation here, so Jerry suggests packing a winter survival kit. Basic items include a blanket, candles, granola bars and a small shovel. A folding traction grate can help you escape from snow banks, and road flares can help grab the attention of a driver barreling down the next grid road over.

4

cost you about $50 more than the regular stuff.

6

Be gentle with your windshield wipers

Pack a winter survival kit

It’s best to avoid driving in extreme temperatures below -30°C

1

Ever see cars driving around with jagged holes in their bumper? Jerry says all these happen in the winter, since many parts of your car — everything from side mirrors to the hood latch — get very brittle in very cold temperatures. Thus, it’s best to avoid driving in extreme temperatures below -30°C, since even the slightest bump or nick can leave lasting damage.

5

tires. A set of winter tires reduces your stopping distance by 30 to 50 per cent, plus they’re usually cheaper than repairs. For extra traction, get some with studs or sand built into the rubber. Also, remember to take them off once daily average temperatures go about 8°C in the spring, since the soft rubber wears out very quickly in warm temperatures.

5

Poor visibility presents major dangers during winter driving, so it’s important to be gentle with your windshield

wipers. Wipers get very brittle in the cold, and hitting them with your ice scraper can take nicks out of the soft rubber blades. Jerry says the best practice is to flip them up when you’re not driving to make scraping easier, and to keep your blades out of harm’s way.

6

Getting your oil changed is always important, but Jerry says it’s especially so during the winter months. Full synthetic oil can help you get started on the coldest days, though it will

This may be a hard one to swallow, Jerry says, but it’s best not to use an autostarter. Turning on your car from inside your house offers some real comfort, but leaving it to idle for long periods gums up your injection system and reduces performance. Painful as it may be, Jerry says, it’s best just to scrape off your car, get in, start ‘er up and drive right off.

8

To help your engine from taking extra wear during the winter, make sure you have the right antifreeze mix. Cooling systems generally use a mix of ethylene glycol and water to make sure things don’t freeze up on cold days. Jerry says manufacturers usually recommend a 50/50 or 60/40 ratio, so find out what your car needs and fix the mix. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon jdavis@verbnews.com

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Radar Love

A mini guide to selecting the right radar detector by Rhiannon Herbert

G

etting a speeding ticket is practically a right of passage — we’re all in a hurry to get home, leave town, or maybe we just got carried away in the moment along a freshly paved stretch of highway. While the best way avoid a ticket is to adhere to the posted limit, purchasing a radar detector is an option for those who wish to have their ears, as well as eyes, on the road.

frequency and the one bounced back tells a police officer how fast you’re traveling. It’s the Doppler effect in action – the very same that tells us the Universe is still expanding. Science!

Important features Use of a digital radar detector is legal in Saskatchewan, so there’s no need for shady dealings. When beginning your search, be aware that band detection and range are the most important features. Look for models that pick up K and Ka bands, as these are most common (X was common back in the day, but is now rare). While most models are made to pick up these particular bands, some entry models may not pick up all Ka waves. Early detection is key, and a good range will give you well over a kilometre of notice in the open, flat landscape of our provincial highways. One

Radar detectors: How do they work?

Photo: courtesy of Myke2020

Just as I.C.P puzzled over the nature of magnets, I too wondered at the workings of radar. Most simply put, detectors do just that: they detect radio frequencies emitted by radar guns, which are sent out and bounced off passing vehicles. The difference between the emitted

other feature you may wish to look for is added laser detection, known as “LIDAR”, to keep up with the increasing use of laser technologies by law enforcement. Lastly, choose a model that’s not going to interfere with your driving or concentration. Look for intuitive ‘eyes-off’ controls, dimmed display options, and anything that avoids having to reset functions more than absolutely necessary. This also applies to motor or sport bikes, which can accommodate smaller units under the dash.

Which to buy? Your choice will come down to how much you want to detect, and how much you want to spend. New models range from 40 to 400 or more, but Ebay is a good way to go to get a nice kit on the cheap. Entry units will get you basic radar detection for the average high-

way trip, and are dash-mounted. Combination radar/lazar detectors tend to cost more but may be worth it, with some models even providing alerts for red light cameras and dangerous intersections. “Stealth” models cost a mint but are virtually invisible (and require professional installation). Cobra is a popular and reliable make, while Whistler and Escort are other good brands to look for. Additional features and accessories may also be part of your purchase, such as GPS, voice settings, mounting kits, and travel cases. No matter what you choose, use your detector’s capacities wisely and leave driving like a true maniac to me. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon rherbert@verbnews.com

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2014 Ford Escape impresses Ford joins the future with small-yetpowerful engine by jeff davis

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ike all American carmakers, Ford limped its way through the past five years, fighting to stay afloat through recessions and bailouts. But unlike many of its peers, Ford now looks to be out of the woods, and is producing a lineup that’s not just adequate, but exciting. Ford Escape has long been a household name in Saskatchewan, with hundreds of thousands sold in North America, and many millennials will remember being driven to hockey or ballet practice in them as kids. The new 2014 Escape doesn’t look like the boxy little mini-SUV we know so well. Instead, the new version looks sleek and athletic, with a smoothedout shape and forward leaning stance. My first impressions when sitting down in the driver’s seat of a basic 2014 Escape were better than I expected. I had at least a full three inches of headroom, and lots of room for my arms and legs. The interior features more sharp

angles and some risk-taking design elements. The arrangement of the centre console and air vents and the styling of the door handles recalls, vaguely, the space critters from Aliens. The instruments look really cool, and have needles illuminated in an eerie, iridescent blue. The backseat in the Escape appears to be designed for people with legs. The front seat rolls basically all the way forward, which is kind of cool, since you could fit even the tallest people in the back row. The most basic Escape is the “S,” and starts at $26,299. It has a four cylinder, 2.5 litre, 168 hp engine, a pretty nice cloth interior and grimacing, plasticky steering wheel. The Escape comes only in automatic these days (lovers of stick shift: look elsewhere) but a nice cruise control system comes standard. Bluetooth comes in all but the most basis Escapes. After a few minutes driving the Escape southward out of the city, I got

the feeling this would make an excellent road-tripping car. The driving position was extremely comfortable and roomy, and the steering wheel has these bumps on it that sort of force you to drive with your hands at ten and two o’clock. I normally take a more casual grip on the wheel, but this proper safety technique just feels right in the Escape. And while I’m also generally a lover of engine noise, this basic Escape produced a sort of whine that could become annoying after awhile. There was also an inexplicable hissing sound in the cab, which sounded vaguely like radio static, though I couldn’t figure what it was exactly. The Escape feels ready for winter. You get the impression of sitting quite high above the road, and the Escape easily handled barrelling over some deep muddy ruts I happened across. To boot, Jubilee Ford is offering a smoking deal I can’t help but mention. If you buy an Escape they’ll throw on

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a full set of winter tires for free, rims included. They’ll even put them on before you drive away, so you’ll be winter-ready right off the bat. As for appearances, the Escape looks fairly handsome, particularly from the front and side. The rear, however, looks rather boxy. Overall, though, I like it and it looks completely different than past versions. The trunk is decently large, and the perfect size for a dog kennel. The rear seats drop in a 60/40 split and getting your skis in would be no problem. Transporting any sort of furniture or lumber would be a challenge in this, though.

After taking the basic Escape out for a spin and being suitably impressed, I hopped into a metallic pumpkin-coloured Titanium. This is the top of the line Escape, and will run you between $37,000 and $42,000. In the past, whenever you paid more for a Ford you got a larger engine. But something truly surprising has happened with these newer models: when you pay more, you get a smaller engine. I just about fell out of my chair when I heard this. It seems like Ford has really gotten the message on fuel efficiency. The Escape Titanium has a 2.0 L engine instead of the 2.5 L found in

the base, and the mid-range ones have a tiny 1.6 L powerplant. Despite being half a litre smaller, the Titanium’s turbo fuel-injected EcoBoost engine produces more power, clocking in at 240 hp. Even before getting off the dealer’s lot, I could tell this was a totally different beast. The Escape Titanium offered an excellent driving experience, and had the peppy responsiveness and acceleration the base model lacked. Steering control was tighter, thanks to the all-wheel drive, and that engine whine in the base model was replaced by a satisfying turbo roar. Blasting

down the highway towards Regina I noticed the full-size moonroof, which actually adds another inch-and-a-half of headroom — awesome! The heated leather seats got toasty very quickly, and can be turned up to really hot temperatures, so perfect for the impending winter. However, despite this being the top of the line Escape, something about the Titanium just doesn’t scream luxury — maybe it was that the leather wrapping on the steering wheel was off. As for tech features, the proximity key and push button start were really cool, the backup camera had an initially confusing but eventu-

ally helpful course projection, and the centre console had a decent sized touchscreen. Like its predecessors, the 2014 Ford Escape is likely to be a fixture on Canadian roads for years to come. And while it may be too small for some, Ford has three larger SUVs in its lineup right now so you can find the right fit for you: the Edge, the Explorer and the big-daddy Expedition. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon jdavis@verbnews.com

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Verb Issue S262 (Oct 18-24, 2013)