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ISSUE #216 – NOVEMBER 16 TO NOVEMBER 22

ARTS

CULTURE

MUSIC

SASKATOON

LIFE LESSONS THE WOODEN SKY

WITH

LIFE ON A BULL Aaron Roy is poised to make history, again GOOD OLD WAR On searching for the perfect song LINCOLN + SMASHED Films reviewed­

PHOTO: COURTESY OF JUSTIN BROADBENT


NEWS + OPINION

CONTENTS

CULTURE

ENTERTAINMENT

Q + A WITH TROY GRONSDAHL

LISTINGS

On Beneath a Petroliferous Moon. 12 / Q + A

Local music listings for November 16 through November 24. 18 / LISTINGS

LIFE OF A BULL RIDER

GOOD OLD WAR

LINCOLN + SMASHED

Aaron Roy is poised to make history, again. 4 / LOCAL

On the search for the perfect song.

The latest movie reviews. 20 / FILM

13 / ARTS

NIGHTLIFE PHOTOS

THE GALILEO PROJECT Tafelmusik takes to the stars. 13 / ARTS

We visit The Rook & Raven and 6Twelve. 22-25 / NIGHTLIFE

DESIGN LEAD / ROBERTA BARRINGTON DESIGN & PRODUCTION / BRITTNEY GRAHAM CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS / PATRICK CARLEY PATRICIO DEL RIO, ADAM HAWBOLDT + ALEX J MACPHERSON

Amy Matysio lights it up. 6 / LOCAL

THE WOODEN SKY

Life lessons on the road. 14 / COVER

EDITORIAL PUBLISHER / PARITY PUBLISHING EDITOR IN CHIEF / RYAN ALLAN MANAGING EDITOR / JESSICA PATRUCCO STAFF WRITERS / ADAM HAWBOLDT + ALEX J MACPHERSON

ART & PRODUCTION

A LIFE UNDER THE LIGHTS

ON THE COVER:

VERBNEWS.COM @VERBSASKATOON FACEBOOK.COM/VERBSASKATOON

BUSINESS & OPERATIONS

SCHOOL BREAK

HALAMAZING!

ON THE BUS

Our thoughts on the U of R students facing deportation. 8 / EDITORIAL

We visit Kebab + Donair in Sutherland. 16 / FOOD + DRINK

Weekly original comic illustrations by Elaine M. Will. 26 / COMICS

COMMENTS

MUSIC

GAMES + HOROSCOPES

Here’s what you had to say about alternative poppies. 10 / COMMENTS

Foggy Notions, Little Miss Higgins + Blue Rodeo. 17 / MUSIC

Canadian criss-cross puzzle, horoscopes, and Sudoku. 27 / TIMEOUT

OFFICE MANAGER / STEPHANIE LIPSIT MARKETING MANAGER / VOGESON PALEY FINANCIAL MANAGER / CODY LANG

CONTACT COMMENTS / FEEDBACK@VERBNEWS.COM / 881 8372 ADVERTISE / ADVERTISE@VERBNEWS.COM / 979 2253 DESIGN / LAYOUT@VERBNEWS.COM / 979 8474 GENERAL / INFO@VERBNEWS.COM / 979 2253

PLEASE RECYCLE AFTER READING & SHARING PHOTO: COURTESY OF PH

2 NOV 16 – NOV 22 VERB MAGAZINE

CONTENTS

LOCAL

EDITORIAL

COMMENTS

Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

FILM

NIGHTLIFE

COMICS

TIMEOUT

VERBNEWS.COM


LOCAL

THE LIFE OF A BULL RIDER

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE PBR CANADA

Aaron Roy has a chance to make history, again. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

A

aron Roy climbs into the chute and eases himself down on his bull real slow. Careful to avoid any sudden movements. That might spook the beast, and cause it to buck or lurch violently — and no bull rider wants that. The space is too confined, the bull simply too big. Once seated, Roy slips his hand under a rope wrapped around the bull, just below the shoulders, before another cowboy pulls the rope tight. Roy wraps it around and around his hand, getting a good grip, getting comfortable. Or at least as comfortable as a 160-pound man can be when he’s tied to an enormous beast. As comfortable as a person can be with two thousand pounds of power between his legs. Think about being strapped to the top of a car, then it taking off, and you might get an idea of what it’s like to be sitting on a bull in the chute, waiting for the gate to open. Most people, if found in a position like that, would likely be scared. Nervous, even, their mind racing a million miles a minute.

But not Roy. Sitting there in the chute, strapped to a quivering, restless bull, Roy isn’t thinking or feeling anything. He isn’t worried about getting injured or planning how he’ll ride 2,000 pounds of bucking animal. No, Roy’s mind is blank. Nothing else matters in this moment: it’s just him and the bull and the next eight seconds. When he’s ready, Roy nods his head, and bang! the gate swings open.

Bull riding has long been considered the most dangerous eight seconds in sports. And about a year ago, a team of researchers at the University of Calgary released a study confirming that this long-held consideration was, in fact, wildly true. The registry they compiled proved bull riding not only to be dangerous, but to be “the most dangerous organized sport in the world” — with 36 percent of all injuries falling under the category of “severe.” Take Aaron Roy for instance. He has been bull riding professionally since 2009 and, by his own admis-

sion, hasn’t been hurt. Much. “I’ve been lucky to avoid being injured too much,” he says. “I’ve blown out both my knees. When I first started out I broke my arm. Other than that I’ve only broken my nose, cracked my cheek bone and earlier this year I got a pretty bad concussion.” Those kind of injuries come part and parcel with the bull riding territory. Which is why, naturally, when you are new to a sport like this there’s going to be a modicum of knee-trembling dread involved. “When you first start out, there’s fear,” explains Roy. “For you to sit down on a bull, you’re going to be scared. Simple as that.” But here’s the thing about fear and bull riding … if you’re afraid, you’re in trouble. “When you’re scared,” says Roy, “you’re not thinking clearly. Your mind isn’t in the right place so your body is going to want to bail out of there. That’s when you’re going to get hurt or something else bad is going to happen.” So how do you abate this fear? How do you get yourself, mentally and physically, to the point where CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

4 NOV 16 – NOV 22 NEWS + OPINION

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EDITORIAL

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Q+A

ARTS

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FOOD + DRINK

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LISTINGS

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COMICS

TIMEOUT

VERBNEWS.COM


PHOTO: COURTESY OF ANDY WATSON

climbing onto the back of a piece of gargantuan pissed-off livestock seems like a good idea? The answer is simple: you practice. “When I was in college I was getting on 10 or 15 bulls a week,” says Roy. “Every Wednesday night I’d be out riding, practicing.” But Roy isn’t in college anymore. And these days, especially in the

getting hurt.” And with a significant cash prize on the line, along with the chance of being the first and only person to ever win three national championships, that’s simply not a risk Roy is willing to take.

The split second the gate swings open at the Finals and his bull bursts

For you to sit down on a bull, you’re going to be scared. Simple as that. AARON ROY

weeks leading up to the 2012 PBR Canadian National Finals in Saskatoon, the two-time Canadian bullriding champ isn’t high on practice. “I don’t do it much anymore,” admits Roy, who, in 2010, became the first rider to win two national championships. “Now that I’m riding every weekend, I don’t need it. I don’t get on practice bulls, it’s just too risky. It really increases your chances of

out of the chute, Roy knows what to expect — sort of. He knows that once the bull turns out, that’s when everything will start pulling and jerking. He knows there’s no way in hell that a 160-pound man can physically overpower a bull, so he’ll have to constantly be in the right position to take the animal’s power away. He also knows that he’ll have to watch

the shoulder, figure out the direction it’s going, counter move off the bull’s moves, and ride the beast jump to jump — never looking too far ahead. The one thing that Roy doesn’t know, however, is how the bulls he draws will behave. “You can study them a bit, but they’re living animals,” explains Roy. “They’re like you and me. Sure, they can have a set pattern, act out of habit, but they could also just have one of those days and do something completely different. You never know.” But that kind of uncertainty doesn’t bother Roy. He is ready — mentally and physically — for anything any bull can throw his way. He’s ready to let everything around him disappear, to block out the noise and crowd and just ride. But above all else, Aaron Roy is ready to make history. Again.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

5 NOV 16 – NOV 22 @VERBSASKATOON

CONTENTS

LOCAL

EDITORIAL

COMMENTS

Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

FILM

NIGHTLIFE

COMICS

TIMEOUT

NEWS + OPINION


LOCAL

A LIFE UNDER THE LIGHTS

PHOTO: COURTESY OF MIKE FLY

Saskatchewan acting sensation Amy Matysio’s career comes full circle. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

A

my Matysio wasn’t born to act. It just happened. “My career has been one thing leading to another,” she says over lunch in a crowded coffee shop, snow blowing past the window. “I feel like I discovered that it was a part of me very naturally as I was being exposed to different avenues, and I feel like I aligned myself with things I’m really passionate about. And then something comes along and I want to try it.” Deeply creative and driven, Matysio lives to work. “I want to create work, produce work, be a part of other people’s work, say great words that writers write,” she muses. “And put myself in a place where my collaborations are constantly inspiring me.” Matysio is one of the most recognizable faces in Saskatchewan. A pillar of the local arts scene, she has performed on stages and in front of cameras across the province. She has worked as an actor, a director, and a producer. She has performed in local productions and played opposite some of the biggest names in Hollywood, from Ryan Reynolds and Anna Faris to Woody Harrelson. Her recent projects include inSAYSHAble, a series of comedic shorts posted online, Midsummer [a play with songs], which ran at

Regina’s Globe Theatre this autumn, and Stranded, a science-fiction thriller starring Christian Slater. Matysio has always enjoyed the spotlight — an old home video shows her “just going to town” on impressions from the movie Police Academy, and she confesses to staging numerous productions in her parents’ living room — but she came to acting relatively late. Growing up in Regina, Matysio dabbled in the arts but rarely thought of performing as anything other than a sideline. She tried everything from piano lessons to Ukrainian dancing; focus and direction came later, when she chose to attend a high school across town. “I went to LeBoldus,” she says. “That opened me up to a whole new set of problems — there was improv at LeBoldus and the theatre department was really strong. I was doing band and doing theatre and doing choir — all the arts. High school was a great time to examine being an artist and figure out if this was something I wanted to do.” By the time Matysio hit grade 12, theatre was looking more and more promising. That year, 1997, she starred in a play called Flock Formations, which was written by students and orchestrated by Daniel Macdonald, one of Saskatchewan’s finest playwrights. She didn’t know it — she couldn’t have

known it — but the experience would come to define her career, a life spent under the lights.

Matysio never looked back. After finishing high school, she embarked on a course that has taken her around the world. It has not been easy. Few actors are financially secure; even fewer spend time worrying about where their next paycheque might come from. Matysio knows this better than anyone. “You have to really want to do this,” she laughs. “Because it’s not easy.” Her reputation has grown steadily over the past several years, but Matysio knows nothing is certain in an industry where jobs are scarce and talent abundant. What separates her from many of her contemporaries, and what has sustained and expanded her career, is fiery ambition. “You can see it in my eyes when I want something,” she laughs. “It’s like candy, I’ve got to get it. And when I don’t get it, it’s that same feeling of sadness and it really hurts because I invest so much of myself in everything.” Matysio has learned that fatalism — and brassy jokes — helps, but sometimes the pressure reaches intolerable levels. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

6 NOV 16 – NOV 22 NEWS + OPINION

CONTENTS

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EDITORIAL

COMMENTS

Q+A

ARTS

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LISTINGS

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NIGHTLIFE

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TIMEOUT

VERBNEWS.COM


PHOTO: COURTESY OF CAREY SHAW

Matysio first experienced this in 1999, while she was completing a BFA at the University of Regina. “There came a point when I thought I might quit university,” she says, after debating whether to share the story. “I had forgotten what it was about performing and acting that made me want it in the first place.” Rather than trudge on without

gain a little perspective,” she says. “It’s very important, but it’s hard to do. You have to gain a little perspective … [Y]ou could amuse yourself for a very long time … but you need to figure out a way to see if what you’re doing really matters.” Matysio has traveled all over the world and, until recently, has returned home to Saskatchewan

I want to create work, produce work, be a part of other people’s work, say great words that writers write. AMY MATYSIO

meaning or direction, Matysio got out. She flew to England for a few months, where she studied acting at the York St. John University and saw as many shows as possible. The experience was revelatory. By throwing herself headlong into the English theatre scene, watching everything from big West End musicals to “crazy experimental work,” Matysio overcame her ennui. Today, when she is feeling discouraged or downtrodden, she finds a way to recharge her batteries. “You have to

energized and raring to work. Now, she’s worried that she might not return at all. Earlier this year, the Saskatchewan Party announced its intention to wind down an $8 million tax credit for the provincial film industry. The decision outraged many people and generated several protests and hundreds of furious tweets. Matysio’s Twitter account is brimming with indignation, but in person she just seems sad. “I can say it so plainly,” she says. “I wouldn’t be where I am without the film industry

in Saskatchewan, and how it’s grown over the past decade. That’s just fact.” She attributes much of her national and international exposure to projects completed in Saskatchewan. Matysio estimates that 80 percent of her résumé has some connection to this province. “That’s a lot of work,” she says, sounding morose. “If you take that away, there’s not very much left for me to do. The rest of the work is elsewhere and now I need to make up for that somewhere else.” There have been many arguments tabled in support of the film tax credit, which was worth up to 55 percent of labour on a production, and most focus on the idea that the industry is both an economic driver and valuable resource. Matysio agrees. “Film is an industry and it is a resource,” she says. “We as people, as creative resources, are a resource, and we will keep producing work for as long as we can. We’re not going to tap out — we’ll just do it elsewhere.”

For now, Matysio plans to stick around as long as she can keep working. But there are other reasons why she wants to stay, too. Her family is here. Her boyfriend, award-winning fiddle player Karrnnel Sawitsky, is here. And Sas-

katchewan has always been good to her, a point driven home when Daniel Macdonald revived Flock Formations, the play she starred in as a hungry high school student. “They asked me to come back and do a cameo in the show,” Matysio explains, smiling at the memory. “So on closing night I went and I did a scene, a tiny walkon scene, playing opposite the girl playing my part.” Midway through the show, Matysio walked onstage and addressed the young actor playing the character that she had premiered more than a decade earlier: “You should be careful. You’ll never know where you’ll end up, maybe doing a walk-on in a high school play.”

“What was so crazy and surreal was being there and being on that stage and looking at this young girl who was about to set off onto the same course,” Matysio says, the enthusiasm in her voice palpable. “She was my age when I played the role. Looking at her was like looking into the mirror, but in a very cool way, and that reminded me and told me that I have done something, and that my success has brought me all the way back to here, and to that moment.” ( ( ) 881 Feedback? 8372 Feedback?Text Textit!it!306 306) 881 8372 @MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

7 NOV 16 – NOV 22 /VERBSASKATOON

CONTENTS

LOCAL

EDITORIAL

COMMENTS

Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

FILM

NIGHTLIFE

COMICS

TIMEOUT

NEWS + OPINION


EDITORIAL

PHOTO: COURTESY OF JIMMY EMERSON

SCHOOL BREAK

Deporting university students is too heavy-handed.

W

hen it comes to theories of punishment, people tend to fall into one of two categories. First, there’s the utilitarian camp, which thinks punishment should be forward-looking and should act as a means to deter future crime. Then there’s those who favour retribution as a form of justice. These folks believe a person’s punishment should fit the crime they’ve committed. And if you want to know which camp you fall into, take a good hard look at the case of Victoria Ordu and Ihuoma Amadi — the two University of Regina students who have been holed up in a Regina church since June 19, seeking sanctuary from deportation. For those of you

unfamiliar with the case, here are the nuts and bolts of it: both Ordu and Amadi are from Nigeria, both are students at the University of Regina, both are here on full scholarships paid for by their government and, as international students, both have visas that allow them to work on campus. Oh, and in 2010 both Ordu and Amadi went to Service Canada and got Social Insurance Numbers. Here’s the thing, though: both Ordu and Amadi were under the misconception that their SINs allowed them to work off-campus, and at one point last year they both spent a couple weeks working at a local Walmart. But guess what? That’s illegal. And as soon as Ordu realized this, she quit her job. Amadi was also made aware of

her mistake during her second week of work, when she was led away in handcuffs by two Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) agents. And that’s why Public Safety Minister Vic Toews and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney are so hellbent on deporting the pair of students. That’s right. For working a few measly weeks, the federal government has ordered Ordu and Amadi to be deported back to Nigeria. Now if that seems a tad extreme to you, don’t worry. You’re not alone. Everybody from Liberal MP for Wascana Ralph Goodale and Sask Party minister Bill Boyd, to scores of students and concerned citizens feel the federal government’s treatment of Ordu and Amadi is too harsh. Even the U of CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

8 NOV 16 – NOV 22 NEWS + OPINION

CONTENTS

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EDITORIAL

COMMENTS

Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

FILM

NIGHTLIFE

COMICS

TIMEOUT

VERBNEWS.COM


PHOTO: COURTESY OF ALEC COUROS

R has contacted the government, advocating on behalf of the students’ pleas that the pair stay in Canada and complete their education. And we also think that deportation is far, far too severe a punishment for what these students did. Now, we’re not saying Canada shouldn’t enforce its immigration laws, because it should. And we aren’t suggesting that ignorance of these laws is an excuse that should exclude illegal workers from punishment. But let’s try to keep things in perspective here. And quite frankly, deporting two college students for working a couple of weeks is borderline draconian. So why can’t Toews, Kenney and company treat Ordu and Amadi in

a manner that actually reflects the severity of what they did? Why can’t they approach this from a reasonable angle and allow the punishment to fit the crime? Of course, that calls into question what would be considered reasonable. What we suggest is that the government could start by suspending the students’ study permit — which would cost roughly a couple hundred dollars to restore. And let’s be honest: while not much, that’s a good chunk of change for most students. Heck, we wouldn’t even be opposed to giving them a fine. Say, perhaps, a total in and around the sum of what they made during their illegal two week working ten-

ures. And perhaps this is their only second chance. But deportation? No way. That’s just unfair and wrong-headed. And we think it’s high-time the federal government got off its tootough-on-crime high horse and let reason dictate their actions.

These editorials are left unsigned because they represent the opinions of Verb magazine, not those of the individual writers. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbSaskatoon feedback@verbnews.com

9 NOV 16 – NOV 22 @VERBSASKATOON

CONTENTS

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COMMENTS

Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

FILM

NIGHTLIFE

COMICS

TIMEOUT

NEWS + OPINION


COMMENTS

ON TOPIC: Last week we asked what you thought about alternative poppies. Here's what you had to say:

– I agree with article about poppies. Implying that remembering war in some way glorifies it is reductive. Ask anyone who was actually there (those few that are still with us). I’m pretty sure none of them are advocating for the glory that was drowning in mud, dying of wounds where no one can help you, alone in a battlefield, or of trench foot or of any number of other illnesses. Lest we forget.

– Simply remembering wars past (as your editorial suggests) without critically assessing them (i.e. blindly wearing a red poppy) is ludicrous and lazy. With a severe lack of critical thinking, just wearing a red poppy indeed glorifies war. We need those that remember the other casualties (animals, purple poppy, or civilians), the impact it has on the environment, on people’s mental healths. I say where whatever frickin poppy you want and consider war in whatever way you want. Just because it happened and most say you should be respectful in the way they deem respectful doesn’t mean anything.

– Hey keep the red poppies. And remember those who died for our freedom

– Less young people wearing red poppies these days. Makes me sad. Let’s give thanks to those who went before us while they’re still here.

– I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wearing a red poppy. I wear mine as a sign of respect and a way to honour the veterans, But feel free to not wear one.

crap. Let people do what they want Verb!

Text yo thoughtsur to 881 VE R B

pragmatic perspective in her role aiding the police. In response to “Cold Casing,” Local page, #215 (November 9, 2012)

8372

– I’ve seen a lot of people (my grandpa being one, and people in his age bracket) wearing their poppies on their hats. Is that a thing? Is that ok, or should it always be over your left side of your chest?

– Lest we forget. I think about the red poppies blowing in the wind, and will work for peace. Amen.

– Not super related to your poppy story but I think the poem Flanders Field is one of the most beautiful pieces of Canadian lit.

– There were many in the civilian population after the first world war that didn’t think honouring the soldiers was the way to go about fixing the problems of the world. Wearing red poppies honours those soldiers in a similar way. We need to consider more than their sacrifice!

– Your right to be ungrateful little brats and piss all over the hard work and sacrifice of the generations before you was brought to you courtesy of: the generations before you! So go ahead and exercise your right to not wear a poppy or wear a purple or a white or whatever damn colour poppy you want. But remember WHY you can do that. Lest we forget.

– Wtf is with all the people wearing poppies on their hats they belong over your heart!!!

– It’s so important to honour our veterans. They won’t be around forever, and getting their stories now is essential. Take the time to strike up a conversation with these guys (and gals) when you see them around. They would love to chat. And wear your poppy with pride, knowing you live in one of the greatest nations in the world.

OFF TOPIC – Interesting read about the infantry soldiers I could never physically do that n these guys are reserve? Wild! Way to make Canada proud! God Bless! In response to “Relentless Pursuit,” Local page, #215 (November 9, 2012)

– I wear my red poppy happily, detest war and work for peace, and see nothing incongruous with the above statement. The poppies don’t honour war as this amazing, incredible thing! But hey, if it isn’t for you, that’s fine.

– Hello Alex, it’s Corporal Mark Webb. You interviewed me for the Verb. I’ve read the article a number of times and each time I enjoyed it more. It was very well written. Thank you again for coming out and getting our story out there. Hope you enjoyed your time in the field.

– Awww a poppy for animals who died in war? I feel like that’s a part of the price of battle that I hadn’t thought about before. What’s wrong with honouring them?

– Chad Bronlee is hawwwwwwt! Nice cover :D

ference. Here you have someone who wants to make a positive change, genuinely cares about the ppl and that’s not good enough? Oh hush with your hating cause at the end of the day he IS the president. KZ

In response to “Love Me Or Leave Me,” Cover story, #215 (November 9, 2012)

– Result of USA election was a 2x4 to the skull of GOP Time for them to drop the goofs

SOUND OFF – I like the DOWNtown person you make me laugh but the food bank complainers suck ( like get a job so ya dont have to go there you can afford a text phone like. Hello

– Flanders Field is in Belgium and anyone who is of Belgian ancestry has had to endure more wars and wars that were far bloodier than any country or citizens on earth - ever. If Sask people want to remember any disaster, let it be the fraud & bankruptcy Brad Wall’s political party forced on Sask between 1988-1992…wear a Tiger Lily & never forget what a snake oil salesman & liar Wall is.

– I saw a commercial on National Geographics about sharks being ammune to any deseases like cancer, TB, AIDS…is that a hint ? That medical scientists found a cure to these deseases? We have to extinct the sharks? I think it’ll be worth it! If it is a cure.

– Live long enough and the only things you really like and enjoy are a good meal good company and a good story.

– Obama better get that fiscal cliff figured out, i dont think our economy can handle a downturn in both the eurozone and the united states

– Teri I’m breaking up with you... We are never ever ever getting back together :D ps whalers for the cup 2013

– There’s a lot of dysfunctional people trying to make money on the housing situation. They’re not up to landlording renos or building. Something’s gotta be done!

– I agree with the texter who said ‘’Keep Christ in Christmas’’. It seems we forget that Christmas is to celebrate the birth of Jesus not Santa!

– I don’t know why the person who texted in about keeping Christ in Christmas equated the two. Christmas is a massive, commercial holiday. Christ is a person who has been granted mythical status in christian folklore. If you believe in him, then the holiday season falls over his birthday (depending on which calendar you follow), but that’s about it.

In response to “Relentless Pursuit,” Local page, #215 (November 9, 2012)

– I was skeptical going into the psychic story, but thought Powell was extremely well spoken, had a succinct way of trying to explain what she experiences, and a

– Just wear all your damn poppies at the same damn time and people stop freaking out over insignificant

– People who are continuously hating on Obama, get real! Him just being (re)elected is a change already in itself. The economy was at its worst when he became president so keep in mind change doesn’t come over night and he has and continues to make a dif

– Santa is fake Jesus is real! Who would you rather believe in? – Wonky furnace all fall. Tough puzzle in the control safety loop. 2 furnace guys walked away. Last night -25 C howling wind 4 AM I fixed it. Thats Canadian sh*t!

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

10 NOV 16 – NOV 22 NEWS + OPINION

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EDITORIAL

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ARTS

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– Its not about endless amounts of money. Its greedy peasant thinking framing it that way. There is enough to go around here! We shouldn’t need food banks.

– Poverty issues you either get it or don’t. If you spew all the old platitudes homilies fairy tales etc when confronted with poverty chances are not getting it!

– Superstore has a countdown number of shopping days left THIS IS CRAZY PEOPLE everyone just needs to relax about things and enjoy the now.

– How can I get the 50 on the bus I’m on there every day at least twice and Iv never seen you guys LOL come over to Confed and give me the money I read u guys every week!

– Aaaaaaand cue the endless number of complaints about winter driving NOW! Ok I have one: slow the eff down but not so slow you’re crawling along at 20. It’s a happy medium guys!

– To the person who texted that it was shameful to say anything bad about Atchison: he was elected to public office. The very job is one that puts him in the public eye, and opens him up to public criticism. Critiquing public officials is our right as citizens of a democratic country and does not show a lack of disrespect for the elected official. If you want to blindly just glorify someone because they happened to dupe the majority of the population into thinking he’s a good choice, go for it. But I’m going to try and be a little more critical in my thinking.

– The constant rattling I can hear right now started off being annoying, but ater ripping apart my kitchen and living room I can’t find it. And it’s now gone to an intermittent rattle I think I’m going to go crazy!

– There is an unbelievable number of people in my neighbourhood who have their Christmas lights up and TURNED ON already. I think that is bonkers but I loooooove looking at them.

– Whre r u ? Can i see where u r? – Old lady in Sobeys parking lot almost ran into me because she wasn’t paying attention, then when she screeched to a halt she purposefully and obviously would look anywhere but me, before glancing my way and flashing an enormous grin. I was pissed, but that was so hilarious it totally made up for it :)

– Bit shoutout to all the bikers I see on my morning commute, bundled up like crazy and doing their best to get through the sloppy snow You guys are amazing!

– Hey so if Atch is so great and the city is just ballin and everything is peachy f***n keen then why the hell haven’t most neighbourhoods been scraped/had snow removal?

– I have the best bro in the world eye patch you know whats up! Thanks for all the help :D

– You are not as ferocious as u think u are so keep trying, LOL

– I think this city could stand to be a little more commuter friendly. What’s that you say? A BRIDGE TOLL? Get real that’s the stupidest Idea ever. Oh and it wasn’t mentioned before the election? Of course not.

Broadwell, JillKelley and General John Allen

– There is something inherently frustrating about doing a task and feeling so proud, only to have someone come along and point out that one glaring error you’d missed this whole time, LOL. and then its back to squre one

– Why bike when you can rollerblade?

– Family Circus is terrible

– U guys should have ablawwwwg – New romantic comedy, exotic locations like Miami and Afganistan, starring general petraeus, Paula

– I always miss u when u go shoot at bars i want to be in the verb newspaper. Why not me?

– Online bullying is way out of control I’m so glad Twitter and Facebook didn’t exist when I was in highschool or university. How terrible what kids these days have to face. I think technology and everything is great, just a thought.

– Taxis in this city take to damn long to get to where they need to be and cost to damn much it’s insane too bad buses dont run l ate. Definitely need a car to get around here.

– It’s November save your Christmas decorating for mid-December

NEXT WEEK: What do you think about the University of Regina students who are facing deportation? Pick up a copy of Verb to get in on the conversation:

– Everyone on the bus starin down at their phones is like zombies. U talked about a zombie invasion but it’s already here. – People who are to judgemental need to chill out and look at the poop in there own backyard before they start tossing shade on other people. There is no reason why you need to go around all self-important and thinkin ur so great and then try to cut people down. Have a little respect

We print your texts verbatim each week. Text in your thoughts and reactions to our stories and content, or anything else on your mind.

11 NOV 16 – NOV 22 /VERBSASKATOON

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EDITORIAL

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Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

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NIGHTLIFE

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TIMEOUT

NEWS + OPINION


Q+A

BENEATH A PETROLIFEROUS MOON

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE MENDEL ART GALLERY / BENEATH A PETROLIFEROUS MOON

Exhibition explores the legacy of oil production. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

T

he use of petroleum is one of the defining characteristics of modern society. Oil and gas enable so many things we take for granted, from transportation to plastics. We use petroleum every day, yet it remains strangely invisible. Beneath a Petroliferous Moon, a new group exhibition at the Mendel, is an attempt to make people more aware of their environment and their actions. Featuring work by, among others, Edward Burtynsky, Ernst Logar, and Robyn Moody, the exhibition addresses a highly political issue without delving too far into ideology. Dark and menacing, the show nevertheless tackles salient issues head-on. Some of the works are scathing, others merely descriptive, but all focus on a single idea: engagement. To find out more, I caught up with Associate Curator Troy Gronsdahl.

AJM: So much art is regional or national. What does it tell you when a show with truly international proportions emerges?

subtle look at the industry, it can open it up for more contemplation. Part of that through humour, part through aesthetic experience.

TG: I think that the issue is a multinational or global issue. And Saskatchewan is certainly implicated in that industry, and in that way we’re all implicated. She wanted to make visible something that is deeply connected to every facet of our life, either though the food that we eat or the production

AJM: These are issues that have been around for awhile. Why choose to stage this exhibition now?

Alex J MacPherson: Oil is a controversial subject. Is it hard to separate art from politics, to keep it from being tendentious?

AJM: You used the word “implicated,” which most people interpret in a negative sense. It seems that this idea of awareness is fundamental, that not being aware makes us complicit.

Troy Gronsdahl: It’s a very complicated and complex issue. [Curator Jen Budney] didn’t want it to be a diatribe or present a singular point of view. She tried to capture some of the complexity of the issue through working with diverse artists, artists working internationally and presenting different approaches to the subject.

TG: In relationship to our regional economy, the benefits seem more tangible now than they did 10 or 20 years ago. I think it’s very relevant right

[M]aking the issue visible again could… empower people to make small changes. TROY GRONSDAHL

of the goods we consume. We all depend on oil and the petroleum industry for those things, and we often don’t consider the role it has in our lives.

now, as Saskatchewan is gaining more prominence in the national economy and as we ramp up our petroleum development. I think it’s worthwhile to consider these things. AJM: One of the things about petroleum is that we’re so linked to it that no big change is in sight. It feels almost futile. TG: I feel like these big international challenges do have a tendency to disempower people in some ways. Because it is such a big issue, a big crisis, it has a tendency to make people feel like they have no role in solving the problem. Part of making the issue visible again could possibly empower people to make small

TG: There is a certain amount of complicity, because we do depend on these resources for our standard of living. I think an exhibition like this is a polarizing viewpoint. If it was an inflammatory or damning depiction of the petroleum industry, it would be polarizing, but by showing a more

changes. I’ve been doing a lot of research about Saskatchewan, key moments in our history where we took the lead — healthcare or the foundation of the Arts Board — through collective action and through ingenuity and compassion. Maybe [this is] one of those things.

Beneath a Petroliferous Moon Through January 6 @ Mendel Art Gallery Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

12 NOV 16 – NOV 22 CULTURE

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FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

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ARTS

GOOD OLD WAR

Three voices and the search for a great song. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

D

an Schwartz is not interested in being part of a movement or cultural upheaval. “Movements come and go,” he says, speaking from southern California. “We want to create a good sound that people enjoy, and can enjoy forever, that could have existed in ’66 and can exist forever in the future. We don’t want to be an Americana band or a folk band … we just want to be a great band.” Schwartz is one third of the Good Old War, a Pennsylvania band known for compelling acoustic music and powerful three-part vocal harmonies. Their latest record, Come Back as Rain, is an apt demonstration of raw, organic folk music at its best, uncomplicated by heavy-handed producers. Schwartz, Tim Arnold, and Keith Goodwin made Come Back as Rain to counter the dishonesty they see in contemporary music. “I think that we’ve noticed that people don’t believe bands anymore,” Schwartz says. “I’ll hear a band but I don’t believe that it’s them. I believe they’re working hard in the studio, but I don’t believe they sound like that. For us, our big trick is having a good vocal thing happening, and we want people to know this is actually a real thing.”

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Come Back as Rain sounds real because it is. Schwartz and his bandmates recorded it live off the floor, and it overflows with electric energy. Even the ballads are rousing, chiefly because nothing compares to the raw power of three voices performing as one. But while the Good Old War are best known for their singing, the key to their sound is not so easy to discern. “We just wanted to be able to play our songs with just a guitar,” Schwartz says. “That was always the theory: can we play it with just the acoustic guitar and the three of us singing?” It is impossible to overstate how important this is: only the best songs can stand on their own. And Come Back as Rain shows just how good 11 songs by three guys from Pennsylvania can be. Good Old War November 23 @ The Odeon $39.25 @ Ticketmaster

THE GALILEO PROJECT

Tafelmusik explores the fusion of art and science.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF COOPER SMITH

G

alileo Galilei was a Renaissance man. His contributions to mathematics, physics, philosophy, music, and astronomy

BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

forever changed the face of modern science. The Galileo Project, an ambitious fusion of music, science, and revolutionary ideas created by Tafelmusik, a baroque orchestra from Toronto, is an attempt to showcase the value of Galileo’s work. “Tafelmusik specializes in repertoire that starts right at that time,” says Alison Mackay, the Saskatoon expat who conceived of The Galileo Project. “That time of Galileo was a very interesting time for us, in the context of the music we play. We had been experimenting for several years

with concerts that perhaps had a narrated script performed by an actor or with some kind of global or historical context for our music.” In its finished form, The Galileo Project casts music by some of the most important baroque composers — Handel, Vivaldi, Monteverdi, Telemann — against a backdrop of high-resolution images of the solar system and poetic narration. “The Galileo Project is the first time we’ve experimented with a theatrical set and lighting design,” Mackay says, adding that the musicians chose to memorize their parts,

freeing the orchestra to move onstage and into the audience. “It really gives the audience a different impression,” she says. “We can move around the stage almost like constellations.” The Galileo Project has something for everyone. Hard-line baroque listeners will be thrilled to hear music played on period instruments, while classical music neophytes will be able to hear a sampling of some of the most important music ever composed. Perhaps more importantly, The Galileo Project unites art and science under the banner of progress. “It’s

quite revolutionary,” Mackay says. “And it opens the door for people who maybe aren’t that familiar with our kind of music.” The Galileo Project November 28 @ Third Avenue United Church $40+ @ Persephone Theatre Box Office

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

13 NOV 16 – NOV 22 @VERBSASKATOON

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COVER

THE WOODEN SKY

PHOTO: COURTESY OF JUSTIN BROADBENT

Fast food is poison and other life lessons from the Wooden Sky. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

T

here are certain rules all touring bands must follow. These rules of the road are universal and inviolable. The most comprehensive list was compiled a few years ago by an American musician named Thor Harris. It includes gems like “If you fart, claim it” and “Don’t f*ck anyone in the band.” These are obvious and defensible. Less obvious — though no less important — are things like “Driver picks the music” and “Remember the soundman’s name.” But Gavin Gardiner thinks commandment 19 is the most important of all. “Fast food is poison,” he laughs. “And it’s true.” Gardiner is an authority on the subject of touring. His band, the Wooden Sky, has logged thousands of miles and played dozens of shows this year. Known for releasing thoughtful alt-country records with a heavy dose of rustic introspection and then touring the hell out of them, Gardiner and his bandmates have carved out a reputation for themselves as one of Canada’s preeminent live bands. Their latest project is a four-month odyssey in support of Every Child a Daughter, Every Moon a

Sun, which was released in February. Gardiner knows the road exacts a heavy toll, but he’s prepared for it. “I think it’s important that we all try to stay healthy,” he says. “Like, actually physically take care of ourselves.”

better band and playing to the wider audience,” he says. “You’re living it every single day [and] sometimes you lose sight of the fact that you’re having success.” If you measure success in sold-out concerts, ebullient

I want to make music for making music, for music lovers … I don’t know why I would make music that I didn’t like. GAVIN GARDINER

That means giving up rockstar indulgences (most of the time, presumably) and concentrating instead on good food and exercise. “But sometimes when you’re driving down the highway, the Trans-Canada, that’s it, that’s your only option,” he says of greasy spoon pit stops. Fortunately for music fans across Canada, Gardiner and his bandmates are willing to endure the soggy hamburgers and greasy french fries. “For us, the constant goal is to be improving and striving to be a

audiences, and fantastic records, it seems plain that the Wooden Sky are finding it — even if they can’t see past the golden arches.

The fundamental problem with a band like the Wooden Sky is that their music defies description. Or, more accurately, cleaves to it. Calling Gardiner and his compadres soulful alt-country pioneers is no less accurate than calling them introspective acoustic soundscape artists. Trying to capture CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

14 NOV 16 – NOV 22 CULTURE

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF BEN ADAMSON

the scope of Every Child A Daughter, Every Moon a Sun with a handful of adjectives is futile, especially considering Gardiner’s view of things: “If we wanted this record to feel like a fairly loud, upbeat record, all we would have

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

to do is drop six songs.” Their sound is malleable, and the ones on Every Child a Daughter are no exception. This is plain when Gardiner and his bandmates take to the stage. Whereas some groups will only play rock clubs or theatres, the Wooden Sky will play anywhere. “I think that’s why I love being in the band in the first place,” he says. “I think that we have the ability to really shine as a rock band in a bar and we also have the ability to really shine in a church, where everything is quiet

and people are in pews and there’s so much natural reverb.”

The most versatile band in Canada began life as Gardiner’s bedroom project while he was studying at Ryerson University. One thing led to another, and the Wooden Sky soon emerged as a fully-formed band that transcends genre and style. There are elements of rock and country and folk and roots and Americana in their music, of course, but their ability to collaborate in the studio and on the stage produces a sound that cannot be mistaken for anything but the Wooden Sky. Their first record was called When Lost At Sea. A couple years later, they released If I Don’t Come Home, You’ll Know I’m Gone. Gardiner later realized that it was his breakup record, the profoundly bleak musings of a man captured by sorrow and frustration. The band followed it with a short EP and, earlier this year, Every Child a Daughter, Every Moon a Sun. The new record feels like Gardiner turning the lens outward. “I don’t know if it’s the right term, but the bigger picture?”

Gardiner muses. “[It’s about] realizing how connected things are to each other, and that it can go from a personal to a universal idea. [And] trying to understand what it means to actually know someone.” What’s really striking about Every Child a Daughter is the way it sounds. More expansive than any of its predecessors, the record is overflowing with lush soundscapes and rich musical textures. Sprawling across every inch of the sonic landscape, Every Child a Daughter is the sort of record where the sound of the song is just as important as the song itself. “It Gets Old To Be Alone” could, for example, stand up as a simple acoustic song, but the added instrumentation — especially Walker’s guitar parts, which are sensational — transforms a simple acoustic weeper into a deeply moving ballad, crackling with emotion. Even today, eight months and dozens of shows after its release, Gardiner is not sure what to make of it. “It definitely feels like a home

record,” he says, choosing his words carefully. “It’s warm sounding and lush and it’s fairly downtempo. There are explosive moments, but for me it’s that kind of record.” This is Gardiner’s interpretation, but he is willing to entertain a variety of other theories as well. In fact, he will even defend them. Pointing to a recent review of an unnamed friend’s new record, in which the unfortunate critic used the word “mistake,” he says: “I don’t think you can judge someone’s art and say they did it wrong. There’s no right or wrong; you take from it what you take from it.” Gardiner understands that records are subjective. This is convenient not because it discharges artistic responsibility but because it means the fans determine whether the record is a success. Every Child a Daughter may not receive the radio play it deserves, but Gardiner refuses to be cowed by industry standards. “I think that’s a difficult thing for people in the music industry, quote

unquote, to wrap their head around,” he muses. “It makes people nervous, I think, because it doesn’t allow you something to really latch on to immediately. Those people, I don’t think they’re in it for the right reasons. I want to make music for making music, for music lovers. That’s not exclusive. I’m not trying to be pretentious by saying that; it’s just the kind of music I like. I don’t know why I would make music that I didn’t like.” And as long as Gardiner and the Wooden Sky remember commandment 19, they should be making music they — and everyone else — like for a long time to come. The Wooden Sky November 24 @ The Bassment $17+ @ The Bassment Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

15 NOV 16 – NOV 22 /VERBSASKATOON

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FOOD + DRINK

Photography courtesy of Adam Hawboldt.

HALAMAZING! Kebab and Donair serves up delicious, quick halal fare. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

H

ave you ever seen the term halal on a menu here in town and wondered, “Hmm … that’s an interesting word, but tell me, what is it all about?” Well, good reader, I’ll tell you. Halal is a term used to describe food that has been prepared in such a way that it is permissible to eat according to Islamic law. And that, my friends, is the simplest, most straightforward way I can describe it. But if you want to get into the nitty-gritty of the food Muslims are permitted to eat under the dietary guidelines of their religion, well, things do get a bit more technical. Most of the foods addressed are meat. Pork, blood, carrion and animals that have been mistreated aren’t welcome in halal cooking. Then there’s dhabihah — the method in which animals that are to be eaten are slaughtered. There is a lot more to halal, a whole heckuva

lot more. And I’m no expert. The only reason I bring it up is because the other day I stopped by Kebab and Donair on Central Avenue for a bite to eat. And sitting there, chatting with the restaurant’s owner Syed Arif Ali, he told me something

K&D expanded and began making dishes like beef bahari, lamb chops, chicken tikka, etc. Then Syed Arif Ali mentioned that he had a thought to see how far he could expand his menu of halal offerings. And that’s what he did. So now if you want a piece of fried chicken with French fries or onion rings — that’s all halal — K&D is the place to get it. Heck, if you want delicious, quick food of any sort, K&D is a restaurant you simply have to try. With a menu that’s big and getting bigger, I wasn’t sure what I wanted when I first walked into the restaurant. I was hemming and hawing while looking at the menu, before Syed Arif Ali suggested that I try the Spicy Tandoori Chicken. So that’s what did. And it was amazing. It was spicy, but not so spicy that it killed the taste. Speaking of which, the dish was excellent: the chicken was moist, and the rice and salad and sauces (fresh tomato sauce and a

[I]f you want … fried chicken … that’s all halal — K&D is the place… ADAM HAWBOLDT

interesting. He told me that everything on his menu is halal. Which, at first glance, is understandable. The restaurant started out strictly as a kebab-donair-falafel joint. That stuff, if done right, would probably be halal anyway. Then

yogurt sauce) complimented the meat in a way that’s best described as harmonious. Oh, and the best thing about K&D … they’re open until 3am on weekends, and they deliver. So the next time you’re looking for a late-night snack, look no further. Seriously, it’s delicious.

Kebab and Donair 706-A Central Ave. | 979 0467

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

LET’S GO DRINKIN’ VERB’S MIXOLOGY GUIDE TANDOORI TEQUILA COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

Next time you have some tandoori chicken, do yourself a favour and take the time to make yourself this cocktail. The ingredients might, at first, strike you as strange, but the moment it hits your lips you’ll be singing a different tune.

2 curry leaves 1 long pepper 2 ounces el Jimador Silver (or any tequila, really) 1/2 ounce fresh pineapple juice 1/2 ounce lime juice 1/4 ounce simple syrup 1 slice grilled pineapple

DIRECTIONS

Crack the long pepper and curry leaf in the bottom of a tin with a muddler. Add the remaining ingredients and shake well. Double-strain over ice and serve in a highball glass with a garnish of grilled pineapple.

16 NOV 16 – NOV 22 CULTURE

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MUSIC

NEXT WEEK

COMING UP

FOGGY NOTIONS

LITTLE MISS HIGGINS

BLUE RODEO

@ BEAUMONT FILM AND RECORD FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 – $7

@ BROADWAY THEATRE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30 – $28

@ TCU PLACE TUESDAY, JANUARY 15 – $25+

The Foggy Notions began as a duo, just Kalon Beaudry and Janice Weber doing their thing. Both Beaudry and Weber had played in the Vicious Crystals, and one day they decided to work on and perform songs together. Pretty soon they enlisted Gerard Saretsky, with whom Beaudry had written songs before, and Charles Lemire. The result? A snappy little debut album called Beginning to See. Though they’ve since seen their share of rotating members, the Notions offer up a sound that’s light and catchy, poppy and romantic, and have been winning over fans around the city and beyond. This wicked group will be on display at Beaumont Film and Record next Friday. Also appearing on the ticket will be The Moas and Latcho Drom.

Take some old-time country, add a heavy dose of blues, toss in a pinch of jazz and a dash of folk, and you have the musical stylings of Little Miss Higgins. Higgins (whose real name is Jolene), was born in Brooks, AB and grew up in Independence, KS. For her latest album, Across the Plains, Higgins won Best Blues Album and Best Album Design at the 2011 Western Canadian Music Awards. The singer/songwriter will be serenading her way — guitar in hand — to Broadway Theatre next week. And whether she’s playing songs about underwear or overwhelming feelings, one thing is for certain: her smooth voice and unmistakable talent will keep you glued to your seat and leave you wanting more.

In 1987, a relatively unknown band from Ontario released a single off their album, Outskirts. That single was called “Try,” and pretty soon it became a staple on Canadian air waves. From that point on, Blue Rodeo has been a fixture on our national music scene. And with songs like “Lost Together,” “Hasn’t Hit Me Yet,” “Five Days in May” and “Bad Timing,” there’s good reason why they’ve become one of the most beloved Canadian acts working today. Consisting of such musical heavyweights as Jim Cuddy, Greg Keelor, Bazil Donovan and Glenn Milchem, among others, Blue Rodeo’s alt-country/rock sound is unmistakable. And come January, you’ll have a chance to experience that sound when they hit the road for a cross-Canada tour. – By Adam Hawboldt

PHOTOS COURTESY OF: THE ARTIST / THE ARTIST / THE ARTIST

SASK MUSIC PREVIEW

PHOTO: COURTESY OF BUSHWAKKER

SaskMusic would like to congratulate Bushwakker Brewpub on recently being named the top brewpub in Canada by vaycay.ca. Coincidence, perhaps, that Bushwakker recently adopted an allSaskatchewan mandate for their background music? If you’re a Saskatchewan artist and would like your album to be added to their playlist, contact http://www.bushwakker.com

Keep up with Saskatchewan music. saskmusic.org

17 NOV 16 – NOV 22 @VERBSASKATOON

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LISTINGS

NOVEMBER 16 » NOVEMBER 24 The most complete live music listings for Saskatoon. S

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16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

FRIDAY 16

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs. 9pm / No cover PIANO SERIES: MAURICE DROUIN / The Bassment — Feel like taking in some

GRANDTHEFT, SMALLTOWN DJS / Louis’ — Come check out this stop on the Good People Tour. 9pm / $10 GUTTERDOGS / Lydia’s Pub — A local rock a band that’s big on talent. 10pm / $5 cover MEMORY LANE / North Ridge Hall, Martensville — A tribute to music from the ‘40s, ‘50s and ‘60s. 7:30pm / $20 GWAR / The Odeon Events Centre — Get ready for a heavy metal show unlike any other. 6:30pm / $335 (www.theodeon.ca) DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm TROY HUDSON / Prairie Ink — Honest folk music in an intimate environment. 8pm / No cover L.O.R.D FUNK + FRIENDS / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of funk, blues and R&B. 9pm / No cover CHRIS ASTRO / Spadina Freehouse — Looking for a good time? Look no farther. 8pm / No cover ROUTE 66 / Stan’s Place — A band from Regina playing vintage rock and country rock. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / Cover $5 MODUS + MERN / Tequila — Hit up the MPowered Party and get two DJs for the price of one. 9pm / Cover TBD FABRIC / Vangelis — Come join us for a night of musical sweetness. 10pm / $5

smooth jazz stylings? Come check out Maurice Drouin. 4:30pm / No cover GUITAR SERIES: BOB EVANS / The Bassment — Winner of the 2003 US National Fingerstyle Guitar Championship. 9pm / Cover $15/20 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — Austen Roadz throws down a high-energy dance party. 9pm / $5 cover HURRICANE CLETIS / Buds — Local rockers play infectious tunes. 10pm / $6 WYLD UPRISING / Crown & Rok — A night of hot tunes. Cover TBD ORAL FUENTES / The Fez — A night of sweet reggae. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ ECLECTIC / The Hose — Local turntable whiz pumps snappy beats. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite rocks. 9pm / $5

SATURDAY 17

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes all night. 9pm / No cover PUTRESCENCE / Amigos Cantina — Come out for a kickass night of deathgrind. 10pm / Cover TBD JAZZ DIVA: ELIANA CUEVAS / The Bassment — One of the top singers of Latin American music. 9pm / $25/30 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — With over 25 years of DJ experience, Austen Roadz throws down a highenergy top 40 dance party along with DJ CTRL every Saturday night. 9pm / $5 cover HURRICANE CLETIS / Buds on Broadway — Local rockers with an infectious sound. 10pm / Cover $6 HONEY WAGON / The Fez — Blues and rock straight out of Creighton. 9pm / Cover TBD

DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite has always been known to break the latest and greatest tracks in multiple genres. 9pm / $5 cover DESPITE THE REVERENCE / Louis’ — Local band playing hard rock with metal influences. 9pm / Tickets TBD COAL CREEK BOYS / Lydia’s — Don’t miss out! 10pm / $5 LIFTED / Lydia’s Pub — Come dance your heart out in Lydia’s loft. 10pm / $5 FABER DRIVE / The Odeon — An award winning power-pop band. 7pm / $15-25 DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — There’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5 F.E.R.N. / Prairie Ink — A local folk/acoustic performer. 8pm / No cover L.O.R.D FUNK + FRIENDS / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of funk, blues and R&B. 9pm / No cover DR. J / Spadina Freehouse — A local DJ dropping hot beats. 8pm / No cover ROUTE 66 / Stan’s Place — A band from Regina playing vintage rock and country rock. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests. 10pm / $5 CONEXUS POP SERIES: ONE VISION THE MUSIC OF QUEEN / TCU Place — If you like Queen, there’s no way you can miss this. 7:30pm / 35-55 (www.tcutickets.ca) FREESTYLERS / Tequila — This British EDM duo is nothing short of awesome. 9pm / $10 ECONOMICS, J RILEY HILL, STEPHEN COOLEY / Vangelis — What better way to spend a Saturday night? 10pm / $5

SUNDAY 18

INDUSTRY NIGHT / Béily’s UltraLounge — Hosted by DJ Sugar Daddy. 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff ELIXIR / Convocation Hall, UofS — Featuring rarely performed piano quartets. 2:30pm / $10+ GEORGE CANYON / Dakota Dunes Casino — This talented musician from Nova Scotia plays country tunes the way they should be played. 8pm / $35 (www. tickets.siga.sk.ca) DJ KADE / The Hose — Saskatoon DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover MADCHILD / The Odeon Events Centre — A member of Swollen Members doing his hip hop thing. 7pm / $20 (www. theodeon.ca)

SUNDAY JAM / Vangelis Tavern — The Vangelis Sunday Jam offers great tunes from blues to rock and beyond. 7:30pm / No cover

MONDAY 19

GALLOWS / Louis’ — Wade MacNeil, formerly of Alexisonfire, is in town with his new band. 9pm / Cover TBD METAL MONDAYS / Lydia’s Pub — If hard, heavy awesomeness is your thing, swing by. 9pm CHAD BROWNLEE, DALLAS SMITH / The Odeon — Come out for a night of kickass country music. 7pm / $20+

TUESDAY 20

BLACKIE AND THE RODEO KINGS / Broadway Theatre — A folk rock/alt-country band made up of all-star Canadian musicians. 8pm / $38 ROSS NEILSEN / Buds — Infectious blues rock from a talented east coast musician. 10pm / $6 LEONARD COHEN / Credit Union Centre — Don’t miss this Canadian music icon. 8pm / $56.50-276.50 (Ticketmaster) DJ SUGAR DADDY / The Double Deuce — This crowd favourite rocks. 9:30pm / $4 VERB PRESENTS OPEN STAGE / Lydia’s Pub — The open stage at Lydia’s has hosted many of Saskatoon’s finest performers. 9pm / No cover OPEN MIC / The Somewhere Else Pub — Come out to show your talent. 7pm / No cover

WEDNESDAY 21

HUMP WEDNESDAYS / 302 Lounge & Discotheque — Resident DJ Chris Knorr will be spinning all of your favourite songs. 9pm / No cover until 10pm; $3 thereafter ROSS NEILSEN / Buds on Broadway — Infectious blues rock from a talented east coast musician. 10pm / Cover $6 THE AVENUE RECORDING COMPANY PRESENTS OPEN MIC / The Fez — Hosted by Chad Reynolds. 10pm / No cover DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover UOFS JAZZ / Louis’ — A university band playing some slick jazz tunes. 9pm / Cover TBD DR. J ‘SOULED OUT’ / Lydia’s Pub — Dr. J spins hot funk and soul every Wednesday night. 9pm / No cover WILD WEST WEDNESDAY / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Hosted by DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman. Come ride the mechanical bull. 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

18 NOV 16 – NOV 22 ENTERTAINMENT

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EDITORIAL

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Q+A

ARTS

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FOOD + DRINK

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LISTINGS

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NIGHTLIFE

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DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Featuring Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King. 10pm / No cover

THURSDAY 22

JOHN MCDERMOTT TRIO / Broadway Theatre — Playing a collection of your favourite songs. 8pm / $38-43 ROSS NEILSEN / Buds — Infectious blues rock from a talented east coast musician. 10pm / Cover $6 THROWBACK THURSDAYS / Earls — Come experience the best in retro funk, soul, reggae and rock. 8pm / No cover THUNDER RIOT W/CONKY SHOWPONY / The Fez — This local DJ plays the kind of music that’ll get you moving. 9pm / $5 DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — Local DJ Sugar Daddy will be rocking. 8pm / $5; free with student ID before 11pm

FRIDAY 23

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs. 9pm / No cover FOAM LAKE / Amigos Cantina — Catchy rock and roll from a local quartet. 10pm / Tickets at the door PIANO FRIDAYS: ROSS NYKIFORUK / The Bassment — Come check out Nykiforuk tickle the ivories. 4:30pm / No cover STRAIGHT FROM THE FRIDGE / The Bassment — Featuring Ellen Kolenick, this band plays a mix of jazz, Latin and pop. 9pm / Cover $12/16 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — Austen Roadz throws it down every Friday night. 9pm / $5 cover THE MOAS, FOGGY NOTIONS, LATCHO DROM / Beaumont Film & Record — If it’s good tunes you like, don’t miss this show. 8pm / $7 ALPHA YAYA DIALLO / Broadway Theatre — A performer at the front ranks of the African music scene. 8pm / $35.50 KASHMIR / Buds — Western Canada’s premier Led Zeppelin tribute band. 10pm / Cover $6 NATALIE STRUCK, MAKELIARS, THE SLEEVES / The Fez — A night filled with sweet sounds from three talented acts. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ ECLECTIC / The Hose — Local turntable whiz DJ Eclectic pumps snappy electronic beats. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite rocks. 9pm / $5 XAVIER RUDD / The Odeon Events Centre — A folksie, funky singer/songwriter hailing from Australia. 8pm / $39.25 (Ticketmaster)

DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — There’s no better party around. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm STONE MOUNTAIN MUSIC / Prairie Ink — A lovely folk rock trio. 8pm / No cover TRANSCONTINENTAL BLUES BAND / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of blues, and bustling good times. 9pm / No cover TIM VAUGHN BAND, JOCELYN & LISA / Spadina Freehouse — Come celebrate the Freehouse’s 10th birthday. 8pm TERRI-ANNE STRONGARM / Stan’s Place — Come out for a night of rocking country. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests. 10pm / Cover $5 CRYSTAL ELLIS, RHIANNON / Tequila — Rhiannon is a hot DJ/rap artist. Crystal Ellis is a DJ/Playboy Centrefold. 8pm / Tickets TBD THE REBELLION / Vangelis — A local altrock/pop group. 10pm / $8

SATURDAY 24

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes. 9pm WOOL ON WOLVES / Amigos — An indie rock band from Edmonton. 10pm / Tickets available at the door THE WOODEN SKY / The Bassment — A country-folk indie band from Tortonto. 9pm / $25/30 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s — Austen Roadz throws it down with DJ CTRL. 9pm / $5 KASHMIR / Buds — A Led Zeppelin tribute band. 10pm / Cover $6 RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS / Credit Union Centre — It’s the Red Hot Chili Peppers, folks. Need we say more? 8pm / $48.5085.90 (www.ticketmaster.ca) RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS AFTERYPARTY / Crown & Rok — Come unwind after a hot show! JOHNNY DON’T / The Fez — Satirical songwriting meets kick-ass rock. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ KADE / The Hose — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — Featuring this local crowd favourite. 9pm / $5 cover LIFTED / Lydia’s Pub — Come dance your heart out in Lydia’s loft. 10pm / $5 TIM VAUGHN / Lydia’s Pub — A wicked blues/pop/acoustic musician. 10pm / $5 DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — There’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5 THE LOST KEYS / Prairie Ink — Eclectic, easy listening tunes. 8pm / No cover

TRANSCONTINENTAL BLUES BAND / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of blues and bustling good times. 9pm / No cover THE GAFF / Spadina Freehouse — Check out this local DJ. 8pm / No cover TERRI-ANNE STRONGARM / Stan’s Place — Come out for a night of rocking country. 9pm / No cover

DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / $5 VIVA LAS VEGAS / Tequila — Featuring DJs Dubz, Mern and Kidalgo. 9pm / Cover TBD

GET LISTED Have a live show you'd like to promote? Let us know! layout@verbnews.com

19 NOV 16 – NOV 22 /VERBSASKATOON

CONTENTS

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EDITORIAL

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Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

FILM

NIGHTLIFE

COMICS

TIMEOUT

ENTERTAINMENT


FILM

LOVE FOR LINCOLN PHOTO: COURTESY OF 20TH CENTURY FOX

New bio-pic of America’s 16 th president is excellent, despite its flaws. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

H

ow much you like Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln will depend on what your expectations are. If you want to see an epic, sprawling Civil War pic, well, you’re sh*t out of luck. Same goes if you want to see a real representation of how things went down in Lincoln’s day. But if you’re into heavy American patriotism, serious character studies and some of the finest acting you’ll see all year, then you’re going to like the heck out of Lincoln.

This narrow focus really gives the movie weight. So too does all the terrific acting. Daniel Day-Lewis, arguably the best actor working today, doesn’t simply play a good Lincoln. He becomes Lincoln, breathing life into him — inside and out. But it’s not just Day-Lewis walking tall in this film. David Strathairn (Good Night, and Good Luck) is great as Secretary of State William Seward, as is Sally Field (Places in the Heart) in the role of Mary Todd Lincoln.

LINCOLN Steven Spielberg Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field + Joseph Gordon-Levitt DIRECTED BY STARRING

120 MINUTES | PG

talking to four soldiers. Out of nowhere, the soldiers start reciting the Gettysburg Address verbatim. “Oh brother,” I thought, “here we go! This unbelievable cheese is going to get unbelievably cheesier.” Fortunately, I was wrong. But still, there is a lot of patriotic chest beating going on. And too much myth-making. Lincoln’s actual views on African Americans are barely breached (that might tarnish the myth of The Great Emancipator). And there’s nary a mention that Lincoln wanted to pass the 13th Amendment not because he was against slavery, but for political reasons. See, he hoped abolishing slavery would cripple the South’s economy and negatively affect their army, thereby ensuring a win for the North. Yet for all the things it neglected, Lincoln is still an excellent movie. And a pretty darn good look into the last days of a great man struggling through his greatest hour.

Daniel Day-Lewis…becomes Lincoln, breathing life into him… ADAM HAWBOLDT

Personally, I wanted all of the above, so by the time the final credits rolled I was conflicted as all get out of here. Still am — kind of. See, on the one hand I thought the movie worked on so many levels. Writer Tony Kushner (Munich, Angels in America) wisely avoids trying to tackle the entire life of Abraham Lincoln, instead opting to focus the script tightly on the last few months of Lincoln’s life, covering his struggle to end the Civil War and all the underhanded tricks (bribery, lies, threats) Lincoln needed to get the Thirteenth Amendment passed.

And then there’s Tommy Lee Jones playing abolitionist congressman Thaddeus Stevens. Wow! The only way to describe Jones’ performance is incendiary. Every time he’s on screen, the film catches fire and soars to its highest heights. He’s a lock for an Oscar nomination and, to be honest, probably deserves to win. And yet, for all the great acting and superb focus, I couldn’t shake the feeling that Spielberg could’ve done more with this movie — a feeling that started from the very first scene. After a gruesome battle in 1865, we see Abe sitting on a tree stump,

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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20 NOV 16 – NOV 22 ENTERTAINMENT

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A SMASHING SUCCESS

PHOTO: COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

A new, refreshing film about alcoholism. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

W

here’s the strangest place you’ve woken up after a serious bender? In the back of a horse-drawn carriage? Tucked in between a washer and dryer in a stranger’s laundry room? Well, if you’re first-grade teacher Kate Hannah, the answer to that question would be “under a freeway on a ratty old couch after a night of kickthe-hell-out-of-your-liver drinking and a blast of free crack cocaine.” Don’t be mistaken, though. Hannah (played by Mary Elizabeth

Heck, the main character isn’t even the kind of person who drinks to deal with depression or other pitch-black secrets. Nope, Kate is just a smart, sweet, charming 20-something school teacher who has never really left her college days behind. She and her husband Charlie (Breaking Bad’s Aaron Paul) go to bars, drink like rock stars, play lawn games in the backyard, make the drunken whoopie, pass out, wake up, drink beer in the shower … that sort of stuff. Anyone familiar with

[T]he whole movie really rests on her shoulders. Good thing Winstead delivers in a big, bad kind of way… ADAM HAWBOLDT

Winstead) is no druggie. She only smokes the crack because, honestly, she can’t think of a reason to say no. But Kate does have a drinking problem. A serious one. And it’s this problem that’s front and centre in director James Ponsoldt’s new movie, Smashed. Now, Smashed isn’t your typical Hollywood movie about alcoholism. There’s no bottoming out or great triumph over drinking or death or any of the standard stuff associated with these types of movies.

the university lifestyle is familiar with the routine. But one day that routine gets broken when, while teaching, Kate — who’s hungover to the high heavens — pukes into a trash can in front of her class. Not knowing what else to do, Kate gives people the old “oh, it’s just morning sickness” excuse. This lie leads to another and another until Kate has everyone believing she’s pregnant. Well … almost everyone. Kate’s vice principal (played by the won-

SMASHED James Ponsoldt Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Aaron Paul, Nick Offerman + Octavia Spencer DIRECTED BY STARRING

85 MINUTES | 14A

derful Nick Offerman) sees through her lies and convinces Kate to give AA a shot. But this is no Alcoholics Anonymous-is-the-end-all-and-be-all flicks. Instead, what Smashed does is take a sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking look at a young woman trying to tackle the first big problem in an otherwise fun, problem-free life. And Winstead (Scott Pilgrim vs. The World) really plays the hell out of this role. Because it gives such an intimate look into one person’s life, the whole movie really rests on her shoulders. Good thing Winstead delivers in a big, bad kind of way. It also doesn’t hurt that the supporting cast of Paul, Offerman, Megan Mullally and Octavia Spencer all check in with strong performances. Smashed is currently being screened at Roxy Theatre.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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21 NOV 16 – NOV 22 @VERBSASKATOON

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NIGHTLIFE

Photography by Patrick Carley – feedback@verbnews.com

22 NOV 16 – NOV 22 ENTERTAINMENT

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 @

THE ROOK & RAVEN The Rook & Raven 154 2nd Avenue South (306) 655 2220 MUSIC VIBE / A mix of old and

new rock FEATURED DEALS / Enjoy 1 litre

of house wine or a bottle of another wine, and receive a free cheese platter DRINK OF CHOICE / Wine — Trapiche or St. Francis TOP EATS / Pork tenderloin — pan-roasted, served with sweet potatoes, red wine risotto & vegetable medley, or fish and chips SOMETHING NEW / Barking Squirrel Lager, Heineken, and a new Foundry cider on draft

23 NOV 16 – NOV 22 /VERBSASKATOON

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NIGHTLIFE

Photography by DelRioPhotographics.com – feedback@verbnews.com

24 NOV 16 – NOV 22 ENTERTAINMENT

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FRIDAY + SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 + 10 @

6TWELVE LOUNGE 6Twelve Lounge 612 Spadina Crescent East (306) 667 0172

MUSIC VIBE / Smooth lounge and

chill out tunes FEATURED DEALS / Beef tenderloin

medallions, and oysters DRINK OF CHOICE / Crazy Mary (bacon-infused vodka and bourbon, Clamato juice and housemade spice, served in a class with a smoked sea salt and pepper rim TOP EATS / Appy platters or mussels SOMETHING NEW / There’s a new appetizer menu available to try

25 NOV 16 – NOV 22 @VERBSASKATOON

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COMICS

© Elaine M. Will | blog.E2W-Illustration.com | Check onthebus.webcomic.ws/ for previous editions!

26 NOV 16 – NOV 22 ENTERTAINMENT

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TIMEOUT

CROSSWORD CANADIAN CRISS-CROSS DOWN 1. One who gives financial support 2. Responsibility 3. Wild animal’s home 4. Rub out 5. Clothing 6. Rich soil 7. Take to court 8. One versed in rhetoric 9. Healing ointment 11. Insinuating 12. Whoppers 14. Bit of bird food 17. Musical beat 20. Interior design 21. Something that

belongs to me 23. Check for accuracy 25. Male children 27. Pack rat 28. Attention to detail 29. Corrosive chemicals 30. Makes a payment 32. Break out of prison 33. College officials 34. Place to play 37. Authoritative order 40. Come to a halt 42. Hit with the hand 44. Time period in history 46. Deceitfully clever

SUDOKU ANSWER KEY

A

B

8 5 7 6 4 2 1 3 9 2 9 6 3 7 1 5 8 4 1 3 4 9 5 8 6 7 2 6 8 3 7 1 9 2 4 5 5 4 9 8 2 3 7 6 1 7 1 2 4 6 5 8 9 3 9 6 5 2 3 7 4 1 8 3 7 1 5 8 4 9 2 6 4 2 8 1 9 6 3 5 7

28. Humorous drawing, as in a newspaper 31. Impoverished 35. Pass a test easily 36. Goes as fast as possible 38. Briny expanse 39. Parts of pairs of eyeglasses 41. Heart colour, on a card 42. Surgery souvenir 43. Gave final form to a film 45. Prince Edward ___ 47. Put away for use later 48. Cleans chalkboard erasers 49. Practice punching 50. Write with a computer

6 9 4 5 2 3 7 8 1 7 8 1 6 4 9 3 2 5 2 5 3 7 8 1 6 9 4 9 1 6 8 3 7 5 4 2 4 7 2 9 6 5 1 3 8 5 3 8 2 1 4 9 7 6 3 2 9 4 5 6 8 1 7 8 6 7 1 9 2 4 5 3 1 4 5 3 7 8 2 6 9

ACROSS 1. Be an omen of 5. As well 9. More rational 10. Rains heavily 12. Empty space 13. Songs of praise 15. Kinds 16. Crooked deal 18. Make fast 19. Night before 20. High-priced 21. Manner of doing 22. Wait on tables 24. Longed for 26. Formation of troops or ships © WALTER D. FEENER 2012

HOROSCOPES NOVEMBER 16 – NOVEMBER 22 ARIES March 21–April 19

LEO July 23–August 22

SAGITTARIUS November 23–December 21

This is going to be a fun week, Aries. Whether it be an invite to a hip party or simply hanging out with friends, good times shall be had by all.

There are only so many hours in a day, Leo. Twenty-four, to be precise. So try to make the most of the time you have this week to start a new project.

We all have room for personal improvement, Sagittarius. So why not take this week to try and turn your shortcomings into something positive.

TAURUS April 20–May 20

VIRGO August 23–September 22

CAPRICORN December 22–January 19

Contemplation. That’s the watchword this week, Taurus. Whenever you get a free moment, take the time to sit back and think about the big things in life.

It might take you a while to make sense of things this week, but once you get everything straightened out, clarity, thy name shall be Virgo.

This promises to be a magical week for you, Capricorn, full of wonder and awe. Enjoy it, before reality, inevitably, comes crashing down.

GEMINI May 21–June 20

LIBRA September 23–October 23

AQUARIUS January 20–February 19

You may find yourself feeling beaten down and run ragged early this week, Gemini. Don’t worry. In a few days you’ll be full of zip and zeal.

Sometimes how good you are depends entirely on how lucky you are. And this week, Libra, you’re going to be both lucky and good. Enjoy it!

If someone challenges you this week, Aquarius, don’t shy away from them. Instead, put on your game face and start taking names and kicking ass.

CANCER June 21–July 22

SCORPIO October 24–November 22

PISCES February 20–March 20

When the going gets tough, the tough grab the going and beat the ever-loving stuffing out of it. Yep, it’s going to be that kind of week. But you got this!

Some weeks are meant for exploring, other weeks all you want to do is curl up on the couch. If given the choice, opt for the latter in the days ahead.

Like sands in an hour glass, you may find your energy levels slowly but steadily dwindling this week, Pisces. Never fear: all will be right soon!

SUDOKU 9 4 5 3 8 1 6 4 2 5 2 4 9 6 5 7 6 3 8 3 2 1 4 7 2 6 1 7 8 7 9 5 1 3 8 9

CROSSWORD ANSWER KEY

A

5 4 9 6 3 1 5 8 1 8 6 7 8 3 7 9 2 4 4 2 6 2 5 3 5 7 8 1 9 4 2 1 9 6 3 7

B

27 NOV 16 – NOV 22 /VERBSASKATOON

CONTENTS

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Q+A

ARTS

COVER

FOOD + DRINK

MUSIC

LISTINGS

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NIGHTLIFE

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ENTERTAINMENT


VERBNEWS.COM

Verb Issue S216 (Nov. 16-22, 2012)  

Verb Issue S216 (Nov. 16-22, 2012)

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