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COLD CASING A Saskatchewan psychic helps the police NUTCRACKER Making costumes for the Moscow Ballet SKYFALL + KILLER JOE Films reviewed­

LEST WE FORGET ISSUE #215 – NOVEMBER 9 TO NOVEMBER 15

PHOTO: COURTESY PHOTO: OF MARKCOURTESY MARYANOVICH OF PH


CONTENTS

NEWS + OPINION

CULTURE

ENTERTAINMENT

Q + A WITH PETER BRENNAN

LISTINGS Local music listings for November 9 through November 17. 18 / LISTINGS

Queen + the SSO. 12 / Q + A

RELENTLESS PURSUIT

NUTCRACKER

A day in the life of a Canadian infantry soldier. 4 / LOCAL

Arthur Oliver makes magic with costumes. 13 / ARTS

SKYFALL + KILLER JOE The latest movie reviews. 20 / FILM

NIGHTLIFE PHOTOS

A HISTORY OF BREATHING

We visit Colonial and the Freehouse.

Daniel Macdonald’s latest play. 13 / ARTS

22-25 / NIGHTLIFE

DESIGN LEAD / ROBERTA BARRINGTON DESIGN & PRODUCTION / BRITTNEY GRAHAM CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS / PATRICK CARLEY PATRICIO DEL RIO, ADAM HAWBOLDT + ALEX J MACPHERSON

How a psychic helps solve cold cases. 6 / LOCAL

CHAD BROWNLEE

On making the jump to country music. 14 / COVER

EDITORIAL PUBLISHER / PARITY PUBLISHING EDITOR IN CHIEF / RYAN ALLAN MANAGING EDITOR / JESSICA PATRUCCO STAFF WRITERS / ADAM HAWBOLDT + ALEX J MACPHERSON

ART & PRODUCTION

COLD CASING

ON THE COVER:

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BUSINESS & OPERATIONS

PURE POPPYCOCK

JAMAICAN ME HUNGRY

ON THE BUS

Our thoughts on the alternative poppy movement. 8 / EDITORIAL

Get a taste of Jamaica at the Konga Cafe. 16 / FOOD + DRINK

Weekly original comic illustrations by Elaine M. Will. 26 / COMICS

COMMENTS

MUSIC

GAMES + HOROSCOPES

Here’s what you had to say about transfer payments. 10 / COMMENTS

GWAR, Faber Drive + Carrie Catherine.

Canadian criss-cross puzzle, horoscopes, and Sudoku. 27 / TIMEOUT

17 / MUSIC

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RELENTLESS PURSUIT A day in the life of a Canadian infantry soldier. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

I

am standing in a minefield. Shells from a battery of howitzers whistle overhead. The gun pits are more than five kilometres away, but each report feels like a kick in the chest. “Look at this,” says Warrant Officer Daniel Beason, a cheerful combat engineer from Newfoundland, running his hand along an all-but-invisible strand of wire cutting across our path. “This is a bounding fragmentation mine,” he adds, after unearthing what looked like a dull green coffee can. “It has two explosive charges. The first launches it out of the ground, the second explodes it. The kill radius? About 30 metres.” The scariest thing about standing in a minefield, even one sown with inert training mines, is that it looks like every other patch of prairie in sight. The only difference is that every inch of it is potentially lethal. “This is a liquid pressure actuated mine,” Beason says, gesturing toward a halfburied device no bigger than a pack of cigarettes, a “toepopper” designed to separate a person’s foot from his or her body. Moments earlier, I had walked right over it. Landmines come in all shapes and sizes. Some are powerful enough to knock the track off a main battle tank; others, packed with shrapnel, will maim or kill anyone who treads on them. Mines are cheap to manufacture and deploy, difficult to neutralize, and extraordinarily effective against

virtually all combatants — and civilians. Because of the long-term risk, Canada was one of the first countries to sign the Ottawa Treaty, which outlawed anti-personnel mines. But the Canadian Forces are sometimes asked to fight in areas littered with these devices. Beason’s minefield is benign, but the feeling of standing in it is sobering. “We train as we fight,” he says.

Beason’s dummy minefield is part of Exercise Relentless Pursuit, a Canadian Forces Reserve training

with communications equipment, several officers and non-commissioned members are sipping coffee and trying to stay warm. Captain Mike Graver is leaning over a laminated map peppered with flag markers. A tall redhaired man attached to Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, Graver is the officer in charge. He explains that the exercise features a number of reserve units from across the province: the Royal Regina Rifles, the North Saskatchewan Regiment, and 38 Combat Engineer Regiment. Each team of four or five soldiers is expected to navigate the training area and stop at

[Soldiers] step out the door for the country, but they fight for each other. TONY ENGELBERTS

weekend. The exercise began at four in the morning, with small groups of soldiers shivering in the predawn gloom. Their task would not be easy. Framed as an infantry skills competition, Relentless Pursuit is actually a grueling trek through the training area at Canadian Forces Detachment Dundurn. The soldiers are expected to march 20 kilometres over uneven ground cloaked in rain and beaten by an icy October wind. At the command post, little more than a green tent and a truck packed

several different “stands,” where their performance in a specific activity will be graded. From instinctive shooting, armoured vehicle recognition, and combat first aid to minefield extraction, key leader engagement, and stalking, each section would face an array of challenges similar to what they might encounter on the battlefield. “When we’re developing training exercises for our soldiers, we have to design them in such a manner that the tasks we give them sometimes verge on the impossible, so that they know CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

4 NOV NOV92––NOV NOV15 8 NEWS + OPINION

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF ALEX J MACPHERSON / VERB MAGAZINE

what their capabilities are.” explains Lieutenant Colonel Tony Engelberts, commanding officer of the North Saskatchewan Regiment and Royal Regina Rifles. That edge was apparent when Corporal Mark Webb and his section of grinning soldiers jogged into the distance-judging stand. “We expected this to be tough for everyone,” Webb laughs, shrugging off his rucksack and C7A2 carbine. His section had jogged the last five kilometres to the stand, even though they had been marching for eight or nine hours. “We joke a lot, a lot of black humour. Plus, we encourage each other.” As a corporal, Webb was responsible for shepherding the private soldiers in his section through the course. Webb was clearly exhausted, making the tasks at the distance-judging stand that much more difficult. “We eat a lot of granola bars,” he laughs. “And beef jerky.”

In theory, taking part in a field exercise should be anything but fun. The hours are long, the rucksacks backbreaking and the weather often miserable. Soldiers, however, are notorious for defying expectations. Virtually everyone in the field was grinning despite the crushing exhaustion. Engelberts thinks exercises are one of the reasons soldiers stick around. “If we just trained in the classroom and on the floor, I probably wouldn’t have anybody here within 18 months,” he says. “You put a bunch of guys to-

gether that have some shared experiences, and the first thing they will talk about usually is how they all barely survived something, whether it’s combat, whether it’s something that almost killed them weather-wise.” Exercises like Relentless Pursuit are extremely demanding. Soldiers must be much more than riflemen, and a well-designed exercise forces soldiers to perform a wide range of activities while thinking carefully about the consequences of their actions. “The situation a frontline combat arms soldier can find himself in can involve everything from doing support to the civilian possibility, dispensing aid, doing a medium-level conflict counterinsurgency, and doing high-intensity combat,” Engelberts says. “An infantry unit could be doing all of those simultaneously. You have to have a wide breadth of skills and knowledge in order to pull that off.” That is not easy to accomplish for most reservists, who work between four and 10 days each month. Most have full-time civilian jobs and many have families, meaning their work with the military is a major commitment. Engelberts understands. “I have to give them a reason to want to be here, because I ask a lot from them and the Canadian Forces asks a lot from them,” he says. “I have to make sure I’m giving them something challenging and interesting, especially during a time of — I won’t call it peacetime right now, but we’re not actively in a shooting

war. I’ve got to keep them engaged.” The war in Afghanistan has done much to bring the Canadian Forces into the public consciousness, but Engelberts knows sustaining that momentum will be difficult. Exercises go a long way to reinforcing the bonds that all soldiers share. “The Canadian government might order a soldier to go to war, but when it comes down to the crunch, a soldier on the ground is fighting the war for the guy beside him and for his section, his platoon, his unit,” Engelberts says. “They step out the door for the country, but they fight for each other.”

As Relentless Pursuit drew to a close, Master Corporal Joel Sutherland was finishing up the stalking challenge, an exercise focused on camouflage and stealth. His tactical vest was festooned with branches and twigs, homemade camouflage. “It’s been pretty good so far,” he says of the day’s field exercise. “A lot of walking, yeah, but that’s what we do. It’s a lot more fun than [civilians] think it is. But we take it very seriously, too. After all is said and done we share our experiences and laugh. It’s an experience a lot of other people never get.” ( ( ) 881 Feedback? 8372 Feedback?Text Textit!it!306 306) 881 8372 @MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

5 NOV 9 – NOV 15 @VERBSASKATOON

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF GARY RIDSDALE

COLD CASING

Saskatchewan psychic works with police on investigations… just not here in Saskatchewan. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

I

magine you’re sitting on a bench in the middle of a crowded mall. It’s Christmas time. All around you people are milling about, doing some last minute shopping. Now imagine while you’re sitting there you close your eyes and you listen carefully to everything that’s going on around you. The voices intermingling, the cash registers beeping, footsteps, rustling bags, the hum of the escalators. Imagine all that, and you’ll begin to get an idea of what it’s like to be Barb Powell. You see, Powell is a psychic. And that whole Christmas-shopping-atthe-mall scenario, well, that’s what she experiences every day in her head. “It’s constant,” says Powell of the din she encounters. “You have trouble sleeping. It’s hard to relax and just shut down. There’s a certain anxiety and it just kind of gets you going.” “You get used to ignoring it,” continues Powell. She pauses for a second, chuckles and says, “I have three kids, a dog and a husband … I’ve gotten quite good at ignoring and blocking things out.” And most of the time, that’s how Powell moves through life. Ignor-

ing. Blocking things out. Sure, when she walks past a person Powell may sense that he or she is having a bad day or something, but that’s none of her business. She can’t concern herself with everyone she passes. “I just can’t get into that,” she says. “If I’m out with my kids, I can’t

after Powell had begun doing psychic work for others. Relatively new to the industry, she was doing a reading for a customer and began talking about a person she sensed to be the woman’s sister. Powell saw a detail of a tattoo on the sister’s back. It was a rose.

I remember thinking [the body] was down this specific highway. BARB POWELL

be working. But when I am in work mode, that’s when I go deeper than just skimming the surface. That’s when I have to connect.” And sometimes that means connecting with people beyond the grave — especially when Powell is called in to help the police with cold cases.

The first time Barb Powell got involved with a cold case was because of a reading she’d done. That was a little more than a decade ago, not long

Powell went on to tell her customer other things she assumed the woman already knew — that her sister had mental issues, that her sister had disappeared, etc. When it was over, the woman told Powell that her sister (or her sister’s body) had never been found. Then she asked if Powell would be willing to talk to a detective about her sister. Powell said she would, never really expecting that anything would materialize from it. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

6 NOV 9 – NOV 15 NEWS + OPINION

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But one day as she was driving down the street, her phone started ringing. Powell pressed the button and said hello. An official-sounding male voice came on the line. Sure enough, it was a detective from North Carolina. “I was like, ‘holy crap!’” remembers Powell. “Immediately, I pulled over to the side of the road and began explaining some things about the sister to the detective. Things I knew, things I could feel. Things, I hate to say, that I didn’t have the heart to tell [the customer].” And so marked Powell’s first step into the world of cold cases. Soon other law enforcement agents (mostly from the United States) were contacting her in search of her service. “I remember this one case I did where they were trying to locate a body,” says Powell. “I remember thinking it was down this specific highway. I don’t know why, I just got pulled there. I just felt it. But at the same time it felt like I was being pulled in a separate direction.” Naturally, Powell was interested. But because of her schedule, she couldn’t just drop everything and go see the highway she’d envisioned.

“Two days later they found a body at the exact location I was being pulled to,” she says. “And then they found another body in the other direction I’d been sensing.”

But don’t get things twisted. It’s not as though Powell is saying she’s the one who solved any of the cold cases, or even found the bodies for that matter. Not at all. Unlike what television shows like Medium or The Mentalist may lead you to believe, Powell will tell you that the role a psychic plays in a cold case investigation is nowhere near the front and centre. “I certainly don’t think psychics solve crimes,” she explains. “That’s the police’s job. They obviously know more about the details of a crime and where to look for bodies than most other people. So for me it’s just saying names, dates, telling them about whatever details I come up with. They can take that, put it with what they have and hopefully it’ll open up some more doors or scenarios for them if they’re stuck.” And if that helps, great. If not, at least she tried. But here’s the thing:

it’s not as though Powell is out there trying to help police departments all the time. Just the opposite, in fact. She only works a case (pro bono, naturally) if the cops call her first. “I would never contact the police,” says Powell. “I’ve never wanted to be an ambulance chaser. Sitting there,

watching the news for someone to go missing, then offering my help. That’s not me.” “We don’t subscribe to a newspaper, I don’t watch the news, I don’t do anything of the sort because, honestly, I don’t want to know,” she explains. “As bad as that sounds, I’m

much happier letting people contact me if they need help.” Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

7 NOV 9 – NOV 15 /VERBSASKATOON

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF STEPHEN DYRGAS

PURE POPPYCOCK

Wearing a red poppy does not glorify war.

I

f you’ve been paying close attention to the news lately, chances are you ran into a story or two about alternative poppies. Maybe it was the uproar Quebec Premier Pauline Marois caused when she pinned a poppy with a fleurde-lis centre to her lapel last week. Or perhaps it was the purple poppy campaign that was launched in Eastbourne, England. You know, the one to help remember all the forgotten animal victims of war. Or maybe, just maybe, you stumbled across an article about white poppies. You see, since 1933 a select group of peaceniks from England to Canada and beyond have been pushing the white poppy as a symbol of peace, which they imply is in stark contrast to the meaning behind the traditional red poppy,

in the days leading up to Remembrance Day. And we think that’s pure poppycock. Don’t get us wrong. We’re all for peace and animals. We think the fleur-de-lis is a meaningful symbol, and we are most certainly in favour of personal expression. But trying to convince others that your poppy is somehow morally or ethically superior to the red poppy is wrong. Consider the reader who wrote in to the National Post saying, “the red Legion poppy, in my opinion, represents the nostalgia and romanticizing of war … We should remember that we don’t have to go to war to get peace.” Now, without getting too philosophical or

technical here, that kind of thinking, while shiny and optimistic, shows an absolute disregard for history. Since 1921, the red poppy has stood as a symbol of remembrance and respect for all the men and women who have fallen in war and military service. It’s a visual pledge to never forget what these people did for us, our country and the world. Inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,” the red poppy was first used by the American Legion to commemorate their soldiers who died in the First World War. Since then it has been adopted by military veterans’ groups in the CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

8 NOV 9 – NOV 15 NEWS + OPINION

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF PATCARD

Commonwealth and has never — in no way, shape, or form — represented a nostalgic or a historical longing for battle. In fact, in essence the red poppy is a symbol of peace, in that through remembering the horrific realities of war, we are spurred onwards in our work towards preventing conflict. So we wear red poppies in the days and weeks leading up to Remembrance Day to commemorate the sacrifice of soldiers, to keep their deeds and memories alive. And it’s important to note that we’re not saying everybody should wear a poppy. Do it or don’t, that’s your prerogative. But suggesting that embracing the red poppy is a glorification of conflict is simply wrong. It would be in better taste, and would show a tad more respect for the fallen, if those proponents of the white poppy

REMEMBRANCE DAY • The first Remembrance Day was conducted in 1919 throughout the Commonwealth • It commemorated the end of the First World War on Monday, November 11th 1918, at 11 am1987 • Remembrance Day pays tribute to Canadians who died in service to Canada, from the South African War to current operation. • The symbolic use of the poppy is credited to the poem “In Flanders Fields,” which was written by Canadian physician and Lieutenant Colonel, John McCrae. The poem’s opening lines remark how poppies were often the first flowers to grow in the devastated ground around Flanders.

didn’t try to hijack Remembrance Day to advance their own personal and/or political agenda. These editorials are left unsigned because they represent the opinions of Verb magazine, not those of the individual writers.

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COMMENTS

ON TOPIC: Last week we asked what you thought about transfer payments. Here's what you had to say:

– Quebec use of transfer payments it their business. Much greater concern should be focused on the use of saskatchewan taxes by the Saskparty and NDP to run an illegal immigrant sponsorship program that illegally sponsored more than one immigrant at a time. You’ll recall the Federal Government recently told the Saskparty to cease and desist offering immigrant sponsorships.

Text yo thoughtsur to 881 VE R B 8372

– Transfer payments artical way off base and fuelling anti-French sentiment. It’s terrible. You forgot to mention we were receiving payments why crap on someone getting the same deal as us? Seems dumb 2 me

– Your editorial raised some interesting points, though I don’t necessarily agree with all of it. However, I like how the Quebec provincial government supports social programs/families. Just shows what they value. Way better than Wall and the SaskParty.

– The model the Maritimes used sounds quite smart actually might be a good thing for Quebec to look into as they move to become more financially independent.

– 2 gun cohen badass muthaf**ka never heard of the man before so this is pretty wild mean streets of london to leading chinese army, they should make amovie of this guy for real In response to “Guns A’ Blazin’,” Local page,

– Live and let live. Who cares what quebec does with their transfer payments? The program works for every Canadian; how the money gets spent is not up to us. It sounds like Quebec takes quite good care of its citizens, actually. I wouldn’t mind if the SaskParty wanted to subsidize my childrens’ daycare.

– What the snack is quebec doin im shock n i want some1 to SAY N DO sumthing.stand up to those who CAN CHANGE IT.I hope dis gets2rite peps

– Quebec and transfer payments opinion was abysmal and twisted. Promoting an anti-French sentiment is wildly dangerous and irresponsible. You should be ashamed.

#214 (November 2, 2012)

SOUND OFF – If there were endless amounts of money to go around, I’m sure the food bank could give the food that people need and want. However, that is not the case. Food banks assist people by providing food hampers. It’s not the be all and end all. You need to be thankful for whatever is part of that food hamper. If you’re not happy with the hamper, give it to someone that can use it.

– Fun fact: Try swallowing a spoonfull of cinnamon it is nearly impossible as the cinnamon absorbs saliva and dry the mouth go ahead try it!

OFF TOPIC – Quebec use of transfer payments is none of Saskatchewan’s concern. It’s their region and they are entitled to do what they want there and if we go there it’s up to us to follow their rules. Of appropriate concern, however, is that Brad Wall, the Saskparty & NDP used our Sask tax dollars recently to send Canadians to a foreign country for medical experiments that are illegal in Canada (lib. therapy) and that were well documented as being SnakeOil in two international medical studies.

– Bring on the zombies! Ha ha zombies are not really silly !

– The early bird may get the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese.

In response to “The Zombies Are Coming,” Editorial page, #213 (October 26, 2012)

– WoW just read about two gun thas amazing.u really do learn new things each day: )i love hear learning about back in tha day. BayBeDoll =87 In response to “Guns A’ Blazin’,” Local page, #214 (November 2, 2012)

– Sound off-how come some people put recyclable material in recycle bins but wrap them in no recyclable plastic bags?

– Whoever had the bright idea of lowering the legal drinking age needs their head examined.

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

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Take a look at the statistics. DUI’s will more than likely increase if lowering the legal drinking age is approved.

– The first snow fall always look good. I am glad that winter is here and everyone has to lerner how to drive again . Like little old ladies . Ha ha !

– Keep Christ in Christmas.

– So many businesses are decked out in Christmas jazz already. Dear god that is far to early

– WOW!!!! HIV-AIDS vaccine in 5 years. No adverse affects in patients of first study. - TJZ

– We have freedom in Canada because of those who have given their lives and because of those that continue to serve. Wear your poppy with pride.

– Seen many people around not wearing poppies as we approach Remembrance Day. I think that’s disgraceful. I know it can be hard to conceive of a world where your safety and basic rights are challenged (we’re so desensitized to everything, watch it on the news every night but can’t empathize).

Many people sacrificed everything to work towards a great common good, and wearing poppies is one way of remembering how horrible it all was. Working for peace is the most important thing we as a global community can do. And remembering where we came from helps in that. So wear those poppies, and think of who came before you. With respect, DJM

– Relievd the States did the right thing and reelected Obama. 4 more years most popular tweet (take that beiber)

– Sure cheer for Obama you liberals but he’s running the US into the ground. There economy is pooched and it’ll just get worse. He mightt be more likable than mitt but this won’t be good for Canada, mark my words. I admit he has some good points, but getting the economy on track isn’t one of them

NEXT WEEK: Alternative poppies. Pick up a copy of Verb to get in on the conversation: We print your texts verbatim each week. Text in your thoughts and reactions to our stories and content, or anything else on your mind.

11 NOV 9 – NOV 15 /VERBSASKATOON

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF JEANS ‘N CLASSICS

ONE VISION

Peter Brennan’s orchestral rock. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

M

any people think of rock bands and symphony orchestras as the two poles of live music. One is steeped in tradition, the other rebellion; one is loud and boisterous, the other reserved and intellectually demanding. Many people think this way, but Peter Brennan knows better. Brennan founded Jeans ’N Classics, a band dedicated to expanding the realm of rock music beyond the limitations imposed by conventional instruments. Today, Jeans ’N Classics play rock music with orchestras across North America. Their latest project, One Vision, features the music of Queen and the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra. Alex J MacPherson: When did it occur to you that a rock band could, and perhaps should, work with an orchestra? Peter Brennan: I fell in love with it as a concept before having ever experienced it, not knowing if I actually would experience it. I always really liked the sound of orchestral instruments within the context of pop music or rock music. I suppose it really started to hit hard with certain Beatles recordings, even though they didn’t use an orchestra in the full sense. AJM: Is it difficult to do rock music with an orchestra? PB: On the one hand you have a fantastic pop song or a fantastic rock song that didn’t have an orches-

tra anywhere near it, yet had its integrity and had its wow factor, and also may have been commercially successful. Who am I to come along and reinvent this? I have to be very careful to not reinvent it, and to show it all the respect it merits. Yet on the other side I have this animal, this big orchestra, and I want them to enjoy playing as much as I do.

doesn’t just confine itself to Queen. Generally speaking, you bring in this crowd that’s not used to the orchestra. As the concert goes on, you find that they roar for that orchestra, they think of them as their own. There’s a very spontaneous sort of heartfelt appreciation for those musicians. Whether or not they want to come and hear Mozart the following week

I … liked the sound of orchestral instruments within the context of … rock music. PETER BRENNAN

AJM: Why is Queen’s music so wellsuited to this format?

is another issue, but they sure are educated in the nontechnical sense.

PB: It’s an irony, but two sides that perhaps dominate Queen’s sound, other than the vocals. Brian May loves big rock guitar, and he’s the absolute master, as far as I’m concerned. The other side of it is Freddie’s training and the way he wrote — it was the foil to Brian’s guitar. You have a very studied, sophisticated, almost classical approach to writing. It’s not John Mellencamp here. We don’t have three-chord heartland country pop here; it’s very sophisticated.

AJM: So what can fans of rock and of orchestral music expect to hear? PB: We touch on hits, we touch on album classics. For people who are Queen fans, they’ll have a really good time, but they’re also going to hear Queen with an orchestra, which is a delight. I think it’s a very cool show. SSO One Vision November 17 @ TCU Place $35+ @ tcutickets.ca

AJM: Can you use this to get people interested in other orchestral music?

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

PB: I don’t know how far-reaching the influence goes after the fact. It

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

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NUTCRACKER

Arthur Oliver’s remarkable career as a costume designer.

A

rthur Oliver has always been a designer. “I knew I wanted to do this when I was 16,” he says. “I’ve had a pencil or pen to paper since I was three, drawing clothes. I don’t think I could do anything else.” Unlike many designers, Oliver was never seduced by the world of high fashion. He prefers the land of make-believe, where fantasy becomes reality and costumes can push the boundaries of the imagination. Oliver has been designing costumes for years. His portfolio is heavy on Shakespeare — he apprenticed at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival — but also includes theatre productions, operas, and ballets. His latest project is Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. Scored by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, The Nutcracker is perhaps the most famous of ballets. It has been performed thousands of times and is adored by millions; the story is as timeless today as it was at the 1892 premier. Originally choreographed by Stanislov Vlasov, the Moscow Ballet’s production has been running for 20 years. And this year the costumes are getting an overhaul from Oliver,

BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

whose designs are as sumptuous as they are innovative. “I’m known for having a distinct look and flavour to my costumes,” he says. “I try to make an Arthur Oliver show look like an Arthur Oliver show. And that means sometimes the costumes will not be what you expect. They may be based on a traditional look but they will have broader colours, bigger patterns — almost larger than life, but not distractingly so.” For Nutcracker, Oliver worked to make the costumes as dynamic as possible, so they echo the movements of the dancers and support the performance. “Basically, the first rule is to help tell the story,” he says, explaining that costumes are a crucial part of a ballet, where there are no spoken lines. “What they are wearing informs everything: what our memory recalls about status, what the weather is like, financial position, everything.” In certain cases, costumes can actually shape the way an actor or dancer portrays his or her character. And while the story of Clara — known as Masha in the Moscow production — and her adventures with the Nutcracker and the evil Mouse

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE MOSCOW BALLET

King is steeped in tradition, Oliver found the experience freeing. His Mouse King is scarier, his snowflakes more dazzling, his Grand divertissement characters more dynamic than anything audiences have seen before. “I’m sure I will have a few things in there that will surprise some audience members,” he laughs. Great Russian Nutcracker November 18 @ TCU Placee $45+ @ tcutickets.ca

A HISTORY OF BREATHING

Daniel Macdonald’s latest extraordinary creation. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

D

aniel Macdonald’s last play, Velocity, was about the collapse of civilization and the implosion of a marriage, seen through the eyes of a high school student. If Velocity chronicled the fall, Macdonald’s latest creation, A History of Breathing, examines the aftermath — and hints at redemption. “I think it has artistic validity,” says Ted Cole, whose character Andrew is left to ponder his purpose and meaning while navigating a post-apocalyptic world with his daughter, Lily. “As an actor, you don’t always get to do

great new works. Oftentimes you’re doing classics, which are fantastic, or you’re doing entertainment. I think this particular piece, although it will be entertaining, really dips very heavily into the realm of art.” A History of Breathing is in some ways the story of a relationship between a father and a daughter. “This is a father who cares very much for his daughter, and has in some ways done remarkably well considering the circumstances and in other ways has failed miserably,” Cole says. “It’s that human frailty, the decision you

make in a split moment, that will affect your life forever — fill you with regret, fill you with a desire to protect your daughter.” On the other hand, A History of Breathing mines Macdonald’s fascination with mythology from around the world, from classical European tales to North American aboriginal myths. But while the images are vivid, the storytelling is spare and potent. “I think the biggest word in the play is ‘responsibility,’” Cole laughs. Ultimately, the play strips away everything we

take for granted, leaving behind only what truly matters. “One of the requirements of art is that you sort of examine what it is to be a human being,” Cole explains. “This play examines the choices we may have to make, how to live with yourself if you’re pushed to the extreme and you find yourself doing things that are normally reprehensible.” Although he characterizes A History of Breathing as less of an intellectual or philosophical journey than an emotional one, Cole doesn’t dismiss the implications of what the play means. “Breathing,”

he says, “is a metaphor for being alive.” And that’s precisely the point Macdonald drives home: just how important it is to be alive. A History of Breathing Until November 18 @ Persephone Theatre’s Backstage Stage $21+ @ Pesephone Box Office Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

13 NOV 9 – NOV 15 @VERBSASKATOON

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LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME Chad Brownlee turns his back on hockey and makes the album of his life. BY ALEX J MACPHERSON

C

had Brownlee prepares for a concert the same way he prepares for a hockey game. “The feeling is actually strikingly similar,” the rangy country singer says. “I got nervous before every single hockey game, from when I started playing the game until I retired. I get those same butterflies, that same excitement, before I go onstage. It’s just an indicator that you’re ready and that you’re doing the right thing. If I went on before a show and I wasn’t nervous, I’d be worried.” Brownlee was born in Kelowna and spent his childhood splitting time between school and the hockey rink. He was a solid defenceman. After two seasons with the Vernon Vipers, he was drafted by the Vancouver Canucks before spending four years playing for the Minnesota State Mavericks. During his senior year at Minnesota State, Brownlee was nominated for the NCAA Hockey Humanitarian Award after writing “The Hero I See” to raise money for a charity. Brownlee’s musical ability was no secret. He began playing piano as a child and later took up the tenor saxophone. Guitar soon followed, and Brownlee found himself hooked by the rush of writing and playing songs. In 2007, Brownlee played his first game with the Idaho Steelheads, an ECHL team based in Boise. Although

he was playing hockey for a living, a series of shoulder injuries threatened his career. Eventually it became too much and, tired of surgery and rehab, Brownlee reluctantly abandoned his dream of getting paid to play the sport he loved. But rather than sink into obscurity or get a conventional job, he simply changed direction.

tion Rising Star award, a nod to the strength of his debut. Brownlee’s sophomore effort, which was released in February, has fared even better. Love Me or Leave Me captured the hearts and minds of country fans across Canada, and earned Brownlee a nomination for the Male Artist of the Year CCMA Award. “We’re really

And, at least onstage I’m not worried about someone taking my head off like I did in hockey. CHAD BROWNLEE

“I think there was a little voice inside my head that always believed I could make a career out of it,” Brownlee says of swapping his hockey stick for a guitar. “I think if you really put your mind to something, if you have the motivation and the passion for something, you will achieve it. It’s just a matter of putting in the time.”

The transition went smoothly. Brownlee released his first album, Chad Brownlee, in 2010. He was subsequently nominated for the Canadian Country Music Associa-

proud of the way that album turned out, from the writing process to the recording process, and everything in between,” Brownlee says. “It took me to a new place as an artist and as a songwriter.” If Chad Brownlee was an able debut, a demonstration of Brownlee’s ability and a promise of what was to come, Love Me or Leave Me is a reflection of just how good he can be, offering a pleasing blend of radiofriendly hooks and earnest songwriting. It is everything a popular country record should be: catchy, fun, and fundamentally upbeat. Brownlee’s approach to songwriting is more CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

14 NOV 9 – NOV 15 CULTURE

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF ENERGETICCITY

conventional than some of his contemporaries — Aaron Pritchett, say, or Eric Church — but he skirts the mimicry trap by writing better songs than many of them. “Love Me or Leave Me,” the best song on the record, is a fine example. Brownlee’s punchy tenor is immediately familiar, even if you haven’t heard him

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

sing before. He has a wide range, and he uses every inch of it, occasionally threatening to overpower the ubiquitous crunchy guitar licks layered underneath. “Listen,” on the other hand, hints at Brownlee’s crossover potential. He appears to have a taste for flashy acoustic guitars, but leaves the impression that he would be just as comfortable fronting a rock band with a battered old Stratocaster. Love Me or Leave Me is everything it purports to be and nothing that it doesn’t. Heavy on singles and mercifully light on kitsch, the record is sure to garner more acclaim as Brownlee tours the country. When asked,

Brownlee says something magical happened while he was recording it. “During the creative process, during the writing and recording, there’s an element you just can’t explain,” he says, speaking slowly. “Anybody in the creative world will tell you that they just don’t know when it’s going to hit. They don’t know when they’re going to have a great idea or write a great song or paint their best painting: it just happens and sometimes you don’t know why. I think there were a lot of those moments throughout this process — it turned out great, but I can’t explain why or how.”

As it turned out, whatever mystical alchemy went on in the studio needs no explanation. Brownlee may struggle to describe how he wrote and recorded Love Me or Leave Me, but he is completely forthright about how his hockey background has affected — and enhanced — his career in music. “I’ve learned a lot from hockey that I’ve applied to music,” he explains. “Without that time, I wouldn’t be the artist I am today and the person I am today. Hockey has really given me that ability to find that concert — and to stick with it.” Hockey rewards players who practice hard and learn to roll with the punches, real and metaphorical. His ability to weather criticism and his

commitment to the craft have laid the groundwork for a long and promising career in an industry where volatility is the norm and the average lifespan of an artist is measured in weeks on the chart. Naturally, Brownlee shrugs this off and turns the conversation toward his fans, the people who buy his music. “I love inspiring other people and seeing the impact of the songs I write in a positive way,” he says. The best way to do that, he

thinks, is to play as many concerts as possible. Like many musicians, Brownlee frames the allure of the stage in junkie terms. “There’s a ton of adrenaline,” he says. “That’s the drug and that’s the addiction, just feeling the intense power of adrenaline and the emotion.” “And,” he laughs, “at least onstage I’m not worried about someone taking my head off like I did in hockey. I don’t worry about that unless some-

one starts throwing tomatoes at me — and that hasn’t happened yet.” Chad Brownlee November 19 @ The Odeon $20+ @ theodeon.ca Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

15 NOV 9 – NOV 15 /VERBSASKATOON

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FOOD + DRINK

Photography courtesy of Adam Hawboldt.

JAMAICAN ME HUNGRY

Konga Cafe serves up amazing Jamaican cuisine. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

I

f you ever find yourself in Jamaica, haggling with a street vendor over the price of a Bob Marley record, the three things that will get you a good deal

are: paying in Jamaican dollars, knowing how to suck your teeth, and speaking Patois — if you can. The only reason I know this is because of our server at the Konga Cafe.

Looking over the menu, I ask her about the canajun pork chops and how spicy the jerk chicken is. She tells me the pork chops (served with apples and onions in a maple syrup reduction) are sweet and delicious, and that the jerk on the chicken comes straight from Jamaica. When I ask her what she’d recommend to eat, without hesitation she tells me “goat curry.” She mentions she’s been to Jamaica a lot and, without a doubt in her mind, the goat curry made at the Konga Cafe is the best she’s ever eaten. And this presents a bit of a conundrum. See, when I first walked in the door of Konga Cafe I was dead-set on getting something doused in jerk sauce — chicken, pork chops, anything. But after our server made such a convincing case about the goat curry, how could I refuse? After almost no discussion, my dinner guest ordered the jerk mahi mahi and we were ready to roll. And let me say this about our server’s recommendation: she was right! The goat curry was, hands down, the best goat dish I’ve ever eaten (and I’ve eaten a lot!) The curry sauce was spicy yet savoury, and the meat itself, well … it was moist and tender and, best of all, not overly gamey. Halfway through my meal, I began eyeing my friend’s mahi mahi. The jerk sauce looked incredible. So when

she turned her head I shoveled a forkful of fish into my craw. Okay, maybe I asked for a bit. But how I got to sample the fish is not

The goat curry was, hands down, the best goat dish I’ve ever eaten.

We finished off the meal with some key lime pie (hands down the best you’ll find in the city), a birthday shot (a mini-cake filled with spiceinfused rum), and a hollowed-out strawberry filled with vodka and Baileys Irish Cream. By the end of the meal I was stuffed and way more than satisfied. The portions at Konga Cafe are huge, the food is delicious and the staff is so friendly you’ll want to go back again and again. Konga Cafe 204 Avenue H North | 244 7867

ADAM HAWBOLDT

important. What is important is the fish was cooked to perfection and the jerk sauce was so good it darn near left me speechless.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

LET’S GO DRINKIN’ VERB’S MIXOLOGY GUIDE JAMAICA COCKTAIL

INGREDIENTS

With the winter months just around the corner why not escape to the island paradise of Jamaica? And if you can’t do that, why not bring a little taste of Jamaica to your home?

3/4 oz dark rum 1/2 oz coffee liqueur 3/4 oz lime juice 1 dash bitters

DIRECTIONS

Half fill a cocktail shaker with ice cubes. Pour in the coffee liqueur, lime juice, rum and bitters. Shake well. Strain the concoction into a tall, chilled cocktail glass, and serve immediately.

16 NOV 9 – NOV 15 CULTURE

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MUSIC

NEXT WEEK

COMING UP

GWAR

FABER DRIVE

CARRIE CATHERINE

@ THE ODEON EVENTS CENTRE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 – $35

@ THE ODEON EVENTS CENTRE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 – $15+

@ THE BASSMENT FRIDAY, JANUARY 25 – $13+

Have you ever seen Gwar perform? If not, stop what you’re doing and YouTube these cats. Seriously: you won’t be disappointed. And you certainly won’t mistake Gwar for any other band you’ve ever seen before. With their elaborate science-fiction/ horror-film inspired costumes, obscene lyrics and rather graphic stage performances, this heavy metal fourpiece is one of a kind. Originating in Richmond, Virginia, Gwar began turning heads and blowing minds in the late ‘80s. A dozen albums later, and this two-time Grammy-nominated act is still going strong. Not only is their live show hard rocking, it also lampoons celebrities and current events while managing to drop your jaw to the floor. Tickets available at theodeon.ca

Sometimes a little winning goes a long way. Just ask the guys in Faber Drive. After beating out more than 500 other competitors to win the Fox Seeds radio challenge, these pop rockers from Mission, B.C., caught the eye of Nickelback frontman Chad Kroeger, who signed them to his 604 Records label. Soon this four-piece — consisting of Dave Faber, Jeremy Liddle, Jordan Pritchett and Andrew Stricko — released their debut album, Seven Second Surgery. Their next album, Can’t Keep a Secret, netted them two more hit singles — “Give Him Up” and “G-Get Up and Dance.” Come check them out when they rip through Saskatoon on their Lost in Paradise tour. Tickets for the show are available at theodeon.ca

The best way to describe Carrie Catherine’s shows are playful and passionate. With a mesmerizing voice and a sound that’s both groovy and soulful, roots-based and energetic, this local singer/songwriter has been wowing audiences for the past decade or so. Along the way she’s picked up awards for her songwriting, been nominated for the 2010 Lieutenant Governor’s Arts Awards and began to produce the Hayloft house concert series, which takes place in an old grocery store that’s been converted into a living area/ work space/music venue. Don’t pass up the chance to see this lovely chanteuse perform live at The Bassment. Her warm, welcoming voice and carefully crafted songs will leave you wanting more. – By Adam Hawboldt

PHOTOS COURTESY OF: THE ARTIST / THE ARTIST / DAVID RECORDON

SASK MUSIC PREVIEW

PHOTO: COURTESY OF CHRISTIAN BERTRAND / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The Brighter Futures for Children fundraiser is seeking volunteer artists to perform at their benefit on March 28, 2013, in support of early childhood programming. Volunteer artists will receive publicity on the event posters and website, as well as the opportunity to sell music and merchandise at the event. The deadline to apply is November 30th; if you think you might be interested, please contact Lona Gervais @ gervaisla@saskatel.net. Keep up with Saskatchewan music. saskmusic.org

17 NOV 9 – NOV 15 @VERBSASKATOON

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LISTINGS

NOVEMBER 9 » NOVEMBER 17 The most complete live music listings for Saskatoon. S

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11 12 13 14 15 16 17

LOOSE STONES / Stan’s Place — Come out for a night of rockin’ good tunes. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Frank Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / Cover $5 BC READ / Somewhere Else Pub — Come down and check out this consummate musician. 9pm / No cover

SATURDAY 10

FRIDAY 9

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs liven up the atmosphere at 6Twelve. 9pm / No cover JULIE DOIRON / Amigos Cantina — An award-winning indie singer/songwriter will be taking over Amigos for a night of haunting tunes. 10pm / $10 (www. ticketedge.ca) PIANO FRIDAYS: TROY MCGILLVRAY / The Bassment — Feel like taking in some smooth jazz stylings? Look no further 4:30pm / No cover BLUES & ROCK SERIES: THE VEXATIONS / The Bassment — Playing R&B and soul hits for your listening enjoyment. 9pm / Cover $12/16 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — Austen Roadz throws down a high-energy top 40 dance party every Friday night. 9pm / $5 cover RIFF RAFF / Buds on Broadway — Classic 80’s rock covers. 9pm / $6 RAVEWIND DANCE PARTY / The Fez on Broadway — Dust off your dancing shoes and get down here. 9pm / Cover $10 DJ ECLECTIC / The Hose & Hydrant — Local turntable whiz DJ Eclectic pumps snappy electronic beats all night long. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite is sure to have you on the dance floor in no time. 9pm / $5 cover BASS INVADERS / Lydia’s Pub — A local alt-rock band. 10pm / $5 DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — There’s no better country rock party around, so check it out. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm JAMES STEELE TRIO / Prairie Ink — A fabulous night of great fiddle tunes. 8pm / No cover BUDDY HOLLY SHOW / Royal Canadian Legion Nutana Branch — Come out and relive the past with this tribute show to Buddy Holly. 8pm / $10 advance (McNally Robinson, the Legion); $15 door

DRAMA AT THE DISCOTHEQUE / 302 Lounge and Discotheque — A drag show with stellar DJs. 9pm / Cover TBD HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes all night. 9pm / No cover LOCALS ONLY 5 / Amigos Cantina — Featuring Killa1nce, MH + AB, Fabric, Frank Rizzo + Heywood. 10pm / Tickets at the door PIANO SERIES: CHRIS DONNELLY AND MYRIAD / The Bassment — Think jazz meets classical meets pop on the piano. 9pm / $15/20 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — Featuring Austen Roadz + DJ CTRL. 9pm / $5 cover RIFF RAFF / Buds — Classic 80’s rock covers. 9pm / $6 WHOLE LOTTA ANGUS / The Fez — Classic AC/DC covers. 9pm / Cover TBD MAGIC CITY CHORUS: THOSE WERE THE DAYS! / Forest Grove Community Church — A musical flashback to the 60’s. 7pm / $22 (call 956-7357) DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite is sure to have you rocking on the dance floor in no time. 9pm / $5 cover COW PUNCHERS / Lydia’s Pub — Come see what this act is all about. 10pm / $5 LIFTED / Lydia’s Upstairs Loft — Come dance your heart out in Lydia’s loft, and enjoy what Saskatoon’s electronica scene has to offer. 10pm / $5 DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5 JON BAILEY / Prairie Ink — Come on down and enjoy some rock/folk tunes. 8pm / No cover LOOSE STONES / Stan’s Place — Come out for a rockin’ good time. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad

King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Frank Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / $5 BC READ / Somewhere Else Pub — Come down and check out this consummate musician. You won’t want to miss it. 9pm / No cover MODUS + CHAN L / Tequila — A night of phat beats awaits, so head on down and get ready to rock out! 9pm / Cover TBD EVENING HYMNS / Vangelis — Indie folk rock that is hot out of the Big Smoke. 10pm / $5

SUNDAY 11

INDUSTRY NIGHT / Béily’s UltraLounge — Hosted by DJ Sugar Daddy. 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff HOLIC, A GHOST IN DRAG, THE BODY POLITIC, GHOST OF A GHOST, JUMBO / The Fez — An awesome line up from start to finish. 9pm / $8 BRIE NELSON, DAVE SIMARD / Gillian Snider’s House — Come out for a night of great music in an intimate environment. 8:30pm / For tickets go to www. gilliansnider.com DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover MISCHA DANIELS / Tequila — Come down and party with the Dutch sensation! 8pm / $11 SUNDAY JAM / Vangelis Tavern — The Vangelis Sunday Jam is an institution, offering great tunes from blues to rock and beyond. 7:30pm / No cover

MONDAY 12

METAL MONDAYS / Lydia’s Pub — Like heavy metal tunes? Swing by, listen to some killer music and get in on some concert giveaways. What could be better? 9pm

TUESDAY 13

THE MULES / Buds on Broadway — A local act that we promise you don’t want to miss. 10pm / Cover $6 DJ SUGAR DADDY / The Double Deuce — This crowd favourite has always been known to break the latest and greatest tracks in multiple genres. 9:30pm / $4 cover CUNNINLYNGUISTS / Louis’ — An incredible hip-hop trio from the States. 9pm / Tickets TBD VERB PRESENTS OPEN STAGE / Lydia’s Pub — The open stage at Lydia’s is a chance for bands, solo artists and even comedians to showcase original material. 9pm / No cover CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE »

18 NOV 9 – NOV 15 ENTERTAINMENT

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OPEN MIC / The Somewhere Else Pub — Come out and show your talent. 7pm / No cover

WEDNESDAY 14

HUMP WEDNESDAYS / 302 Lounge & Discotheque — Resident DJ Chris Knorr will be spinning all of your favourite songs and requests. 9pm / No cover until 10pm; $3 thereafter THREE STRINGS FRETLESS / Buds on Broadway — Come down and check ‘em out. 9pm / $TBD NEIL YOUNG AND CRAZY HORSE / Credit Union Centre — Don’t miss this rock and roll icon. He puts on one helluva live show, rocking as hard now as he ever did. 7:30pm / $94.75+ (Ticketmaster) THE AVENUE RECORDING COMPANY PRESENTS OPEN MIC / The Fez on Broadway — Hosted by Chad Reynolds. Sign up and play at this weekly event. 10pm / No cover DJ KADE / the Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DR. J ‘SOULED OUT’ / Lydia’s Pub — Dr. J spins hot funk and soul every Wednesday night. 9pm / No cover WILD WEST WEDNESDAY / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Hosted by DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman, this is one of the best country rock parties around! 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff STEVE MAIER / Rock Creek — A local musician doing his thing in an up close and personal venue. 8pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / No cover XZIBIT / Tequila — This night will pimp your ride! Ok, maybe not, but it’ll still be amazing! Come down and check out the one and only Xzibit. 8pm / $25+ PEACE / Vangelis — Come out and enjoy this local act as they rock out in one of the best venues in town. 10pm / $5

THURSDAY 15 THE DISSENT / Amigos — If it’s metal you want, you got it. Come on down and check this act out. 10pm / Cover TBD JAZZ JAM: DAVID FONG TRIO / The Bassment — You sing? Play an instrument? Then come on down and get your jam on. 8pm / Cover $5 THREE STRINGS FRETLESS / Buds on Broadway — A hard-rocking act; come on down and check ‘em out. 9pm / $TBD THROWBACK THURSDAYS / Earls — Come experience some of the best in retro funk, soul, reggae and rock provided by Dr. J. Is there anything groovier? 8pm / No cover THUNDER RIOT W/CONKY SHOWPONY / The Fez on Broadway — Come dance the night away as this local DJ plays the kind of music that’ll get your feet moving. 9pm / $5 DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — Local DJ Sugar Daddy will be rocking the turntables to get you dancing on the dance floor! Every Thursday night will be filled with passion parties, pole dancing, shadow dancers and much more! 8pm / $5; free cover with student ID before 11pm GUNNER AND SMITH, JORDAN KLASSEN, MIKE EDEL / Vangelis — A night of hot folk, roots and rock. Hit ‘em up! 10pm / Cover $8

FRIDAY 16

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs liven up the atmosphere at 6Twelve all night long. 9pm / No cover PIANO FRIDAYS: MAURICE DROUIN / The Bassment — Feel like taking in some smooth jazz stylings? Come check out Drouin tickle the ivories of the Kinsman Yamaha S6 grand piano. 4:30pm / No cover

GUITAR SERIES: BOB EVANS / The Bassment — Winner of the 2003 US National Fingerstyle Guitar Championship. 9pm / Cover $15/20 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — With over 25 years of DJ experience, Austen Roadz throws down a high-energy top 40 dance party every Friday night. 9pm / $5 cover HURRICANE CLETIS / Buds on Broadway — Local rockers with an infectious sound, come on down and rock the night away. 10pm / Cover $6 ORAL FUENTES / The Fez on Broadway — A night filled with the sweet sounds of reggae, bringing a little soul and heat to the prairie winter. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ ECLECTIC / The Hose & Hydrant — Local turntable whiz DJ Eclectic pumps snappy electronic beats all night long. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — Able to rock any party, this local crowd favourite has always been known to break the latest and greatest tracks in multiple genres. 9pm / $5 cover GRANDTHEFT, SMALLTOWN DJS / Louis’ — Come check out this stop on the Good People Tour. 9pm / $10 GUTTERDOGS / Lydia’s Pub — A local rock a band that’s big on talent. 10pm / $5 cover MEMORY LANE / North Ridge Hall, Martensville — A tribute to music from the ‘40s, ‘50s and ‘60s. 7:30pm / $20 GWAR / The Odeon Events Centre — Get ready for a heavy metal show unlike any other. 6:30pm / $335 (www.theodeon.ca) DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm TROY HUDSON / Prairie Ink — Honest folk music in an intimate environment. 8pm / No cover L.O.R.D FUNK + FRIENDS / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of funk, blues and R&B. 9pm / No cover

ROUTE 66 / Stan’s Place — A band from Regina playing vintage rock and country rock. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / Cover $5 MODUS + MERN / Tequila — Hit up the MPowered Party and get two DJs for the price of one. 9pm / Cover TBD FABRIC / Vangelis — Come join us for a night of musical sweetness. 10pm / $5

SATURDAY 17

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes all night. 9pm / No cover PUTRESCENCE / Amigos Cantina — Come out for a kickass night of deathgrind. 10pm / Cover TBD JAZZ DIVA: ELIANA CUEVAS / The Bassment — One of the top singers of Latin American music. 9pm / $25/30 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — With over 25 years of DJ experience, Austen Roadz throws down a highenergy top 40 dance party along with DJ CTRL every Saturday night. 9pm / $5 cover HURRICANE CLETIS / Buds on Broadway — Local rockers with an infectious sound. 10pm / Cover $6 HONEY WAGON / The Fez on Broadway — Come and enjoy some blues and rock straight out of Creighton. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up with hot tunes. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — Able to rock any party, this local crowd favourite has always been known to break the latest and greatest tracks in multiple genres. He’s sure to have you on the dance floor in no time. 9pm / $5 cover DESPITE THE REVERENCE / Louis’ — Local band playing hard rock with metal influences. 9pm / Tickets TBD

COAL CREEK BOYS / Lydia’s — Don’t miss out on a night of great music and good times! 10pm / $5 LIFTED / Lydia’s Upstairs Loft — Come dance your heart out in Lydia’s loft. 10pm / $5 FABER DRIVE / The Odeon Events Centre — An award-winning power pop band. 7pm / $15-25 DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends ‘cause there’s no better country rock party around. 8pm / $5 F.E.R.N. / Prairie Ink — A local folk/ acoustic performer will put on a fabulous performance in an intimate setting. 8pm / No cover L.O.R.D FUNK + FRIENDS / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of funk, blues and R&B. 9pm / No cover ROUTE 66 / Stan’s Place — A band from Regina playing vintage rock and country rock. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests, from Sinatra to Lady Gaga. 10pm / $5 CONEXUS POP SERIES: ONE VISION THE MUSIC OF QUEEN / TCU Place — If you like Queen (and who doesn’t!), there’s no way you can miss this. 7:30pm / 35-55 (www.tcutickets.ca) FREESTYLERS / Tequila — This British EDM duo is nothing short of awesome. 9pm / $10 ECONOMICS, J RILEY HILL, STEPHEN COOLEY / Vangelis — What better way to spend a Saturday night than with musicians like these? 10pm / $5

GET LISTED Have a live show you'd like to promote? Let us know! layout@verbnews.com

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MCCONAUGHEY KILLS

PHOTO: COURTESY OF LD ENTERTAINMENT

Killer Joe is a dark, twisted, deeply funny film noir. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

W

hat a lot of people forget about Matthew McConaughey is that the guy can act. Don’t get me wrong, he’s not the next Marlon Brando or anything. Far from it. But because of a run of movies like The Wedding Planner, How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, Failure to Launch, etc., etc., McConaughey tends to get stereotyped as the charming romantic-comedy lead who simply can’t keep his shirt on. And while it’s understandable if that’s how you view the hunky Texan, here’s the thing: the dude has been flat-out captivating in at least a few of

in fine, fine form. Playing a Dallas detective named Joe Cooper (who, it turns out, is also a hit man for hire), McConaughey is charming, funny, smart, reptilian, violent, menacing and lecherous all at the same time. And man is he ever a pleasure to watch in Killer Joe. So is the entire film, for that matter. Directed by the brilliant William Friedkin (The Exorcist, The French Connection), Killer Joe is set in podunk Texas where a dimwitted drug dealer named Chris (Emile Hirsch) owes a gang a truckload of money — a gang that’s going to kill him if he doesn’t pay up.

KILLER JOE William Friedkin STARRING Matthew McConaughey, Emile Hirsch, Thomas Haden Church + Gina Gershon DIRECTED BY

103 MINUTES | PG

And that’s all I’m willing to say in regards to the plot of Killer Joe, because any more would simply ruin a terrific, twisty-turny and terribly dark movie for you. That said, Killer Joe isn’t for everyone. It’s a graphic and disturbing flick that will make you stare into the lower rungs of depravity for so long that it may become downright nightmarish. But while that’s happening, you’ll be laughing at all the dark humour and sitting on the edge of your seat waiting to see what happens next. In short, Killer Joe is a wickedly intense, utterly savage and darkly hilarious film in which no thought or action is too amoral. Oh, and if you do decide to watch Killer Joe this weekend keep this in mind: you may never be able to look at fried chicken in the same way again. You’ve been warned. Killer Joe is currently being screened at Roxy Theatre.

Killer Joe is … wickedly intense, utterly savage and darkly hilarious… ADAM HAWBOLDT

his movies. His character Wooderson is usually the first thing that pops into peoples’ minds when they think of Dazed and Confused. Be honest. When you read that sentence you immediately heard the line “That’s what I love about these high school girls, man. I get older, they stay the same age,” didn’t you? It’s nothing to be ashamed of. He was incredible in that movie. He was also dynamite as Jack Brigance in A Time to Kill. And guess what? In his new movie Killer Joe, McConaughey is back

So what does Chris do? Well, his mother purportedly has a $50,000 life insurance policy that has Chris’ sister Dottie (Juno Temple) as the sole beneficiary. Dottie isn’t quite right in the head, so Chris reckons if he has their mother knocked off he can convince his sister to give him the money. And their father, Ansel (Thomas Haden Church), who is about as sharp as a bowling ball, thinks the plan is a good idea. And that’s where “Killer” Joe Cooper comes into play.

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER

SKY’S THE LIMIT

Latest Bond installment one of the best in franchise history. BY ADAM HAWBOLDT

A

sk people to rate their top five favourite James Bond movies and two things will invariably occur. One, nobody in their right mind will include Moonraker. And two, no one will list the exact same movies in the exact same order. Don’t believe me?

and 5) The Spy Who Loved Me. And I’m willing to bet that your list is different from that. Hell, now that I’ve seen Skyfall, the 23rd installment of the Bond franchise, my list is different than that. Because I can say, in all honesty, Skyfall is one of the best Bond flicks I’ve seen. Like, ever. Where it falls on my list, I don’t know right now.

Silva is one of the best Bond villains … mostly because Bardem breathes so much life into the character. ADAM HAWBOLDT

Okay. When asked this question a few days ago, the list I gave ran as follows: 1) Goldfinger, 2) Dr. No, 3) From Russia With Love, 4) GoldenEye

All I know is The Spy Who Loved Me is getting the boot, and I’m going to have to revisit the top-five rankings fairly soon.

So what, you may ask, makes Skyfall so good? Well, in a word — everything. But since this is a movie review let’s see if I can’t break it down. First, it’s directed by Sam Mendes (American Beauty, Road to Perdition) and shot by crackerjack cinematographer Roger Deakins (No Country For Old Men, The Big Lebowski). The result is a visually stunning film that delves deep into the essence of 007 while unfolding at a wicked pace that yanks the viewer in from the very first scene. And speaking of Skyfall’s opening sequence, all I can say is “Yowzers!” When the film starts we see Bond racing across rooftops on a motorcycle, trying to retrieve a hard drive containing the identity of every undercover NATO agent on the planet. The chase takes him to the top of a moving train, where he is struggling with a bad guy when disaster strikes.

James Bond (Daniel Craig) is accidentally shot by a fellow agent and dies. Okay, who am I kidding? Bond doesn’t die. But for a while his agency assumes he’s dead, before he reemerges from a vacation of sorts and begins to track the missing hard drive again. This brings him in contact with a creepy, sexually ambiguous, eerily psychotic super-villain named Silva. Played by a blonde and bewigged Javier Bardem, Silva is one of the best Bond villains in some time — mostly because Bardem breathes so much life into the character. Which brings us to another reason why Skyfall is so good: character development. It’s almost as though, after 50 years of Bond, the powers that be have decided to take a long look into 007’s inner turmoil and show fans what truly motivates him. What’s more, for the first time in the franchise’s history, the character of M (Judi Dench) is explored and

SKYFALL Sam Mendes Daniel Craig, Judi Dench, Javier Bardem + Ralph Fiennes DIRECTED BY STARRING

143 MINUTES | PG

we’re given some keen insight into what makes the spymaster tick. Roll all this into one big ball and you have a Bond flick that’s stripped down, grittier and more revelatory than most installments in the franchise’s history. And if you don’t leave the theatre wanting to see what happens to 007 next, then I feel kind of bad for you.

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NIGHTLIFE

22 NOV 9 – NOV 15 ENTERTAINMENT

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5 @

THE COLONIAL

The Colonial Pub & Grill 1301 8th Street East (306) 343 0917 MUSIC VIBE / Top 40 FEATURED DEALS / 2 beer for $7.50

(9-11pm), 2 highballs for $6 (911pm), and flavoured vodka for $4.50 and imports for $5 (9pm ‘til close) DRINK OF CHOICE / Vodka SOMETHING NEW / A kitchen will be opening soon, and it’s Girls’ Night on Tuesdays

Photography by Patrick Carley – feedback@verbnews.com

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Photography by DelRioPhotographics.com – feedback@verbnews.com

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3 @

THE FREEHOUSE

The Spadina Freehouse 608 Spadina Crescent East (306) 668 1000 MUSIC VIBE / Funk, pop, ‘80s,

pop rock, and whatever the DJ is playing FEATURED DEALS / Seasonal desserts and entrées DRINK OF CHOICE / Sangria TOP EATS / Pizza, made fresh in the forno oven COMING UP / Anniversary party on November 23rd, and a Boxing Day party on December 26th

25 NOV 9 – NOV 15 @VERBSASKATOON

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© Elaine M. Will | blog.E2W-Illustration.com | Check onthebus.webcomic.ws/ for previous editions!

26 NOV 9 – NOV 15 ENTERTAINMENT

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TIMEOUT

CROSSWORD CANADIAN CRISS-CROSS DOWN 1. Unit of time 2. Took advantage of 3. Moldovan monetary unit 4. Mouthy 5. Reduce its worth 6. You have to make it while the sun shines 7. Higher than 8. Make smooth and shiny 9. Opposite of everybody 11. Kind of engineer 12. Be out of breath 14. Refuse to acknowledge 17. Past middle age 20. Church council 21. Done too soon

24. Orchestra’s place 26. Curling target 28. It’s white with no number 29. Arrive at 30. Part of the pistil 31. Of small width 33. Become stuck to 34. Jacket material 35. Circular movement of water 38. Nest built on a cliff 41. Take on cargo 43. Self-righteously complacent 45. ___ Aviv, Israel 47. Bring to a conclusion

SUDOKU ANSWER KEY

A

B

8 1 5 9 2 4 7 3 6 3 4 7 5 8 6 1 9 2 6 2 9 1 3 7 8 5 4 9 6 1 8 7 5 4 2 3 7 5 2 4 6 3 9 8 1 4 8 3 2 1 9 6 7 5 2 3 4 7 9 1 5 6 8 5 9 6 3 4 8 2 1 7 1 7 8 6 5 2 3 4 9

___ Hallows” 27. Arouse the wrath of 29. Outline 32. Comb backwards 36. Eggs 37. Problem at the airport 39. Faulty firecracker 40. Earthy deposit 42. “See you later” 43. Lose hair, like a dog 44. List of printing mistakes 46. A way out of a problem 48. Sing in Switzerland 49. Become hardened to 50. Satisfactorily 51. Cutting side of a blade

4 5 2 8 6 7 3 1 9 6 3 8 2 1 9 4 5 7 9 1 7 4 5 3 2 6 8 3 8 9 5 7 1 6 4 2 5 2 4 3 8 6 9 7 1 7 6 1 9 4 2 8 3 5 1 4 3 7 9 8 5 2 6 2 9 6 1 3 5 7 8 4 8 7 5 6 2 4 1 9 3

ACROSS 1. Think over 5. Slice of lamb 9. Canadian whose parents were Japanese immigrants 10. Ruinous damage 12. Cram for an exam 13. Site for curved hairs 15. Unpleasantly patterned 16. Rattler in a whistle 18. Tear apart 19. Manitoba’s neighbour: abbr. 20. Slender, graceful girl 22. Break a Commandment 23. Tearful 25. “Harry Potter and the © WALTER D. FEENER 2012

HOROSCOPES NOVEMBER 9 – NOVEMBER 15 ARIES March 21–April 19

LEO July 23–August 22

SAGITTARIUS November 23–December 21

The key to all effective communication is listening, so keep your damn ears open this week, Aries. Otherwise, you might get things twisted.

Your mind may feel like a bird bouncing around a small cage this week, Leo, and it might be hard to find peace or clarity of thought. Good luck.

This is an excellent time to start something new, Sagittarius. What that something is is entirely up to you. But get out there and expand your horizons.

TAURUS April 20–May 20

VIRGO August 23–September 22

CAPRICORN December 22–January 19

Sometimes it feels like life is squeezing so hard you can’t breathe and at other times like it’s pulling you apart. Get ready to experience both.

Oh Virgo, your powers of persuasion are going to be running high this week. Don’t neglect them. Use them if necessary, but only for evil.

You know Eminem’s song, “Cleanin’ Out My Closet?” Well, maybe you should give that a try this week — both literally and figuratively.

GEMINI May 21–June 20

LIBRA September 23–October 23

AQUARIUS January 20–February 19

Get ready for a blast from the past this week, Gemini. It could be a person, a song, a movie or something else, but nostalgia is on its way.

You may receive a lot of information you disagree with this week, Libra. That’s fine, but don’t outright dismiss the news. That’d be a sad mistake.

Have you felt that lately you’re on the edge of something? Either something awesome or something dangerous? If so, get ready to take the leap.

CANCER June 21–July 22

SCORPIO October 24–November 22

PISCES February 20–March 20

You may feel the urge to tell someone to shut up this week, Cancer. Don’t say it. Or at least not in those words — it could come back to bite you.

You may have a lot of cool and wonderful ideas this week, Scorpio. Good for you. The key, however, is to figure out which ones are the good ones.

Chaos: that’s going to be the keyword for the next week or so, Pisces. So strap on a helmet, bite down on your mouthguard and brace yourself.

SUDOKU 4 1 3 8 9 5 1 4 5 3 2 8 8 9 7 2 4 3 8 6 9 1 6 3 1 7 2 6 9 5 7 4 7 5 6 2

CROSSWORD ANSWER KEY

A

8 9 4 6 3 4 2 6 1 3 5 4 9 5 3 7 5 2 6 3 8 9 7 5 1 8 9 4 2 1 7 1 7 8 6 2

B

27 NOV 9 – NOV 15 /VERBSASKATOON

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Verb Issue S215 (Nov. 9-15, 2012)