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Issue #207 – September 14 to September 20

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form and function Rebecca King talks fashion a family affair Family of the Year put out their best album Resident Evil & Bill W. Film reviews ­

sailing the seven seas with

hey Ocean!

Photo: courtesy of lucas morgan


contents

NEWs + Opinion

culture

entertainment

Q + A with anthrax

Live Music listings

Charlie Benante talks 30 years of rock. 12 / Q + A

Local music listings for September 14 through September 22. 18 / listings

on aesthetics

family of the year

Rebecca King, and Saskatchewan’s fashion scene. 4 / Local

How four roommates made their best album yet. 13 / Arts

resident evil: retribution & Bill W. Adam reviews the latest films. 20 / Film

Nightlife Photos

classical to classic rock Victor Sawa builds bridges. 13 / Arts

Patrick visits the Welcome Week festivities at the U of S. 22 / Nightlife

a Born Fighter

Hey ocean!

David Vertesi tells Alex about the band’s latest album . 14 / cover

Editorial Publisher / Parity Publishing Editor in Chief / Ryan Allan Managing Editor / Jessica Patrucco staff Writers / Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson

ART & Production Design Lead / Roberta Barrington Design & Production / Brittney Graham Contributing Photographers / Michelle Berg, Patrick Carley, Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson

Rick Langlais chats to Adam about faith, and helping out kids. 6 / Local

On the cover:

verbnews.com @verbsaskatoon facebook.com/verbnewssaskatoon

Business & Operations

Holy Crap

Skip the Dishes review

on the bus

Religious groups get tax breaks, but why should they? 8 / Editorial

Ordering food has never been so easy. 16 / Food + Drink

Weekly original comic illustrations by Elaine M. Will. 26 / comics

comments

Music

Game & Horoscopes

Here’s what you thought about texting and driving. 10 / comments

Quadrant Khan, The Steadies & Xavier Rudd. 17 / music

Canadian criss-cross puzzle & weekly horoscope readings. 27 / timeout

Office Manager / Stephanie Lipsit Marketing Manager / Vogeson Paley Financial Manager / Cody Lang

contact Comments / feedback@verbnews.com / 881 8372 advertise / advertise@verbnews.com / 979 2253 design / layout@verbnews.com / 979 8474 General / info@verbnews.com / 979 2253

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on Aesthetics

Rebecca King balances form and function. by Alex J macpherson

D

esigning clothes has — and always will be — about balancing form and function. From French haute couture houses to companies that make department store clothes, designers are interested in maximizing both utility and beauty. Rebecca King, a Saskatchewanborn fashion designer, has found that balance, no small achievement considering her cynical view of an industry she describes as fickle and cutthroat. In a career spanning eight years, King has developed a style that is eminently wearable yet deeply interesting. By weighing her desire to push boundaries against the exigencies of business, King has carved out a niche for herself in Western Canada. “I think it’s really hard for a lot of designers,” she says, sipping a glass of water in a crowded coffee shop early on a Sunday morning. “They want to be creative and they want to do whatever they want — that’s why they are a designer. But it’s just

too much for most people. It’s always been a strong point of mine that my clothes are different but wearable, and I naturally had that balance in my style. And sometimes I don’t like that about myself, but it works for me and my line.”

King, who is 26, was born in Hudson Bay, a town of about 1,600 people nestled against the Manitoba border. Her mother is an interior designer, her father an art teacher. Today, King can’t remember a time when art was not a priority. “It’s something my parents cultivated,” she says. “We did posters for Remembrance Day once a year. During poster week, the week before the poster was due, we could skip school and stay home. We all had stations of materials and paper. I was taught the technique of art and design. That’s what was important to my parents, and that’s what came through.” A career in design was never a question for King, who started sew-

ing in high school. After graduation, she spent two years studying fashion at Marvel College in Edmonton. The experience was unfulfilling. “They taught you how to sew and they taught you how to craft, and you played a lot with portfolio design,” she says. “But it was never explained what you could do [after college].” Eventually, King ended up in Saskatoon where, with little to go on, she started making clothes. Today, King is best-known for her tailored jackets, coats for women who seek the ideal blend of originality and practicality. Like all designers, King goes through phases — “Last year I was just gaaah over brown and red together,” she laughs, “but now I’m in love with burgundy” — but certain influences keep cropping up. “There are some cuts I’ve always been into,” she admits. “A tuxedo cut, longer in the back, or the little shoulder tabs — those army details.” Lately, King has been experimenting with what she calls “old man fabrics.” Tweeds and houndstooths, Continued on next page »

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Some of Rebecca King’s original designs. Photo: courtesy of Jocelyn ann photography

in other words. “I love it,” she says. “I love the flat caps, I love the sweaters, I love the suspenders.” It may seem incongruous for a fashion designer like King to obsess over men’s clothing from decades past, but her offbeat taste is the key to her success. Rather than repurpose old ideas for a new generation, she blends influences while skirting labels like “military inspired.” From epaulets to elbow patches, her best pieces incorporate a wealth of ideas without sacrificing the originality that her clients have come to expect. “If you look at my lines, you can see what I like pretty quickly,” she says. “But people say, ‘That’s a Rebecca King.’ There’s a style to it you can pick out — it might be the tailoring, it might be the colours or the tones.” Whatever it is, King has created an army of loyal followers, people who seek the perfect balance between form and function. “I think what everybody wants is something they can wear a lot,” she muses. “Something not so bold that they can wear it once, but something that has a bit of an edge.”

King’s success is an example of how local entrepreneurs can bolster their

brands by offering first-rate service. “I try my best but I don’t have a team working behind me that perfects all these things,” she says. “What I do have is that I’m local. You can come back to me at any time,” she explains. “If your seam breaks, I’ll fix it for you. I’m always

wasn’t a conscious choice, King sees herself as a designer first — and a designer always. “I never thought about what I was doing,” King says, reflecting on her life which now includes a husband who is studying architecture in Calgary and an unborn child.

It’s always been a … point of mine that my clothes are different but wearable… rebecca king

here if something happens.” Because King works on a relatively small scale, she is able to form lasting relationships with her clients, some of whom have been buying her clothes for years. Unlike some businesspeople, who equate expansion with success, King is happy working alone. Moving to a factory-style manufacturing process would involve an enormous outlay of cash and a significant loss of control. It’s hard to be a designer when you’re spending time worrying about hiring sales reps, she says. Even if it

“I think it’s good that I didn’t know what I was getting into — otherwise I wouldn’t have done it. My goal was always to do what I loved,” she says. “And it still is my goal. I just take the next logical step. I don’t plan ahead. I just see what comes up and make smart decisions all the way along.” Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

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Saskatoon’s youth are given a hand by Rick Langlais. Photo: courtesy of adam hawboldt / verb magazine

A Born Fighter

Even with a grand opening to celebrate his new location looming, Rick Langlais struggles to keep Hands On Street Ministries afloat. by Adam Hawboldt

I

t all started with a message. A message that changed Rick Langlais’ life. For many years, Langlais had been a troublemaker. A loose cannon stomping the urban terra. A wild man who sold copious amounts of drugs, solved problems, collected money, even overdosed a couple times. “I pushed the limit at every turn, in everything I did,” admits Langlais. “And I ran into a lot of problems, caused a lot of trouble.” By the early 1990‘s, however, the

hard and loose lifestyle of the streets had become too problematic, too troublesome for Langlais. He knew it was time to change — or else. The thing is, change rarely comes easy. So in a last ditch effort to go straight, Rick turned to God for a helping, guiding hand. It worked. “From then on, without a shadow of a doubt, I knew there was something bigger out there for me,” says Rick. “And more than anything I wanted to give other people an avenue out like I found. I wasn’t sure how I Continued on next page »

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was going to do that. At first I thought about making a fight club because I was into sh*t like that. So I started looking around for a space.” That’s when the message came. It was from a man named Bernie Dirk, who owned a pool hall and a pawn shop in Saskatoon’s west end. Some of Bernie’s “tenants” in an upstairs poker room were three months behind on their rent and were being aggressive and hostile. “Bernie sent [a] message that he’d heard I was looking for something; I sent a message back saying ‘I’m not interested, Bernie, I’m changing,’” remembers Langlais. But Langlais hadn’t changed so much he didn’t need help straightening out, so he went to see what Bernie wanted to talk about. Turns out, what Bernie wanted was to get rid of his tardy tenants. And that’s exactly what Langlais did — right then and there. With the help of his fists, Langlais convinced the tenants to leave the upstairs poker room for good. Now Langlais had the fight-club space he wanted. A month or two passed. Not much happened up there in Langlais’ new space. Punching bags were punched, people came to fight with mouthguards and boxing gloves — that sort of thing. Then one day some kids showed up. “They wanted to hit the bags,” says Langlais, “but I told them to get lost. They asked for something to eat and got the same answer.” Next day the same group of kids showed up again. And again, the day after that. “That third time they came this little guy named Lloyd looked up at me with these big brown eyes and said, ‘Please mister, can I have some food? I’m real hungry,’” recalls Langlais. “I remember being real hungry when I was young, so I told the kids to stand there. Don’t move. Don’t even breathe. Then I ran downstairs three flights to the pool hall.” Rick came back with cookies for the kids. Told them not to come back. The next day, around 3 o’clock, Langlais heard something that sounded like a herd of buffalo coming up the steps. When he went to investigate, what Langlais saw was a

long line of kids snaking up the stairs, all of them looking for cookies. “That first group of kids went to school and told everybody,” chuckles Langlais. “I should’ve seen that play coming.” What Langlais couldn’t have seen coming, though — at least not at the time — was the way one magnanimous act can ripple the waters of your life.

Rick Langlais is a fighter. Always has been, probably always will be. His dad called him Rocky (after the undefeated pugilist Rocky Marciano) because he said his son came out of the womb fighting. When he grew up, Langlais fought in the

kitchens, an enormous walk-in food room, even a garage at the far end of the facility in which Langlais plans to teach local kids how to restore classic cars. “When we moved in here, we didn’t have the funds to do what we wanted,” says Langlais. “But people started volunteering, equipment started showing up and the next thing you know we went from ‘let’s just touch it up’ to ‘let’s renovate the whole place.’” But a building like that isn’t easily renovated. Especially when the entire thing — the facility, the programs, the food, etc. — relies on either donations or money from Langlais’ own pocket. “Has it been a struggle?” asks

I had it pretty rough growing up, so I hate seeing any kid suffer or be in need. rick langlais

streets for pride and honour. He’s had his throat slit, was stabbed, shot and stuck with a needle. He fought for his life, and went toe-to-toe with pimps and abusive parents. For the past 22 years, beginning not so long after the day he gave those cookies away, Langlais has been fighting tooth and nail to keep the Hands On Street Ministries afloat. Since opening its doors in 1992, Hands On has had one simple mission — to serve the needs of Saskatoon’s inner-city youth. On any given day, at any given hour, Langlais and his staff can be found providing food, clothing and a safe haven for anywhere between 50 and 100 youth a day. “It’s all for the kids,” says Langlais. He pauses. “I had it pretty rough growing up, so I hate seeing any kid suffer or be in need.” And because of the work Langlais does, there won’t be any shortage of children in attendance on September 25th, when the Hands On celebrates the grand opening of its new facility on Avenue F. And what a facility it is. Inside, there is a video game room, a rec room with a pool table, a baby supply room, a study room,

Langlais, of keeping Hands On Street Ministries open. “Absolutely!” And he has the paperwork to prove it.

Sitting behind a desk in his office, Langlais stares at a security monitor hanging on the opposite wall. He keeps a close eye on what’s happening in each room in the Hands On building. His eyes dart up and down and all around. To his right, on the desk in front of him, is a stack of bills. For a brief moment, Langlais looks away from the monitor, runs his gnarled, battle-scarred hands through the stack, smiles and says, “Look at these bills … What am I going to do with them? I already took an extra mortgage out on my house.” But Langlais isn’t worried. “We’ll find a way,” he answers, when asked how he’ll pay the bills. “This place runs on 100 percent faith.” Faith in humanity. Faith in the kindness of others. Faith that somehow, some way, Hands On will come up with the $5,000 they need for the kitchen, the $945 for the garage door, the more than $3,000 for the flooring and money for the rest of their big-

ticket expenses. Even with all those expenses looming, Langlais still isn’t worried. “[T]his is what I love,” he explains. “Everything will be alright.” Again Langlais pauses. As he rubs away the goosebumps forming on his arms, you can almost see his passion. The heart he wears on

his sleeve. And you can’t help but hope he’s right. Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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holy crap

Religious groups shouldn’t get tax breaks. by the editors of verb

G

iving tax exemption to religious organizations isn’t a new concept. In fact, the Bible— in Genesis 47:26 to be precise — talks of how priests’ lands were exempt from paying the Pharaoh’s tax in Egypt. In medieval times, the Roman Catholic Church and the throne of England were so close that the church was exempt from all taxes. And somehow (perhaps by the grace of god?) tax exemptions have been grandfathered into modern-day common laws. To this day, religious organizations in Saskatchewan receive exemptions from various forms of taxation. We think that’s unfair. Since anything to do with religion can be a touchy subject, let’s take the whole issue of faith out the equation, and simply look at religious groups merely as non-profit charities for a moment. Like other non-profit

organizations, these groups receive tax breaks because they a) work to relieve poverty, and b) benefit the community in a way the courts have said are charitable. Those aren’t our words or ideas — they’re ripped straight from Canada’s Income Tax Act. That’s all well and good, but we think churches should be subject to all the same tax rules that govern non-profit organizations. For instance, all religious organizations receiving tax exemptions should be required to keep open books. They should be able to demonstrate, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that they are providing a valuable and tangible service to their communities. If not, adios tax breaks. What’s more, like other non-profit organizations with tax exemptions, religious groups should keep their political beliefs to themselves. If a

church wants to rail against marriage equality, for example, they shouldn’t be able to rely on a public subsidy to help them do so. And before you think: “That kind of stuff doesn’t happen here in Canada” — think again. Earlier this year, the United Church of Canada raised the issue of boycotting Israeli products. Then in August they came out in opposition to the Northern Gateway pipeline. We don’t mean to pick on the United Church, they’re just a good recent example of faith groups engaging in political advocacy. Now don’t get us wrong, free speech is important and we support it wholeheartedly. If you’re a religious organization and you want to espouse your politics, go for it. Get out there and scream from the rooftops. But don’t expect the rest of us to help pay for it. It’s simply not fair.

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comments

On Topic: Last week we asked what you thought about texting and driving laws in Saskatchewan. Here's what you had to say:

–Texting while driving prohibition is a novel idea, sadly the use of cellular phones without a hands-free device hasn’t been deterred by a similar action. Stupid people will continue to do idiotic things that endanger others no matter what the law states, all because they live to serve their own wants.

text yo thoughtsur to 881 ve r B

licence. It presumes everyone’s great until proven distracted, but that “proving” part could result in someone getting hurt or injured.

8372

– Verb editors have some nerve saying texting and driving really isn’t that bad. Tell that to someone who has lost a loved one because of it.

– It is dumb to just wait to see if someone does something that doesn’t warrant them having a

– It is absolutely ridiculous that reading papers while driving isn’t illegal. Small dogs on laps can be equally distracting. But I don’t know if your way is the best to go about addressing the problem

– What happened to sudoku?? I picked up the “new and improved” verb turned to the last page and was disappointed that sudoku was gone.

– Verbs new design looks good but the content sucks! 3 news articles? That’s it? Also I thought that the comic section is suppose to be funny

Comment in response to “Out with the old,”

Comment in response to “Out with the old,”

Editorial page, #205 (August 31, 2012)

Editorial page, #205 (August 31, 2012)

– Verb’s the word! Love the new look but bring back numbers2 please! Sudoka baby thank you! FREE rags is where its at! Comment in response to “Out with the old,”

Off Topic

Editorial page, #205 (August 31, 2012)

– Well Im very disappointed in ur “New & Improved “ Verb u left out SUDOKU .

– Love the new layout of the Verb magazine.

Comment in response to “Out with the old,”

Comment in response to “Out with the old,”

Editorial page, #205 (August 31, 2012)

Editorial page, #205 (August 31, 2012)

– I know I speak for many when I say Bring back Sudoku! Comment in response to “Out with the old,” Editorial page, #205 (August 31, 2012)

– I like how the nightlife is two pages but other then that switch back! the old style was way better!

Sound-Off – Tatoos piercings body mod all OK cool up to a point. But some people have way too much. The expression becomes “I’m really into myself!”

– Out of sight out of mind. If you get out of my sight you will be out of my mind.

– Dew yoo reely primt thease tehxts verbaitim?

Comment in response to “Out with the old,” Editorial page, #205 (August 31, 2012)

– R.I.P. Levi Tayler 1997-September 10, 2011. U will be missed. Your

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dear great friend me ;( I hope you see me looking on you every night, cause my tears are praying to see you before I see the light <3. – Isn’t anyone going to ask how my hand feels after punching that iron like jaw of that baby?

– draw near to God and he will draw near to you. (james 4) i dare you to try to comprehend how easy that promise actually is.

– Time to “Scratch Atch “. -W.H. :-)

– Steel is dead in North America. Workers and executives priced themselves out that industry decades ago. Symptomatic of whats happening now. All the work is going offshore where workers and execs are way lower priced.

– People try to impress with how busy they are. Its mostly self-made self-interested busy. Burning all that time and energy on yourself is never impressive.

– There is no excuse for animal abuse.

– Moved twice in two months. REALLY tired of cleaning up other people’s filth. Can’t believe people sit and watch TV for hours while their homes get that dirty. Maybe we need a TV show that teaches people when and how to clean their homes properly. I kinda think its just an ignorance thing. Its not hard when you know!

– Canada-UK, memory stick-data spike, fries-chips, chips-crisps, take out-take away, cell-mobile, spoof-send up, and so on. We all speak english. There must be a secret Ministry of Distinctive British Nomenclature just to irritate the rest of us and express some ownership of the language.

Next week: What do you think about churches receiving tax breaks? Pick up a copy of Verb to get in on the conversation: We print your texts verbatim each week. Text in your thoughts and reactions to our stories and content, or anything else on your mind.

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Photos: courtesy of Matthew Rodgers

Anthrax

Charlie Benante on thirty years of rock. by Alex J MacPherson

I

t’s been almost thirty years since Scott Ian and Danny Lilker found the name of their band in a high school biology textbook. In that time, Anthrax have become synonymous with thrash metal, their name inextricably linked to the thought of pounding drums and shredding guitars. But it hasn’t been an easy road for the New York band. Lineup changes and a long period of inactivity kept their name in — and out — of the headlines. Now, though, they’re back. Reunited with lead singer Joey Belladonna, Anthrax recorded their best album in years and are heading out on the road, to play metal for the masses. I caught up with drummer Charlie Benante, who has been in the band since 1983, a few days ago. Alex J MacPherson: You’ve been in this band for almost three decades. How does it feel? Charlie Benante: You know, it’s just weird to put it into words, but it doesn’t feel like it’s been that long. For me, the years have gone by but I don’t feel like it’s been that long. Most of it is enjoyment. There’s been some blood, sweat, tears throughout the whole thing, too. AJM: Tell me a bit about making Worship Music. It had a difficult birth. What does it mean to you to have that record done and released? CB: Well, it put us back on the map. It’s definitely been a long road, get-

ting to that record. It took awhile to make this record, and it just wasn’t the right time for that record to come out until all the elements were part of it, the right people involved in it. AJM: You talk about how Worship Music put you back on the map. But isn’t Anthrax an institution in metal music? Do you think about it that way? CB: Honestly, not until someone brings it up. It’s not something I think about all the time. I think it’s a question of getting together, playing together, and sometimes you look at each other onstage and it’s like, sh*t

no reason why you should stop making music. But then again, people get into it for the wrong reasons. Sometimes they get into it when they’re young and they just can’t handle certain things. Sometimes life just gets in the way. AJM: Aside from Worship Music, I understand you’re working on a covers project. What’s that about? CB: That project started out as a little bit of a goof, for me especially. We’ve always done cover songs as B-sides, just to keep it interesting. Joking one day, we said we should do a Rush song. Scott was like, ‘Yeah, let’s do a Rush song.’ We didn’t want to pick

[I]t’s like, sh*t man, we’ve been doing this for awhile and I’m still enjoying this. Charlie Benante

man, we’ve been doing this for awhile and I’m still enjoying this. There’s a lot to be said for that. There are a lot of bands that can’t keep it together. They have problems with this guy or that guy, and believe me, we’ve had our share of issues, but something should be said about longevity. AJM: Every band goes through difficult periods. How did you manage to keep it together?

one that was new; we wanted to pick one off the first few records. We picked ‘Anthem‘ — that song has a real metal feel. Then we did a Boston song called ‘Smokin’’ and that kicked ass. We just picked some weird tunes and just had a bit of fun with it. Anthrax Sept 24 @ The Odeon Events Centre $39.50+ @ The Odeon Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

CB: There’s a drive that’s inside of you, of course. If you love doing this — that’s a big thing, man. If you really love making music, then there’s

@MacPhersonA @MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com amacpherson@verbnews.com

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Family of the Year

How four roommates made their best album.

T

he best song on Loma Vista, the latest record by Family of the Year, is called “Living on Love.” Driven by sunny synthesizers, surf guitars, and washed out vocals, the song is a metaphor for the Los Angeles-based band — an ode to living in the moment. “Living on Love” began life as a sketch, a throwaway idea singer Joseph Keefe called “F*** my Life.” His brother, drummer Sebastian Keefe, dreamt up the chorus — “Living on love / Living on love and libations” — and a joke was transformed into a signature song. “That was written when we were all living together,” laughs Christina Schroeter, who, along with James Buckney, rounds out Family of the Year. “We were on and off tour, and we were seriously all living together in a small apartment, literally living on love and libations. We were drinking and partying and writing music.” “When you’re broke and living in LA trying to be something creative, it can be really dark,” she continues, “but I think we try to look at the upside of what’s going on.” This sentiment forms the heart of Loma Vista,

by alex J MacPherson

a record that was created in spite of relative misery, not because of it. Family of the Year have been making music for quite a while; Loma Vista, an album of irrepressible optimism, is their best yet. Schroeter, the only member who grew up in California, attributes the band’s distinctive sound to the Golden State itself. “It feels really good to be there,” she laughs. “When we’re on tour long enough, we look forward to the light at the end of the tunnel. It fills you with this really warm feeling.” The band’s sound, a spacey mélange of acoustic guitars, vintage synthesizers, and languid vocals, is inspired by the long trail of California music. Today, the band can’t imagine making music anywhere else. Pointing to the rigours of everyday existence, Schroeter says she and her bandmates live for the moment. “I think being in a band … you’re always striving to be a little bit better. You forget to open your eyes … and enjoy what you’re doing.” Family of the Year September 22 @ Louis’ Pub $17.50 @ Ticketmaster

Classical to Classic Rock

Victor Sawa on building bridges. by alex J MacPherson

V

ictor Sawa once told me that music is all the same. We were talking about why some people feel intimidated by classical music; Sawa, whose taste runs from the Beatles to Beethoven, explained that his job as maestro of the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra is to make sure people hear good music. Which is why he is teaming up with some professional pop musicians. “It’s fusion,” Sawa says of the program, which includes songs by

Roy Orbison, Queen, Journey and Leonard Cohen. “It’s a combination of jazz and rock; it’s a combination of classical and pop.” Featuring Ron Paley, Jack Semple, and tenor Fernando Varela, Classical to Classic Rock casts the rich textures of orchestral music against the glittering pop pedigree of the three soloists. But, Sawa points, out, this isn’t a new concept. “Frank Sinatra, those guys? They had orchestras,” he says. Obviously, Sawa is a devotee of

the orchestra, but there is no question that Varela will be the star of the show. A native of Puerto Rico, Varela grew up emulating Michael Jackson. A protégé of David Foster and a disciple of Andrea Bocelli, his voice bridges genre and cross borders. For most of the musicians, the concert will be the first time they

hear every element together. “Once they are listening to it … a lot of them go, ‘hey, this is great!’” Sawa says. That said, Sawa’s job is far from easy. In addition to conducting the orchestra, he has to listen to the soloists to keep the song on track. “And,” he laughs, “look calm.”

Victor Sawa September 22 @ TCU Place $35+ @ tcutickets.ca / TCU Box Office Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@MacPhersonA amacpherson@verbnews.com

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Photo: courtesy of michael halsband

Photo: courtesy of Rick Baker

Setting sail

Hey Ocean! embark on the voyage of their lives. by Alex J MacPherson

F

rancis Beaufort was a man of stubborn practicality. Concerned that one sailor’s squall was another’s stiff breeze, Beaufort devised the scale that now bears his name as a way of measuring wind speed and wave height. From the dazzling beauty of calm seas to the raging pulse of the most powerful hurricanes, the Beaufort scale quantifies experience and defines the undefinable. Were he alive today, Beaufort would probably be driven to chart the career of Hey Ocean!, a pop band from Vancouver. Like the sea, which flits between moments of benign tranquility and terrifying violence, Hey Ocean!’s music is sometimes placid, sometimes aggressive, and always surprising. Capable of transforming raw emotion into deeply sophisticated pop songs, Hey Ocean! represents the pinnacle of indie rock. And, like Beaufort himself, they have a special relationship with the sweeping expanses of water that cover the planet. For David Vertesi, Ashleigh Ball, and David Beckingham, the sea is more than a metaphor for the scale and scope of their music. It is a reference point, the standard against

which all things can be measured. It is a canvas for emotions and a constant source of inspiration. It is integral to everything they do. “I think that no matter where you’re from, whether you’re from New York or L.A. or Paris or Vancouver, every city, every location has a big effect on how you make music, the imagery you use and what your reference point is,” Vertesi, who plays bass and sings in the band,

doubts the band could exist in a different city. But now, Hey Ocean! are leaving their home behind. After ascending the ladder of success, Vertesi and his bandmates are perched on the brink of international success. But it’s not at all clear whether the vehicle to which they’ve harnessed their hopes and dreams, a new record called IS, can stay afloat. Hey Ocean! have spent the past several years cultivating a reputation

[W]e’re so proud of [the latest album] and so excited about it — it’s the next step in our journey. David Vertesi

says. “In our music, we talk about the ocean, the mountains, and the northwest. It’s the framework for the things we’re going through. Everybody has a different framework, but I think some of the core stories and struggles are the same.” Hey Ocean! have always been a Vancouver band. In fact, Vertesi

as one of Canada’s most important pop bands. Rooted in the low-fi, high-energy rubric familiar to fans of independent music, Hey Ocean! have set themselves apart by crafting sophisticated yet accessible pop songs that they play with teenage intensity. But if their first two records, Stop Looking Like Music and It’s Continued on next page »

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Easier to Be Somebody Else, represent the apotheosis of DIY garage pop, IS is something else entirely. “It was very intentional,” Vertesi says of the band’s new, more polished sound. “It was very much something we worked on. With this album, we knew it would sound quite different from our previous records, but we never want it to sound like a different band. And that’s one of the reasons we’re so proud of it and so excited about it — it’s the next step in our journey. And the next album will be different from this album, just as this one is different from the last.” This is an understatement. Put simply, IS is what happens when a preeminent independent band known for its unimpeachable integrity signs a major label contract. Unlike the band’s earlier efforts, which astonished people because no one expected that music of such emotional depth could emerge from an ad hoc recording studio, IS is burnished and buffed by all manner of professional equipment. Although the album’s sonic profile will be instantly familiar to listeners of mainstream radio, it may shock some of the band’s more passionate fans. Vertesi isn’t convinced, though. In fact, he questions whether the band has strayed far at all. Pointing out that he, Ball and Beckingham surprised their label by being “very hands-on,” Vertesi says signing with Universal doesn’t necessarily ruin their indie credibility. He

And the decisions that influenced IS shouldn’t upset anyone, mainly because this may be the best batch of songs Hey Ocean! have ever committed to tape. From “Make a New Dance Up,” an ode to starting over powered by a four-on-the-floor beat, sparkly guitars, and punchy horns, to the richly adorned yet charmingly unaffected ballad “Islands,” IS is rich and luscious, an apt demonstration of how professional recordings don’t have to sound lifeless. Vertesi, who produced most of the record, hopes the slick outer layer won’t turn anyone away. “At the end of the day, I think people can tell when you’re being honest, when you’re making music that’s true to yourself, and they find that alluring,” he says. This is becoming more and more difficult as the forces of deeply commercialized boilerplate radio hits align themselves against individuality and depth, both intellectual and emotional. But, Vertesi laughs, “You have to sweep all that crap aside and figure out what the core of what you’re doing is.” In this case, the core idea is simple. IS is about grappling with the demands of success, which equate to leaving and loss. The record captures Vertesi, Ball, and Beckingham in a moment of vulnerability — the instant when one epoch ends and another begins. This is plain on “Jolene,” the album’s standout track. A pulsating, infectious pop song driven by an upbeat guitar riff, “Jolene” is about recognizing that the sea “is the hardest thing to leave.” To move forward, Hey Ocean! must spend more time away from their home in Vancouver, their muse and the site of their earliest successes. The future will undoubtedly be difficult; sailing through uncharted waters is never easy. But if IS is any indication, Vertesi, Ball, and Beckingham are well on their way.

Photo: courtesy of Lucas Morgan

wonders whether public perception of his band corresponds with reality. “We’ve had people tell us ‘you’re DIY, stick it to the man,’” he laughs. “It really wasn’t that kind of vision. It wasn’t a big decision that we made. It was more like, every time we came to certain situations we just made a decision over and over again.”

Hey Ocean! September 22 @ Louis’ Pub $17.50 @ Ticketmaster

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food + Drink

let’s go drinkin’ Verb’s mixology guide

Nice and easy Skip the Dishes, a new web-based food service, delivers in a big way. by adam hawboldt

I

f you’re anything like me, somewhere in your humble abode there’s a drawer full of take-out menus. You use these when you’re too lazy to cook, or too busy. Sometimes you go rummaging through that messy drawer the day after a long hard night out on the town, when the idea of cooking a meal is about as appealing as a kick in the bollocks. That’s the sorry state I found myself in last weekend — hapless, hungry and hungover. So what did I do? Went to the junk drawer, of course, to look for the menus. But there was a problem. See, I recently moved to a new house and, well, all my old menus didn’t make the trip. Lucky for me, early last week I had lunch with a young local entrepreneur named Josh Simair, who told me about his new business. Called Skip the Dishes, Simair’s online business is essentially that junk drawer full of menus — only electronic and way more convenient. “I went to the U of S and so did the rest of the people involved with this,” says Simair, “and as students we’d be in one of the reading rooms, doing

a group project and you get hungry but you can’t find anywhere to eat, so end up going to Subway. Every. Single. Time. You get kind of bored of that. So that’s sort of where the idea [for Skip the Dishes] came from. I’m guessing a lot of people have had this idea before.” Indeed they have. In big cities all around the world web-based services

Skip the Dishes … is … convenient. adam hawboldt

like Simair’s are springing up. So on Sunday, still reeking of grampa’s sauce, I logged on to www. skipthedishes.ca in search of food. Here’s how it works: First you enter your postal code (so they know where to deliver), then click on the Find Restaurants button. The next step is choosing said restaurant. At the moment, more than 20 have signed up with Skip the Dishes. If you’re in the mood for the imperial cuisine of Pakistan, click on Mogul Divaan. If it’s Turkish fare

KACHUMBER COOLER

Ingredients

Next time you order in some Indian or Pakistani cuisine, give this drink a try. Not only is it fresh and fragrant, but the Kachumber Cooler will also help bring the best out in your food.

2 half-inch slices of cucumber 8 leaves fresh cilantro 2 quarter-inch slices of green finger chili (any medium-mild chili can be substituted) 1 3/4 ounce gin 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice 1/2 ounce simple syrup

Directions

you’re after, click on Istanbul Diner. Pizza? Go with Pizza Pirates. Or for delicious Indian food, click Kabab King. The list goes on. Me, I went with Spicy Bite because, well, I’ve never eaten there before; all the other aforementioned restaurants I’ve tried. But variety is the spice of life, right, so I went with the unknown. Click. On to the next screen. There, I scanned the Spicy Bite menu, before I settled on the Tandoori Platter. I clicked once again, customized my order, then clicked the Add to Order button. On to the last step, where I gave my credit card information, then went to lie down. And less than 45 minutes later, my food arrived. And it was terrific. Kinda like the Skip the Dishes service itself — easy and convenient.

Muddle cucumber, cilantro,and chili until slightly mashed. Add gin, lime and simple syrup. Shake vigorously. Strain into a glass, half filled with ice. Garnish with a slice of cucumber.

Skip The Dishes www.skipthedishes.ca Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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music

Next Week

coming up

QUADRANT KHAN

THE STEADIES

XAVIEr RUDD

@ Amigos cantina Saturday, September 22 – $5

@ The Odeon events Saturday, September 22 – $15

@ The Odeon events centre Friday, November 23 – $39.25

The first time you hear Quadrant Khan’s music you’ll notice there’s something different about it. With roots in his Bangladeshi heritage, drawing off past trombone and guitar-playing experience, Quadrant Khan (aka Shumon Khan) has been packing dance floors and making feet move ever since bursting onto the Saskatoon electro music scene in the late ‘90s. He has performed throughout the prairie provinces and eastern Canada, ran an online radio show and, for a brief while, wrote a monthly column for Tribe. These days, Khan is doing a weekly residency at 6Twelve Lounge, and is also a resident DJ for the Macelleria House group in Italy. This show is a part of CFCR’s FM-Phasis fundraiser.

Take one dash of dance, a tablespoon of rock, a smattering of reggae, and mix them together in one funky blend. Now to top everything off, add a liberal dose of three-time Juno nominee Earl Pereira (formerly of Wide Mouth Mason), and what do you get? One of the funkiest bands in Saskatoon. Formerly known as Mobadass, The Steadies have a sound they’ve dubbed island rock. It’s like Top-40 meets reggae, and then some. Since forming in 2010, The Steadies have become a seriously in-demand band, playing alongside the likes of The Roots, K-OS, Bedouin Sound Clash and more. These guys will be playing the Odeon next week, see www. theodeon.ca for more ticket info.

One man, more instruments than you’ll believe, and a cool laid-back vibe. That’s what you’ll experience at an Xavier Rudd concert. Hailing from Australia, this multi-talented musician takes to the stage with his guitar, harmonica, yidaki, banjo, lap steel guitar and his voice. What comes out is a blend of folk, blues, indie, rock and reggae that will, quite simply, blow your hair back. Not only did Rudd’s ‘04 album Solace go platinum, not only has he toured with the Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson and Ben Harper, but, in 2007, Rudd was also named the “World’s Sexiest Vegetarian Celebrity” by PETA. He will be rolling into Saskatoon in late November. See Ticketmaster for ticket information. – By Adam Hawboldt

Photos courtesy of: the artist / the artist / the artist

Sask music Preview The BreakOut West Festival runs from September 27-30 in Regina, and features some of the best musicians, performing in many different genres, from BC to Manitoba. Many of these acclaimed artists, some of whom have been nominated, will wind up the festival at the Western Canadian Music Awards on the 30th. The WCMAs will feature performances by Dan Mangan, Said The Whale, Jason Plumb and The Northern Pikes. Keep up with Saskatchewan music. saskmusic.org

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listings

september 14 » September 22 The most complete live music listings for Saskatoon. S

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17 18 19 20 21 22

14 15

Friday 14

HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs liven things up all night long. 9pm / No cover Ride Til Dawn, Shakey Wilson, Bruce Ramone, The Sea Hags / Amigos Cantina — An awesome night of local music for CFCR FM-Phasis. 10pm / $5 cover PIANO FRIDAYS / The Bassment — Featuring Brett Balon. 4:30pm / No cover ROOTS SERIES: KK NOGUEIRA & SOLAR RIO / The Bassment — Bossa Nova guitarist KK Nogueira knows how to slap the six-string like no other, so come on down and enjoy. 9pm / $10/14 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — Featuring Austen Roadz and DJ Ash Money. 9pm / $5 cover

Kashmir / Buds on Broadway — Western Canada’s top Led Zeppelin band will be in town all weekend. 9pm / $6 cover STONE’S THROW / The Fez on Broadway — A night of hard rock awaits. 8pm DJ ECLECTIC / The Hose & Hydrant — DJ Eclectic pumps beats. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite spins the latest tracks in multiple genres. 9pm / $5 cover Trigger Effect, The Faps, A Ghost in Drag, Holic / Lepp’s Metal Bar — From punk to metal, this show has what you want. 10pm / Cover TBD Solid College, Sophomore Jakes / Lydia’s Pub — Hot tunes in a great venue. 10pm / $5 cover TECH N9NE / The Odeon — Fast, furious and funky rap. 8pm / Tickets available at 1–866-973-9614 DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — Round up your friends. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm JAMES STEELE TRIO / Prairie Ink — This 21-year-old is already a fiddle veteran. 8pm / No cover EDDY ROBERTSON / Somewhere Else Pub — “Fast” Eddy is one of the hottest axe-slingers in town. No cover CharlyHustle / Spadina Freehouse — A local DJ that knows how to make you move. 8pm / No cover Urban Outlaws / Stan’s Place — Local group plays country rock. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King entertain all night. 10pm / $5 INDIGO JOSEPH W/ FINFOLK / Vangelis Tavern — Blues rock meets folk funk in this great show. 10pm / $5

AMANDA LEPORE / Diva’s Club — Amanda Lepore is touring her new album. 8pm KORY ISTACE / The Fez on Broadway — Kory Istace plays everything from folk to southern rock. 8pm / Cover TBD DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite spins the greatest tracks. 9pm / $5 cover The Nailheads, Zombie Bouffant, Nodding Donkey, 10th Avenue / Lepp’s Metal Bar — A whole lot of punk mixed with a bunch of fun. 10pm / Cover TBD Vulture Cult / Lydia’s Pub — Local band plays rock ‘n roll. 10pm / Cover $5 LIFTED / Lydia’s — Featuring the local DJs of Fuse Collective. 9pm / $5 BIG SEAN / The Odeon — Check out California-based rapper Big Sean. 8pm / $45+ @ theodeoneventcentre.ca DJ BIG AYYY & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws — Round up your friends . 8pm / $5 JON BAILEY / Prairie Ink — Bailey’s charming blend of folk and rock is always engaging. 8pm / No cover EDDY ROBERTSON / Somewhere Else Pub — “Fast” Eddy is one of the hottest axe-slingers in town. No cover DJ Albert, Dislexik / Spadina Freehouse — Check out this pair of top-notch DJs. 8pm / No cover Urban Outlaws / Stan’s Place — Local band plays country/rock. 9pm / No cover DUELING PIANOS / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King entertain all night. 10pm / $5 RORY BOREALIS / Vangelis Tavern — Local folk rockers take the stage. 10pm / $5

Saturday 15

Industry Night / Béily’s UltraLounge — Hosted by DJ Sugar Daddy. 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff DJ KADE / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover Owls By Nature and guests / Lepp’s Metal Bar — Lepp’s presents a show full of indie, folk, rock and blues music. 10pm / Cover TBD SUNDAY JAM / Vangelis Tavern — The Vangelis Sunday Jam is an institution, offering great tunes from blues to rock and beyond. 7:30pm / No cover

AMATI QUARTET / 3rd Avenue United — Performing string quartets on a set of rare Amati instruments. 2 & 7:30pm / $15+ persephonetheatre.org HOUSE DJS / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin deep and soulful tunes all night. 9pm / No cover Gunner and Smith, Little Criminals / Amigos — Two bands, one kickass showall for CFCR FM-Phasis. 10pm / $5 cover PIANO SERIES: PIANO FEST FUNDRAISER / The Bassment — Local legends tinkle the ivories all night long. 9pm / $15/20 AUSTEN ROADZ / Béily’s UltraLounge — Austen Roadz throws down a dance party along with DJ CTRL. 9pm / $5 cover Kashmir / Buds on Broadway — Western Canada’s top Led Zeppelin band will be in town all weekend. 9pm / $6 cover

Sunday 16

Monday 17

Jesse Roads Band / Buds on Broadway — A smooth rocking trio from Alberta. 9pm / $6 cover Metal Mondays / Lydia’s Pub — If hard, heavy awesomeness is your thing, swing by. 9pm / Cover TBD Continued on next page »

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Tuesday 18 Jesse Roads Band / Buds — A smooth rocking trio from Alberta. 9pm / $6 cover DJ SUGAR DADDY / The Double Deuce — This crowd fave spins great tracks. 9:30pm / $4 cover Amanda Rheaume / Gillian’s House — This Ottawa-based musician plays folk and more. 8:30pm / See www.gilliansnider.com for ticket info VERB PRESENTS OPEN STAGE / Lydia’s — Show what you got. 9pm / No cover Open Mic / The Somewhere Else Pub — Come show your talent. 7pm / No cover

Wednesday 19

HUMP WEDNESDAYS / 302 Lounge & Discotheque — Featuring esident DJ Chris Knorr. 9pm / No cover until 10pm; $3 thereafter Jesse Roads Band / Buds on Broadway — A smooth rocking trio from Alberta. 9pm / $6 cover The Avenue Recording Company presents Open Mic / The Fez — Hosted by Chad Reynolds. 10pm / No cover DJ Kade / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover Sloan / Louis’ Pub — Don’t miss this Juno-winning alt-rock quartet from Halifax. 8pm / Tickets $25 (ticketmaster.ca) Dr. J ‘Souled Out’ / Lydia’s Pub — Dr. J spins hot funk and soul. 9pm / No cover WILD WEST WEDNESDAY / Outlaws — Hosted by DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman. 9pm / $4; no cover for industry staff Stephen Maguire / Rock Creek — Country meets soul. 8pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King will entertain all night. 10pm / No cover

Thursday 20

Jazz Jam: Richard Haubrich Trio / The Bassment — Come jam with local musicians. 8pm / $5, jammers get in free Caught in a Dream / Buds — An Alice Cooper tribute band. 9pm / $6 cover Throwback Thursdays / Earls —Featuring Dr. J. 8pm / No cover Thunder Riot with Conky Showpony / The Fez — Come dance the night away with this local DJ. 9pm / $5 DJ Kade / The Hose & Hydrant — Saskatoon DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover DJ Sugar Daddy / Jax — DJ Sugar Daddy will be rocking all night. 8pm / $5; free cover with student ID before 11pm Abandon All Ships / Louis’ — An Italian-Canadian metalcore band from Toronto. 6pm / $12 (Ticketmaster)

September Long / Lydia’s — Come out to the Histiocytosis Fundraiser. 7pm / Tickets TBD Outside the Wall / The Odeon — An amazing Pink Floyd tribute band. 8pm / Tickets $20 (theodeon.ca)

Friday 21

House DJs / 6Twelve Lounge — Funk, soul & lounge DJs. 9pm / No cover shooting guns, foggy notions / Amigos — Come out for CFCR-FM-Phasis. 10pm / Cover $5 Piano Fridays: Martin Janovsky / The Bassment — Come take in some smooth jazz stylings. 4:30pm / No cover Roots Series: Jay Semko / The Bassment — This is one show not to miss. 9pm / Cover $15/20 Austen Roadz / Béily’s UltraLounge — Also featuring DJ Ash Money. 9pm / $5 cover Gong Show / Buds — Come enjoy this party band. 9pm / $6 cover Devon Coyote / The Fez — This BC singer puts on energetic shows. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Eclectic / The Hose — DJ Eclectic pumps snappy beats all night long. 8pm / No cover DJ Sugar Daddy / Jax Niteclub — This local crowd favourite spins the greatest tracks. 9pm / $5 cover DJ Big Ayyy & DJ HENCHMAN / Outlaws Country Rock Bar — Round up your friends. 8pm / $5; ladies in free before 11pm Caila Ellerman / Prairie Ink — Check out this fresh local talent. 8pm / No cover Kelly Read & We’re Thorry / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of sweet local music. 9pm / No cover The Nightrain / Spadina Freehouse — A local Guns N’ Roses tribute band. 8pm / No cover Don Anaquoad / Stan’s Place — Check out this local talent. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King entertain all night. 10pm / $5

Saturday 22 House DJs / 6Twelve — Resident DJs spin tunes all night. 9pm / No cover Quadrant Khant, Dislexik, Form, Economics / Amigos — Four solid acts, one great price. 10pm / Cover $5 The Neil Currie Quartet w/ Gillian Snider / The Bassment — Neil Currie and Gillian Snider offer some slick jazz standards. 9pm / $12/$16 Austen Roadz / Béily’s — Also featuring DJ CTRL. 9pm / $5 cover Gong Show / Buds — Come and enjoy one of Saskatoon’s premier party bands. . 9pm / $6 cover Pandas in Japan, guests / The Fez — Many talented acts put on an awesome show. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Kade / The Hose — Saskatoon’s own DJ lights it up. 8pm / No cover DJ Sugar Daddy / Jax — This local crowd favourite spins the greatest tracks. 9pm / $5 cover All Night Gala / Joos Yoga Studio — Joos’ grand opening will feature The Gaff, Wooden Reverie and We Were Lovers. 8pm / see www.joos.ca for ticket information Hey Ocean! / Louis’ — This pop-funk trio from Vancouver rocks it. 8pm / $17.50 (ticketmaster.ca) LIFTED / Lydia’s — Come to Lydia’s upstairs loft for this show. 9pm / Cover $5 Dan Silljer Band / Lydia’s — This left-handed guitarist will rock you. 9pm / Cover $5 The Steadies / The Odeon — This local act is funky as all get out of here. 8:30pm / Tickets $15 DJ Big Ayyy & DJ Henchman / Outlaws — Round up your friends. 8pm / $5 Peter Abonyi / Prairie Ink — Come out for a night of world/jazz music. 8pm / No cover Kelly Read & We’re Thorry / Somewhere Else Pub — A night of sweet local music. No cover. 9pm / No cover Charly Hustle / Spadina Freehouse — This DJ will move you. 8pm / No cover

Don Anaquoad / Stan’s Place — Come check out this local talent do his thing. 9pm / No cover Dueling Pianos / Staqatto Piano Lounge — Terry Hoknes, Neil Currie and Brad King belt out classic tunes and audience requests. 10pm / $5

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film

Photo: Courtesy of screen gems

better off dead

Resident Evil: Retribution doesn’t offer much. by adam hawboldt

W

henever you sit down to watch a movie based on a video game there should be an unwritten agreement between you, the movie-goer, and whomever made the film. The movie-goer must be willing to suspend a need for plot and a desire for pitch-perfect dialogue. And in return they should expect to see copious amounts of action and an as-close-to-the-original-as-youcan-get rendering of their favourite video games. For the director’s part, well, he or she simply has to deliver on what the audience expects.

[T]he fight scenes are fun to watch. Adam Hawboldt

If you’re the type of person who can hold up your side of this agreement, chances are you’ll enjoy the hell out of a movie like Resident Evil: Retribution. Picking up where Afterlife left off, this flick — the fifth installment of the franchise — is big on violence and special effects. Though, contrary to what you’d expect from the Resident Evil fran-

chise, Retribution has Alice (Milla Jovovich) living in suburbia, taking care of her adorable little daughter. Not to worry. The deadly virus created in earlier films by The Umbrella Corporation — you know, the one that turns people into zombies — hasn’t gone anywhere. And it isn’t long before the zombie apocalypse comes to suburbia in search of brains and flesh. Naturally, Alice’s kick-ass-nowand-take-names-later mentality takes over and all hell breaks loose. But it isn’t zombies she’s after. I mean, sure she’ll kill any that come her way, but the main antagonist is the malicious artificial intelligence program, the Red Queen, that runs biological weapon simulations for Umbrella. Early in the film we see Alice fighting her way through the Tokyo simulation and, as far as moviegame flicks go, it’s pretty rad. For that matter, nearly all the fight scenes are fun to watch. With a lot of slow-motion shots that’ll leaving you saying “Wow! That was cool” and more than enough zombies being blown away to stay true to the video game, the fight scenes are by far the best thing about this movie. Now, I know some of you love this franchise — more than $670 million in box office gross will attest to that. But me, I’ve never been able to make the video-game-

Resident evil: retribution Directed by Paul W. S. Anderson Starring Milla Jovovich, Sienna Guillory + Michelle Rodriguez 95 minutes | 14A

into-movie agreement needed to thoroughly enjoy a film like this. I mean, is it really that difficult to give us a coherent plot and decent dialogue? To date, nearly every videogame movie has fallen short in these two areas. And Retribution is no different. The plot is muddled, the story is about as interesting as an 800-page book on wallpaper and the dialogue is stilted. As for the acting? Well, let’s just say that Jovivich, Sienna Guillory and Michelle Rodriguez have all seen better days. So the verdict on Retribution? If you’re a fan of the first four films (or a big fan of video-game flicks in general), you’ll like this movie. If you’re anything like me … not so much.

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Sober Thoughts

Photo: Courtesy of Page 124 production

New documentary Bill W. takes an honest, unflinching look at the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous. by adam hawboldt

B

ill Wilson was 22 years old when he had his first drink. That drink led to another one. And another one. Seventeen years and too-many-drinks-to-remember later, Wilson had hit rock bottom. His once promising career as a Wall Street investor was obliterated. His life in turmoil. His finances in such dire straits that both he and his wife were living in abject poverty. So at the behest of a friend, Wilson began attending meetings with the Oxford Group — a religious group founded by Frank Buchman

This is how Alcoholics Anonymous was born. This is what directors Dan Carracino and Kevin Hanlon’s debut movie Bill W. is about — mostly. Shot in a variety of styles, Bill W. uses everything from photographs to rare film footage, audio tape of the man himself, talking-head interviews, real-life reenactments, you name it, to tell the story of a man who was named one of Time magazine’s Time 100: The Most Important People of the Century. Sometimes this mishmash of mediums works. For instance, the

Bill W. uses everything from photographs to rare film footage … to tell the story… Adam Hawboldt

to provide a “moral re-armament” in America. Soon Wilson was sober. Five months into his sobriety, Wilson was in a hotel lobby in Akron, Ohio. A business deal had just fell through. He was pacing the lobby, eyes fixed on the cocktail lounge, wanting another drink. Instead, Wilson had a religious epiphany that told him to talk to another drunk. He found that person in the form of Dr. Bob Smith.

audiotapes of Bill W. are incredible. As though the man himself is telling you to pull up a seat and listen to his story. The audio tapes of Dr. Bob and of Bill’s tortured wife Lois also add a lot of depth and colour to this documentary. But for all the deep, nostalgic goodness the tapes provide, the blending of all those different styles takes more away from the film than they put into it. Leaving the docu-

Bill W. Dan Carracino + Kevin Hanlon Starring Bill Wilson + Bob Smith Directed by

104 minutes | UNRATED

mentary too herky jerky, too stilted, at times a tad confusing. That’s not to say Bill W. is a terrible documentary. Not at all. With a modest tone and sensible story arc, the documentary sheds a bright light on a pioneer who helped popularized a scientific-minded theory of alcoholism as a disease. You see, for most people — especially those who have attended AA — Wilson is a deified figure of sorts. A bastion of goodness and caring. But this documentary isn’t having any of that. Instead of presenting Bill as a demi-god, Carracino and Hanlon take the viewers into the dark corners of a troubled and complex life. They tell you about how Wilson cheated on his wife. They also tell a story of how Wilson used to experiment with LSD in the early days of the drug’s history. Bet you didn’t know that. As for the rest of the movie, well, it’s not The Thin Blue Line or Hoop Dreams. But if you’ve ever been curious about the history of AA and the people who started it, Bill W. is well worth a watch.

Bill W. is currently being screened at Roxy Theatre.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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thursday, september 6 @

the U of s The University of Saskatchewan’s Welcome Week festivities

what it is / Two days of live

music, beer gardens, a carless drive-in and tons of free giveaways live music / Thursday saw Charly Hustle, Chapter Thrive, Young Benjamins and Chad Reynolds take the stage

Photography by Patrick Carley – feedback@verbnews.com

23 Sept 14 – Sept 20 facebook.com/verbnewssaskatoon

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Photography by Patrick Carley â&#x20AC;&#x201C; feedback@verbnews.com

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the u of s The University of Saskatchewan’s Welcome Week festivities

live music / Spread out over two

days, the university’s welcome week activities included even more live tunes on the second day, when Dr. J, Jeans Boots, Powder Blue, We Were Lovers, and Gunner and Smith took the stage How it all began / The event is a well-established tradition around campus, dating back to before the start of the Second World War, and is the biggest annual party on campus

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Š Elaine M. Will | blog.E2W-Illustration.com | Check onthebus.webcomic.ws/ for previous editions!

26 Sept 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sept 20 entertainment

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crossword canadian criss-cross

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ACROSS 1. With the addition of 5. Not naked 9. Cook a turkey 10. Kind of space 12. Tendency to become angry 13. Go for first 15. Breakfast meat 16. China grass 18. Anger 19. Mid-month, in old Rome 21. One who lends a hand 22. Responsibility 23. Slender woman 25. Rushing stream 27. In short supply 29. Skilled worker who makes things by hand 32. Left-hand page 36. Praise extravagantly 37. Protective shelter 39. Triangle on a pool table 40. Rent alternative 41. On guard

43. Feathery fashion accessory 44. Tomorrow in Spain 46. By far 48. Decisive refusal 49. Burst into tears 50. Unfit for the young 51. Spinning toys

DOWN 1. Saddle part 2. Baby’s seat 3. Computer operator 4. Watchband 5. Cockpit companion 6. Bit of fishing gear 7. Didn’t go hungry 8. Give the meaning of a word 9. All set 11. It’s already been shown 12. Not that 14. Put your feet up 17. Afternoon movie 20. Part company

© walter D. Feener 2012

22. Tell what to do 24. That guy’s 26. Gun the engine 28. Wild duck 29. Tiny particle 30. Mountain ash 31. Underground passage 33. You may get it if a dog bites you 34. Find fault with angrily 35. Acceptable 38. How we stand 41. From the beginning 42. Poi source 45. Map abbreviation 47. Drink hot tea

answer key

Horoscopes September 14 – September 20 Aries March 21–April 19 Feel like having an adventure, Aries? If so, then now is the week to do it. So put yourself out in the world, and take a short journey. It doesn’t have to be far, but you’ll want to go.

Leo July 23–August 22 Be careful what you say this week, dear Leo. You might come off as boastful or arrogant if you aren’t mindful of the words that are coming out of your lion mouth.

Sagittarius November 23–December 21 Much like Ron Burgundy, you’re kind of a big deal Sagittarius. Act accordingly. Don’t get too big of a head, it might just float away, but remember not to sell yourself short, either.

Taurus April 20–May 20 You know those weeks where you’re lazy and don’t feel like doing anything? Well, this ain’t one of those You’ll be full of get-up-and-go, so pursue whatever you want.

Virgo August 23–September 22 Change, real change, rarely comes without a struggle. Remember that, Virgo. Because even though this week might be difficult at times, the silver lining will present itself if you ride it out.

Capricorn December 22–January 19 “Goonies never say die!” Remember that, Capricorn, because you may need to adopt that mentality for the next week or so. If things get tough, repeat it as your mantra.

Gemini May 21–June 20 Sometimes a one-track mind can be detrimental, but not this week. Stay focused on whatever task you have at hand, and good things could happen. Trust the universe.

Libra September 23–October 23 Don’t go where the path leads this week, Libra. Instead, get off the path altogether and stomp the terra. Leave your mark. Blaze your own trail, and laugh while you do so.

Aquarius January 20–February 19 If you want to acquire new wisdom, start by looking in the mirror and being honest with yourself, Aquarius. All real wisdom stems from being truthful, so ask yourself the hard questions.

Cancer June 21–July 22 Stop, and take a look around you. See anything you like? If so, take a mental picture and use it later this week as a calming point because things are going to get crazy soon.

Scorpio October 24–November 22 Lately, has it felt as though you’ve been taking crazy pills? Like everything around you doesn’t make sense? If so, get used to it. You might find the next few days to be very perplexing.

Pisces February 20–March 20 Be prompt this week, Pisces, it may be incredibly important. Give yourself time to get ready and always be on time. “Those who are tardy do not get a fruit cup.”

27 Sept 14 – Sept 20 facebook.com/verbnewssaskatoon

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Verb Issue S207 (Sept. 14-20, 2012)  

Verb Issue S207 (Sept. 14-20, 2012)

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