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Issue #59 – December 21 to January 10, 2013

ial spec ded n e ext iday hol ue iss

looking ahead Corey Chamblin on his love of coaching inuit sculpture MacKenzie exhibit explores soapstone carving this is 40 + celeste & jesse forever Films reviewed­

getting lost blue rodeo

with

Photo: courtesy Photo: of courtesy dustin rabin of Ph


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NEWs + Opinion

culture

entertainment

Nightlife Photos This week we visit the Creative City Centre. 17 / Nightlife

On the cover:

blue rodeo

Getting lost with these iconic Canadian rockers. 14/ cover

a new beginning

Not Kidding around

Live Music listings

How Clive Weighill transformed policing. 4 / Local

This week we visit the Fainting Goat. 11 / Food + Drink

Local music listings for December 21 through January 12. 18 / listings

Q + A with prop planes

Celeste & Jesse forever + this is 40

Local rockers speak out. 12 / Q + A

We review the latest movies. 20 / Film

verbnews.com @verbregina facebook.com/verbregina

Editorial

ONWARD AND UPWARD

inuit sculpture

Corey Chamblin talks about his love of coaching. 6 / Local

Exploring the history of soapstone carving with Timothy Long. 13 / Arts

holiday headache

canadian brass

on the bus

Our thoughts on the alleged war on Christmas. 8 / Editorial

Mixing traditions with five guys and five horns. 13 / Arts

Weekly original comic illustrations by Elaine M. Will. 22 / comics

Publisher / Parity Publishing Editor in Chief / Ryan Allan Managing Editor / Jessica Patrucco staff Writers / Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson Contributing writer / jessica Bickford

ART & Production Design Lead / Roberta Barrington Design & Production / Brittney Graham Contributing Photographers / tamara klein, danielle tocker, Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson

Business & Operations

comments

Music

Game + Horoscopes

Here’s your say about stripping laws in Saskatchewan. 10 / comments

Ink Road, Gord Bamford + Billy Talent.

Canadian criss-cross puzzle, weekly horoscopes and Sudoku. 23 / timeout

16 / music

Office Manager / Stephanie Lipsit Marketing Manager / Vogeson Paley Financial Manager / Cody Lang

contact Comments / feedback@verbnews.com / 881 8372 advertise / advertise@verbnews.com / 979 2253 design / layout@verbnews.com / 979 8474 General / info@verbnews.com / 979 2253

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A New Beginning How Clive Weighill transformed the Saskatoon Police Service by Alex J Macpherson

C

live Weighill climbs stairs quickly. Really quickly. Like a man half his age, or a teenager. When I meet him, Saskatoon’s omnipresent chief of police is wearing a simple uniform: shirt, pants, badge. Standing in his cluttered third-floor office, he plays the perfect host, disappearing in search of water and returning with coffee. He is lean and spry and energetic, the result of lunchtime runs along the riverbank. His speech is measured and steady, an engaging mix of insights and asides. He avoids copspeak whenever he can. He has good posture. And, of course, he climbs stairs quickly. Weighill, who is 59, is a man of boundless energy. That his constitution has not been eroded by six years of stress and responsibility is a testament to his vitality, because his job has not been easy. When Weighill took over in 2006, the Saskatoon Police Service was unmoored and adrift, an institution in crisis. Today, the force operates as a modern police service should, working with and within the community to stamp out crime and address the socioeconomic groundwork of criminal

behaviour. Weighill is the architect of that change.

Clive Weighill didn’t plan on becoming a police officer. Growing up in Regina, he wore his hair long and disliked the forces of law and order. Then his house was robbed. His visit to the police station changed everything. “This great big burly policeman was at the front desk, and he treated me real nice,” Weighill recalls. “He really cared about my break-and-enter. He seemed to care about me. I left with a whole different impression. I guess my stereotype, what I thought police were like, was sort of torn down.” Grainy images beamed north from the United States, pictures of violence and turbulence in the late 1960s, galvanized him to join the ranks of the Regina Police Service. “I was thinking, ‘Gee, those poor cops are really put in the middle,’” he says. “I thought it would be a good thing to get involved with, to try to make a bit of a difference in the community.” Weighill suspected policing would be a good career, but he had no real expectations. “Certainly I never dreamed I’d end up chief of police somewhere,” he laughs. “I was hoping I would maybe retire at the rank of sergeant, or something like that.” He underestimat-

ed his capacity for hard work. In three decades of service, Weighill amassed a dizzying array of experience, from straightforward patrol work and crime prevention to fraud investigations, drug enforcement, and long-term planning. (Even now, he spends several days each year working on the street, an adrenaline rush he can’t bring himself to give up.) After nine years as deputy chief, he was tapped to replace Russell Sabo as the anchor of the Saskatoon Police Service. “I was very fortunate,” he muses. “I’ve had a real good growth experience throughout my career. I’ve got a fairly solid operational background, and yet I’m very adept at [understanding] what’s going on in the community as well.” These experiences would prove vital in Saskatoon, a city united by its mistrust of the police. In 2006, when Weighill arrived, the Saskatoon Police Service was at its nadir. Rocked by allegations of misconduct, and in at least two cases criminal behaviour, the force’s public image was in serious trouble. Weighill knew he needed to resuscitate the service’s reputation while managing change and growth in the city. “There were a few unfortunate incidents that directed attention toward the service,” he says after pointing out that the Saskatoon Continued on next page »

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Photo: Courtesy of the saskatoon police service

Police Service had a lot of potential. “It brought morale down and it brought perceptions of the service down. But we got to work quickly.” Weighill’s approach can be broken down into three pillars: visibility, consistency, and transparency. To make

the fact that interaction fosters healthy relationships. “It’s so important to build up that rapport with the public, that they believe in what we’re doing, that they believe in the direction, and they believe we’re going to do something to help them if a crisis does arise.”

I think the community has to have trust in the police, and without the trust we’re lost. clive weighill

the police more visible, and in doing so rehabilitate its strained relationship with the public, he orchestrated a major redeployment designed to put officers where they were needed most: on the street. The decision had far-reaching consequences. More beat officers curbed street crime which reduced the workload of the investigation division, which allowed them to spend more time working on serious cases. More importantly, officers on the street became a conduit between Weighill and the public. “I think the community has to have trust in the police, and without the trust we’re lost,” he says, alluding to

The idea is simple. An officer insulated by the steel and glass of his patrol car is a stranger, but an officer on the street is a human being, someone who shows up when things are bad and when things are good — someone who can be trusted. “That’s one of the most important functions of policing, the visibility,” Weighill says. “Because number one, visibility reassures people; and number two, it takes away an opportunity for crime. It’s kind of a double-whammy.” Weighill ensured consistency by carving the city into three divisions,

each with a dedicated staff. Officers learned about their patrol areas and people learned about their police officers. Then he turned to transparency, a problem that has plagued police forces for decades. “As the chief of police, the buck stops at my desk,” he explains. “I’ve always believed that as the chief it’s my responsibility to communicate with the citizens and with the media as much as I can. That gives people the assurance that they know what’s going on with the police service, and that the chief knows what’s going on.” Tellingly, his philosophy extends beyond triumphant reports of solved cases and captured crooks. “We always have incidents we’re not proud of that happen at the service, but we don’t hide those, either,” Weighill explains, hinting perhaps at a recent scuffle between police officers and firefighters that resulted in a highly publicized trial. “[If] we have a police officer that’s in trouble, we’re honest about it, people know about it, and we deal with it.”

Evidence of Weighill’s success –— and tireless work ethic — is everywhere. The Saskatoon Police Service commissions third-party surveys, which have consistently shown de-

creasing crime rates and increasing public satisfaction. A recent study found that eight percent of residents consider crime and policing the number one issue facing the city, a decrease of almost 30 percent over six years. This confidence in the police and its tireless chief is echoed by the city’s politicians. “I remember when I first came to Saskatoon,” Weighill explains. “One of the members of the Board of Police Commissioners said, ‘Chief, we don’t mind spending money to help the police service, but we want to see some results.’” And they have. Weighill’s budget proposals are buttressed with verifiable facts. This year, council approved his budget, a 5.13 percent increase, without asking for a single change. Weighill’s stock is such that in June, 2011, city council approved the construction of a new police station, a modern headquarters fitted with

the latest technology and big enough to handle a growing police force. The current building, which was built in 1977, was designed to house 300 people. The Saskatoon Police Service currently employs more than 650 individuals. “Almost everywhere you look at the building is outdated,” he says. “They’ve built a building now that will last us well into the future.” “Every day I get to be a part of the change, what’s going to happen for Saskatoon, and there’s a pride in that,” Weighill muses. “And it’s also a big responsibility, and that gives you kind of an adrenaline rush as well.” The station is scheduled to open in 2013. Expect a lot of stairs.

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Onward and Upward

Corey Chamblin on coaching, his love of the game, and winning the Grey Cup by ADAM HAWBOLDT

C

orey Chamblin always wanted to be a coach. Even when he was a professional football player — bouncing around the NFL from Baltimore to Jacksonville, from Green Bay to Tampa Bay, Denver to Indianapolis — he always knew he’d end up standing on the sidelines, wearing a headset, calling the shots. “My plan was to play a couple of years of pro, then go be a high school guidance counsellor and get into high school coaching,” says Chamblin in his laid-back southern drawl. “That was the original plan. I ended up playing a couple years pro, but didn’t end up walking down that other road.” Indeed he didn’t. When Chamblin’s playing days were over, instead of coaching at a local high school in his hometown of Birmingham, Alabama, he moved to Tennessee (the state where he played his college ball) and became an assistant coach at Cumberland University. That was 2005. In 2006, Chamblin moved to Germany where, as defensive assistant

and secondary coach for the Frankfurt Galaxy, he helped the team win the World Bowl Championship. But his time in Europe was short-lived. The following year, Chamblin hopped back across the pond and into a job as the defensive backs coach with the Winnipeg Blue

the surroundings are, it’s always the same on the field. Doesn’t matter about the situation.” And here’s the thing: regardless of what situation he’s in, Chamblin invariably finds ways to be successful. So much so that, heading into the 2012 season, every CFL team he had

This next year, I think it’s possible to have the best record and be in the Grey Cup. corey chamblin

Bombers. From Winnipeg he went to Calgary and then to Hamilton, before settling in as rookie head coach with the Saskatchewan Roughriders last year. “I’ve been to a lot of places in a fairly short period of time,” chuckles Chamblin. “And the biggest thing I’ve figured out, having been all those places, is that it doesn’t matter to me where I am. Football is football. Doesn’t matter where you go or what

been a part of made it either to the division finals or the Grey Cup (Chamblin finally captured the holy grail of Canadian football four years ago with the Stampeders). And while Chamblin’s string of division finals and Grey Cup berths came to a halt this past season, the 2012 campaign must still be viewed as a success. Think about it. He took a team with the worst record in the league, lit a fire under their asses, Continued on next page »

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Photos: courtesy of Huskies Outsider

turned the program around and led the Riders back into to the playoffs in just one year. Not too shabby for a guy who has yet to see his 36th birthday. Yet for the tremendous amounts of success he’s experienced at such a young age, it hasn’t been all wine and roses for Coach Chamblin.

“DAMN!” That was the first thought that came to Chamblin’s mind when a 68yard touchdown pass found Calgary receiver Romby Bryant in the endzone during November’s semi-final between the Riders and the Stamps. With only 20 seconds left on the clock, hearts and hopes all around Saskatchewan dropped in unison as the Stamps pulled ahead 36-30.Chamblin’s heart wasn’t one of them. “It didn’t break or hit rock bottom,” he says. “I knew it was a big blow. Still, I thought we had a chance to make something happen at the end.” The only thing that happened was the Stamps went on to play for the

Grey Cup, while the Riders went to clean out their lockers. The loss was a tough pill for many in the province to swallow, but not Chamblin. Within five or 10 minutes of the final buzzer he had gotten over it. “There’s no sense in dwelling on it,” he explains. “Almost immediately after that loss it was time to look ahead to 2013. That’s the thing: sometimes people and fans put too much weight on a loss and the past. Me, I learn from the past and take that new knowledge into the future. Build on it.” But what exactly does the future hold for Chamblin? The simple answer to that is “a lot of work.”

Stop for a minute and ask yourself: what does a CFL head coach do in the off-season after his team gets eliminated? Does he unwind for a bit? Perhaps take a vacation? Not if his name is Cory Chamblin. Since the 2012 season ended, Chamblin has been incredibly busy. There are

GM meetings to attend, old game tapes to watch, analysis to be done on all the things the Riders did well last year, as well as all the things they did bad. Then there’s free agency on the horizon — and all the complex decisions that come with it. Oh, and since the team recently decided not to renew the contracts of offensive-line coach Kris Sweet, defensive-line coach Mike Walker and linebackers coach Alex Smith, there’s also a good deal of work going into finding their replacements. “There’s so many things to do,” admits Chamblin. “You wanna go ahead and interview coaches or go ahead and sign the coaches you’ve already interviewed. You have to look at the current team, look at free agents, look at the production of the offence, defence and special teams. Yeah … there’s a lot going on.” But Chamblin is up for the task. Heck, he’s more than up for it — he’s enjoying the hell out of it. “I have a deep love for this game,” he admits. “A deep love for coaching. A deep love for teaching and discipline and winning. So all

this is fun. And everything we do now, in the off-season, is going to set us up to be in a better position to win next year. We went from worst record to the playoffs in one year. This next year, I think it’s possible to have the best record and be in the Grey Cup.”

And most of Saskatchewan hopes he’s right.

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7 Dec 28 – Jan 3 /verbregina

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Holiday Headache

Photo: Courtesy of Trey Ratcliff

We all need to chill out when it comes to the semantics of Christmas

T

is the season to be jolly, to show unrequited goodwill towards those around you, to spend time with people you care about (if you want), and, in certain circles, to sit around, beer in hand, watching Team Canada vie for the World Junior Hockey Championships. ‘Tis also the season for the so-called “war on Christmas” to recommence. You know what we’re talking about. Every year around this time people on one side of the debate start going on about how the phrase “Merry Christmas” should be replaced with something more politically correct, like “Happy Holidays,” and about how Christmas slogans and symbols should be removed from public places because of their religious (to some) affiliations. Folks on the other side argue that it’s imperative to keep Christ

in Christmas, and that any use of a more generic greeting is proof of a vast secular conspiracy to destroy Christianity. This is, they claim, the birthday of their saviour and should be celebrated as such. It’s almost impossible to make it through this time of year without the issue of “Merry Christmas” vs. “Happy Holidays” getting revisited for the umpteenth time. In fact, recently in Saskatoon tempers on both sides flared when city buses began displaying “Merry Christmas” on their electronic destination boards. And we think that’s simply preposterous. Not the messages, but the debate itself. We don’t care if Merry Christmas is displayed on public transit. And it’s not because we support the “keep Christ in Christmas” argument, because we don’t. Nor do we support those on the politically correct side of the fence. What we support is a society in which you can say anything

you want — Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Joyous Kwanzaa, Jolly Solstice, Happy friggin’ Holidays, or anything else — without fear of criticism or reprimand from others. This is a time of year to rejoice, folks, not to bicker over semantics. Why can’t we take the well-wishing as a simple gesture of good will without getting embroiled in a kerfuffle that regurgitates the same soundbites over and over without making any progress, before ultimately dying away in the cool dawn of the new year, where it lies dormant until the following November? Seriously. Can’t we all just get along? It’s not so hard. Don’t believe us? Think back to the year 1914 (go with us here, this will all make sense in a minute). The British and German armies, two sworn enemies, were locked in mortal combat all along the Continued on next page »

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Western Front. Bullets, barbed wire and death were in abundance. But in the week leading up to Christmas, and especially on Christmas Eve and Christmas day, unofficial ceasefires were called. At Ypres, German soldiers allegedly began placing candles on Christmas trees in their trenches and singing Christmas carols. Pretty soon soldiers from both sides were venturing into No Man’s Land, exchanging gifts and season’s greetings. Lest we forget, these were people trying to kill each other less than 24 hours earlier. And if they can get along during this time of year (even if it was only for a short period of time), we, the purportedly peaceful and respectful public, should be able to do the same. And yes, we fully realize that noting the use of Christmas trees and Christmas carols in the aforementioned anecdote may seem as though

we support the whole religious/ Merry Christmas side of the argument, but that’s not the case. See, Christmas trees pre-date a Christian version of Christmas. So do wreaths and yuletide and a whole host of Christmas carols (heck, check out our infographic on this page for more details). And for many, Christmas is simply a secular holiday, a few days off work/school to hang out and generally take a load off. But that’s besides the point here. Hell, those soldiers could’ve been lighting menorahs, decorating their trenches with kente, sacrificing a lamb to pagan gods or sending politically correct well wishes from one end of No Man’s Land to the other. You see, ultimately, it’s not the words or customs that you use at this time of year, it’s the message and intent behind them. And in one way or another, whether

you’re saying “Merry Christmas,” “Happy Holidays” or “Have a swell Saturnalia,” it’s the message that’s important. As long as you’re conveying good will and joy to others, why bother getting tangled up in your -isms or religions or beliefs? So let’s stop all the petty squabbling, chill out, and just enjoy the season. So a big Happy Hanukkah! Merry Christmas! Happy Holidays! Joyous Kwanzaa! and Stupendous Solstice — essentially, keep on rocking, Regina! — from the staff here at Verb. These editorials are left unsigned because they represent the opinions of Verb magazine, not those of the individual writers.

holiday trivia

Many of the symbols associated with Christmas have been influenced by different cultures and beliefs from all over the world

• Christmas trees: evergreens were used as symbols during

• Yule or Yuletide: people often associate this idea with the Christian version of Christmas, but really Yule has been linked to a mid-winter festival celebrated by Germanic pagans, the Wild Hunt (an ancient European folk myth), and the Norse god, Odin

• Christmas carols: while some are certainly religious, others are just fun-loving jingles, like “Jingle Bells,” “Frosty the Snowman,” and “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”

• Fun Fact: in 1647, the Puritan-led English Parliament banned Christmas celebrations because the symbols being used were too pagan. In America, between 1659-1681, the Pilgrims enacted a similar ban in Boston

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pre-Christian winter festivals and rites. For the ancient Chinese, Egyptians and Hebrews, the evergreen was a symbol of eternal life. Ditto for wreaths. Oh, and in pagan Europe, tree worship was fairly commonplace

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On Topic: Last week we asked what you thought about changing the stripping laws in Saskatchewan. Here’s what you had to say:

– Holy cow we have Strppers in SK. Get the tar and feathers Maggie. Cover the kids eyes. We’ll need a railroad tie to run them out on bring that tooMaggie. Maggie trying to carry the tar and feathers, cover the kids eyes and drag a rail road tie dutifully fallows her husband Who are we kidding.

– There are a lot of issues surround stripping and what it might do to the comunity, the people who go and the people who work in the industryl. Separate from that is whether or not it should be allowed, and while I wouldn’t go, I think it’s a choice that people have to make for themselves.

– Yes saskatchewan should allow strip joints to operate if u want to have a beer and watch people dance naked fine if u dont then dont go.

– It’ll be fun to go to the local strip club and run into all the girls I went to school with

– If new stripping laws and lower drinking age are best examples of progress we r in trouble

– Good for Saskatchewan for finally allowing stripping and drinking now I can enjoy some juggs with a cold one!

– I disagree to the stripping period! Look at all the trouble it caused last time! black roses to the governer.!!! but hats off to the rest of the country where they allow both stripping and drinking! Saskatoon

text yo thoughtsur to 881 ve r B 8372

should have it that way too. After all they do go hand in hand. Stripping and sipping!

– The only Stripping Laws the Saskparty & NDP should be concerned with are the election laws that will let voters STRIP them of their legislative seats.

OFF TOPIC – Love feature on graphic novels and artists would like to see more! In response to “A New Golden Age?” Local page, #58 (December 14, 2012

sound off – For anyone that wants to voice their opinion about evolution, have you ever seen a rock evolve into anything more intelligent than a rock? Or does a person evolve into anything other than a person? It should be clear to anyone that any intelligence must be first be created. We can become smarter with education but there is no proof to say we are evolving into anything but human beings which we already are. Appreciate creation for what it is. Stop trying to justify something which is out of your hands. If it were in your hands, you would prove that you could live forever. I’m quite certain that you will leave this earthly world as will the rest of us at some point.

– Regarding the Newtown, CT shooting, we need to get the guns out of people’s hands and start putting God back into our schools. We have nothing to give us any conscience to our actions anymore. There is no godly standard to live our lives by and to teach our children to live by anymore. There are no consequences to people’s actions. The justice system has failed everyone. We are lifting up murderers as celebrities and rate mass shootings as one being worse than another. Even one murder is too many. Let’s stop glorifying the murderer and remember the victims. Let’s also disarm people for guns+rage=death. People need to guard their minds rather than their bodies or their possessions. Let’s pray to God that we can keep a sane and healthy mind as well as those around us. Let’s have consequences for our actions. Let’s

– Luv u yesterday luv u still always have always will. Ure my best friend my soul mate my wife ure my companion my soul and my life.Luv u Crystal!Mike

discipline our children so they know right from wrong. Let’s have a justice system that serves our citizens and victims and serves true justice on criminals and not just a slap on the wrist. Let’s grow our children into law abiding citizens and God fearing people. If we kick God out of our schools and our lives, we cannot expect him to protect us.

– It seems like people want freedom of speech but that don’t want that to apply to christians saying Merry Christmas what’s up with that!?

– To all a DOWNtown Merry Christmas and to all a DOWNtown Good Night!

Next issue: What do you think about the alleged war on Christmas? Pick up a copy of Verb to get in on the conversation:

– Fisrt time I heard hoarfrost without seeing its spelling I thought Man! She musta been cold!

– JC’s B-Day Dec 25th they say... WHAT HE’S GOT N0 RELATIVES ? AUNTS UNCLES ?

– When will people learn that you don’t solve problems with guns? If you don’t learn from history you are bound to repeat it.

We print your texts verbatim each week. Text in your thoughts and reactions to our stories and content, or anything else on your mind.

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Not Kidding Around

Photos courtesy of Danielle Tocker

Serious foodie eats and savoury Caesars at Fainting Goat by jessica bickford

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he Fainting Goat is small in a lot of ways. They don’t have much seating, their kitchen is practically microscopic, and their menu is streamlined with only a few items under each category. That said, they are very big on flavour.

the hot, skin-on chips were covered in a slightly sweet but heartily savoury red wine demi-glace, and the other half was in a sun-dried tomato and chevre noir sauce. The chevre sauce was thick, tangy and creamy, with a good sweetness from the sun-dried tomato.

[The meal came with a] mix of wild mushrooms sautéed in a citrus herb butter.

Chris Fink is the owner and chef at Fainting Goat, and he has been there for about a year and a half now. He says that he is really trying to focus on improving their service with some new and dedicated serving staff. He is also always looking for new bands to perform for their live music events. If anything, go for the flavour explosion that is the Fainting Goat’s signature bacon Caesar — it’s wonderful.

Happy holidays, everyone! Danielle and I will be back in the new year with more local food and drinks. The Fainting Goat Restaurant 2330 Albert St. | 352 4628 Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@TheGeekCooks jbickford@verbnews.com

let’s go drinkin’ Verb’s mixology guide

jessica Bickford

I started with the beautifully presented cedar planked fire prawns. The fat, juicy white prawns were served shell-on and butterflied on a charred and still smoking cedar plank. This visually stimulating appetizer was seasoned with herbes de Provence, a fragrant blend that typically includes basil, thyme, and maybe just a hint of lavender. Next up was a split poutine a’la Goat, another appetizer, but I think it would be a great lunch option, too. This was a half and half poutine, which is especially good for indecisive people like me. Half of

Last up was some pan-seared Saskatchewan steelhead trout, served with a wild rice and quinoa pilaf, broccoli, and a sweet chili and honey aioli. The nutty mix of wild rice and quinoa was fluffy with a great earthy flavour, and the fish was flaky, dense, and perfectly cooked. The addition of the sweet and spicy aioli added a little buzz to this fresh and tasty meal.

Overall, this was a cheesy and rich poutine that was brightened up with the addition of fresh tomatoes and green onions on top. Entrées were up next, and I started with a steak. The 10-ounce New York steak was pretty huge, served rare with a nicely charred outside and great seasoning. The meat itself was buttery and rich and came with rustic mashed potatoes and a mix of wild mushrooms sautéed in a citrus herb butter. The mushrooms were great, with a ton of flavour, and the herb butter had just the right amount of citrus to give the whole plate a little kick.

Fainting Goat’s

Ingredients

Bacon caesar

1 oz. bacon-infused vodka a few dashes each of Frank’s red hot sauce and Worcestershire sauce clam cocktail ice seasoning salt to rim pickles, olives, pickled asparagus, and a lime wedge to garnish

This savoury drink is bound to please anyone who likes their beverages to go down like a meal. Smoky, hot, and practically an appetizer, this is as delicious as it is attractive.

Directions

Rim a tall glass with the seasoning salt before adding a good handful of ice. Pour the bacon vodka (check online for recipes to make your own at home) over the ice, and add the hot sauce and Worcestershire before topping up with clam. Give this a gentle stir, and garnish with skewered pickles and a lime wedge.

11 Dec 28 – Jan 3 /verbregina

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Prop Planes

Photos: courtesy of Scott Goodwill / the artist

Regina rockers make the music they want by Alex J MacPherson

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atty O’Connell was fed up with playing music he didn’t love. Rather than complain, he simply formed a band he wanted to play in. Prop Planes played their first show earlier this year. Their debut EP, Begging to Believe, is a slick package, half a dozen songs driven by a range of influences, from contemporary rock to old school punk. The record is part memoir and part roadmap for the future. Although the album is packed with crunchy guitars and punctuated by Craig Moleski’s affecting vocals, the arrangements (clever, hinting at epic) and the dynamics (spot-on) are what make Begging to Believe crackle. I caught up with O’Connell to talk about the slow burn before the band’s first concert, and the tension that defines all good rock groups. Alex J MacPherson: You guys took some heat for the long marketing cam-

paign, with no music, that preceded your first show.

AJM: Who would you like to make music for?

MO: We wanted people to start talking about us. There was some controversy around us. It was both positive and negative. At the end of the day, it did exactly what

MO: It’s totally clichéd to say, but we’re at a point in all of our lives that we’re done trying to pay attention to the radio, what’s selling, what’s popular. If we get the opportunity to tour and do some of that stuff with our band, that’s a bonus

AJM: This record seems less like an album than a collection of solid rock songs, leaving a lot of choices for the next one.

[W]e’re all fighting for the music we want to play. Matty O’Connell

to us, but at the end of the day, it’s about us being able to get together a few nights a week. We’re making music for ourselves.

we intended it to do: create a buzz and just get people talking about the name Prop Planes. All of the negativity that surrounded it? There’s always going to be that group of people that don’t agree with what you’re doing. We’re not in it to make music for those people, anyways.

MO: I think we just want to be authentic and passionate about what we do. You’re always going to have a record label or pop culture play a factor in the direction of your sound, but as long as it’s authentic, … that contributes to a band’s ultimate success. People aren’t stupid. If they can see right through what you’re doing, it’s not going to turn a lot of heads.

AJM: Is balancing that against the desire to be critically and commercially successful difficult?

MO: I think that’s a fair assessment for any band’s first efforts. A lot of it was defining what we were going to sound like as a band. We never set out and said, ‘What do we want this to sound like?’ We probably wrote upwards of 25 songs when we first started. Those six were the first six we played at our very first show. Now we have a solid direction of where we want to go.

AJM: One thing common in all good rock bands is tension, creative or otherwise. Where’s the tension in Prop Planes? MO: I think one of the reasons it took us so long to get any music out is that we all come from different backgrounds. I wouldn’t say we’re breaking out into fistfights in our jam sessions or writing sessions, but I think we’re all fighting for the music we want to play. For us … to get our voices heard, I think that’s a struggle in itself. And maybe that speaks to authenticity.

Prop Planes January 12 @ The Exchange $TBD

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Inuit Sculpture

Timothy Long unveils the secret history of soapstone carving

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wrote a paper about Inuit sculpture when I was an undergraduate student,” confesses Timothy Long, head curator at the MacKenzie Art Gallery. “I read up on the whole phenomenon and realized that it was, in some ways, a manufactured art form that was the product of some southerners who went up [North]. I became rather cynical about Inuit art. In recent years, looking at it and thinking more about what’s been produced, I’ve completely reversed my opinion.” Long is referring to the history of Inuit sculpture, which is not wellknown. Most people assume the form is hundreds if not thousands of years old. In fact, the sculptures we think of as Inuit art have roots in the 1950s. According to Long, the development of contemporary Inuit art was driven by a number of prominent collectors who saw potential in what had previously been a largely utilitarian practice. “Inuit people have been creative for a long time, so it’s nothing

by alex J MacPherson

new,” he says. “[But] it was through their interventions that we have this thing we call Inuit art.” Inuit Sculpture features objects acquired by the gallery since 2006, primarily from donations. Many of the pieces, including Tuukak Kiatainaq’s “Untitled” and Nuyaliaq Qimirpik’s “Bear,” share an artistic element common among Inuit artists. Few Inuit sculptures contain anything unnecessary. Every curve, every contour, is essential to conveying the essence of the subject. “It is invariably reduced down to what is needed,” Long says. “It makes me want to know more about the people behind this artistic expression: how could they come up with something so original, so powerful, in such a short time?” The answer is complicated. The economical style is a reflection not only of the Inuit languages, which are extremely compact and resistant to outside influence, but also the realities of living in the North, a place of unparalleled beauty and difficult living. But Inuit art is far from homogenous.

Photo: courtesy of the mackenzie art gallery

There are hundreds of artists working today, each with a distinctive way of looking at the world — and representing that view in soapstone. “I think that the thing I’ve learned over the last few years is Inuit art is contemporary art,” Long says. “This is not about history, although they talk about their history through their work. It is not about traditional crafts. It is about contemporary thought and expression.” “It is a vital and living art form,” he adds. “Far from being this traditional expression that is rooted in a lost past.” Inuit Sculpture Through February 17 @ MacKenzie Art Gallery

Canadian Brass

Mixing traditions with five guys and five horns by alex J MacPherson

Photo: courtesy oF Bo Huang

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verybody agrees the Beatles wrote great melodies. Everybody also agrees Bach wrote great melodies. But what about the space in between, the blur between crisp classical and rambunctious pop? That belongs to Canadian Brass. Formed by Chuch Daellenbach and Gene Watts in 1970, the group was conceived as the bridge between classical and pop, a traditional ensemble able to reinterpret everything and

anything. “Brass is very much an instrument of today,” Daellenbach says, speaking from a Detroit hotel room. “It can stand up against electronic instruments or in with electronic instruments. It’s very much now in the public perception, but to put five instruments together is very much from the classical tradition, like the string quartet.” Daellenbach and Watts noticed that brass instruments were used in virtually every genre of music, from rock and R&B to jazz and classical. They decided to play the music they loved with nothing but brass instruments. “Basically, present music we love and share that with an audience,” he says. “You find concentric circles of taste.” Canadian Brass have demonstrated the value of the concept time and time again. They have toured

extensively, from China to Carnegie Hall, and recorded dozens of albums, in the process elevating themselves to the very pinnacle of brass-playing. Daellenbach may be the only original player, but an infusion of young talent has only benefited the group, who recently covered Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance,” transforming the pop hit into a slinky jazz number replete with muted trumpets and some extraordinary trombone work. But Daellenbach and his fellow musicians enjoy playing with orchestras, too. “It gives us a bit of respite,” he laughs. “Most of the time, of course, we’re on our own.” Canadian Brass can fill up a massive hall with just five horns, but nothing compares to the sonic might of an orchestra. Big ensembles create big problems, chief among them commu-

nication and the need for extremely playable and predictable arrangements, but the balance between old world classical and edgy modern brass on one stage is simply terrific to see. “It’s been a little bit too long, so we’re eager to get there,” Daellenbach says of their upcoming show in Regina, which will be conducted by Charles Cozens. “We’re just so happy to see audiences.”

Canadian Brass January 12 @ Conexus Arts Centre $69+ @ RSO Box Office

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Lost Together

Photo: courtesy of Dustin rabin

What Blue Rodeo means today by Alex J MacPherson

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reg Keelor doesn’t want to talk about his many achievements. “I don’t mind,” he says. “I’ve just become a little self-conscious.” This is both understandable and unfortunate. Understandable because Keelor, bearded and bespectacled, is in many ways just an average guy from Toronto. He favours cowboy shirts and aviator sunglasses, and likes spending time away from the city. He plays guitar and keeps an eye on his diabetes. Keelor’s reticence is unfortunate because he also happens to be a famous rock musician, a founding member of Blue Rodeo, the band he and Jim Cuddy have spent the past three decades elevating from blistering bar rock outfit to national icon. It is popular to claim that Blue Rodeo’s music is indivisible from the national identity, but such statements are simplistic. Canadians do not have one identity; we have many, and Blue Rodeo’s music has served as a soundtrack to lives in every corner of this country. We are still trying to figure out how two songwriters from Toronto captured the essence of the Cana-

“You know, I think the first time we played [Saskatchewan] was opening up for a band called the Pointed Sticks, in around 1979.” Keelor’s memory is good. He and Cuddy played the basement of Saskatoon’s Centennial Auditorium with two other bands, Modern Minds and the Pointed Sticks. “You didn’t get many shows in Saskatoon that were neat like that,” one fan who attended the show later wrote. “It was inspirational to me being an 18-year-old kid. I remember thinking, ‘We could do a band like that. We could make our own songs.’” That fan’s name was Jay Semko. A few years later, he emerged as the frontman of the Northern Pikes. Cuddy and Keelor bounced around the music scene before forming a new band in 1984. Blue Rodeo’s first album, Outskirts, was released in 1987. From the beginning it was clear that their sound, rooted in folk and rock and country, and enhanced by two distinct songwriting voices, was special. Their second single, “Try,” rocketed up the charts, eventually winning Single of the Year at the Juno Awards. By the time they wrote and released Diamond Mine in 1989, the band had evolved into something much larger

dian experience in a handful of rock songs. The default response to perceptions of greatness is praise, and over the past several years Blue Rodeo have been wined and dined and lavished with awards. But Keelor doesn’t think about it all that much. “They’re sort of secondary to playing music,” he tells me, his voice strong and clear. “They’re just these funny little things that happen. They don’t really have any effect; they’re just a little bit of punctuation along the way.” He pauses for a moment before adding, “And there’s usually a good party that ensues.”

Greg Keelor met Jim Cuddy on the football field at the North Toronto Collegiate Institute. Cuddy played quarterback, Keelor defence. The pair became fast friends, and promised to stay in touch after graduation. By the late seventies, after stints out west, they were playing together in the Hi-Fis, a reasonably successful power pop band. Keelor struggles to remember their first concert in Saskatchewan. “That’s back in the middle ages,” he laughs. After thinking for a moment, he summons the memory.

than a bar band. Keelor found the experience deeply uncomfortable. “It’s a horrible feeling when you first start playing theatres,” he says. “You’re used to playing in front of an intoxicated audience. You’re used to people dancing and hanging out. Then, all of a sudden,

of her set, something about cigarettes,” he says. “It was a ballad: very dramatic, very simply played. That song got the biggest response every night. That one song got the audience in a way nothing else did.” Struck by the power of a simple tune in a big room, Keelor decided he would

Jim and I, we still love songwriting. It’s a big part of how we define ourselves as human beings. greg keelor

you’re in this room where people are sitting, moderately sober, and without any distraction they’re just looking at you.” Although he equates playing theatres to playing with his pants around his ankles, Keelor understands that the experience changed the band’s sound. To illustrate, he tells a story from their first national tour, when the band supported k.d. lang. “She had this one song in the middle

try and write ones like that, too. “I thought that rather than just playing loud dance-y sort of stuff, you could do more subtle things. You could use that space to create an intimacy you couldn’t really do in a bar.” This was the genesis of the sound people identify with Blue Rodeo, an immediately recognizable blend of country and rock characterized by huge respect for the sonic spectrum, dynamics, and the power of literContinued on next page »

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Photo: courtesy of heather pollock

ate introspection. Cuddy and Keelor have dramatically different songwriting styles and singing voices, and each have factions within the band’s fanbase, but they are both adept at writing songs that are warm and approachable. This is apparent in their ballads, intimate and inviting tracks

Photo: courtesy of the artist

like “Hasn’t Hit Me Yet” and “Lost Together,” but even their uptempo songs have a warmth absent from so much guitar rock. Ultimately, Blue Rodeo’s sound is entirely their own, an ineffable alchemy of diverse musical influences, ambitious musical arrangements, and the stark power of Cuddy and Keelor singing together. “Jim and I, we still love songwriting,” Keelor says. “It’s a big part of how we define ourselves as human beings.”

This is what makes Blue Rodeo special. Individual records are snapshots of a particular moment in time, a reflection of the songwriter’s experience flavoured by the spirit of the times. With each new crop of songs comes a new perspective, new maturity, evolution. Taken together, Blue Rodeo’s catalogue offers fans a chance to experience almost three decades through two hearts, two minds, and two pairs of eyes. By writing accessible yet deeply personal songs, Cuddy and Keelor have become representations of what it means to be Canadian, the voices of a particular experience. It is a powerful thought, and one that Keelor, who is extremely modest, tends to disregard. “There can be three generations at one of our shows, and that’s very sweet to see,” he says. “But I think part of that [is that] a lot of the songs are just sort of singable songs. There are some songs that are a little more complicated than others, but a lot of them are just simple, singalong sort of numbers, and I think that has worked for us as well.”

Earlier this year, Blue Rodeo was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. The CBC threw a

massive party and invited dozens of prominent musicians to help Cuddy, Keelor, Bazil Donovan, Bob Egan, and Glenn Milchem celebrate 25 years of making records. It was a diverse group, from the Sadies and Cuff the Duke to Great Big Sea and Whitehorse — musicians who grew up listening to records like Casino and Five Days in July and thinking of Blue Rodeo as one of the most vital voices in Canadian music. Keelor was nonplussed. “It’s a reciprocal thing,” he says. “I’m inspired by all those people. They’ve given us lots, all of them. As songwriters, we’re all stealing from each other a little bit all the time, and so it’s good to have those people around. When I think of a band like the Sadies, I’ve stolen tons from their songbook. What we might have done for them they have certainly done for us, as well.” But while some bands come and go, Blue Rodeo are here to stay. They are working on a new record, the follow-up to 2009’s The Things We Left Behind. Beyond that, Keelor isn’t sure what will happen, except that he and Cuddy will continue to write and record songs.

“We’ve never really been big on the long plan, even though we’ve been around a long time,” he laughs. And they will surely be around for years to come. Keelor can’t imagine doing anything else. “It’s how I understand myself in the world,” he says. It’s how we understand ourselves, too.

Blue Rodeo January 14 @ Conexus Arts Centre $27+ @ ConexusTicket.com

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Next Week

coming up

Ink Road

Gord bamford

billy talent

@ O’Hanlon’s pub Friday, december 28 – no cover

@ casino regina Monday, December 31 – $55+

@ Mosaic place monday, march 25 – $38+

Energetic, charismatic, fresh, a voice all their own. Those are just a few of the terms you can use to describe this local four-piece. Since releasing their first EP, Lady Disaster, in 2010, Donnie Johnson, Cyprian Henry, Peter Broda and Dustin Ritter have surely and steadily gotten better, gaining more and more fans every time they put on a show. That’ll happen when you share the stage with acts like The Sheepdogs, JJ Voss and the RSO. With intelligent lyrics and a pop/alt sound that is infectious as hell, Ink Road puts on a sharp, crackling live performance that will make you want to party your butt off. They’ll be opening for The Fortunate Isles at the end of December, who will be debuting their new guitar player. Best to bring your dancing shoes!

Born in Australia, raised in Alberta, Gord Bamford is a Canadian chart-topping country musician. After his first album — God’s Green Earth, released in 2001 — didn’t exactly set the world on fire, Bamford went back to the drawing board, and what he came back with was gold. Released in 2004, his follow-up album, Life Is Good, featured five top20 singles (“Heroes,” “My Heart’s a Genius,” “All About Her,” “Life Is Good” and “I Would For You”). His next album, Honkytonks and Heartaches, featured his first top-10 hit “Blame It On That Red Dress.” Needless to say, these hits garnered numerous award nominations and legions of fans across the country and beyond. Tickets available at casinoregina.com

Mainstream success didn’t come easy for this punk rock group from Ontario. In the early years, back when they were known as Pezz, Benjamin Kowalewicz, Ian D’Sa, Jonathan Gallant and Aaron Solowoniuk were eking out a musical existence on the underground indie scene in Toronto. After renaming the band Billy Talent, the group released a self-titled record in 2003 that was well received by the mainstream music audience, and Juno awards followed shortly after. Since then, the group’s catchy hooks and melodic punk sensibilities have garnered Billy Talent numerous other awards and helped them sell millions of albums. Don’t miss them when they finally roll into Saskatchewan in March. Tickets available at tickets. mosaicplace.ca – By Adam Hawboldt

Photos courtesy of: courtesy of leftbook productions / the artist / NRK P3

Sask music Preview There’s a lot going on around town this holiday season, so if you’re not sure what to do in the lull between Christmas and New Year’s, or where to be when the clock counts down to 2013, head over to SaskMusic’s events listings at http://www.saskmusic.org/events.php to see what’s going on, now or at any time during the year. And from the staff at SaskMusic, best greetings for the season! Keep up with Saskatchewan music. saskmusic.org

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saturday, december 8 @

creative city centre

Creative City Centre 1843 Hamilton Street (306) 546 5565 Music vibe / Intimate and

acoustic, featuring many live acts Drink of Choice / Red wine and beer coming up / Greg Rekus on January 14, or check out http:// www.creativecitycentre.ca/ category/events/ for updates on other shows

Photography by Klein Photography

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JJ Voss / Whiskey Saloon — Some great rock and country covers along with original songs. 8pm / $10

Christmas Eve Day Jam / King’s Head Tavern — Feel like listening to music on Christmas Eve? Come on down and kick off this first main day of the holidays the right way. 8pm / Cover TBD

December 21 » Saturday 22 January 12 Rory Allen / Casino Regina — Come The most complete live music listings for Regina. S

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Friday 21

Winter Solstice Event / Artful Dodger — A night of unplugged acoustic music, so come on down for a chill time with relaxing tunes. 7pm / Cover TBD Rory Allen / Casino Regina — Come join your favourite impersonator at his A Classic Elvis Christmas concert. There’s something about celebrating with the King that just makes sense. 8pm / $20+ (www.casinoregina.com) Itchy Stitches,  Oblivions Eye, Septic / The Club — Why not celebrate the end of the world in hard rocking style? These great groups will rock your socks off. 8pm / $10 (advance, from the band, Vintage Vinyl and Madame Yes) DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. As long as you’re dancing, he’s happy. 10pm / $5 H1GG1NS / The Exchange — Spinning records all night at The Last Christmas Ever party. Come out and enjoy the last day of the world. 9pm / $15 DJ Pat & DJ Kim / Habano’s — Local DJs spin top-40 hits every Friday night. Come on down and show your moves on the dance floor 9pm / $5 cover Tequila Wranglers / McNally’s Tavern — Country and rock collide in this fantastic group. They’ll have you grooving away to their great sound. 10pm / $5 Leanne Pearson / Pump Roadhouse — A country singer from Winnipeg is bringing her soulful tunes to the Pump. 9pm / Cover TBD Albert / Pure Ultra Lounge — Come listen to Albert every Friday. 10pm / $5 cover Dangerous Cheese / The Sip Nightclub — Come on down and rock out with these guys. Nothing dangerous about their sound! 10pm / Cover TBD

Tuesday 25

join your favourite impersonator at his A Classic Elvis Christmas concert. There’s something about celebrating with the King that just makes sense. 8pm / $20+ (www.casinoregina.com) Nick Faye, Megan Nash, Grain Report, Eden Rohatensky / The Club — A night of original music. 8pm / $8 DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. As long as you’re dancing, he’s happy. 10pm / Cover $5 FadaDance Christmas Party / The Exchange — Featuring DJs B-Rad, Natural Sympathies, The Duchess, Hardtoe, Clean Living, this promises to be a night of hard-rocking good times. 9pm / $12 ($10 students) Riff Raff / Gaslight Saloon — A classic hard rock band will be blowing the roof off the Gaslight Saloon. See you there! 9pm / Cover TBD The Nowhere Men / Lancaster Taphouse — A Beatles tribute band like no other, so come on down and catch the much-loved tunes of the Fab Four. 9pm / Cover TBD Wondertland / McNally’s Tavern — One hit wonders and classic rock will take to the stage, and leave you rocking. 10pm / $5 Leanne Pearson / Pump Roadhouse — A country singer from Winnipeg brings her soulful tunes to the Pump stage. 9pm / Cover TBD Drewski / Pure Ultra Lounge — Doing what he does best, so come on down and check him out. 10pm / $5 cover Dangerous Cheese / The Sip — Come on down and rock out with these guys. Nothing dangerous about their sound! 10pm / Cover TBD Open Jam Sessions / Smokin’ Okies BBQ — Drop by for a jam or to just listen, the choice is yours — no matter what, it’ll always be fun. 3pm / No cover JJ Voss / Whiskey Saloon — Some great rock and country covers along with original songs from this incredible musician. 8pm / $10

Karaoke Tuesday / McNally’s Tavern — Famous live music venue offers its patrons a chance to share the stage, so come on down and show Regina what you’ve got. 8pm / No cover

Wednesday 26

Wednesday Night Folk / Bushwakker Brewpub — Come out for the Redbeard’s Home for the HoliDAZE Boxing Day Bash. Where else would you rather be spending the post-Christmas frenzy? 9pm / No cover Jam Night and Open Stage / McNally’s Tavern — Come on down and enjoy some local talent, or join in and get your jam on. Regina’s full of talent, and we want to see it! 9pm / No cover

Thursday 27

Band Swap 2.0 / The Exchange — Get ready to rock with 35 musicians, as they are swapped into 7 bands and perform a night of rocking tunes! All proceeds go to the Carmichael Outreach. 8pm / $15 in advance (Vintage Vinyl), $20 at the door ($15 with a nonperishable food item) Decibel Frequency / Gabbo’s Nightclub — A night of electronic fun that will have you rocking out like there’s no tomorrow. Come on down and show what you’ve got. 10pm / Cover $5 PS Fresh / The Hookah Lounge — Featuring DJ Ageless and DJ Drewski, slinging some bomb beats to get you moving. 7pm / No cover Fly Points, Gunner, Nate Hilts and Danny Goertz / McNally’s Tavern — Come support these wicked local bands as they take to McNally’s famed stage and rock out. This will be one great show! 8:30pm / $10 Atomic Candy / Pump Roadhouse — A band from Winnipeg that’s sure to please, and will have the Pump’s crowd rocking on the dance floor. 9pm / Cover TBD Amy Nelson / Whiskey Saloon — A new country songstress on the scene, Nelson has a sweet voice and lovely harmonies. 8pm / $5 DJ Longhorn / Whiskey Saloon — Come check out one of Regina’s most interactive DJs, as he takes to the Whis-

Monday 24

Open Mic Night / The Artful Dodger — Come down and jam, or just listen. 8pm / No cover

key Saloon’s stage to show his stuff. 8pm / Cover $5

Friday 28

Paul Keeling / Artful Dodger — A night of smooth jazz; if you’re . 7:30pm / Cover TBD Shania Twin / Casino Regina — A tribute to country songstress Shania Twain. 8pm / $20-25 (www.casinoregina.com) Invasion, The Jump Off, Tomorrow Starts Today, FPG / The Club — Come out for the 5th annual HKR Xmas Party, happening in both the Club and the Exchange; bop back and forth between the venues, just make sure to come out for this great time! 7pm / Advance tickets at X-Ray Records DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. 10pm / $5 Molten Lava, Klein96, Royal Red Brigade, These Estates / The Exchange — Come out for the 5th annual HKR Xmas Party, happening in both the Club and the Exchange. Bop back and forth between; just make sure you’re out for this great time! 7pm / Advance tickets at X-Ray Records DJ Pat & DJ Kim / Habano’s — Local DJs spin top 40 hits to get you grooving on the dance floor. Come on down and see what they’re all about! 9pm / $5 cover Skavenjah / McNally’s Tavern — Everyone’s favourite ska band comes out to party. This is a great show in the pre NYE, post-Xmas lull. See you there! 10pm / $5 Atomic Candy / Pump Roadhouse — A band from Winnipeg that’s sure to please. Come rock out when they take to the Pump’s stage. 9pm / Cover TBD Albert / Pure Ultra Lounge — Come listen to Albert every Friday night as he does his spinning thing. 10pm / $5 cover Sonic Orchid / The Sip — Come on down and rock out with this wicked group. Every time they hit the Sip’s stage, it’s a rocking night like no other. You won’t want to miss this. 10pm / Cover TBD Amy Nelson / Whiskey Saloon — A new country songstress on the scene, Nelson has a sweet voice and lovely harmonies that are sure to please. 8pm / $10

Saturday 29

Paul Keeling / Artful Dodger — Come out for some smooth jazz tunes from

this Vancouver-based pianist, who will team up with Regina-based bassist, Carlo Petrovitch to put on one heckuva show. 7:30pm / Cover TBD 13th Ave Records Rendezvous / Artesian on 13th — Featuring Belle Plaine, The Lazy MKs, The Lonesome Weekends and more, this is an evening with a little something for everyone. 7pm / $15 Dirtbred, Kelevra, In Darkness / The Exchange — Three hard-rockin’ bands take to the stage for your listening pleasure. Come out for a wicked night of hard-rocking music. 7pm / $10 DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. As long as you’re dancing on the dance floor, he’s happy, so come on out. 10pm / Cover $5 Slow Motion Walter / McNally’s Tavern — This wicked party band knows how to get it going. A night with Slow Motion Walter on the stage always blows the roof of the house. Come out for and enjoy their NYE warm-up. 10pm / $5 Atomic Candy / Pump Roadhouse — A band from Winnipeg that’s sure to please; Atomic Candy will be rocking hard from the Pump Stage. 9pm / Cover TBD Drewski / Pure Ultra Lounge — Doing what he does best, come on down and check out Drewski as he does his spinning thing. 10pm / $5 cover Sonic Orchid / The Sip — Come on down and rock out with this wicked band, as they take to the Sip’s stage. 10pm / Cover TBD Open Jam Sessions / Smokin’ Okies BBQ — Drop by for a jam or to listen. No matter what you do, it’s sure to be fun! 3pm / No cover Amy Nelson / Whiskey Saloon — A new country songstress on the scene, Nelson has a sweet voice and lovely harmonies. 8pm / $10

Monday 31

Open Mic Night / The Artful Dodger — Come down and jam, or if you’d rather, just listen. 8pm / No cover Gord Bamford / Casino Regina — Award-winning country music that’s played the way it should be played. Also appearing is Alex Runions. 8pm / $55-60 (www.casinoregina.com) DJ Woo, Yung Freeze, eclipseH, Kataclysm and DreadBeat, Skuzz Sound, The 7 Deadly Sins / The Exchange — Ring in the new year with Continued on next page »

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some great beats and great people! Get on down to the Exchange to ring in 2013! 9pm / Cover TBD Nightrain / Gaslight Saloon — What better way to celebrate New Year’s than with a hard rockin’ Guns ‘N Roses tribute band? We know, we know! There is none! 10pm / Cover TBD Slow Motion Walter / McNally’s Tavern — Spend New Year’s Eve with Saskatchewan’s official rock and roll party band. A party on New Year’s? What more could you want! 8pm / $10 The Pump NYE / Pump Roadhouse — Featuring Marc Labossiere and DJ Dusty, this will be one sweet way to ring in 2013. The Pump will be bumping for New Year’s Eve. 10pm / $15 (ticketedge.ca) Identity NYE / Pure Ultra Lounge — Come on down and hit up the hottest party in town. When you want to party, Pure is a great place to check out. 10pm / Cover TBD Pink Slips / The Sip Nightclub — Come on down and rock out, as we count down to 2013. This will be one mega sweet party. 10pm / Cover TBD

Tuesday 1

Karaoke Tuesday / McNally’s Tavern — Famous live music venue offers its patrons a chance to share the stage. 8pm / No cover

Wednesday 2

Jam Night and Open Stage / McNally’s Tavern — Come on down and enjoy some local talent, or take to the stage and show Regina what you’ve got! 9pm / No cover

Thursday 3

2 Beats & A Hat / Artful Dodger — Presented by DJ Verbal & E-Major, come enjoy two DJs with guest performances the first Thursday of every month. If you haven’t checked this out before, then you’ll want to hit it up! 7pm / $5 in advance or at the door Decibel Frequency / Gabbo’s Nightclub — A night of electronic fun that’s sure to have you rocking out on the dance floor. 10pm / Cover $5 PS Fresh / The Hookah Lounge — Featuring DJ Ageless and DJ Drewski, come on down to unwind, relax, and enjoy some sweet tunes. 7pm / No cover Big Bad Storm / McNally’s — Come support local bands. 8:30pm / $5 Marc Labossiere / Pump Roadhouse — A rockin’, crowd-pleasin’ live show,

come check out Labossiere when he takes to the stage to do his thing. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Longhorn / Whiskey Saloon — Come check out one of Regina’s most interactive DJs, as he does his spinning thing. 8pm / Cover $5

Friday 4

Kenny Shields and Streetheart / Casino Regina — A western Canadian rock band like no other. Come out and get your party on. 8pm / $25-32 (www. casinoregina.com) DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. As long as you’re dancing, he’s happy. 10pm / $5 A Perfect Punchline, Halfway to Hollywood, 908 / The Exchange — Here’s a line-up of talented acts you don’t want to miss. This show has a little something for everyone. 7pm / $10 DJ Pat & DJ Kim / Habano’s — Local DJs spin top 40 hits every Friday night, so head on down to Habano’s, and shake your groove thang on the dance floor. 9pm / $5 cover Alex Zayas / McNally’s Tavern — Coming from Barcelona, Spain, Zayas will knock and rock your socks off, guaranteed! An incredible performer at a great live music venue; this is one show you won’t want to miss. 10pm / $5 Marc Labossiere / Pump Roadhouse — A rockin’, crowd-pleasin’ live show, come check out Labossiere as he takes to the Pump stage. 9pm / Cover TBD Albert / Pure Ultra Lounge — Come listen to Albert every Friday night; he’ll be sure to have you rocking on the dance floor in no time. 10pm / $5 cover

Saturday 5

DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. As longe as you’re dancing, he’s happy. 10pm / Cover $5 FPG / The Exchange — With special guests Septic Paste, Soiled Doves and Set Sail, come out and enjoy this hardcore show. 7pm / $10 Exit Eleven / McNally’s Tavern — Classic rock ‘n roll covers from this sweet band. 10pm / $5 Marc Labossiere / Pump Roadhouse — A rockin’, crowd-pleasin’ live show, come check out Labossiere as he takes to the Pump’s stage. 9pm / Cover TBD Drewski / Pure Ultra Lounge — Doing what he does best. 10pm / $5 cover

Open Jam Sessions / Smokin’ Okies BBQ — Drop by for a jam or to listen. 3pm / No cover

Monday 7

Open Mic Night / The Artful Dodger — Come down and jam, or kick back and listen to the talent that Regina has to offer. 8pm / No cover

Tuesday 8

Karaoke Tuesday / McNally’s Tavern — Famous live music venue offers its patrons a chance to share the stage. 8pm / No cover

Wednesday 9

Jam Night and Open Stage / McNally’s Tavern — Come on down and enjoy some local talent, or get on the stage and show Regina what you’ve got. 9pm / No cover

Thursday 10

Decibel Frequency / Gabbo’s Nightclub — A night of electronic fun. 10pm / Cover $5 PS Fresh / The Hookah Lounge — Featuring DJ Ageless and DJ Drewski doing their spinning thing. Get your butt on the dance floor and shake it! 7pm /  No cover The Accomplice / McNally’s Tavern — This incredibly amazing and talented multi-instrumentalist will bend your ear with his gripping harmonies. This is one show you won’t want to miss. 8:30pm / Cover TBD Leanne Pearson / Pump Roadhouse — A country singer-songwriter from Winnipeg will take to the Pump stage to show what she’s got. 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Longhorn / Whiskey Saloon — Come check out one of Regina’s most interactive DJs as he does his spinning thing. 8pm / Cover $5

Friday 11

DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. 10pm / $5 Living with Lions / The Exchange — Come enjoy these Vancouver rockers. Also appearing will be Empire Choir and Elder Abuse. 8pm / $12 (ticketedge.ca) DJ Pat & DJ Kim / Habano’s — Local DJs spin top 40 hits every Friday night, which are sure to get you on the dance floor. 9pm / $5 cover The Steadies / McNally’s Tavern — Enjoy some laid-back tunes infused with

rocksteady and reggae influences from this wicked group. What more could you ask for? 10pm / $10 Third Degree Birnz / Pump Roadhouse — A local band playing goodtime party music— what more could you ask for? 9pm / Cover TBD Buckcherry / Pure Ultra Lounge — This kickass band will be rocking the Eastroom, so come on down and check it out. 8pm / Cover TBD

Saturday 12

RSO Pops: Canadian Brass / Conexus Arts Centre — Enthralling sounds from a brass five-piece. 8pm / $49-85 (www.tickets.reginasymphony.com) DJ Juan Lopez / Envy Nightclub — This DJ loves requests, nothing is off limits. 10pm / Cover $5

Prop Planes / The Exchange — A CD release party for an up-and-coming local band. 8pm / Cover TBD The Steadies / McNally’s Tavern — Enjoy these laid-back tunes infused with rocksteady and reggae influences. 10pm / $10 Drewski / Pure Ultra Lounge — Doing what he does best. 10pm / $5 cover Open Jam Sessions / Smokin’ Okies BBQ — Drop by for a jam or to listen. 3pm / No cover

Get listed Have a live show you'd like to promote? Let us know! layout@verbnews.com

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Photo: Courtesy of sonypicture classics

What becomes of the broken hearted?

Celeste and Jesse Forever explores what happens when best pals date, break up and try to stay friends by adam hawboldt

C

onfession time: I am not the hugest fan of Andy Samberg. Sure, some of his Lonely Planet music videos were amusing, and yes, from time to time he was funny on SNL. But for the most part, the guy is remarkably unfunny. And Hot Rod and That’s My Boy were so bad I swore I’d never watch another film in which he starred. But then he went and got himself cast as the romantic lead in Celeste and Jesse Forever, and I just couldn’t help myself. Why? Well, I’ve got two words for you: Rashida. Jones. Don’t know how she does it, but it seems like every character Jones plays is adorable, accessible, funny, and so darn engaging that you simply can’t take your eyes off her. Think Ann Perkins in Parks and Rec, Zooey in I Love You, Man, or Cindy in Our Idiot Brother. So when I found out that not only did Jones star in Celeste and

cause for all the laughs Celeste and Jesse Forever gets, at its core this is a fairly heavy movie. When we first meet the title characters, Jesse (Samberg) and Celeste (Jones) seem like the perfect couple. They make heart

Jesse Forever but she also co-wrote it, well, Andy Samberg be damned. This was a movie I had to watch. And I’m happy I did. Not only was it a touching and original rom-com, not only was it passionate and honest, but you know what

[F]or all the laughs Celeste and Jesse Forever gets, at its core this is a fairly heavy movie. Adam Hawboldt

gestures to each other with their hands, they talk to each other vit zee German accent, heck, they still sing “their song” and play silly games together. And no, before you assume anything, they’re not in the honeymoon phase of their relationship.

else? Samberg actually did a pretty good job. In the flick he plays Jesse, a slacker wannabe artist, just right. He’s funny when he needs to be, and dead-on serious (not a silly voice or smirk in sight) when the situation calls. And call it does, be-

Jesse and Celeste have known each other since high school, and have been married for six years. The thing is, though, for reasons you find out in the film, the two have decided to separate. Yet even though they’re in the middle of a divorce, they adamantly try to remain best friends. Heck, Jesse still lives and works in the studio behind the house he and Celeste used to share. But things can’t go on like this forever. Or can they? Well, I’m not about to let the clichéd kitten out of the burlap bag, so maybe you should watch the movie and find out for yourself. Trust me: you will not leave the theatre disappointed. Now, that’s not to say that Celeste and Jesse Forever is a perfect movie, even though — well, I already explained how I feel about Jones. But still, there are pacing and structural issues, and sometimes

Celeste & Jesse ForeveR Lee Toland Krieger Starring Rashida Jones, Andy Samberg, Elijah Wood + Emma Roberts Directed by

89 minutes | 14A

the plot seems just a tad bit messy. But overall, this flick is a genrebending original film that’s funny and honest. And Jones, who is funny and charming as all get out of here, is captivating. Celeste and Jesse Forever will be opening at Regina Public Library on December 27th; see reginalibrary.ca for showtimes.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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Mid-life Crisis?

Judd Apatow’s new flick, This is 40, is full of hits and misses by adam hawboldt

I

f you twisted my arm and forced me to tell you what my favourite Judd Apatowdirected movie is, after much hemming and hawing (and possibly screaming) I’d have to go with Funny People. Yes, that scene from The 40-YearOld Virgin — the one where Steve Carell gets his chest waxed — remains one of the funniest things I’ve seen in my life. And yes, I liked the heck out of Knocked Up. But there was something about Funny People, something real and personal and hilarious, that rubs me in all the right ways. And I wish like hell I could say the same for Apatow’s latest film, This is 40. Because on so many levels it should be his best film yet. It’s the most intensely personal movie Apatow has ever made, it has a terrific cast, it’s well written, touching, funny, etc. etc. But here’s the thing: not only is This is 40 not as good as Funny People, I’ll go on the record saying it’s my least favorite of all of Apatow’s films.

This is 40 Judd Apatow Paul Rudd, Leslie Mann, Megan Fox + Jason Segel Directed by Starring

134 minutes | 14A

But more on that later; for now, let’s look at the plot. A spin-off of Knocked Up, the film tells the story of Pete (Paul Rudd) and Debbie (Leslie Mann), two minor characters in the original film. They’re all grown up now, both run their own companies and both companies are in trouble. Pete owns an indie record label that’s going belly-up; Debbie’s clothing store is missing thousands of dollars which may or may not have been stolen by one of her employees — the beautiful Desi (Megan Fox) or the strange Jodi (Charlyne Yi). At home, things aren’t much better. Both Pete and Debbie are preparing to celebrate their 40th

This is 40 feels more like a collection of scenes than a whole movie with a coherent plot. Adam Hawboldt

Don’t get it wrong, This is 40 isn’t a bad film. Far from it. It’s just that certain things don’t strike the right chords in it.

birthdays … even though Debbie insists she’s only 38. Or is it 37?. The couple have two daughters

Photo: Courtesy of universal pictures

(played by Apatow and Mann’s real-life girls, Maude and Iris), a nice house, a BMW, and a typical upper middle class life. The problem is they bicker. Like, always. Almost every time you see them, Pete and Debbie are at each other’s throats. Dreaming of each other’s deaths and whatnot. But like all good married couples, they don’t let their bickering prevent them from defending their family against other’s disapproval, as proved in one of the movie’s funniest scenes

involving the ever-arguing couple and Melissa McCarthy (Bridesmaids) at a parent-teacher meeting. Yet for all the laughs (and being an Apatow flick, there are more than a few of them), the movie never hits the high point you want it to. Maybe it’s because, while this is Apatow’s most personal movie, it isn’t quite personal enough. Perhaps it’s because there’s way too much on-screen bickering. Or maybe, just maybe, it’s because This is 40 feels more like a collection of

scenes than a whole movie with a coherent plot. No matter, though. For all its shortcomings, This is 40 is still a pretty good movie. Just not the best Apatow has ever made.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@AdamHawboldt ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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Š Elaine M. Will | blog.E2W-Illustration.com | Check onthebus.webcomic.ws/ for previous editions!

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ACROSS

25. Use a weapon effectively 27. Clear (of) 28. Knight’s title 29. Weighed down 32. Golf course hazards 36. Overwhelming feeling of wonder 37. Model of the Earth 39. Stinging cold 40. Sir’s opposite 42. ___ and outs 43. Spanish sparkling wine 44. Passionate 46. Compound similar to another 48. Take exception

1. Money in a wallet 5. Elevator button 9. Place to see some bronco riding 10. Baseball misplay 12. Bathroom problem 13. In the same book 15. Burden 16. Move more slowly than others 18. Big brass instrument 19. Distinctive doctrine 20. Marriage announcement 22. Wreath of flowers 23. Merciful

49. Winter Olympics athlete 50. Take notice of 51. Money drawer

DOWN 1. Vertical list 2. Uses the ì+î function 3. Look at 4. Father of Confederation 5. Think fit 6. Sphere 7. Sealed court document 9. Washer cycle 11. Oppose authority 12. Work hard 14. Butler’s counterpart 17. Aardvark snack 20. Existence

21. Squealers A 24. Fury 26. Vex 28. Manage to live 29. Tibetan Buddhist monk 30. Give as due 31. Muffle, as a sound 32. ___ voyage 33. Paint that dries to a hard B glossy finish 34. Miramichi, for one 35. Do some punching 38. Unit of petrol 41. Office note 43. Wind around and around 45. It screws onto a bolt 47. Compete in a slalom

sudoku answer key

3 1 9 6 7 8 2 5 4 8 4 2 1 9 5 3 7 6 7 6 5 3 2 4 9 8 1 1 9 4 5 3 6 8 2 7 6 2 8 7 1 9 4 3 5 5 7 3 4 8 2 6 1 9 9 5 7 2 4 3 1 6 8 2 8 1 9 6 7 5 4 3 4 3 6 8 5 1 7 9 2

crossword canadian criss-cross

2 8 4 5 7 3 1 9 6 7 3 6 9 2 1 8 5 4 9 1 5 6 8 4 3 7 2 4 2 7 8 1 5 6 3 9 1 6 3 7 4 9 2 8 5 5 9 8 3 6 2 7 4 1 6 5 9 1 3 8 4 2 7 8 4 1 2 9 7 5 6 3 3 7 2 4 5 6 9 1 8

timeout

© walter D. Feener 2012

Horoscopes December 21 – January 10 Aries March 21–April 19

Leo July 23–August 22

Sagittarius November 23–December 21

Sometimes you have a solid grip on the situations in your life and are all over them like a dog on a bone. But now ain’t one of those times, Aries.

Oh, the weather outside is frightful … so say to hell with the weather, Leo. Stay inside as much as possible, and just relax.

Some people may say your thoughts are dreamy, others may claim your head is in the clouds. Either way, it’s gonna be a bit of a slog to focus right now.

Taurus April 20–May 20

Virgo August 23–September 22

Capricorn December 22–January 19

Why take time to chop an onion by hand when you can use a food processor? Just a little something to think about right now, Taurus.

Has the weight of the world been hanging about your shoulders lately, Virgo? If so, good news: things will get considerably lighter in the next little bit.

Your emotions are going to run amok over the next little while, Capricorn: up, down, left, right. Buckle your safety belt, and get ready for the ride.

Gemini May 21–June 20

Libra September 23–October 23

Aquarius January 20–February 19

Some sensitive information may come your way over the next little while, Gemini. Who knows where it may lead, so be careful what you do with it.

You could be on the receiving end of some exhilarating news over the next little while, Libra. Your whole perspective is about to get shaken up.

If you’ve been working hard or are stressed, do yourself a favour, Aquarius. Give yourself a reward. Heck, you deserve this — you’re amazing!

Cancer June 21–July 22

Scorpio October 24–November 22

Pisces February 20–March 20

You know how they say you have to get involved in life, Cancer? Well, right now they’re wrong. Be as detached as possible.

Illegitimi non carborundum. Loose translation: don’t let the bastards grind you down. Wise words to live by for the next while, Scorpio.

Feeling cranky? At odds with the world lately, Pisces? It’s time to kick back and say to hell with ‘em all. Right now, do whatever makes you happy.

sudoku 8 4 1 6 6 9 2 1 5 4 3 2 8 1 3 6 3 7 9 5 9 8 7 4 5 3 4 7 1 2 7 2 5 6 9 8

crossword answer key

A

1 6 8 2 5 7 6 6 5 3 8 1 1 4 2 8 7 1 9 3 3 2 6 9 7 2 4 8 9 5 4 4 3 5 7 9

B

23 Dec 28 – Jan 3 /verbregina

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Verb Issue R59 (Dec. 21-27, 2012)