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Make an understated impression. Available in five neutral colours, from subtle, lighter tones through to bolder, darker hues, COLORBOND steel Matt diffuses light to create a soft and textured appearance. Tested in some of Australia’s harshest conditions, its strength and durability are perfect counterpoints to its designer appearance. Visit COLORBOND.COM/MATT or call 1800 702 764

COLORBOND and the BlueScope brand mark are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. 2018 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved.


DECORATION INSPIRATION 2020

WHAT’S HOT IN HOMES AUSTRALIAN STYLE

Artists to follow now

INSPIRING HOMES WITH HEART FOCUS ON

Cool kids’ rooms PLUS storage buys for toddlers to teens

HOMES WE LOVE

+ RESORT LIVING IN THE ’BURBS + A LUSH SPANISH-STYLE TERRACE + A ONE-LEVEL WONDER

RULES FOR FIRST-TIME RENOVATORS HOW TO

Build a designer shed

BIG MAKEOVER SMALL BUDGET

A smart Sunshine Coast project

BIG CHILL OUR GUIDE TO SUMMER’S BEST HOME-COOLING IDEAS


Relax with Concerto Concerto echoes simplicity and ease with its timeless aesthetic. For the ultimate in relaxation, expansive seating options, clever modular design and removable covers, Concerto is designed for the way we love to live.

kingliving.com 1300 546 438 AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND SINGAPORE MALAYSIA SHANGHAI CANADA


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8 | INSIDE OUT

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PHOTOGRAPHY: KRISTINA SOLJO. ELIZA IS WEARING BASSIKE, BASSIKE.COM. HAIR & MAKE-UP: ELSA MORGAN. SHOT ON LOCATION AT IN BED, PADDINGTON, NSW

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inally! The best four weeks of the year are here. It’s January. If you’re reading Inside Out stretched out on some beach or sun lounger, in-between dips and languidly working your way through the magazine, planning big changes or small purchases for your place this year, we want you to know that our team made this issue especially for you. Intrepid interiors reporter Sarah Pickette spent the month deep in background research for our Trends 2020 story on page 40, unearthing what our most-admired designers are planning across their projects this year. We are not interested in fake news; we want to know what is really going on globally. Regardless of whether you decide to take or leave the big trends of 2020, you can pick your way through our guide to find the golden highlights that work for your style, your space and your life. My only challenge this month is strategic: to clear out the chaos stored under our house. I feel like it’s a dark energy rising up and fogging my brain. I have to defeat that stack of superseded appliances, boxes of old light fittings and myriad orphan chairs. It’s a sinister graveyard for scuffed eskies and ripped beach umbrellas – and it’s all going. Freecycle. Gumtree. Facebook Marketplace. Come and get it, people! And I hope summer’s golden inspiration finds a way to make whatever you are planning to do at your place... better.

Be inspired by our curated moodboards @insideoutpins


TV when it’s on. Art when it’s off.

Inspiration has truly come home. Switch it on, and The Frame seamlessly presents your favourite entertainment with superb QLED picture quality. Turn it off, and instantly transform your living space into a personalised art gallery with Art Mode. Choose from over 1000 pieces of art and photography on the Samsung Art Store.* Learn more at Samsung.com/au/theframe *Supplied with 20 artworks. Additional artworks available for purchase or via subscription. Subscription and other fees are subject to change. Internet connection and Samsung Account are required.


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contents

January 2020 the cut 15 16 26 33 34 36 38 40 50 56

76 FRESH START A Hamptons holiday vibe comes to a split-level

THE CUT This month, we’re hung up on a gorgeous rug by

Britain’s Faye Toogood, one of six art-inspired weaves NEWS Our round-up of the hottest new finds in the world of design, plus places to visit, things to try and pieces to buy BEST BUYS: OUTDOOR TABLEWARE Crowd-pleasing crockery BEST BUYS: DRINKS TROLLEYS Chic ways to roll out the cocktails TOP 10 PICKS Quilted furniture and homewares for designer pads COLOUR TREND See why everyone needs a green piece DESIGN PROFILE: ED WEST The Poho Flowers owner reveals his signature aesthetic and which flowers are having a moment 2020 TREND FORECAST We ask the experts for their take on how we’ll be living in the next 12 months COOL FOR KIDS Three on-trend room styles you can run with and make into a space your child will love WAY TO GO! Keep all of the kids’ stuff out of sight with some of these playful storage options

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inside: homes & renovation

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60 MATCH MADE IN HARMONY Interior designer Leah Henricks was

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looking for a project but her perfect home was already renovated 68 SINGLE LEVEL LOVE Plans for two storeys were canned after a young family realised they had plenty of space on the ground

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house and changes the lives of its owners BACK TO NATURE In a remote part of the South African coast, a Cape Town couple gave their second home a green makeover EXTENDED FAMILY Weekends away at this Mornington Peninsula property are much less squeezy with the new wing FULLY BOOKED What could be described as Australia’s most average home has been turned into a red-hot Airbnb prospect INTO THE BLACK An owner’s desire for a dark shower has become a vision of tile and terrazzo 5 TIPS FOR A RENOVATION ROOKIE Want to do some work on your house and wondering if you can handle it yourself? Shannon Vos breaks out his five top tips for renovation success BUYER’S GUIDE: COOL RUNNINGS Everyone has a different comfort level but one thing’s for sure: sweltering at home is far from ideal. We bring the latest fans and air-conditioners to the rescue KITCHEN NEWS Treat the hub of your home to a fresh batch of accessories, furniture and finishes BATHROOM NEWS Waterprooof speakers, lust-have accessories and decorating ideas to kickstart the new year UTTER DECLUTTER Helpful hints for finding your way through a house full of stuff that really shouldn’t be there. In no time, Georgia Madden will have you sorting like a pro ASK AN EXPERT All your design problems solved


132 This month is all about family time, with style inspiration for kids’ rooms and lots of ideas for summer fun

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out: gardens, entertaining & travel

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132 ALFRESCO MISSION A new entrance and Spanish-style terrace

have made this Sydney home ideal for entertaining 140 I’VE ALWAYS WANTED… A GARDEN SHED Need extra storage or even a place to work? Your shed could be the answer 142 SUMMER IN THE CITY The team behind The Apollo and Greca are now serving up Japanese izakaya in Sydney 148 LORD HOWE ISLAND Could it be the cleanest place on earth?

regulars 58, 130 & 155 SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS Subscribe to Inside Out and

receive six issues for $35 154 LAST WORD Melbourne hosts drinks at yummy Peaches bar

on the cover 18 40 50 59 106 114 118 140

Australian style: Artists to follow now Decoration Inspiration 2020: What’s hot In homes Focus on: Cool kids’ rooms + storage buys for toddlers to teens Homes we love: Resort living in the ’burbs, a lush Spanish-style terrace and a one-level wonder Big makeover, small budget: A smart Sunshine Coast project Rules for first-time renovators Big chill: Our guide to summer’s best home-cooling ideas How To: Build a designer shed

our cover look After living in a semi, Leah Henricks’ family loves the freedom their new freestanding home offers. In summer, the back doors are open most of the day so her kids and dog can wander in and out, and now entertaining is a breeze. The only downside was that the house came beautifully renovated, so there was little for interior designer Leah to do!

Photography: Maree Homer Styling: Kerrie -Ann Jones


An honest palette of concrete and white transformed this relaxed home MOST TAPPED THIS MONTH

EDITORIAL EDITOR Eliza O’Hare CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mia Daminato HOMES GROUP COORDINATOR Sara Sleeman

ART & STYLE ART DIRECTORS Josie Smith, Katrina Yaxley JUNIOR DESIGNER Sophie Wilson IMAGE RETOUCHER Matus Kundrat MARKET EDITOR Natalie Johnson

FEATURES & COPY SENIOR COPY EDITOR Deborah Grant HOMES GROUP PRODUCTION EDITOR Tamarah Pienaar SENIOR DIGITAL WRITER Christina Rae

THANKS TO Kate Hassett, Janice Hogg, Stephanie Hope, Virginia Jen, Sarah Pickette, Ashley Pratt, Matilda Ringrose, Nate Vella ADVERTISING & PRODUCTION HEAD OF BRANDS Anna Mistilis (02) 9282 8111 HOMES COMMERCIAL MANAGER Rhonda Maunder (02) 9282 8687 HOMES BRAND MANAGER Kimberly Anderson (02) 9338 6103 ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER Kate Orsborn (02) 9282 8364 VICTORIA, SA AND WA SALES DIRECTOR Jaclyn Clements (03) 9823 6341 DIRECTOR OF SALES — NSW Karen Holmes (02) 9282 8733 VICTORIA HEAD OF DIRECT SALES Will Jamison (03) 9823 6301 QUEENSLAND HEAD OF SALES Judy Taylor (07) 3101 6636 CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING Nick Carson (02) 9282 8369 NEW ZEALAND INQUIRIES +61 2 9282 8505 GENERAL MANAGER — PRODUCTION SERVICES Ian McHutchinson PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Sally Jefferys ADVERTISING PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Dominic Roy (02) 9282 8691 SENIOR EVENT MANAGER Cate Gazal (02) 8226 9342

MARKETING & CIRCULATION HEAD OF RETAIL AND CIRCULATION Andrew Cohn MARKETING DIRECTOR Louise Cankett SENIOR MARKETING MANAGER Jillian Hogan BRAND MANAGER Sarah Webster CIRCULATION MANAGER Nicole Pearson SENIOR SUBSCRIPTIONS CAMPAIGN MANAGERS Ellie Xuereb, Jesvin Vincent

BAUER MEDIA CORPORATE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Brendon Hill CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Andrew Stedwell EXECUTIVE GENERAL MANAGER, PUBLISHING & DIGITAL OPERATIONS Sarah-Belle Murphy ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Shane Sutton COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR Paul Gardiner GENERAL MANAGER, SUBSCRIPTIONS & E-COMMERCE Sean McLintock BUSINESS MANAGER Georgina Bromfield SYNDICATION syndication@bauer-media.com.au

Seeking to create the perfect beach house, this 1950s fibro cottage was given a well-considered update. For more design and renovation inspiration, follow us on Instagram

@insideoutmag

Address Bauer Media, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 Phone (02) 9282 8000 Email insideout@bauer-media.com.au Online homestolove.com.au/insideout Facebook facebook.com/insideoutau Instagram instagram.com/insideoutmag Pinterest pinterest.com/insideoutpins

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SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES Phone 136 116 Online magshop.com.au/inside-out Email magshop@magshop.com.au Post Inside Out, Reply Paid 5252, Sydney, NSW 2001, Australia Download our Inside Out app, now available on smartphones and tablets For Apple users, download from the App Store For Android users, download from Google Play Published by Bauer Media Pty Limited (ABN 053 273 546), 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. The trademark Inside Out is the property of Bauer Media Pty Ltd. © 2019. All rights reserved. Printed by Ovato Warwick Farm, 8 Priddle Street, Warwick Farm NSW 2170. National distribution by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd. 1300 650 666. ISSN 0004-931X. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Bauer Media Pty Ltd does not accept responsibility for damage to or loss of freelance material submitted for publication. Allow several weeks for acceptance or return. For enquiries regarding subscriptions, phone 136 116, Monday-Friday, 8am-6pm AEST, email magshop@magshop.com.au or mail letters to: Inside Out Reply Paid 5252, Sydney, NSW 2001, or subscribe online at magshop.com.au/insideout. Subscription rate*: Australia $69.95 (one year, 12 issues); NZ A$79.95 (one year, 12 issues); other countries A$159.95 (one year, 12 issues). All overseas subscriptions sent air speed. *Recommended price

PHOTOGRAPHY: SIMON WHITBREAD. STYLING: VANESSA COLYER TAY

GENERAL EDITORIAL INQUIRIES


Hansgrohe M71 2jet, sBox Kitchen Mixer

hansgrohe makes kitchen chores easy With hansgrohe’s new M71 kitchen mixer there’s no need to try and squeeze your large pots in the sink; the extra long 76cm hose gives you the freedom to fll them up with ease. Start and stop the water fow or choose between the gentle vegetable spray or a full fow jet with only one hand using the integrated buttons in the mixer head. Plus hansgrohe’s innovative sBox hose guidance and storage system prevents tangles and keeps everything neat and tidy under the bench.

Extra long 76cm hose | Easy water control | sBox hose guidance & protection | Magnetic hose docking | 15 years warranty & spare parts

Available at: VIC Bright Renovations brightrenovation.com.au 03 9870 3658

e&s eands.com.au 1800 429 589

NSW Elia Bathrooms eliabathrooms.com.au 02 9160 3000

WA Lavare Bathrooms lavare.com.au 08 9230 7950

Parkwood Plumbing parkwoodplumbing.com.au 08 9455 6433

Sea of White seaofwhite.com.au 08 9344 1500

German innovation since 1901 | hansgrohe.com.au


INSIDE OUT | PROMOTION

sually reserved for expensive hard-wood floors, the classic Herringbone look is now available in a hard-wearing, affordable laminate. Designed and manufactured in Germany, Carpet Court’s Herringbone combines a durable laminate structure with parquetry-esque patterns to create gorgeous flooring that’s fit for family life.

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What lies beneath ELEGANCE MEETS MODERN VERSATILITY WITH HERRINGBONE LAMINATE FLOORS FROM CARPET COURT.

Five on-trend shades – including light blonde, golden oak and a minimalistic concrete look – make Herringbone ideal for retro, Art Deco, Art Nouveau, contemporary Brooklyn or industrial aesthetics. Strong enough for residential and commercial purposes, Herringbone flooring is made from sustainably sourced pinewood and is easy to install with an innovative tongue and groove technique. The sturdy 8mm click-in panels are staggered at angles to create classic patterns that recall classic European interiors and chic New York apartments. Minor spills and wet mopping are no problem for Herringbone’s modern matte finish, thanks to a moisture guard core that results in significantly reduced swelling of the laminate. Every variant in the Herringbone range is water resistant for up to 48 hours. Herringbone is exclusive to Carpet Court, contact your local store for additional information.

Visit carpetcourt.com.au for more information and inspiration.


DESIGN | SHOP | PLACES | PEOPLE | SPACES

THE ROLY POLY CHAIR IS AVAILABLE FROM HUB FURNITURE, HUBFURNITURE.COM.AU

THE CUT

the rug has it A painting by British artist Faye Toogood inspired this handmade rug so it’s only fitting the larger, softer sister has her own wall show. Part of the six-piece Doodles Collection from cc-tapis, which is described as “painterly, abstract and free-thinking”, Seated Nude is captured here with a Driade chair affectionately known as Roly Poly, also by the multi-disciplinary design star. Faye, we salute you. Seated Nude, $14,580, from Poliform; poliformaustralia.com.au

PHOTOGRAPHY OMAR SARTOR


THE CUT INSPIRED DESIGN

N E W W AV E S With soft rolling waves in mind, architect Daniel Boddam has designed his striking new Coast furniture collection. Shown here are the Wave bed, Malibu side table and Celeste wall sconce – all clean, calm pieces with clear beachside references. The curved bedhead is a soft-structured marvel inspired by waves, and the sconces suggest pearls in an oyster – just the ticket for a bedroom with a beach view. See more at DANIELBODDAM.COM

TOMATO BOOKS

McCAHON COUNTRY

This beautiful book, featuring some of the best work by New Zealand landscape artist Colin McCahon, is a journey through his life’s work. Writer and curator Justin Paton delves into Colin’s different eras and styles — all moody and earthy — making it very seductive coffee-table material. $59.99, Penguin.

EDITED BY ELIZA O’HARE

The cult fragrance of the moment is the aroma of a juicy, ripe tomato, appearing in fragrances and diffusers such as the delicious Carrière Frères Tomato Diffuser, $89 for 190ml. LIBERTINEPARFUMERIE.COM.AU

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREA FERRARI (TACCHINI)

HEAVEN SCENT


TABLETOP

SOURCE MATERIALS The right coffee table for now has to be stone, and these two designs by Giorgio Bonaguro for Tacchini will bring delicate colour and modernity to any living space. Joaquim marble coffee tables, $3710 (left) and $6670 (right). STYLECRAFT.COM.AU

REFRESHER

JUST THE TONIC It’s summer, so gin and tonics will be standard, but these new mixers by Fever Tree are not. High-taste and low-calorie, the limited-edition Cucumber and spicy Clementine tonic waters elevate the experience; $4.60 per bottle. DANMURPHYS.COM.AU

IN BLOOM

HYDRANGEAS Captured in season by floral stylist Sophia Kaplan (above), hydrangeas bloom from late spring to early summer and make abundant, sculptural table settings. Choose a low, round vase to support stems of varied sizes. Check out Sophia’s work @sophia_kaplan

PETS

DOG HOUSE

Coco Republic’s new range of pet beds and beautiful marble bowls makes total sense to dog-lovers who are also design-lovers. Charlie dog bed, $895 (medium) or $1395 (large). COCOREPUBLIC.COM.AU

BEST SEAT

FLUID FORM Designed in 1970, the Etcetera Lounge Chair in a lush shade of Grass Green velour sits at the top of our wishlist this month. Exclusive to Byron Bay’s Tigmi Trading. TIGMITRADING.COM

PLANTING IDEA

JUST OPENED

Oh YOKO YOKO! Brisbane’s hot hottest precinct has a new addition. Sitting door to sister restaurant Greca, Jonathan right next doo Barthelmess’s Yoko brings some very stylish Japanese action to Howard Smith Wharves – as well izakaya bar ac as the most fa fabulous yellow interior and a killer pair of But be warned – there’s no phone to book! turntables. Bu 2/5 Boundary Street, Brisbane. YOKODINING.COM.AU

the high/low These Kun Design ‘Lotus’ planters stand out as both edgy and classic, with their structured columns in staggered heights. Starting from $625 each. DOMO.COM.AU

IN STORE

PLUMB PORCELAIN This month, the Long Courrier range of Chinese porcelain pieces and hand-dyed French flax linen coasters debuts at Robert Plumb. Coasters, $9 each; bowls, from $35 each; and platters, from $64 each. ROBERTPLUMB. COM.AU

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Interested in starting an art collection but not sure where to look and how much to fork out? We have you covered with our pick of Australia’s best

art smarts

emerging artists across a range of media

WORDS & COMPILATION KATE HASSETT


PHOTOGRAPHY: TRAIANOS PAKIOUFAKIS (PORTRAIT OF NATALIE WEARING SHHORN CLOTHING)

THE CUT

Natalie Rosin SCULPTOR, SYDNEY

Working with a temperamental material like clay might seem counterintuitive for the exacting mind of an architecture student, but for Natalie Rosin, who undertook a ceramics subject in the last two years of her study and never looked back, the unpredictability was strangely attractive. “I don’t know why I chose clay, but it’s like family; you can’t choose them yet you unconditionally love them.” Although she put aside a career in architecture to pursue art full-time in 2017, her background still has a strong influence on her practice, with Modernist architects such as Le Corbusier, Harry Seidler and Robin Boyd informing her design aesthetic. What Natalie loves most about creating art is the process. “The constraints of clay really interest me,” she says. “I love how the material has its own language. Sometimes it’s an argument between what is possible, what gravity prescribes and what I envision in my mind.” Not just beautiful sculptures, Natalie’s diminutive designs (some fitting into the palm of your hand and costing less than $100) allow you to take home a little piece of Australia’s architectural history. Natalie’s next exhibition is Endangered + Extinct, at the Australian Design Centre in Darlinghurst, Sydney, from March 26 to May 27; natalie-rosin.com or @natrosin

THIS PAGE Natalie Rosin’s Montage Series (top) is available from Curatorial & Co while Breeze Blocks (left) sells through Saint Cloche Gallery. OPPOSITE Holly Greenwood’s Beer Stained Sturts, a 2019 oil on Belgian linen, can be found at Sydney’s Olsen Gallery. See more of her work on the following page.

INSIDE OUT | 19


THE CUT

Holly Greenwood PAINTER, SYDNEY

PHOTOGRAPHY: NAT ROGERS (HAYLEY’S PORTRAIT)

Growing up in a creative family, Holly Greenwood was exposed to the arts from a young age. “I have always been curious about how other people live,” she says, “and have often been drawn to a more unconventional view of beauty.” This view has long informed her artistic practice, as seen in her latest collection of works, titled ‘The Time Between’. Holly has drawn inspiration from the stark yet intimate scenes of Australia’s clubs and pubs “with their faded and dusty beauty, reflective of a time when people sought refuge in a community and could let their guard down.” Her expressive and moody pieces, priced from $3400 and available through Sydney’s Olsen gallery, find beauty in the mundane and demonstrate her commitment to authenticity. olsengallery.com or @hollygreenwood

Hayley Millar-Baker VISUAL ARTIST, MELBOURNE

Looking from afar at the work of Hayley Millar-Baker, you could be forgiven for mistaking her pieces for standard photographs. But look closer and you discover an alternative world where histories are merged in a co-existence of time and culture, and nothing is as it seems. “I’m focussed on filling in the gaps and finishing the stories belonging to South-East Aboriginal history, both present and future,” says Hayley, who is of Gunditjmara, Brazilian, Anglo-Indian and European descent. “These accounts are so often sugar-coated in our taught histories. I use my art to reveal truth, or a narrative that better suits an ideal Aboriginal experience.” Contact Vivien Anderson Gallery for prices. hayleymillarbaker.com or @hayleymillarbaker 20 | INSIDE OUT


Thea Anamara Perkins PAINTER, SYDNEY

If there was ever a chance to invest in an artist before they ‘explode’ – this is it. Last year was big for Arrernte and Kalkadoon artist Thea Perkins. She was a finalist in the Archibald with her portrait of fellow artist Christian Thompson, a Brett Whiteley Travelling Scholarship finalist and a participant at the Tarnanthi Festival, where she hosted a panel with notable Tangentyere artists. Her beautiful, personal works are grounded in the intimacy of memory and how those experiences inform our wider perspective of the world. A selfdescribed “loving and philosophical” artist, Thea is currently working on a new series of paintings and taking commissions, which vary in price. Thea’s next group show is at Edwina Corlette Gallery in New Farm, Brisbane, from February 18 to March 7; theaperkins.com or @anamara.art THIS PAGE (from top) John Street, a 2018 acrylic on board, and West Street II, a 2017, another acrylic on board, both by Thea Perkins. OPPOSITE (from top) The Pokies, a 2019 oil and oil stick on board by Holly Greenwood. Untitled 8 (I’m The Captain Now), a 2016 inkjet print on paper by Hayley Millar-Baker. Hayley pictured with another of her works Untitled (The Circumstances Are That A Whale Had Come On Shore), a 2018 inkjet piece on cotton rag.


THE CUT

Rose Ashton PAINTER, SYDNEY

While most artists will develop a signature style over the course of their career, this concept is both terrifying and amusing for Bondi artist Rose Ashton, who is at odds with how she would describe her own work. “As I grow, so too will my art. I hope to not be defined too exclusively with anything at this point in my career.” It’s this commitment to exploring and expanding her artistic boundaries that sees Rose create pieces ranging from detailed paintings to intricate line drawings depicting the beauty of the female form, as well as more expressive mixed-media works – priced from $100 to $2000. “My art has evolved as I’ve matured, travelled and met other artists,” says Rose. “Where once I was vague about a subject, I now go deep below the surface of an idea, where I can swim around in it for a while and see what’s possible.” Rose has launched @roseashtonartclass to teach “fun fine art” to children and adults through private workshops around Sydney. Find out more at roseashton.art or @roseashtonart

Mulga

ILLUSTRATOR, SYDNEY

Anyone familiar with the work of Joel Moore – or more likely his artistic moniker, Mulga – will recognise his playful and cheeky illustrations featuring bright, bold colours and distinctive black outlines. Not one to shy away from a challenge, Mulga quit his desk job as a “normal office-worker dude” in the financial planning industry to start life as a full time “art dude” five years ago, and has since made his mark on everything from large-scale murals to children’s books. “I loved to create and draw, so I decided to have a crack at doing that. I guessed that making a living from art was possible, so I tried really hard and it paid off.” In Mulga’s vibrant, colourful world, replete with anthropomorphic dreamscapes of lions smoking tobacco pipes and tigers in diamond sunglasses, interspersed with bearded hipsters and a healthy dose of good vibes, it’s summer all year round. His originals start from $425. A selection of Mulga’s artwork is available as part of Samsung’s ‘The Frame’ art collection; mulgatheartist.com.au or @mulgatheartist


Gabrielle Penfold

PHOTOGRAPHY: BRUNO STEFANI (ROSE ASHTON PORTRAIT)

PAINTER, SYDNEY

Like postcards from places you’d rather be, Gabrielle Penfold’s works are an exercise in longing. Inspired by life’s simple pleasures – trips to sun-drenched destinations, personal journeys through old historical tomes and long lunches with friends, it’s impossible not to feel moved by her joyful evocation of the everyday. “I am fascinated by history, so that does become a huge influence,” she says. “However, increasingly my travels have informed my work. I explore the myths and legends of the places I visit and often work them into my art.” Her clay work and unique oil paintings (priced up to $8500) are “an expression of all that is ephemeral, beautiful and fragile in the natural world.” While she only started showing her work three years ago, Gabrielle is excited for what the future holds. “As a young female artist, I’m becoming braver at sharing my voice. I feel so privileged to do this and think it’s important I do it with thought and respect.” Gabrielle’s next group show is Earth Matters at Clare Gallery in Double Bay, Sydney, from January 16 to February 12; gabriellepenfold.com or @gabriellepenfold

THIS PAGE (clockwise from top) Scorpello, a 2019 oil on board, and Menorca Warm, a 2019 oil on board, both by Gabrielle Penfold. Gabrielle pictured at her Lunch and Dinner exhibition at Clare Gallery, and assorted works there. OPPOSITE (from top) Frida, a 2019 acrylic, ink and pastel work on paper, and The Death Of Delusion, a 2019 ink on paper, both by Rose Ashton. Rod The Rad Koala, a digital print on paper by Mulga.

INSIDE OUT | 23


Bridgette McNab PAINTER, MELBOURNE

For the two-time Archibald finalist, creating art isn’t unlike our creation of identity. “With the rise of social media and technology, existence has become a full-time social performance,” says Bridgette McNab. “Platforms like Instagram embody our augmenting culture of spectacle and surface [so] separating the real from the fantasy is almost impossible. In the words of RuPaul, ‘We are all born naked and the rest is drag.’” Bridgette’s figurative ruminations on the performative nature of contemporary culture and our place within it are graphic, cinematic and full of life and colour. While she is influenced by the genres orbiting fantasy and masquerade, her artworks depict a nonchalant dreaminess that is capturing the attention of collectors across the country. For this young woman, there’s never been a more exciting time to be in the arts. “In a broad sense, art is a vehicle for communication, especially for voices that may otherwise not be heard,” she says. “I feel like women are finally getting some of the spotlight; and with more and more galleries popping up, the power isn’t resting in big establishments any more.” Her originals are priced from about $650; her prints are around $200. For details of upcoming exhibitions, see bridgettemcnab.com or @bridgettemcnab


THE CUT

Amy Finlayson

CONTEMPORARY ARTIST, SYDNEY

Creator, curator, model and founder of The Fin Collection (an accessible and inspirational creative platform for the arts), Amy Finlayson wears many hats. But pushing boundaries in her own art practice is where she finds a true sense of liberation. Working with mixed media, the Perth-born, Sydney-based artist uses acrylics, spray paints and pigments to form her textural, layered contemporary imagery. “I find the best pieces I make come from a deep-rooted desire to communicate something that I want to say, but can’t find the words to do so,” she says. Amy’s latest series centres around ideas of identity and suburbia while growing up in Perth, and coming into her own as a woman and an artist. Expect to pay anything from $300 to $5200 for her work. thefincollective.com or @amy_fin

Sarrita King PAINTER, DARWIN

For the Darwin-based Gurindji and Waanyi woman Sarrita King, art has been a part of her life for as long as she can remember. The daughter of the late highly-acclaimed artist William King Jungala, her creative drive was nurtured from a young age. After a decade of travelling around Australia, she returned to Darwin, where the raw beauty of the land and our connection to it provides endless inspiration. “I see art as our original form of communication, as well as telling a story or sharing a piece of ourselves,” she says. “To either create artwork or appreciate it, and to have it resonate with you, is a way of ensuring that a little piece of you is always within this world long after you’re gone.” Predominantly working with acrylic on canvas, her intricate creations (from about $715) depict elements of traditional methods while drawing on contemporary attitudes and techniques. But she says her works are defined by those who view it and give it new life. “I hope they feel connected [and] find something that resonates with them or a memory they have from their own lives. I love it when people tell me what they see in my work.” Some of Sarrita’s art is in Samsung’s ‘The Frame’ collection; sarritaking or @kingsisters_art

THIS PAGE (from top) Rebecca II, a mixed media on archival paper by Amy Finlayson. Lightning, an acrylic on linen by Sarrita King (behind the artist). OPPOSITE (from top) I’ve Heard It Said That Nothing Is True, a 2019 oil on poly cotton by Bridgette McNab. Another work from Sarrita’s Lightning series.

INSIDE OUT | 25


THE CUT

BEST BUYS

outdoor tableware Melamine, acrylic and resin go where fine china and crystal dare not

26 | INSIDE OUT

STYLING ASSISTANT: KRYSTEL ROBINSON

CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW Cape terrazzo-look melamine bowl, $12.95, Country Road. Modern Melamine dinner plate in Pink Grapefruit, $12, West Elm. Pyramids melamine dinner plate, $14.75, Walter G. Byron acrylic jug, $39.95, Country Road. Ivrig glass, $6.99 for four, Ikea. Riverstone resin butter plate in Honeycomb, $55, and resin stone dinner plates in Pink Guava and Melon Swirl, both $160, Dinosaur Designs. Bornn enamelware marble plate in Mint, $34.95, Dinosaur Designs. Byron acrylic flute, $12.95, Country Road. Esme soda-lime-glass coupe, $16, West Elm. Panier oval basket in Rust, $80, Hay. Annie Coop custom ‘Tavira’ linen tablecloth, $240, Style Revolutionary. Background is timber contouring in Riverine, from $18 per lineal m, Porta.

PHOTOGRAPHY KRISTINA SOLJO STYLING NATALIE JOHNSON


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Summer dreams

TRANSFORM YOUR BEDROOM INTO A COOL, CALMING HAVEN WITH BESPOKE FURNITURE FROM SNOOZE.


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Season for calm BRING IN THE LIGHT

EMBRACE TRANQUILLITY THIS SUMMER WITH BEDROOM FURNITURE THAT’S MADE FROM NATURAL MATERIALS AND TACTILE FABRICS IN RESTFUL COLOURS.

Choose a soft, tranquil shade for your headboard. Featured here is the Maxis extended headboard, exclusive to Snooze, upholstered in Warwick 'Nixon Linen' fabric.

“Scent is calming and often a key trigger for treasured memories. Seek out candles, incense and florals that will bring your favourite fragrances into the bedroom.” Sam Amore, Stylist for Snooze


A soft fabric headboard set within a dark timber frame evokes serenity and creates the tranquil bedroom setting you’ve always dreamed of. Curved edges and light, bespoke upholstery define the Maxis extended bed frame. Expertly crafted in Australia using premiumquality Warwick fabric, the Maxis can be customised to suit you. Choose from an array of stains and fabrics to create a bedroom you’re sure to love.

MATTER OF BALANCE Complement a gentle colour palette with dark timber furniture to bring a sense of sophistication to the bedroom. Pictured here is the Maxis bedside table and Lotus tallboy. There’s a variety of bespoke furniture options available at Snooze, and you can customise a stain to suit your bedroom décor.

NATURAL CHOICE Style your bed with nurturing, organic tones such as rose and mustard. Here, the Linen House ‘Haze’ quilt cover set in Maple is taeamed with the ‘Cleopatra’ Euro pillowcase. Accessorise the space with an assortment of throws and cushions to take your bedroom’s comfort to the next level.

Visit Snooze in-store or online to find out more about the Maxis extended bed frame and accompanying furniture ranges.


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REFINED PRACTICALITY Furniture in a deep-toned timber stain is the perfect choice for a retro-style bedroom. The Maxis tallboy is a great spot to display your favourite personal belongings.

Expertly crafted in Australia, the Lotus bed frame, exclusive to Snooze, is the essence of modern design with a retro twist. It features a simple, rounded headboard and base in Warwick ‘Chambray Storm’ fabric and a Chocolate timber stain. The Lotus is customisable in a range of fabric styles and timber stains, so you can create a bed that speaks to your personality and style.

CIRCULAR ACCENTS Accent your bedroom space with the circular form of the Lotus bedside table, which pairs beautifully with the Lotus bed frame and the Mayfield ‘Chet’ lamp.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to find out more about the Lotus bed frame and accompanying furniture ranges.


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Retro fit COME HOME TO A MODERN TAKE ON A RETRO BEDROOM, WHERE CURVED, EXPRESSIVE BEDROOM FURNITURE IS TEAMED WITH GEOMETRIC PATTERNS AND PLAYFUL ’70S HUES.

PLAYFUL SHADES Add a bold, refreshing jolt of mustard and teal to freshen your bedroom for summer. Featured here is the Linen House ‘Nimes’ linen quilt cover set in Chai, ‘Pani’ cushion and ‘Belmore’ throw in Teal. Complete the look with striking geometric cushions.

“Indoor plants are firmly back in vogue. Showcase your plants in vintage vessels and rattan pots to beautify your bedroom and tie the modernretro look together.” Sam Amore, Stylist for Snooze


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Child’s play CREATE A BEDROOM THAT’S FRESH AND FUN WITH BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED FURNITURE, DELICIOUS COLOURS AND ACCESSORIES THAT ARE SURE TO GET THE TICK OF APPROVAL FROM THE LITTLEST SNOOZERS IN YOUR FAMILY.

“Soft furnishings and bedding in gorgeous colours and patterns add fun to your child’s bedroom. They can also be very easily modified as their tastes change.”

SWEET TREAT Make your child’s bed frame pop with linen featuring delicious motifs in gelato tones. Shown here is the Logan & Mason Kids ‘Sprinkles Gelato’ reversible quilt-cover set. Keep accessories sunny and fun with a cheery yellow cushion.

Sam Amore, Stylist for Snooze

TIMELESS TIMBER A practical Bingo timber bedside table coordinates beautifully with its matching bed and ensures you’ve created a space that will be easy to adapt as your little one grows. The Mayfield ‘Pia’ desk lamp provides the perfect accent here.


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KEEP IT TIDY Bring order to your child’s bedroom with a chest of drawers to fill with clothes or their favourite toys. Decorate it with wooden trinkets, colourful wall hangings or fun, decorative pompoms to make it distinctly theirs. Featured here is the Bingo chest of drawers.

Play away, then fall into bed at the end of the day: the Bingo bed frame, exclusive to Snooze, is a bedroom piece your child will adore. The storage compartments beneath the bed look fantastic and means kids have no excuse not to tidy away their toys! Featuring a light-toned timber bed frame and white finish, this bed is versatile enough to last your child right through to adulthood. Sustainably crafted in Australia, the Bingo bed works beautifully with all styles of bed linen. It’s customisable in an array of upholstery and painted finishes, and available with a trundle base – so you’re prepared for the next sleepover.

Visit Snooze in-store or online at snooze.com.au to learn more about the Bingo bed frame and the new kids’ furniture range.


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The personal touch FOR BEDROOM FURNITURE THAT REFLECTS YOUR OWN DISTINCTIVE STYLE, LOOK TO THE CUSTOMISABLE LOTUS COLLECTION AT SNOOZE. Lotus bedside table and bed frame featuring Warwick ‘Chambray Storm’ fabric.

Lotus tallboy

Lotus chest of drawers

STYLE NOTES 1. Bring the outdoors in with pot plants, foliage and natural materials. They will bring an instant sense of summer to your space. 2. Colour your bed with fresh, juicy hues. The cheerier and more tropical, the better. 3. Complete your bedroom summer styling with artwork and decor with retro accents.

Visit Snooze in-store and online at snooze.com.au to browse the entire Lotus bedroom furniture collection.

PRODUCED BY STORY

Design your perfect space with the Lotus furniture collection at Snooze. Crafted in Australia, you can choose from various bedside, tallboy and chest furniture options to keep your bedroom neat and free from clutter. Each of these pieces are available in array of stains, sizes and shelving styles (for added storage). For added decorative detailing, opt for the Lotus chest in a Chocolate stain. The Lotus bed frame is the essence of contemporary style with a retro twist and can be customised in various stains and fabrics that suit your personal style.


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BEST BUYS

drinks trolleys

STYLING ASSISTANT: KRYSTEL ROBINSON

Dial your dinner parties up a notch with a stylish (and well-stocked!) cocktail cart

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Cane-line ‘Roll’ bar trolley in White Aluminium, $1988, Trit House. Soda water, stylist’s own. Skagerak ‘Fuori’ serving trolley in White/Teak, $1270, Top3 By Design. Kun Design ‘Pipe’ bar cart in Anthracite, $1125, Domo. Maidenii Dry vermouth, $44.99 for 750ml, Nicks Wine Merchants. Chelsea Barware cocktail shaker, $49, and angled jigger, $19, West Elm. Adam Goodrum ‘Trace’ drinks trolley in White/Smoked Oak, $1980, Tait. Fferrone Glassware ‘May’ glasses, $375 for two, and Diamond cut tumblers in Dark Topaz, $135 each, Becker Minty. Chelsea Barware tongs, $16, West Elm. Vintage gold-toned tubular bar cart, $3400, and Linear cut shot glasses, $80 each, Becker Minty. Fulton bar cart, $599, West Elm. Kis O’Gin gin, $89, Ki Spirits. BACKGROUND Palmy wallpaper in Nude, $72 per lineal m, These Walls.

PHOTOGRAPHY KRISTINA SOLJO STYLING NATALIE JOHNSON

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TOP 10 PICKS

in stitches Sumptuous and luxurious,

quilting is making its way into all aspects of our homes 1 Quilted maxi crossbody bag in Black, $59.95, Zara. 2 Timothy Oulton ‘Riders Easy’ ottoman, $2010, Coco Republic. 3 Latinus velvet cushion in Ruby, $110, CLU Living. 4 Coco quilted ottoman in Merlot, $1190, Darcy & Duke. 5 Alva Black chair in Peach, $1395, Sarah Ellison. 6 Florentine quilted velvet Euro cushion cover in Rose, $119, and quilted velvet comforter in Rose, $399, Living Styles. 7 Willow Range ‘Pineapple’ pot in Charcoal, $239 for 50L size, The Balcony Garden. 8 Tacchini ‘Jacket’ lounge chair, $4275, Stylecraft. 9 Normann Copenhagen ‘Trace’ rug in Rose/Sand (1.95m x 1.4m), $744, Finnish Design Shop. 10 Moroso ‘Redondo’ sofa, $20,490, Hub Furniture.

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COLOUR TREND

green scene

From deep forest pine to muted eucalyptus, these peaceful shades offer a lovely salute to nature

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1 Ultra Premium low-sheen interior paint in Mimosa Leaf, $91.34 for 4L, Haymes. 2 Umage ‘Asteria’ pendant in Forest Green, $405, Royal Design. 3 NAU ‘Jolly’ pendant in Eucalypt Powdercoat, $1300, Cult. 4 Desert tufted rug in Dark Green (1.4m x 2m), $1299, Ferm Living. 5 Sequence table 01 in Pale Eucalypt (32cm), $620, Coco Flip. 6 100% flax linen queen sheet set in Olive, $280, Bed Threads. 7 Skeehan Studio ‘Nave’ armchair, $4042, Stylecraft. 8 Nomad bean bag in Dark Green, $640, Koskela. 9 Ferm Living plant box in Dark Green, $149, Designstuff. 10 Muuto ‘Restore’ basket in Dark Green, $155, Top3 By Design. 11 Karakter coffee table in Green, $3000, Cult. 12 Ghost Wares teapot, $138, and mug, $45, both in Sage, Elph Store.

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COMPILED BY NONCI NYONI


PGH BRICKS

BRING THE OUTSIDE IN Bricks balance efortlessly with other interior materials, providing an opportunity for seamlessness between your indoor and outdoor spaces. Classic red or warm brown bricks can be taken from external terrace floors right through to living spaces for great indoor/outdoor flow. The 2019 PGH Bricks Style Guide presents nine exterior and interior palettes, providing you with everything you need to start your build journey with confidence. Take our quiz, and explore your style in brick. Be inspired. Be sure. Be you. SCAN THE CODE TO TAKE THE STYLE QUIZ & DOWNLOAD OUR STYLE GUIDE AT PGHBRICKS.COM.AU/STYLES


DESIGN PROFILE

Ed West

The director of Sydney’s iconic Poho Flowers on the art of conveying a message without words, and why we should give carnations another chance How did you get into floristry? It was somewhat by accident.

I grew up in a house of flowers and was a customer at Poho in my late teens and early twenties. I really got into it about six years ago, and I’ve owned Poho now for about five years. There’s definitely a classic, heritage feel to the brand. We’ve been in the same beautiful Art Deco building for 12 years, and in the past few years we’ve really elevated the look. The signature is evolving and it has a more contemporary feel now. Which flowers are having a moment? More traditional flowers that have been around for a long time, like chrysanthemums and orchids, are coming back into vogue. Baby’s breath, for example, was very much associated with your supermarket florist or the local store two years ago, but increasingly it’s used en masse as a feature rather than filler in a bouquet. There are also a lot of dyed and preserved florals. Some of the flowers that people would have turned their nose up at five years ago – like the carnation – are back on trend, with special dye treatments applied to them, so you get some really amazing tones and super bright neon vibes. So the carnation is back? [Laughs] They’re not for everyone, but are now in some incredible colourways. They’ve come a long way. What is your all-time favourite flower? That’s easy – poppies. They embody everything I love about floristry: they’re very fragile and fleeting, they come in beautiful colours, patterns and shapes, and the way they move is pretty special. What’s the most challenging part of being a florist? It’s not for the faint-hearted. This is a very labour-intensive job, from buying fresh flowers at the markets to unpacking and setting up the store and then doing deliveries. It can be quite taxing. There are a lot of emotions – good, bad or indifferent – associated with flowers, and we’re trying to convey somebody’s feelings, emotions and message with our work, which is always a challenge. But that’s the fun of the job, too. What about the best part? The seasonality. There’s something about turning up to a market or a flower farm and seeing the varieties and the landscapes ever changing. Being inspired and motivated creatively is really easy when you’re constantly presented with new and exciting things. What’s something people should know about floristry? There’s a big difference between buying flowers and floristry. You should trust your florist and build a relationship with them so you can lean on their knowledge. Part of our job is to educate the customer and also try to understand their vision and the message they want to send, so that relationship is really important.

WORDS ALEXANDRA ENGLISH

PHOTOGRAPHY: KRISTINA SOLJO HOTY EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY: FIONA SUSANTO

Poho has a signature aesthetic — how would you describe it?


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Florist Ed West (opposite) has owned Poho Flowers for five years. His lovely Art Deco premises (left) are on the fringe of Sydney’s CBD. From there he makes one-off creations as well as complete floral looks for parties, weddings (bottom left) and even our own 2019 Home of the Year Awards (bottom right).

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trend forecast

ADDITIONAL IMAGE RESEARCH: KATRINA YAXLEY

What will this new decade hold for our homes and how we live in them? We surveyed designers and architects to expose the real decoration trends of 2020

THIS PAGE (clockwise from top right) Below 90cm x 60cm photographic print by Alicia Taylor, $1600 (framed), Becker Minty. Oly ‘Cosmo’ side table, $1450, and Camilla bamboo-silk rug, from $1995, Coco Republic. Bogart Olive velvet occasional chair in Red Wine, $1835, GlobeWest. Aerin ‘Abel’ textured-glass vase, $625 (large), Becker Minty. Elle ‘Block’ square side table in Desert Marble, $1790, GlobeWest. Pallino table lamp, $490, King Living. Walls decorated with Interno limewash paint in Safari and Fired Earth, $54 per 1L, Porter’s Paints. OPPOSITE (clockwise from top left) Google Nest Hub Max voice assistant in Chalk, $349, Harvey Norman. Luxor wool and artsilk rug, $1795, The Rug Collection. Serif 55-inch 4K television, $2399, Samsung. Sonos ‘One’ smart speakers in Soft Pink, Red, Light Grey, Forest Green and Pale Yellow, $349 each, all Cult Design. Oxidised-iron coffee table, $599, Freedom. Zaza three-seater sofa in Positano Blush fabric, from $5412, King Living. Genero Multi-lay luxury vinyl flooring, from $58.85 per sq m, Choices Flooring.

WORDS SARAH PICKETTE PHOTOGRAPHY NIC GOSSAGE STYLING ASHLEY PRATT


living room Turn the texture up to 10: irresistibly tactile materials are the foundation on which a beautiful living room is formed. Extending from super-soft rugs to touch-me wall-coverings, the effect is beautifully soothing. Upholstery fabrics play to this trend, with velvet, bouclé and linen all leading the pack this year. “It makes me happy to see fabrics coming to the fore again,” says Melbourne-based interior designer Camilla Molders. “There are so many incredible fabric choices on the market right now.” Bespoke furniture will be big news in 2020, driven by the urge designers have to utilise those gorgeous fabrics (paired with leather, timber and accents in natural stone). Expect to see curvaceous pieces take prominence in showrooms and low-slung modular sofas further embraced for their superb flexibility (a smart buy for anyone interested in futureproofing). Expect to not see the latest tech offerings: sound systems that deliver music seamlessly from room to room, discreet TVs, clever smart lighting and sleek voice assistants. It’s all about balance, beauty and the creation of relaxation.

“Our days can be stressful so having a calming space to relax in is a must. For me, 2020 will be about layering, texture and rich tones” GEORGIA EZRA, INTERIOR DESIGNER

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“Colour is coming to a kitchen near you but you’ll find it works best when drawn from nature’s palette” DARREN GENNER, KITCHEN DESIGNER

kitchen Planning to renovate your kitchen this year? You might be happy to hear that in 2020 the ‘safe’ white kitchen is shifting even further out of favour, with touches of colour and texture proving they, too, will stand the test of time. “I think homeowners have now reached an understanding that utilising colour and layering can make their kitchen unique and beautiful,” says Georgia Ezra, director of Studio Ezra in Melbourne. Natural patterning and earthy finishes will be everywhere this year: in matt, handmade and terracotta tiles; in weathered, patinated and brushed special finishes for tapware; and in benchtop surfaces and timber veneers where the grain reigns. Appliances are getting sleeker, more efficient and smarter, with sensors making it virtually impossible to cook a bad meal and artificial intelligence allowing machines to self-diagnose a problem. We’ll also see more integrated kitchens, says Darren Genner, kitchen designer and co-founder of Minosa. “They disappear behind doors when not in use, which is fantastic in an open-plan living space.”


“Kitchens will feature a mix of the simple with the playful. Texture and natural materials reign supreme, with the promise of timelessness running through everything” SHAUN LOCKYER, ARCHITECT

THIS PAGE (clockwise from top left) Iittala ‘Vintage XL’ glass bowl, $85, Becker Minty. Mutina ‘Dechirer XL Avana’ textured porcelain tile, POA, Artedomus. Tasmanian oak hand-painted Shaker-profile cabinetry, POA, Provincial Kitchens. Primordia benchtop surface (swatch), from $900 per sq m (installed), Caesarstone. Elysian kitchen mixer in Brushed Brass, $289.90, ABI. Essastone benchtop surface (tray) in Luna Concrete, $406.10 per sq m, Laminex. Stone Smeraldo polished stone surface (swatches), POA, Artedomus. ‘Vintage Oak Original’ engineered-timber flooring in Baltimore, POA, Querkus Decospan. Avalon Gloss square tiles in Bottle Green, from $110 per sq m, Tile Cloud. OPPOSITE (clockwise from top left) Linen table napkins in Cedar, $50 for four, Cultiver. Gordon Ramsay Maze Grill 24cm pasta bowl, $24.95, Royal Doulton. OS60NDBB1 built-in combination steam oven (due for 2020 release), Fisher & Paykel. Leather stacked joinery handles, $65.50 each, Made Measure. Keops decorative glazed wall tile in White Matt, $143 per sq m, Earp Bros. Ercol ‘Originals’ ash bar stool with back in Forest, $750, Temperature Design. De’Longhi ‘Nespresso Gran Lattisimma’ capsule coffee machine, $649, Harvey Norman. Excava benchtop surface, $1100 per sq m (installed), Caesarstone. Terracotta Manual Naveta Miel handmade floor tiles, $49 per sq m, Earp Bros.

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THIS PAGE (clockwise from top left) Rust flax and linen flat sheet, from $110, Bed Threads. Interno limewash paint in Safari, $54 per 1L, Porter’s Paints. Sackville queen-size bedhead in Dargo Jade fabric, $1600, Heatherly Design. Cire Trudon ‘Six’ candle, $135, Becker Minty. Paloma Curve stool, $405, GlobeWest. Kika wall light, $129, About Space Lighting. Axelle wool rug, from $1495, Coco Republic. Drawn From The Abundant Wellspring At Dusk mixed-media artwork by Bec Smith, $3200 (framed), Saint Cloche Gallery. OPPOSITE (clockwise from

top left) Bula’bula Arts Gurrwilinywirriy Mundan (Bush String) pendant light shade, from $785, Koskela. Seed woven-leather king bedhead in Natural, $1790, Aura Home. Louise leather cushion, $139, Domayne. Vintage Stripe linen/cotton blend quilt-cover set in Cinnamon, $229, Aura Home. Daintree timber bedside table, $399, Snooze. Ada Marble polyester-blend fabric (background), $55 per m, Warwick Fabrics. Youngiana Blue hand-printed cotton pillowcases, $105 for two, Utopia Goods. Mini Day & Dusk smart lightbulb, $44.99, LIFX.

“Limewash paint will make a bedroom feel warm; it’s all about movement and depth in both colour and finish” GEORGIA EZRA, INTERIOR DESIGNER


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bedroom Deep tones can be deeply relaxing. In fact, we predict you’ll be introducing touches of rust, mushroom, burgundy or dark green into your bedroom this year. Grey and white aren’t going anywhere, but you might start seeing pattern stepping back and bolder tonal accents taking its place. “Texture will be huge, too,” says Camilla. “You’ll see it in silk and grasscloth wallpapers, in beautiful rugs and upholstered bedheads.” When it comes to beds, customisation is king with homeowners zeroing in on soft, curved lines for their frames and luxuriously quilted and buttoned bedheads. Mattresses also get the bespoke treatment: the latest high-tech options allow each sleeper to adjust the firmness of their side at the touch of a button. The best bed linen on the market will be soft to the touch and light on the planet, in organic cotton, bamboo and Tencel (which is derived from cellulose). An organic thread runs through lighting for bedrooms as well. “Look for lamps and lights in rattan, copper, brass and patinated metals,” says Simon Waine, lighting designer for Sydney’s Light Up Kingsford.

“Everyone’s idea of luxury will be different but most of us would agree that softness and texture create a beautiful sense of sanctuary” CAMILLA MOLDERS, INTERIOR DESIGNER

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bathroom Wellness is where it’s at for bathrooms. “We all have an emotional connection to water and its rejuvenating impact,” says Daniela Santilli, bathroom marketing lead for Reece. “This will play out in the shower space in particular, with luxurious showerheads, body jets and customisation elevating your everyday experience.” Thermostatic mixers, which allow you to set your preferred water flow and temperature, are about to go gangbusters for showers. “Slabs of solid-surface materials and large-format tiles requiring fewer joins are growing in popularity,” says Brisbane architect Shaun Lockyer. “And open-plan bathrooms are the go… it’s time to lose some of those walls.” As with other areas of the home, organic lines will be favoured in 2020. Look to softershaped baths and basins that are either chunky and raw or crisp and super-thin. Special finishes expected to sell well include brushed nickel, matt black and rumbled brass, but don’t dismiss chrome. “The beauty of a chrome tap is that you can be certain it won’t date,” says Shaun. “Keep it simple, minimal and timeless.”

“Colour and texture are set to star in bathrooms, as is customisation and personalisation” DANIELA SANTILLI, REECE

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OPPOSITE (clockwise from top left) Dekton vanity top in Halo and wall surface in Blanc Concrete, POA, Cosentino. Kreeo ‘Diamond’ basin in Rose Quartzite, $11,718, Elite Bathware & Tiles. Gradient soap, $16, and Sphere soap, $16, Fazeek. Avanza Bianco benchtop surface, $86.68 per sq m (supply only), Laminex. The Water Monopoly ‘Rockwell’ bath in Willow Green, $13,285, The English Tapware Company. Roca In-wash Inspira smart toilets, $3249 each, Reece. Nazari Chauen porcelain tiles, $95 per sq m, Earp Bros. Milli Pure basin mixer, $743, Reece.

PHOTOGRAPHY: PRUE RUSCOE (COSENTINO BATHROOM OPPOSITE). PROJECT: ALEX PAPPAS ARCHITECTS (COSENTINO)

THIS PAGE (clockwise from top) Boat Harbour Beach terracotta-look tile, $112 per sq m, Tile Cloud. Crema Grigio travertine tile, from $92 per sq m, Amber. Avalon Gloss subway tile in Jade Green, $97 per sq m, Tile Cloud. A51.11.V2 chrome shower arm and rose, $428, Astra Walker. Bianca Carrara marble slab, $308 per sq m, Marable. Saint Peters tile, $50 per sq m, Tile Cloud. Inax ‘Yuki Border’ ceramic tiles, POA, Artedomus. A51.49 chrome wall-tap set, $198, Astra Walker. Celine ceramic basin, $374.90, ABI. Inax ‘Terrarossa’ ceramic tiles, POA, Artedomus.

“ Bathroom fixtures will head to the extremes in 2020. They’ll be either very organic shapes or really hard edges. Simple, elegant and never fussy” SHAUN LOCKYER, ARCHITECT


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“Pavers and stone anchor a garden while adding texture and warmth” JOANNE GREEN, LANDSCAPE DESIGNER

outdoor Climate change is on everyone’s mind and it will have a big impact on how we design and use our outdoor spaces. “Temperatures are hotter, dam levels are low and drought is insidious, so we need to be savvy about choosing waterwise Mediterranean and local native plants,” says Sydney landscape designer Joanne Green. Couch grass is a good choice for lawns – “it’s surprisingly tough,” she says – and carefully positioned shade trees can help keep the temperature down inside your home. This year’s top-selling outdoor furniture takes its cues from indoor styles, with slimmer lines and beautiful detailing. “Timber, hand-woven synthetic wicker or rope and easy-care aluminium will all do well,” says Amber Cooke, general manager for furniture at Domayne. “No matter which material you prefer, expect your new outdoor furniture to be low-slung and comfortable to sink into.” Outdoor fabrics are more robust and better-looking than ever, pots in natural materials are voluptuous and generous, and outdoor rugs add such an element of luxe to your outdoor entertaining area, you’ll wonder how you ever did without one.

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“Stick to enduring neutrals for your outdoor area and you can add pops of colour in rugs, pots and cushions — all are easy and affordable to update”

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY (GRASS)

AMBER COOKE, DOMAYNE

THIS PAGE (clockwise from top left) Adam Goodrum handmade ‘Coil’ pot, from $750, Garden Life. Burleigh day bed, $2399, Eco Outdoor. Wyatt concrete stool, $425, Coco Republic. Crackenback Freeform natural-stone walling, $121.20 per sq m, and Traditional Format natural-stone walling, $131.30 per sq m, Eco Outdoor. Seagrass door mat, $25, and Border spade, $95, Garden Life. Cotto ‘Arrotato’ elongated bricks, $8.02 each, Eco Outdoor. Triton ‘Egg’ pot, from $55, Garden Life. OPPOSITE (clockwise from top left) Steel sheeting in Surfmist, POA, Colorbond. Lang Mursten extra-long clay bricks in Moller, $15.50 each, PGH Bricks. Catherine Martin for Mokum ‘Tropicalia’ outdoor fabric in Gilver, $269 per m, James Dunlop Textiles. Zaza outdoor sofa in Malibu Silver, $6172, King Living. Couch grass grown from Munns Professional Couch Lawn Seed, $29.98 for 1.1kg, Bunnings. Justin Hutchinson ‘Jak Lounger’ wire-framed outdoor chair with cushion in Mokum South Beach ‘Coral’ outdoor velvet, $790, and Nancy Ji ‘Lily Tray’ aluminium outdoor coffee table, $1056, both Tait.


READING CORNER ALL THEY NEED IS SOMEWHERE TO SIT AND BOOKS TO CHOOSE FROM

COOL FOR KIDS

Want to decorate your child’s room but stuck on the style? Here are three looks with infinite possibilities to personalise

PHOTOGRAPHY KRISTINA SOLJO STYLING NATALIE JOHNSON

STYLING ASSISTANTS: KATE LINCOLN, NONCI NYONI, PALOMA MAINE. *CURRENCY CONVERSION CORRECT AT TIME OF PRINTING

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K I D S ’ S PAC E S SPECIA L

funky fun

If your home has a Scandi vibe, take it into the nursery with light timbers and retroinspired accessories

THIS PAGE Kalon Studios ‘Caravan Cot’, $1895; and Salt Water sandals in Mustard, $84.95, Kido. Stella metallic knit throw, $269; Celine linen pillowcase, $99 for two; and Alma woven wall hanging, $399, Sage x Clare. Ian Monty Wood cedar stool, $380, Oliver Thom. Bob the Monster toy (on stool), $40*, Paper Plane. Redding knit blanket (on floor), $210, Slowdown Studio. Tateplota ‘Amelie’ wooden giraffe, $110, Happy Go Ducky. Raduga Grëz wooden blocks, from $42, Liberty Fox. Muuto ‘Restore’ basket in Burnt Orange, $155, Top3. Linen quilted blanket (in basket), $309; and wooden-ring stacker toy, $39, Paper Plane Store. Triangle metal pendant in Ochre, $229, House of Orange. Dobby wallpaper in Clay, $72 per lineal m, Quercus & Co. Texline Empire Classic 2090 flooring (throughout), $45–$55 per sq m, Gerflor. OPPOSITE Flisat wall storage (holding books), $19.99, Ikea. River Stones linen/cotton bench-seat fabric in Kakadu Plum, $210 per m, Willie Weston. HK Living velvet seat cushion, $189, House of Orange. Oyoy ‘Tiger’ wallhanger in Green, $104; Nobodinoz ‘Sitges’ round cushion in Vita Pink, $69.95; Tocoto vintage Vichy-squares one-piece in Navy, $95; Liewood ‘Amy’ abacus, $52; and Numero 74 flat curtain in Powder, $99, Leo & Bella. HK Living ‘Stitched Squares’ cushion, $129, House of Orange. Redding knit blanket (as before). Raduga Grëz wooden blocks (as before). Basket, stylist’s own. Woodrose quilt-cover set (in basket), $180, Philé. The Underwater Fancy-Dress Parade book by Davina Bell, $25, Kido. Moebe oak frame (with rainbow drawing), $49, Designstuff. Hovsta birch-effect frame, $5.99, Ikea. Carnival roller blind in Caramel, $239, Wynstan. Dobby wallpaper (as before). Timber flooring (as before). INSIDE OUT | 51


THE CUT

fir baby

Get into the forest look with woody furniture and mossy green accessories that are guaranteed to bring your little one closer to nature

WEAR TO GO A PINT-SIZED CLOTHES RACK MEANS GREATER ACCESS TO THEIR WARDROBE

52 | INSIDE OUT


THIS PAGE Woodrow ‘Tooth’ stump, $390, Fenton & Fenton. Parquet topped table, $1550, Tara Dannis Store. Mala paper roll, $11.99; and drawing paper, $5.99 per 30m; and Lohals rug in Natural, $99, Ikea. Display box, stylist’s own. Rattan hoop, $32, Such Great Heights. Nobodinoz skipping rope in Thalassa Blue, $51.95; Muskhane felt mushrooms, $10.95–$29.95 each; Raduga Grez wooden toy vegetables, $70 for 10-piece set; and Chakati round seat cushion in Pollen (on floor), $136, Leo & Bella. Fanny & Alexander binoculars, $125; and Lorna Murray ‘Capri’ hat in Darwin, $85, Hello1234. Wooden coat stand, $19, Kmart. Rylee & Cru ‘Northern Star’ piper dress (on hanger), $92.95, Kido. XOXO game, $39.95, Country Road. Emile Et Ida ‘Rabbit’ sandals, $130, Leo & Bella. Oak Brushed deep-white oil timber wall panelling, $120 per sq m, Woodos. Timber flooring (as before). OPPOSITE Nursery clothes rack, $20, Kmart. Rylee & Cru ‘Dainty Leaves’ Kat dress, $92.95, ‘Vintage Rose’ Blaire blouse, $79.95, and ‘Esme’ dress, $92.95, Kido. Raaraa Kids ‘Goldie’ jumpsuit, $115, Liberty Fox. Tateplota wooden clothes hangers, $20 each; and wooden toy camera, $75, Happy Go Ducky. Woodrow ‘Tooth’ stump (as before). Mushrooms (as before). Aurelie timber bed, $999, Little French. Fern pillowcase, $49; and double flat sheet, $115, Castle. Camomile London king fitted sheet in Teal, $87; By Wirth six-dot wall rack, $289; and Catty Wampus ‘Green Leaf’ play mat, $109, Leo & Bella. Penny Round velvet cushion cover in Butterscotch, from $49, Castle. A-frame doll’s house in Sage, $199, Such Great Heights. Colette Bream tree pillow, $112; and Cabana sun visor in Sandrift, $95, Hello1234. Camomile London hand-quilted single blanket in Teal, $319, Leo & Bella. Raduga Grëz wooden tree forest set, $60, Liberty Fox. Moebe A4 oak frame (on wall), $79, Designstuff. Clay pendant light, $849, Lighting Collective.


THE CUT

HOT DESK SET UP A PLACE TO SIT AND DO HOMEWORK OR TINKER WITH CRAFT PROJECTS

*CURRENCY CONVERSION CORRECT AT TIME OF PRINTING

THIS PAGE Ridge American oak console, $2565, Beeline Furniture Design. Blue resin stationery container with spherical lids, $99; and Soft chair in Mustard, $690, Daniel Emma. Shane Schneck tool box in Grey, $65; Anything scissors in Warm Yellow, $40; and Lex Pott ‘Iso’ ash hooks, $70 for three, Hay. Bornn ‘Marble’ enamelware mug in Blush, $24.95; and Areaware ‘Colour’ puzzle, $65, Until. Milligram ‘Form’ triangle light in Green, $129, Leo & Bella. Mono notebook in Turquoise, $40, and variously coloured pencils, from $7 each, Hay. Timber flooring (as before). OPPOSITE Calypso feature bed frame, $649, Snooze. Sänglärka quilt cover in Dark Blue, $39.99, Ikea. Linen pillowcase, $95, Milou Milou. Tranarö stool/side table in Red, $29.99, Ikea. Solo Pro noise-cancelling headphones, $299.95, Beats by Dr Dre. Martino Gamper ‘Arnoldino’ stool in Boat Blue, $145*, Paper Plane. The Lowdown console in Ocean, $475*, Mustard Made. Mathilde Stripe Euro pillowcase set in Lemon, $109 for two; and Etienne velvet floor cushion in Clay, $179, Sage x Clare. Milligram light (as before). Cased glass column vase in Deep Ocean, $49, West Elm. Time hourglass in Powder & Red, $49; and Mono notebook in Turquoise, $40, Hay. Arc ceramic reusable cup in French Navy, $24.95; and Ripstop backpack, $59.95, Country Road. 31-inch skateboard, $20, Kmart. Reebok ‘Classic Nylon Kid x The Animals Observatory’ sneakers, Kido. Books, stylist’s own. Screen-printed ‘A’ print, $320, Castle. Laurie Maun ‘Arthur’ throw (on wall), $230, Slowdown Studio. HK Living woollen rug in Cobalt, $2495, House of Orange.


tween dream

Busy teenagers love coming home to a bright, bold space that expresses their interest in sport and other passions

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1 Eeny Meeny Miny trays in Colour Mix 1, $159, Blu Dot. 2 Ferm Living ‘Rabbit’ storage box, $149, Designstuff. 3 The Skinny locker in Ocean, $349, Mustard Made. 4 Tjena magazine files in Pink/ Dotted, $4.99 for two, Ikea. 5 Ferm Living ‘Pear’ braided storage basket, $149, Arrival Hall. 6 Numero 74 suitcase in Sweet Blue, $84.95, Nomades Homewares. 7 Hartô ‘Louisette’ tool box in White, $169, Trit. 8 Ay-Kasa midi storage crate in Gold, $34.95, Jack & Willow. 9 Seashell box in Ecru, $103*, Los Objetos Decorativos. 10 Perforated bin in Lavender, $70, Hay. 11 Ooh Noo storage toy boxes on wheels in Blackboard, $249.95, and White, $239.95, Hello Little Birdie. 12 Toaty trunk in Natural, $139, Olli Ella. 13 Shade bin in Dusty Green, $85, Hay. 14 Oyoy round storage box in Blue, $39, Leo & Bella. 15 Normann Copenhagen ‘Track’ basket in Rust, $95, District. 16 Gingham wash bag in Pumpkin/Dijon, $24.90, Città. 17 Oyoy play sacks in Rose and Beige, $96, Leo & Bella. 18 Numero 74 ‘Caravan’ suitcase in Natural, $193, Nomades Homewares. 19 Oyoy ‘Moku’ perforated-back shelf in White, $265, Leo & Bella. 20 Box Box storage boxes, $90 for assorted set of four, Hay.

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INSIDE tree change

Flowers are nice but scented leaves will add spice to your table centrepiece

A bunch of spiral eucalyptus leaves spilling out of a vase and picking up on the grey-green in the Carly Williams artwork behind was a simple but inspired choice by Kerrie-Ann Jones, who styled this Sydney home. Aside from being a natural match for the Luxa oak table from Totem Road, the leaves have a fresh, pest-repelling scent that’s perfect for summer. Turn the page to see more.

PHOTOGRAPHY MAREE HOMER STYLING KERRIE-ANN JONES


Interior designer Leah Henricks was after a project but when she found this newly renovated home in Sydney it just felt right

match made in harmony WORDS & STYLING KERRIE-ANN JONES PHOTOGRAPHY MAREE HOMER


INSIDE | HOME

cheat sheet Who lives here Interior designer Leah Henricks and her husband; with their children, Grace, 7, and Harvey, 5; and pet dog Maggie, a Groodle who is 18 months old. Style of home The Henricks bought the 493-square-metre property and fourbedroom home newly refurbished. Prior to the renovation, it was a single-level, two-bedroom brick house built in the 1950s. The family bought in June 2017 and moved in shortly afterwards. Most of the furniture and artworks are new. Leah and her husband spent about $$$$ $80,000 on decorating and furniture.

KITCHEN Leah is drawn to nature-based palettes so this home’s sage-coloured, Shaker-style cabinetry and wide oak floorboards were right on the money. The fridge and freezer are stored behind the tall doors. Marble breadboard and copper pepper grinder, The DEA Store.

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Our home is a contemporary design with Spanish and Hamptons influences – crazy I know but it seems to work LEAH HENRICKS, INTERIOR DESIGNER/OWNER

GARDEN “Our backyard is to die for,” says Leah. “We never imagined finding a home in this area with such a big grassy area and pool.” Table and chairs, Eco Outdoor. DINING AREA Leah is a fan of good-quality furniture that’s made to last, hence her choice of the Luxa dining table (from Totem Road) and Markson dining chairs in Ivory (from Coco Republic). Artwork by Carly Williams.


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ometimes you just know when you’ve met

‘the one’. That’s how Leah Henricks and her husband felt when they first saw their home in Clovelly, close to the beach in Sydney’s east. “In early 2017, we were a family of four living in a two-bedroom semi and bursting at the seams,” says Leah. “We had an approved DA and were about to start building, but thought we should take a look at the market to understand what we’d get if we bought elsewhere. Then we came across this house. Being a designer, I never thought I’d want a home that was renovated. However, I fell in love with this place as soon as I saw it. So did my husband.” Features that sealed the deal were the unique pink exterior, the beautiful curved walls and the large new kitchen as well as the room divider in the living area. “I wish I could take ownership of the colour selection,” says Leah. “I mean, seriously – a salmonpink house! It might seem a bit over the top, but one of the things I love about this house is that it inspires me as a designer. It pushes the boundaries in design and colour, and also with the finishes that were used.” With her designer eye, Leah knew it would be easy to make it their own – just some decorating to put their stamp on the place. As soon as they got the keys, she jumped right in and began sourcing furniture and homewares from Jardan, Eco Outdoor, Armadillo &Co, MCM House, Totem Road, Koskela, Tigmi Trading, CLO Studios and more to tie in with the existing colour scheme and materials. ‘I always have a game plan,” she says. “I love to immerse myself in the space and do some research. Once I have developed my overarching interior scheme, I look

at how I want to implement it. For this house, I focused on our living areas and have been working through the other rooms over time as our budget allows.” Leah describes her decorating style as relaxed and modern Australian yet timeless, with a touch of minimalism. “I’m inspired by nature and I love a neutral palette with pops of colour and contrasting textures,” she says. “I like to create spaces that connect and reflect the people living in them.” Leah’s favourite is the living room “because of the clever dividing wall between the dining and sitting areas” and gorgeous design features such as the fireplace, decorative firewood stack, oak shelving and pitched white timber ceiling. “But I especially like the look of the white timber bifold doors and the way they frame our stunning gum tree out the back,” she adds. Now that most of the work is done (there are a few projects in the pipeline; see Lessons Learnt on page 67), the family have an easy-to-use transseasonal home. “In summer we open up the doors and fully enjoy our outdoor living space,” Leah explains. “Having a big yard with a pool, barbecue, deck and gum tree makes us really feel like we’re living in Australia. I grew up in regional areas and didn’t think I’d ever achieve this in an innercity suburb. We entertain on the deck and the kids love swimming in the pool, playing tip or going on the swing we have hanging from the tree. In winter, we all cosy around the fire in the living room and have dinner parties with friends.” Leah’s instincts about the house were spot-on and she has adapted her style to suit. This perfect match was meant to be. Leah Henricks can be contacted through leahhenricksinteriors.com INSIDE OUT | 63


INSIDE | HOME

bright idea

1 Entry 2 Powder room 3 Guest room/ study 4 Media/play room 5 Dining area 6 Kitchen 7 Living room 8 Deck 9 Garage 10 Pool 11 Lawn 12 Shed 13 Bedroom 14 Bedroom 15 Bathroom 16 Ensuite 17 Walk-in robe 18 Main bedroom 19 Balcony

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A dividing wall breaks a vast space into smaller, cosier sections and can also be a strong visual element. This wall in Leah’s living room is one of her favourite features and she chose furniture and art to work with it. The neutral white (with a grey undertone) throughout the house is Dulux Lexicon.

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LIVING ROOM Not unlike the rock formations at Clovelly Beach, the scene in the Aquabumps photograph above the sofa is called Mediterranean Melt. “I haven’t been to the Amalfi Coast yet,” says Leah, “but I can definitely imagine basking in that beautiful water one day.” The Long Beach sofa is from Coco Republic. Wilfred armchair, ottoman and throw, Jardan. Kara marble coffee table, Totem Road. Hang 1 mirror, Blu Dot. Rug, Armadillo & Co. Face sculpture by Holly Ryan, Jerico Contemporary.

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ADDITIONAL PRODUCT SOURCING: NATE VELLA

GREAT FINDS

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Flat bedhead in Teak & Tan, $1850, Fenton & Fenton. Avenue throw in Cement, $295, In The Sac. Hang 1 mirror, $599, Blu Dot. Mediterranean Melt photograph, from $150 (unframed), Aquabumps. My Fate Was Always You sculpture by Holly Ryan, $2800, Jerico Contemporary. Kent oak bench, $1490, Barnaby Lane. Kalahari weave rug, from $440, Armadillo & Co. Alby leather cushion, from $772, Jardan. Markson leather chair, $425, Coco Republic.


INSIDE | HOME

ENSUITE The floor tiles are before Leah’s time but she’s been told that the wall tiles are a handmade terracotta design called Antico Arrotato Cotto from Eco Outdoor. Basins, tapware and toilet, Parisi. POOL (opposite left) The pool sits in front of the family’s beloved gum tree. Beneath it is a pretty vinecovered shed with French doors (see page 140 for more shed inspiration). MAIN BEDROOM (opposite right) “I like to put artwork where it feels right in the space, and that isn’t always above the bed,” says Leah. To the side is a framed photograph bought on holiday in Paris. Flat leather bedhead, Fenton & Fenton. Linen, In The Sac and In Bed. Seed leather bench, GlobeWest. Chair and side table, Eco Outdoor.

lessons learnt “ Live in the house for a while to see how it functions” LEAH HENRICK, HOMEOWNER

“While our house is amazing, there are some small changes we’d like to make in the next few years, mainly in the kitchen area. It’s super pretty, but I’d like to add a pantry, more storage and an island with room to sit at. We could also do with extra storage in the study/guest bedroom, and more artwork everywhere.”

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single level love

Plans for an upstairs extension changed when

the owners realised one very personal storey was enough WORDS KATHERINE CHATFIELD PHOTOGRAPHY NIKOLE RAMSAY STYLING EMMA O’MEARA


INSIDE | HOME

KITCHEN/DINING “We chose a polished concrete floor so the kids can zoom around on ride-on toys and it doesn’t get damaged,” says Georgia. Her butler’s pantry hides a lot of mess. Carrara marble benchtops, with American oak-veneer cabinets. Table, O Design by Brad Ottens. Chairs, Barnaby Design. Sol pendant, Jardan. Stools, Click Furniture. LIVING (opposite) The fireplace gives a nod to the mid-century modern style of the original house. “It really speaks to you when you enter the house,” says architect Steve Tillinger. La Paloma bricks in Castellana, Austral. Wilfred chair, Jardan. Cushion, Moss Grotto. Aria rug, AuRugs.

cheat sheet Who lives here Georgia Mackie, 33, a stay-at-home mum; her husband Andrew Mackie, a former Geelong AFL player, 35; and their three children: Freddy, 6, Louie, 5, Lindy, 3, and Banjo, 1; plus dog Bill, a pug. Style of home A five-bedroom, two bathroom, one-level home with a midcentury-modern feel on 1000 square metres in Victoria’s Geelong. The planning took about a year, and the build was 10 months. About $1 million, not including $$$$ decorating and furniture.

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eorgia and Andrew Mackie were already

living in Geelong in 2013 when they saw a tiny yellow-brick house for sale around the corner. While they were drawn to the block, the house was too small for them and their two children, so they bought the property and leased it until they’d decided what to do. “We thought about developing it, but couldn’t decide how to make it work for us,” says Georgia. In 2016 they learnt they were expecting their third child and felt it was time to take the plunge. “That was when we demolished the house,” she says. Architect Steve Tillinger was briefed on a modern, two-storey home and they liked the plans he drew up. But when the couple learnt that planning permission was going to be tricky, they were forced to reassess. “That made us really think about what we wanted,” says Georgia. “After talking to our builder, Matt Wilson of Built by Wilson, we opted to keep the house as a single storey – and I’m so glad we did. The night we made the decision to change the plans, I was on the phone to Andrew and the kids were in the bath and I thought, ‘How great would it be if I didn’t have to keep running up and down stairs, if I could just see where they are all the time.’ Doing it this way has made our lives much more simple, and really changed the way we live.” What they have now is a U-shaped home with a pool in the middle. “I can be in the kitchen and watch the big kids splash around without having to run in and out the whole time,” says Georgia. This interplay of space is essential to the feel of the house, says Steve. “There’s a constant line of sight connecting you to all parts of the home. It feels more like a pavilion than a house with defined rooms.” The design is intended to futureproof the house. “As the children get older, the space will evolve with them,” Steve adds. “Their wing is at the rear of the house and the parents’ bedroom is at the front, so they can be more separate when they choose to be.” Georgia and Andrew also wanted a seamless transition between indoors and out. “The term ‘indoor/outdoor living’ is a bit overused, but this house really delivers it,” says Steve. “Northerly light floods in over the pool and the rest of the house at all times.” Georgia elaborates: “There’s so much glass, we can see the pool nearly all the time, so it always feels like we’re outside – even when we’re not. The big windows by the front door and throughout the house add to that effect, which we love.” Everywhere you look, the materials are simple, beautiful and functional. “There’s honesty and beauty in a neutral palette,” says Steve. “It lets other items become heroes, among them the oversized front door handle and the superb craftsmanship of the joinery.” Georgia admits that the joinery was “a major cost” but says, “because it’s so prominent we wanted to get it right.” Colour has been used to add more personality. “There weren’t many bold colour choices, so I wanted something that stood out a bit,” says Georgia, referencing the peppermint cupboards in the playroom. There are also splashes of pink. “I have one girl, but tried to get as much pink into the house as possible! I think it warms things up. The pink Jardan chair is my favourite thing in the whole house – I sit in it at night when the kids go to bed.” Built by Wilson is in Geelong, Victoria; builtbywilson.com


PLAYROOM “We asked for lots of storage here, so we could tidy the kids’ stuff away when we need to,” says Georgia. “And the floorboards [from Royal Oak Floors] are really warm and nice for the kids to sit on and play.” Cupboard paint colour is Dulux Diorite. Island Life rug, Kip & Co. DINING (opposite top, from left) Gathered around the table are Andrew, Georgia, Banjo, Lindy, Freddy, Louie and pug Bill. Vilac Classic Retro ride-on metal racing car. ENTRY (opposite bottom) Artworks from Lumiere Art + Co set the tone for the pink touches throughout. Ethnicraft straight bench, GlobeWest. Vintage Berber rug, Rigby’s Homewares.


lessons learnt “Never say never!” GEORGIA MACKIE, HOMEOWNER

The family love the house, especially the natural light and the finishes, which make it feel both luxurious and lived-in. There’s only one thing Georgia would change. “If we did it again, I’d add an extra bathroom,” she says. “We didn’t know we were going to have a fourth baby!”

ENSUITE The wall tiles are Carrara marble 50mm x 50mm mosaics from Geelong Tiles, and the vanity is American oak veneer with a Corian top. “The kids have the same colours in their bathroom — but without the marble,” says Georgia. Brushed platinum tapware, Astra Walker. Earth Light in Pure White, Anchor Ceramics. MAIN BEDROOM (opposite) “We chose this Jardan light to give a bit of colour, but I like it because it’s not too extreme for the bedroom,” says Georgia. Artwork by Kate Mayes, through Greenhouse Interiors. Linen, Kip & Co. Hycraft ‘Carramar’ carpet in Winter Mist, Carpet House. The wall is painted Dulux Natural White.

72 | INSIDE OUT


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1 Entry 2 Powder room 3 Main bedroom 4 Ensuite 5 Garage 6 Living room 7 Kitchen 8 Butler’s pantry 9 Laundry 10 Dining 11 Pool 12 Playroom 13 Study nook 14 Bedroom 15 Bathroom 16 Bedroom 17 Bedroom 18 Bedroom 19 Garden

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“We wanted a simple, relaxing bedroom. The late-afternoon sun comes in here so it always has a sense of warmth in the evening!” GEORGIA MACKIE, OWNER

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Wild Floss limited-edition giclée art print on canvas (75cm x 50cm), $450, Greenhouse Interiors. Sol pendant light in American Oak/ Natural (49cm x 20cm), $1109, Jardan. Luxor Silver Blue wool and artsilk rug in Silver Grey (270cm x 360cm), $7349, The Rug Collection. Wilfred armchair in Luna/Suga, $4871, Jardan. Tanner dining chair in Grey, $750, Barnaby Lane. Velvet Euro cushion cover in Scorched Almond, $59, Kip & Co. Dune rattan bedside table, $299, Hello Trader.

74 | INSIDE OUT

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT SOURCING: NATE VELLA

GREAT FINDS


EXTERIOR Georgia has some rare me-time by the pool, which is built along the length of the home and adjacent to the kitchen/dining zone. Behind her is the kids’ playroom. As well as the cedar timber with a grey Cutek finish, the house is constructed in Steel bricks from Austral’s Industrial range. The wooden bench is from GlobeWest. Espaliered lemon trees underplanted with liriope line the fence while a low-maintenance umbrella plant fills the right corner. Pot, Bunnings.


F R E S H

S TA R T

A Sydney family called on the experts to create a Hamptons-style home where they can ‘holiday’ all year WORDS JACKIE BRYGEL PHOTOGRAPHY CHRIS WARNES STYLING KAYLA GEX


INSIDE | HOME

cheat sheet Who lives here Deb and Peter, who both work in the technology field; and their sons: Harry, 12, and Jake, 9. Style of home A renovated and extended two-level home in Sydney’s southern suburbs that now delivers on space, practicality and timeless Hamptons-inspired style. After 12 months of planning the renovation and seeking approvals, the works were carried out over a 14-month period to 2017.

POOL AREA Peter and son Jake on the low-maintenance Millboard Composite Decking encasing the new pool zone. FACADE (opposite) Scyon Linea weatherboard cladding in a crisp white tone called K2 by Porter’s Paints brings welcome charm to the home.

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enovations can take on a life of their own – and

what might begin as a minor update of a room or two can escalate into an overhaul of the entire house, as many will attest. But it’s often for the best of reasons. Just ask Sydneysiders Deb and Peter. “What was originally a desire to move the kitchen downstairs became a complete makeover,” says Deb of their then-ageing split-level brick home. “It was effectively a case of ‘Let’s start again!’” Yet when the couple moved their family into the “very livable” house a decade ago, they initially put off any thoughts of renovation. “We wanted to wait until the boys were old enough that they wouldn’t be drawing on walls and sofas, and pushing trikes into walls,” says Deb of sons Harry and Jake. And they have no regrets about becoming well-acquainted with their home before the revamp. “The best advice we had was to live in the house for a while to understand where the sun and light fell during the different seasons, and how we wanted to use it.” In its pre-makeover state, the three-bedroom house featured living spaces on split levels, a less-than-ideal arrangement for keen entertainers with young children. “Each time we had a barbecue, we’d be up and down the stairs between the kitchen and a very small deck,” says Deb. Engaging architect David Neate of Neate Projects and builder Luke Fallon of Fallon Building Projects, Deb and Peter began by contemplating what should stay and what should go. The conclusion? “It was a case of almost nothing should stay!” says Deb with a smile. “Just about every wall and core structure needed replacing.” The couple then enlisted the expertise of interior designer Sonja Kritzler, putting forward their vision for a timeless Hamptons-inspired makeover. “They wanted the house to be light and fresh with lots of white – nothing that was going to date,” says Sonja. “I wanted an undertone of softness to create a harmonious atmosphere. The spaces had to meet the needs of the whole family and have a classical vibe. We also wanted the children to be just as relaxed within the home as their parents.”

78 | INSIDE OUT


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KITCHEN (both pages) Deb and Harry at the island bench featuring bespoke brass edging. Natural stone reigns supreme here, with luxe Elba marble on the splashback and benchtops. The white overhead joinery in two-pack Porter’s Paints K2 contrasts with the island front in Taubmans Black Flame. Another glam touch is the Volker Haug ‘Big Kick’ pendant light. “The brass adds an extra layer and is repeated throughout the home,” says interior designer Sonja. TBS stools from Studio of Adam Lynch.


INSIDE | HOME

‘‘I call it the ‘barefoot resort’ as we’ve opted for no shoes in the house. We have lots of rattan shoe boxes at the front door and in the garage’’ PETER, HOMEOWNER

Happily, the project proved a wonderful meeting of creative minds.“Deb and I were aligned aesthetically,” says Sonja, “so selecting the soft furnishings as well as the finishes and fixtures was not at all difficult. It also made it easy to create a beautiful flow through the home.” Adds Deb: “I was an Instagram and Pinterest addict, so Sonja really helped me to keep things consistent. It was important to invest in designs that were not going to date, and keep the tones neutral so that we could add colour with accessories and change them over time.” Basking in light and space, the ground level now showcases a striking kitchen and butler’s pantry, soaring ceilings in the living zones and an abundance of concealed storage, with the upstairs housing the family’s bedrooms. A restrained base of crisp white on the walls allows highlights of organic timber, tactile Elba marble and deep navy accents to sing. “There’s the contrast of the navy and white within the joinery, and the navy is also echoed in some of the furniture selections and the front door,” says Sonja. “The Elba marble is the hero in the home and has been used in varying applications, from the benchtops to the fireplace hearth and the bathroom walls.” Inviting the outdoors in was also pivotal to the brief and the result delivers in spades. Expanses of glazing reveal the garden by Darren Kerr of Appleseed Gardening, with views of the leafy surrounds and a shimmering new pool. “Our outlook is so calming,” says Deb. “We love the outdoor spaces, especially during the summer.” For Peter, the backyard has become a far more practical place, with plenty of room for a game of cricket (a must) and to entertain, with space on the large deck for the couple to recline while keeping an eye on the kids. “It’s perfect for summer afternoons with a southerly breeze,” he says. Deb and Peter say the outcome has far exceeded their expectations. “The house is amazing,” says Deb. “There’s space for us all to be together and room for us to spread out when we need to.” Adds Peter: “This is the first full summer we’ve had here and we don’t have to leave the house. We’re on holidays in our own home, which is exactly what we wanted.” To see more of Sonja Kritzler’s work, visit sonjakritzlerdesign.com. Contact architect David Neate at david.neate@neateprojects.com.au; find Fallon Building Projects at fallonbuilding.com.au; and Appleseed Gardening at appleseedgardening.com.au

LIVING ROOM A pair of Harvest leather chairs are partnered with a plush Andy sofa, all from Jardan. The textured Armadillo & Co ‘Ghan Berber’ rug, sitting on engineered European oak boards from Precision Flooring, centres the chill-out zone. The Hay tray table is from Cult. DINING (opposite) Deb and Peter love the Jardan ‘Otto’ table and benches, teamed with leather TBS dining chairs from Studio of Adam Lynch. Illuminating the dining zone is a shapely set of Arturo Onn pendant lights by Jardan.

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1 Entry 2 Formal living 3 Garage 4 Bathroom 5 Study 6 Living 7 Dining 8 Kitchen 9 Butler’s pantry 10 Laundry 11 Deck 12 Pool 13 Bedroom 14 Work space 15 Ensuite 16 Main bedroom 17 Walk-in robe 18 Bedroom 19 Walk-in robe 20 Bathroom 21 Linen


BALCONY The main bedroom opens out to a sun-drenched balcony overlooking the pool. It’s furnished with a wicker sofa from Byron Bay Hanging Chairs and a Hurdle Tray side table from Dowel Jones. LIVING (opposite) A built-in day bed with Jardan cushions makes an inviting spot for Jake to relax. The Gubi ‘Grässhoppa’ floor lamp was ordered through Cult. Curtains in Westbury fabric by My Workroom.

bright idea Deb and Peter were after flooring that would last. They wanted an elegant yet practical surface so chose durable European oak floorboards. As well as having an interesting texture and soft tone, their well-used areas should look just as good in years to come.


LESSONS LEARNT “IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS” DEB, HOMEOWNER

“It’s worth taking the extra time to research and shop around, touching and feeling surfaces and asking lots of questions and leveraging the experts to make sure you are getting exactly what you want. This takes a bit of effort, but is always worth it. The details do matter.”

GREAT FINDS

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT Middle of Nowhere ‘Bjorn’ oval mirror (65cm x 100cm), $365, Life Interiors. By Lassen ‘Kubus’ bowl, $829, Designstuff. Big Kick pendant light in Brass, $3905, Volker Haug. TBS 650 stool, POA, Studio of Adam Lynch. Ghan Berber knot rug (1.7m x 2.4m), $1690, Armadillo & Co. Manhattan armchair, $545, Byron Bay Hanging Chairs. Otto bench, $2448, Jardan. River Stone resin vase in Petal Swirl, $115 (large), Dinosaur Designs.

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INSIDE | HOME

MAIN BEDROOM Floor-to-ceiling blush drapes together with a Naturally Cane ‘Biscayne’ bedhead and Grazia & Co bedside table give the parents’ retreat a stylish look. Duomo wall light from Nightworks Studio. Bed linen, In Bed. ENSUITE (opposite) Classic subway tiles cover the walls of Deb and Peter’s bathroom, while Elba marble tops the vanity and forms the splashback in diamond-shaped tiles from Artedomus. The Piper Smoke pendant lights are from Jardan. Oval mirrors, Middle of Nowhere. Basins, Cibo.

‘‘My vision for clients is to always create a sanctuary, a place where they can stop and recharge’’ SONJA KRITZLER, INTERIOR DESIGNER


BAC K TO N AT U R E

Snuggled between the mountains and the sea, this secluded South African home is the ultimate retreat for its busy owners

DOUBLE DECK The poolside entertaining zone juts out over the slope’s wild vegetation. Paola Lenti loungers, through Dedece. LIVING AREA (opposite) A custom day bed in the bay window rounds out the mix of new and vintage pieces. At left is a mid-century Falcon chair. Cork coffee table, Wiid Design. Risom side chair and stool, Dedece.

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INSIDE | OVERSEAS INSPIRATION

cheat sheet Who spends time here Justin Rhodes and Cameron Munro, who own hospitality venues, a gallery and a co-working space in Cape Town, an hour’s drive away. Style of home A 160-square-metre bungalow on three levels built in the 1970s, with a new colour scheme to match the natural setting.

WORDS CARLI PHILIPS/TRACY LYNN PHOTOGRAPHY GREG COX STYLING SVEN ALBERDING


L

ess than an hour from Cape Town, Misty

Cliffs is a conservation area that only a lucky few have the privilege of inhabiting. South African couple Justin Rhodes and Cameron Munro had been visiting the hamlet for years and always dreamed of buying in the area when they discovered this 1970s bungalow. It seemed like the perfect getaway from their busy lives in the city, where they own a raft of trendy venues and an art gallery. The house needed work, but no major structural changes. One of the first things Justin and Cameron did was paint the whole house (including some of the ceilings and cabinetry) a brave shade of green. This was at the suggestion of their close friend, acclaimed South African furniture designer Gregor Jenkin, who said the soothing mossy colour would complement the original yellow beechwood floors. Depending on the light, the walls veer from hues of avocado to pistachio and fern. Echoing the lush plant life outside, the green scheme extends to the lighting fixtures and even rugs. “It’s green to the max,” says Cameron. Justin and Cameron own a gallery in Cape Town called What If The World and have decorated their weekender with sculptures, drawings and collages from some of the artists they represent. When it comes to furniture, there is a mix of comfortable big-ticket pieces from Italian brands such as Flos, Calligaris and Varaschin. Smaller homewares and ceramics from South African-based designers such as Vorster & Braye and Dokter and Misses Editions are scattered throughout. The layout is a unique footprint of split levels, accessed through an entry on the upper floor, where the main bedroom has been given a new shelving wall with a ceramic basin. On another floor is the open-plan kitchen, dining and living space. Below that are two bedrooms. A narrow central staircase runs

through the three floors and is lined in shiplap timber. Decks and balconies hang off all the rooms, creating a closer connection to the outdoors and good air flow. “The house is small, but it opens up very well,” says Justin. When there for the weekend, the couple might explore the fresh produce markets in nearby Scarborough on the Saturday, then host brunch for friends on the Sunday. “The kitchen is compact, but we make a lot in it,” he adds. One significant addition they’ve made is a split-level deck they installed around the pool. The top level features two vivid blue armchairs that reflect the pool water, and a second, sunken level has a built-in bench that doubles as storage. Midway down the stepped garden path to the beach, Justin and Cameron have also built a balau-timber perch and have plans to install a hot tub there. While the Atlantic can be wild and windy, this spot is hidden and well-protected by vegetation. “It’s like being submerged in the mountainside,” says Cameron of the indigenous shrubland. Picture windows on every floor look out at something spectacular. To maximise the views, it was important for the furniture to be carefully oriented. From the dining table, for example, floor-to-ceiling windows frame the sea, showing how Misty Cliffs got its name. “It’s very magical… the mist plays tricks with the light and sometimes everything below us is white,” explains Cameron. In the main bedroom, latch windows in the reed-lined A-frame ceiling open up to the sky. “When all the windows are open, it feels like you’re on a cruise ship,” he says. The coastal property also works well in the colder months. In the living area, the fireplace mantel echoes the rockery just outside the window and its shield of patinaed steel prevents smoke escaping. Under the bay window is a day bed custom designed with leather trimmings. “It’s like a log cabin in winter,” says Justin. “We light the fire and watch the storms come in. But then in summer we open the house up and it becomes really beachy.” What If The World is in Cape Town, South Africa; whatiftheworld.com


INSIDE | OVERSEAS INSPIRATION

KITCHEN Painting the entire house green — including some ceilings — was one of the few major changes made to the original home. Stool by Gregor Jenkin. PERGOLA (opposite left) Cameron and Justin in their most protected outdoor space. DINING AREA (opposite right) Both men are keen cooks so are always serving up delicious meals. The table and Quaker chairs are by Gregor Jenkin. Ngwenya Glass vessels. IC Lights, available through Euroluce and Living Edge.

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“ We use the pool a lot because the Atlantic Ocean at Misty Cliffs is cold throughout the year. For us, swimming in the sea is a very refreshing and speedy jump in and out� JUSTIN RHODES, HOMEOWNER

LOWER DECK Justin and Cameron designed the built-in seat below the pool to maximise the seaside experience. Guests are treated to the sounds of crashing waves and all sorts of bird life. The embroidered cushions are by Marrakesh-based lifestyle brand LRNCE.


INSIDE | OVERSEAS INSPIRATION

1 Entry 2 Powder room 3 Ensuite 4 Main bedroom 5 Dining area 6 Kitchen 7 Sitting area 8 Deck 9 Guest room 10 Bathroom 11 Bunk room 12 Loft

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MAIN BEDROOM (both pages) Picture windows reveal ever-changing vistas of sea and sky. Behind the bed is a pencil drawing by Paul Edmunds, represented by the owners’ gallery. Silk rug made from saris, Mae Artisan Rugs. Opposite in the niche is a round ceramic basin and shallow shelves. On the Calligaris side table by the wall is an &Tradition ‘FlowerPot’ lamp by Verner Panton, available through Cult.

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT SOURCING: NATE VELLA. *CURRENCY CONVERSION CORRECT AT TIME OF PRINTING

GREAT FINDS

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT Flos ‘ICS1’ brass pendant light, $612, Finnish Design Shop. Coast cotton velveteen cushion in Mint, $145, Bonnie & Neil. Carl Hansen + Son ‘OW150’ day bed, POA, Cult. Empira White 5151 solid surface, POA, Caesarstone. Carl Hansen & Son ‘OW150’ day bed, from $6000, Cult. Flowerpot VP3 table lamp in Dark Green, $293, Finnish Design Shop. Cuba stool, $576 (small), Beeline Design. Small Jug 2 ceramic jug, $160*, LRNCE. Dulux Wash&Wear low-sheen paint in Tendril, $91.55 per 4L, Bunnings.


GUEST ENSUITE Timber cabinetry painted a green-tinged grey continues the natural vibe. Ceramics by Vorster & Braye and Wonki Ware, both South African brands. GUEST BEDROOM (opposite) Another beautiful green room, this time paired with a hand-embroidered bedspread from LRNCE. Leather Banana Pouffe, Missibaba. Pink metal side table, Hay. Paper collages by MornĂŠ Visagie.

The custom leather ottoman by local brand Missibaba was a gift from a friend; it's the perfect piece to drag onto the bedroom balcony for morning coffee


INSIDE | OVERSEAS INSPIRATION

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RENOVATE

in or out

Soften the transition with natural materials and shapely greens Australians are very good at blurring the boundary between indoors and out, and this home nails it. The metal-framed glass sliding doors and timber decking take care of practicalities (while the latter is also suggestive of trees beyond), and planters ďŹ lled with hardy succulents add sculptural interest at various levels. All that’s left is to pick a step! Turn the page to see more.

PHOTOGRAPHY SHANNON McGRATH


DREAM IT. DESIGN IT. DO IT.

extended

exterior Hardy materials, including permeable pavers and Klip-Lok roofing in Woodland Grey, were selected to withstand the home’s coastal conditions.

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INSIDE | RENOVATE

family When the Cooper clan get together at the beach in Victoria, they now have a home to fit everyone

ARTWORK (INSIDE) BY NICOLE BOWLLER

cheat sheet Who lives here Chris and Liz Cooper, retired solicitors. Their four children and two grandchildren – including son William, a carpenter; daughter-in-law Sarah, an architect; and one-year-old grandson Sidney – are all frequent visitors. Style of home A boxy four-bedroom 1980s brick house that’s been transformed into a five-bedroom holiday home on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula. Daughter-in-law Sarah Cooper started working on plans for the renovation in April 2015. Building began in April 2017 and was completed 10 months later. The landscaping was finished in January 2019. Total cost of the renovation was $$$$ roughly $600,000.

WORDS JOANNE HAWKINS PHOTOGRAPHY SHANNON M C GRATH


lower living The original timber stairs and exposed brick fireplace are now features in the new addition. Vitra metal side tables (supporting plants), Living Edge. Muskhane rug, Kido. Artwork by Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori.

married her husband William, she also gained an extended family. “As well as his parents, Chris and Liz, he has three sisters,” Sarah says. “So I married not only William, but his large and loving family, too. They’re all amazing.” Another bonus was being introduced to Chris and Liz’s beach house in Portsea, on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula, which the older couple bought back in 1997. Set in a secluded cul-de-sac surrounded by ancient Moonah trees and with views over a nearby golf course and coastal bushland beyond, the location is stunning. “It’s heavily vegetated with no sense that there are neighbours on either side. The site slopes away from the trees and when you’re staying there you can relax completely, because it really feels like you’ve left your daily life behind,” says Sarah. But while the holiday house was much-loved and well-used, the brick ‘spec’ home that sat on the 2210-square-metre site left a little to be desired. Not to mention the fact that as the Cooper clan had grown, with partners now added to the mix, the house was proving to be a tight squeeze. “Chris and Liz really encourage us all to use the house, but as the family was evolving, it just wasn’t big enough. They felt it was time to add more space,” explains Sarah.

William made the 3.2m dining table, which can seat the whole family. Muuto ‘Nerd’ dining chairs, Living Edge. Armani grey marble benchtop, Attila’s Natural Stone & Tiles. About A Stool bar stools, Hay.

dream it.

Initially, Chris and Liz planned to demolish the existing house and start from scratch. Built in the 1980s, the brick structure was dark and dated, with myriad boxy rooms – including a tiny kitchen and excessively large laundry – and no real connection to the beautiful landscape outside. “The house didn’t address the site, it was closed off from the views, and they just couldn’t see a way of solving those problems and adding more space without knocking it down,” Sarah recalls. As Sarah spent more time in the house with William and her new in-laws, she developed a real affection for it. “I saw how they lived in it and how much they loved it. And there were all these corners of the house that were beautiful at different times of the day. So I came up with a few ideas of how we could renovate the house sympathetically, and they were very quickly on board with the idea of keeping it.”

ADDITIONAL PRODUCT SOURCING: NATE VELLA

W

hen architect Sarah Cooper

kitchen/deck


INSIDE | RENOVATE

wishlist + Space for a large table “Chris and Liz love having the whole family together around the table,” says Sarah. + Framed vistas “There are beautiful views over the rest of the site and the golf course on the western side of the house, but you couldn’t see them from the original house.” + Second living space “The family was g owing and need gr ded a secondary brea br eako ko kout outt liv ivin i g space. They love having ever ev ver eryo yo y one one e together, g but also wanted morre mo re spa paccce e forr a little privacy.” + Fl Flex exib bil ilit lity itty “Ch Chris and Liz wanted the hous ho ous use to use to wor ork fo f r everyone, now and in n the he futtur u e. As we wellll as accommodating alll of al of the fam amilily, amil y the h y wantted it to wor orkk for wh hen n it w waas ju just st the h two wo of th them e .”

the moodboard

FROM FAR LEFT Muuto ‘Nerd’ chair in Grey, $705, Living Edge. Hawthorn clay bricks in Surrey, $2127 per 1000, Austral Bricks. Armani honed grey marble, $605 per sq m, Attila. Wash&Wear paint in Showdown, $91.55 per 4L, Bunnings. Inax ‘Sugie Series SU2031 Hanten’ ceramic tiles, POA, Artedomus.

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upper living A double front door painted Dulux Showdown on the outside opens to the expansive living space where timber floorboards flow from one zone to the next. Sofas, Arthur G. Banquette in Field fabric, Kvadrat Maharam. Vitra ‘Gueridon’ coffee table, Living Edge. Rug, Provincial Home Living.


INSIDE | RENOVATE

design it.

One of the major problems with the original house was the lack of windows on the western side, which obscured the view. Sarah’s solution was to extend the existing lounge out to the north, creating a spacious living/kitchen/dining area with sliding doors that opened up to an elevated deck. The skillion roof has also been extended across the new kitchen and living area, which, combined with the clerestory windows, allows much more light. “Chris and Liz really wanted to push that grand feeling of light and openness so you could really relax into the space,” says Sarah. “And they needed a connection to the outside and the weather, mainly because they wanted to be able to see what time of day it was, and which season.” That link to the landscape, not to mention the sloping roof, pine-clad ceiling and existing brickwork, also contributed to the mid-century feel that Liz craved (she grew up in a modernist house in the bayside Melbourne suburb of Beaumaris). “Simplicity and honesty of materials is another principle of mid-century homes, and that was something we put into practice here,” Sarah explains. “It’s not a fancy house and the shell itself is quite modest, but we put more money towards things we interact with, such as beautiful taps and the gorgeous marble on the kitchen’s island bench.” Sarah also added a second living area, a fifth bedroom and an additional bathroom, and converted the existing carport into a retreat for Chris and Liz. “We now have 14 beds in the house, but the sleeping spaces are quite small and worked around really generous living areas so the house actually brings the whole family together,” says Sarah.

do it.

LESSONS LEARNT

“Choose a builder who

understands the home”

ARCHITECT SARAH COOPER, DAUGHTER-IN-LAW

“Our builder loved the existing home and actually understood why we were keeping it. As the renovation progressed, we learnt so much from the existing build details that informed it, which saved money and created connections between old and new.”

While Sarah admits that designing a new, improved beach house for her in-laws was “a bit nerve-wracking”, she felt it was the right thing to do. “I wanted to do this because I thought I could do a really good job for them. We were on the same page when it came to the renovation and I was also really transparent the entire way through, especially with the design. I explained everything we were doing, so there were no surprises,” she says. From the tender stage onwards, Sarah also collaborated with Jean Graham from Winter Architecture, who helped with the contract administration, paperwork and financial side of things as well as liaising with the builder, Glenn Diamond. And despite the steep site causing some issues (the water would race down the site, bringing dirt and sand with it), the build was completed in a speedy 10 months, allowing the family to enjoy their holiday retreat again the following year. “I just think, what amazing parents-in-law I have. They’ve created this space so we can all co-exist without any tension. This house is a really robust backdrop for fun, family life – whether that’s experienced individually or as a whole family.” Architecture by Sarah Cooper in collaboration with Winter Architecture; winterarchitecture.com.au. The builder was Glenn Diamond of Diamond Building Services; 0400 102 231. The engineer was James Jonathon from Tebbs Engineering; instagram.com/tebbsengineering INSIDE OUT | 103


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All the bedrooms are functional and stylish. Vitra ‘Slow’ chair and ottoman, and e15 ‘ST04 Backenzahn’ side table, all Living Edge. Table lamps, Euroluce. Bed linen, Bed Threads. Vivaldi 2 wool carpet, RC+D. Artwork by Nicole Bowller.

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1 Entry 2 Upper living 3 Kitchen 4 Dining 5 Lower living 6 Bedroom 7 Ensuite 8 Laundry/WC 9 Bedroom 10 Bedroom 11 Bedroom 12 Bathroom 13 Ensuite 14 Walk-in robe 15 Main bedroom 16 Outdoor dining 17 Barbecue area 18 Tennis court


the best bits + Island bench “I love the Armani Grey marble on the bench, which is 5.5m long. It’s perfect for the most social part of the house!” says Sarah. + Sloping roof “The living spaces look huge, but are actually quite modest. But the skillion roof creates a dynamic space that feels like it’s lifting up because it extends to those high-level windows.” + Bricks “I like how the existing brick ties in with the home. People who haven’t visited the house for years think they’re part of the new build and just love them.” + Multiple spaces to sit “There are spots for different times of the day, from the banquette for newspaper reading to outside ledges where we can sit with a beer in the evening.”

bathroom A skylight brings natural light to this compact space. Inax Sugie mosaic floor tiles and Nuance wall tiles, Artedomus. Strap shower tray, Rogerseller. Side table, Living Edge.

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BEFORE&AFTER

fully booked A young owner’s keen eye and impressive work ethic saw her transform a rundown Sunshine Coast home into a nice little earner WORDS CERI DAVID PHOTOGRAPHY MINDI COOKE STYLING HAYLEY JENKIN


INSIDE | RENOVATE

cheat sheet The owner Hannah Williams, a budding property developer, originally purchased the house to renovate and live in with her French bulldog, Mila. Style of home A three-bedroom cottage close to the beach in Mooloolaba, on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast. Hannah bought the block in 2016, putting in a pool and giving the house a swift hands-on revamp before moving in. The home’s interior is 127 square metres and a loft-style guest house was added to the back garden in 2018. In February 2019, Hannah moved out of the house and now rents out both properties via Airbnb (search for The Palm House and The Pool House). $60,000 for the house and $27,000 $$$$ for the swimming pool.

POOL A cane sunlounger from Samsara Home provides a perfect spot to chill out by the water. DINING NOOK Hannah in the relaxed eating area. Pendant light from Bali-based Kim Soo. Cushions from Raw Sunshine Coast and Kip & Co.

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INSIDE | RENOVATE

A

DINING Reclaimed French oak herringbone floors from Floorwood run through the home. Hannah brought in new V-groove cabinet doors from The Kitchen Shop, an oven by Smeg and aged-brass tap by Astra Walker. Crisp Taubmans Snow Drop freshens the walls and ceiling. EXTERIOR The home’s living areas flow out to a HardieDeck pool surround.

nyone who’s ever renovated will tell you

it can be quite a journey. You can plan the trip as much as you like, but there’s no telling exactly where you might end up. The route Hannah Williams took saw her buy a modest, rundown house on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast with the aim of doing it up and living there with her dog, and perhaps a housemate. “It was very dated, with salmon-coloured tiles and diamond-grille security screens,” says Hannah. “But its potential was immediately obvious – it’s a 10-minute walk from the beach.”

all hands on deck

Aged just 24 when she settled on the property, Hannah’s goal was to update the house with a tight budget of $40,000, so she rolled up her sleeves, hiring power tools, jackhammering tiles with the help of her sister, and painting the underlying concrete white.

When it came to the kitchen, she had a couple of tricks up her sleeve. “I only spent a couple of thousand dollars by keeping the carcasses and adding new doors,” she says. “For the benchtops, I was able to find high-end offcuts. My benches might not have fancy waterfall edges, but they still look great.” The bathroom and laundry required professional help, at which point Hannah brought in her cousin Rohan, owner of Total Building and Construction in nearby Witta, who was able to do her a great deal on gutting and replacing everything in those spaces. Decor-wise, she went for a Mediterranean vibe, painting the walls and ceiling Taubmans Snow Drop while sticking to black accents in the kitchen and natural materials in the living zones. Furniture was kept simple. “My mum bought me the bentwood dining chairs when I went to university and the dining table was my sister’s childhood desk.” The renovation process coincided with a family holiday to Bali, where Hannah had linen curtains custom made. “That’s also


where I picked up all the door handles for the house,” she says. “I can still picture my mum precariously perched on the back of a motorbike with the enormous pendant light that’s now hanging in the main bedroom!”

labour of love

Keeping costs low was a key priority, but this didn’t take any of the fun out of the renovation for Hannah. “I absolutely loved the whole process,” she says. “To picture something in my mind and then see it become a reality was so exciting.” From the beginning, Hannah had focused on the property’s strengths as a whole. Making the most of the 509-square-metre block, she added a swimming pool and a guest house (which was featured in the January 2019 issue of Inside Out) as a flexible space that could be used for visiting friends or paying guests. Hannah listed the guesthouse on Airbnb and found herself bowled over by the burgeoning interest in it. “Over time I realised so many

MATTER OF CONTRAST Designed as a “New York loft with an Australian coastal twist”, the guest house extension added by Hannah in 2018 adds balance and contrast to the property. For the weatherboard exterior of the guest house, the savvy renovator flipped the colour palette of the main house — white with black trim — painting the lion’s share of its little sister in Dulux Black with accents in Dulux Casper White Quarter. The result is two separate living quarters that feel stylistically united yet individual.

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floor show

With that decision made, Hannah replaced the white concrete floor to get the house rent-ready. “It was a bit of a nightmare to maintain, so I started researching floorboards online.” This is where her budgeting skills finally met their match. “I came across these old French oak herringbone floors. They’re wire-brushed and imperfect, which I love. I had to have them, so I saved and saved – they cost $20,000. I blew the budget significantly.” In February, she added the house to Airbnb and it was almost immediately booked up for months – sometimes by returning guests, at other times for photo shoots by brands and influencers. The main drawcard? Those herringbone floors. “They’re one of the things guests comment on most when they stay, so I’m really happy I went with them in the end.” Hannah moved in with her boyfriend in Noosa, with no regrets that her home is now enjoyed by others. “It was never really my plan to move out and I love to go back and visit,” she says. “I’m completely hooked on the whole renovation process though, and I can’t wait to do it again.”

WORK IN PROGRESS 1 When Hannah bought it, the house was structurally sound but needed an overhaul inside and out to bring it up to date. 2 Tired elements, such as the worn carpet, diamond-grille security screens and magnolia paintwork, had to go. 3 Hannah cut down the bar-style top on the island bench, keeping the cabinetry carcasses and adding modern doors. The timber rafters were given a lick of white paint.

1

ARTWORK IN LIVING AREA BY JAI VASICEK

people were missing out on booking the place – it was really popular,” she says. The location was clearly a winner, as was Hannah’s beachy decorating style, which led her to wonder if it might be worth renting out the main house, too.


INSIDE | RENOVATE

FROM LEFT Living area A relaxed sofa from Bianco Interiors in Bali is paired with an armchair from Abide Interiors. Laundry Caesarstone Calacatta Nuvo is used on the bench. Main bedroom Fabric bedhead from Create Estate and mirror from Hello Trader. Bathroom An aged-brass Astra Walker mixer complements the basin from Marble Hub.

LESSONS LEARNT 7

“It’s important to have a plan but to also be adaptable when things don’t go your way”

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“Initially, I had white flooring throughout, but after living in the house for a while I realised it wasn’t too practical and replaced the white concrete with floorboards. I am so glad I did because they’re one of the house’s best features.”

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HANNAH WILLIAMS, HOMEOWNER

1 Entry 2 Living area 3 Sitting nook 4 Kitchen/dining 5 Laundry 6 Bathroom 7 Main bedroom 8 Bedroom 9 Bedroom 10 Pool

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INSIDE | RENOVATE

Who lives here Karly, a dietitian, and David, a business owner, with their two daughters aged 13 and 16. Type of project An ensuite in a contemporary home, newly built in Newcastle, NSW.

I N D E TA I L

into the black

With a white base in their other bathrooms, the owners ventured into dark territory with this ensuite

WORDS LYNNE TESTONI PHOTOGRAPHY ALEXANDER McINTYRE


before

It was the views that seduced Karly and David to build their new home just south of Newcastle. Happily ensconced in a house nearby, Karly says she had no intention of moving again until David spied a prime block of land in Merewether Heights. “He was like, ‘I just want you to come and have a look,’” she says. “I said, ‘I’m not moving.’ Then he goes, ‘Just come and look.’ I looked and I went, ‘Oh bugger. It’s good.’ The block had a beautiful view and it was just very difficult to say no. My husband can be a persuasive man.” The couple decided to build a new three-storey home. Although experienced ‘builders’ (this is their fourth house), they decided to employ an interior designer this time around: New Lambton-based local Stewart Horton of Horton & Co. After seeing the work he had done for some of their friends, Karly and David asked him to manage the entire process from the DA stage through to the fit-out of all the rooms.

during

Karly has always loved a monochromatic palette, which was the brief she gave to Stewart, and for the ensuite she wanted a luxurious, indulgent space. The three bathrooms in the house have a similar palette, but the powder room and children’s bathroom feature white as the base. “I wanted something a little more boudoir-ish,” says Karly. “I like the idea of having a shower in the dark. Everything else in the room is quite light and fresh, but the black gave it something more, a bit of richness.” Karly and David originally wanted the floor to be polished concrete, but site considerations made it difficult and expensive, so Stewart suggested terrazzo tiles as an alternative. “Looking back on it now, I would have hated the concrete,” says Karly. “Concrete is very industrial and bland-looking, and the terrazzo just gives it life and character that concrete wouldn’t have provided.”

after

Working with a limited colour palette, Stewart used different textures and patterns to create a contemporary feel. “The ensuite has quite a lot of intricacy and interest,” says Karly. It also includes a black shelf running from the entry into the shower, to store products and accessories. “The space almost has a theatrical kind of feeling to it, especially when you are in that shower,” says Stewart. “It’s very dark and cave-like, with a very dramatic vibe, and I think that’s what they really love about it.”

the result

The smooth texture of the terrazzo tiles is Karly’s favourite element of the ensuite. “It has a silky-satin feel under your feet,” she explains. “And I do love a nice dark shower. Sometimes I don’t get home until late, and having a shower with a really low light in the dark just feels like I’m decompressing the day. It’s a luxurious feeling rather than a chore.” For more of Stewart’s work, see hortonandco.com.au

“I like the idea of having a shower in the dark. Black gave [the light room] something more, a bit of richness” KARLY, HOMEOWNER

VANITY (opposite) Designer Stewart Horton used a mix of textures to create a sense of luxury. The Dolomite stone benchtop in Super White from CDK Stone allows the Abstrakt terrazzo tiles from Fibonacci Stone to remain the hero. Polytec Venette MDF joinery in Black is teamed with J Pull handles from Index + Co. The Covet Short Clip bath sconce is by Kelly Wearstler. SHOWER Extreme Black porcelain tiles from Earp Bros add to the mystery. BASIN DETAIL The Laufen Pro A under-counter basins and Milli Glance tapware are both from Reece. An Oscar bowl by Greg Natale and a Diva dish by Kelly Wearstler bring polish to the elegant space.

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1

The Block: Glasshouse co-winner and interior architect Shannon Vos. voscreative. com.au

make plans

tips for a 5 renovation rookie

Planning some work on your home? Shannon Vos spills on what to tackle – and steer clear of – to get the job done

N

The most important step of any renovation, extension or build is the planning stage, and it’s imperative get it right. Usually, the more thought and effort that goes into a plan, the smoother the job will run and the quicker it will take to complete, potentially saving you thousands. It may be a case of poring over your plans with a builder, consulting a plumber over tap choices or even chatting to a painter about which white paint to go with. The best advice will come from your experienced builder and trades: they’ve done it a hundred times before and know the most effective way to tackle your build. + No detail is too small, and the more information a builder or tradesman can obtain before starting their job, the easier their task will become. + Plumbers like to have all the taps and spouts onsite before their job even

begins. It gives them an idea of what they’re working with and enables any troubleshooting well before installation, usually after waterproofing and tiling. + Tilers love to have their input in shower grates and tile choices. They know what

works well in different spaces and that mosaic tiles will slow down a job like nothing else and cost you so much more. Make the most of the expertise at hand and ask lots of questions. + Electricians hate it when you ask them to retrofit (install after the build is

ew Year’s resolutions usually centre around who we are

and what we do. Let’s face it: our thighs, livers and bums get the lion’s share of the ‘New Year, New Me’ line of thinking and that’s the end of it – but what about our homes? Do we ever consider what they’re going through, their needs? They do have to put up with a lot (especially the poor bathrooms, bless them) and it’s about time we included our loving – or at least comfort-giving – homes in our Dec 31 thoughts. But where to start? What can you tackle on a kid-free weekend, and what’s best left to the professionals? With the latest series of The Block still fresh in our minds, many of you are keen to get going. So let’s have a look at what is realistic and how you could save plenty of money with a little bit of effort...

finished) any lighting elements. It’s hugely cost-effective to get a trade in early, so they can ‘rough in’ and avoid any problems that may be brewing. + Councils are notorious for leaving DA applications on the shelf for a good month or two, so dig in and prepare for a lengthy approval process. + Plans do change so you will need to be fluid with your build. Sometimes the build dictates the plan, so prepare for failure as much as success and you’ll make those mishaps so much easier to overcome when they rear their ugly heads.


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PHOTOGRAPHY: ARMELLE HABIB. ARCHITECT: FIGR, FIGR.COM.AU. BUILDERS: GRUNDELLA CONSTRUCTIONS, GRUNDELLA.COM.AU; NATURAL BUILD VIC, NBVIC.COM.AU

LINE ’EM UP To ensure your build runs smoothly, choose your professionals, trades and even some materials, such as these Lantern cement floor tiles in Sage from Earp Bros (opposite), ahead of time.

Do your research and spend a bit of time online – homestolove.com.au is a great place to start

2

start small Any DIY weekend warrior knows the value of baby steps. Before you can run, or even briskly stroll, you need to know how to walk, because every great builder started as a lowly apprentice. Far too many times I’ve seen overconfidence lead to a rushed renovation that ends in tears, expensive fix-ups and trips to the hospital. There is true value in starting small and learning your trade, and the same goes for us DIY demons. That may be as simple as getting the hang of swinging a hammer (icepack on stand-by), practising your cuts using a circular saw (that’s three 0s, then press the green phone button) or spending the day watching a YouTube tutorial from the safety of your sofa. The fact is, we all need to start or pick up from somewhere, and the safest way to do it is slowly. You may want to run before you can safely hang a Gyprock wall, but it pays to begin with an easier task. INSIDE OUT | 115


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keep it clean

After planning and then planning again, the next stage – starting – is usually the hardest, but it’s all about having a crack. What you can do is dependent on your confidence, ability (these two rarely line up) and your particular project. For most jobs though, it will be demolition or site prep, the former involving arming yourself with the hardiest of sledgehammers (pick something that looks tough) and going at it like a six-year-old at a lolly-filled piñata. If it’s a bathroom you’re tackling, I would insist you get an electrician to turn off the electricity and a plumber to disconnect the water. Go easy on any

PAINT PARTY It might look easy but there is skill involved in painting and also tiling (top). Before you start, watch some YouTube videos and talk to as many experts as possible.

116 | INSIDE OUT

load-bearing walls and always, always, wear your safety gear. Best yet, ask a builder what they think you can safely do on a spare weekend that would actually be helpful and not cause any delays. Most sites (new builds or renovations) are easily cleared with a team of soldiers with shovels, making way for any piers, concrete slabs or joists. Tradies love a clean and prepped work site, so that’s where I’d start – by keeping the site spotless, tackling any of the mindless demolition myself and then stepping back and watching the trades breeze through their work.

4

know your limits

Some of us like to think we’re still twenty-something and absolutely invincible, but we all need to appreciate where our ambitions supersede ability. These days, it’s an easy Google search to work out how to do some minor tiling or painting or shelf-hanging. Where I would draw the line, though, is the trades that need certification for completion of work, where standards need to be legally adhered to. All waterproofing, plumbing, roofing, electrical and structural work should be left to qualified professionals and, if you have doubts about your trades, ask for their qualifications and licences and visit the Fair Trading website to run a home building licence check. Apartment blocks seem to shun anyone with a can-do attitude and a free weekend, so check with your strata manager prior to doing any work on your place or public areas. Most weekend renovators only take on painting and a bit of gardening, but if you’re brave enough and have a how-to video running in the background, you can easily tile or lay a floor, knock up a garden shed (in about a day) or even put together the most complex of flatpacks (saving your partner the effort can only be good for your marriage).

PHOTOGRAPHY: MAREE HOMER (GREEN WALL), DEREK SWALWELL (WHITE TILES), MARTINA GEMMOLA (SHOWER). ARCHITECT: MULTIPLICITY, MULTIPLICITY.COM.AU (BATHROOM)

3

Ask a builder what they think you can safely do on a spare weekend that would actually be helpful and not cause any delay


5

be alert Lengthy builds cost money and the quickest way to break the bank is to come up against a big problem you haven’t planned for. It could be anything from busting through optical fibre, a burst water main or even a certificate of occupancy being knocked back. Anything big like that could cost you more in trades and rent. Have a plan in place for all the possible mishaps on a job site, then you won’t get caught in the headlights wondering what to do when the proverbial hits the fan. If you’re shooting from the hip and don’t have a great relationship with a builder or trades, your best bet is turning to someone you trust who knows a thing or two about building (like this gangly writer). And remember, bathrooms shouldn’t take more than three weeks (a kitchen slightly less) and you can usually get out of a big extension in under a few months. Downlights can be changed in mere minutes, a new floor could take a few days, and a large paint job (in and out) should be done in a fortnight. Watch the clock, but don’t hover over your trades. At the end of the day, you are paying them for their time with your hard-earned money, so it’s always worth keeping track of them and the job.

WELCOME SURPRISE Sometimes it pays to think on your feet. In the case of this bathroom, the owner used tiles that were left over from their newly built pool — a beautiful and cost-effective solution.


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COOL RUNNINGS

I

t’s that time of year again – and there’s always that real

scorcher of a day at the beginning of summer – when you remember how unbearably hot your home can get and why you made plans to install air-conditioning last year. However, keeping your home cool throughout the warmer months can be costly. It’s been estimated that Australians spend $4.6 billion to stay chilled over summer, so it’s important to take your time choosing the correct system – and make sure it’s efficient. And while air-conditioning might seem ideal, it can be expensive to buy and not all systems are created equal. Other cooling options, like ceiling fans, can be much more affordable. Our comprehensive guide will help you find your best option. WORDS & PRODUCT SOURCING LYNNE TESTONI

FAN CLUB The humble ceiling fan is very effective at cooling a room, and provides a cost-effective compromise if you can’t afford air-conditioning.

PHOTOGRAPHY: LYNDEN FOSS (BOTH PICS). STYLING: TAHNEE CARROLL (DINING); SARAH ELLISON (OUTDOOR ROOM)

Keen to stay comfortable this summer? Chill out with our expert guide to the best cooling ideas on the market


awnings, blinds and shutters Cleverly chosen window treatments can improve your home’s energy efficiency in summer, as well as keeping you cool. For example, awnings provide much-needed shade over windows and are ideal for west- or north-facing rooms. And when used over your outdoor entertaining area, they’ll give protection against the sun during the hottest part of the day. Amelia Taylor, head of product at Wynstan, says Wynstan’s Straight drop awnings can reduce cooling energy costs by up to 60 per cent, especially when used in conjunction with dark fabric for more protection from the sun. Blockout blinds are also great at trapping cool air inside the home and protecting it from the outside elements. According to Amelia, one of the most popular products in the Wynstan range are the honeycomb-style Whisper Cellular shades, which have an added layer of insulation in the blind, thanks to the air pockets between the layers of fabric.

SHUTTER SPEED As well as being a stylish design feature, plantation shutters can be closed off against heat and harsh sunlight or opened to allow cool air in.

portable cooling Portable cooling systems include airconditioners and freestanding fans and are ideal for renters or apartment dwellers. They have the advantage of allowing you to cool just one room at a time and, as such, can be very efficient. If you tend to work long hours and come home to an empty but hot house, a portable fan can quickly cool down a room, especially if you open the doors and windows and have good ventilation throughout your space. The latest products in this category include the bladeless fans offered by Dyson, which feature simple and elegant styling to blend in with contemporary homes. Classic and vintage styles are also still popular. Portable air-conditioners are affordable to buy, but running costs can be higher than built-in units, which means you may be hit with unexpected energy bills if you end up running an air-conditioning unit all night or all weekend. Air-purifying products, where fans combine cooling with a purifying element, are another growth area in this category. Dyson has just released its Pure Cool Me personal purifying fan, while De’Longhi’s 3D Comfort is an air purifier, heater and cooling fan in one.

FROM TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT Goldair 40cm pedestal fan in Matt Black, $99, Harvey Norman. Breeze 41cm tripod fan in White/Ashwood, $129, and Breeze 41cm table fan in Black/Ash, $119, both Beacon Lighting. 3D Comfort fan in Black, $549, De’Longhi. Dimplex Evaporative cooler fan in White, $338, Appliances Online. Pure Cool Me personal purifying fan, $499, Dyson.

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air-conditioning There are two main product types for air-conditioning systems – ducted and wall-mounted. Ducted solutions are generally cheaper to run, but they can be expensive to retro-fit in an existing home. For this reason, they’re ideal for new builds or renovations/extensions, especially when a second storey is added, as it can be difficult (read: expensive) to install a ducted system in a multi-storey building. Wall-mounted units are often confined to the main rooms of the home to save on costs – usually the living space and bedrooms. Kyle Rafter, national product manager at Fujitsu General Australia, says the demand for air-conditioning across the country is growing, and it’s very rare for a new build in Australia to not have some form of air-conditioning included during the construction phase. “Generally, what a builder will do is give one of two options: the cheapest option, which will be a couple of wallmounted units in the living room and maybe the main bedroom, or a ducted system throughout the house,” he says. “A ducted solution might be double the cost of a wall-mounted unit, but it’s cheaper to run over the long term.” If you’re looking to install an airconditioning unit, be sure to check out the energy star rating for heating mode and cooling mode, which should be displayed at point of purchase and on the manufacturer’s website. The more stars, the more energy-efficient the unit is.

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT Zena split system air-conditioner in Blackwood, from $1650, Daikin. Lifestyle range wall-mounted reverse cycle air-conditioner, from $1619, Fujitsu General. Mitsubishi Electric 7.8kW reverse cycle split inverter air-conditioner in White, $2799, Winning Appliances. WS split system air-conditioner with voice activation in White, from $1242, LG. Esatto 4.1kW portable air-conditioner in White, $599, Appliances Online.

PHOTOGRAPHY: PABLO VEIGA (KITCHEN). STYLING: CORINA KOCH (KITCHEN)

HIDING PLACE Subtlety is key with ducted air-con, which allows you to individually cool the rooms in your home from one central unit installed in the ceiling or roof.


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HOW TO KEEP YOUR COOL

ceiling fans For a long time, the ceiling fan has been the forgotten cousin of the cooling world, with its flashier relative, the air-conditioner, taking centre stage, says Denise Hammond of Beacon Lighting. But she believes they are now more popular than ever. “Like a lot of cooling options, ceiling fans have gone in and out of fashion, but I think they’re here to stay as they’re a very cost-efficient way of keeping cool,” she explains. “Unlike air-conditioners, which change the air temperature, ceiling fans move air. As you perspire, air movement over damp skin increases evaporation, helping you to feel cooler.” Ceiling fans can also work in conjunction with air-conditioners, as the fan pushes cooled air down and into other areas of your home, which means you don’t need to have the thermostat set quite as low. Denise says they are capable of reducing air-conditioning costs by up to 10 per cent. In other good news, most ceiling fans use only as much power as a traditional 60-watt light globe, so you can feel cool for as little as 1 cent an hour (however, this can vary depending on your energy provider, fan size and fan use). There are many different styles of fans on offer, although the simple white units continue to be the most popular.

Jan Prichard, Origin Energy’s general manager of customer care, says creating zones in your house is one of the most effective ways to keep energy costs down when it comes to cooling. “Cooling the whole home when you spend most of your time in one or two rooms can quickly add up over summer,” she says. “It’s worth thinking about just cooling down your living space in the evening, or perhaps your bedroom if the nights are hot.” She also explains that one of the most common mistakes we make is setting the air-conditioner temp too low. “Many people overcool and set the temperature to 18 or 19 degrees,” she says. “By setting the thermostat to the recommended 23 or 24 degrees, you’ll still feel comfortable and cool. In addition, you’ll save on costs, with every degree below that adding five to 10 per cent towards your energy use.” The calculator on the Energy Rating website (energyrating.gov.au) is a great resource for consumers, allowing you to compare the energy efficiency of various appliances, including air-conditioners. It will also give you the estimated cost per year to run air-conditioners from most major brands – ducted and non-ducted.

FROM TOP The Zen 4-blade fan in Black, $649.95, Clipsal. Eco Breeze DC 3-blade ceiling fan without light, $299, Universal Fans. Tahitian 132cm 5-blade fan in Off White, $389, Beacon Lighting. HPM ‘Hang Sure’ 3-blade ceiling fan in Aluminium, $95, Bunnings. Infinity DC 54-inch (137cm) 3-blade ceiling fan in Timber/Black, $439, Universal Fans. Shoalhaven 142cm 3-blade fan in Brushed Chrome/Ashwood, $499, Beacon Lighting.

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lo

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So

you RT Elevate

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au

love blossoms

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Treat your furry friend to a brand new bowl for a brand new year. This Woof Luxe bowl, $38, is pooch-perfect; bendo.com.au

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o m $ 1 1 0 ; unt i rs. Fr l . co

BEST IN SHOW

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Rock-hard stone serving trays

Luxe rectangle marble tray, $69; domayne.com.au. Amethyst tray, $310; fentonandfenton.com.au. Terrazzo dimple tray in Snow, $104; zakkia.com.au

heights with Eva

ou

3 OF A KIND

ag

ew on t e

Marimekko continues to bring it with bright and brilliant prints, as the lilac-pink blooms on this Primavera Keittiopyyhe tea towel show. $25; marimekko.com

SOFT SPOT Embrace the shapely curves of the &tradition ‘Catch JH16’ bar stool by Jaime Hayon in your kitchen. The playful yet simple form of this seat will contrast beautifully against hard surfaces and is available in two heights, as well as fabric and leather finishes. From $1750; cultdesign.com.au

KITCHEN NEWS

all yours

Keep it personal with monogrammed napkins, coasters and more

Inspired by the time-honoured tradition of monogrammed linen, Philé has brought this art to the table with their range of flax linen napkins in dreamy tones. Choose from eight monogram styles and a variety of thread colours to create your own set or the perfect housewarming or wedding gift. $70 for four; phile.com.au

to the letter These white marble and polished brass coasters will bring a touch of luxury to any soirée. $42 for four; williams-sonoma.com.au

CLIMATE CONTROL The RS6121SLK1 integrated column refrigerator from Fisher & Paykel is the keen entertainer’s dream. This sleek number features variable temperature zones that can be customised to suit your needs. The design can also fit seamlessly behind joinery, as shown here in this project by Crosson Architects. $12,999; fisherpaykel.com

ON THE GO Get your caffeine hit in a sustainable and handcrafted way with a reusable ceramic takeaway cup by Kim Wallace. From $39; kwceramics.com.au 122 | INSIDE OUT

COMPILED BY VANESSA COLYER TAY

PHOTOGRAPHY: SIMON WILSON (FISHER & PAYKEL)

SMART THREADS


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PHOTOGRAPHY: DEREK SWALWELL. STYLING: RACHEL VIGOR

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colour crush Give your walls, chairs and even your bathtub a colour update with Chalk Paint by Annie Sloan. Add a few coats of Chalk Paint Lacquer for a water-resistant protective finish. The pretty shade on this tub is Scandinavian Pink, $54.95 per 1L; anniesloan.com

COME CLEAN A handy and slick addition in the shower or near the vanity, the Tooletries silicone soap holder, $24.99, makes washing up that little bit easier; yellowoctopus.com.au

ELEGANT TOUCH With its tactile matt rubber finish, the curvy Mette Ditmer ‘Lotus’ ceramic soap dispenser will look right at home on your vanity. Available in eight beautiful tones, you’re bound to find one that suits your bathing space. $95; oliverthom.com.au

NEW MODERN Simple and sophisticated, Rogerseller’s latest addition to its Arq ii collection of tapware is sure to please. The wall mixer and 200mm outlet shown elegantly bring together clean lines and a refined brushed nickel finish, $745; rogerseller.com.au

BATHROOM NEWS

style splash

fresh linen l Love Linen’s new towel range is woven from a soft linen/cotton blend. Combine that quality with a classic waffle texture for an everyday essential that’s a pleasure to use. From $19.95; ilovelinen.com.au

Treat yourself to some new feature elements and feel-good accessories

fine detail Architectural hardware specialist Joseph Giles elevates the design of handles and hooks. Bring the final polish to a bespoke vanity with these hexagonal T-Bar pulls, POA; englishtapware.com.au

3 OF A KIND

Waterproof speakers Take singing in the shower to the next level Ultimate Ears Wonderboom 2 portable bluetooth speaker in Unicorn, $129; harveynorman.com.au Shower bluetooth speaker in Electric Bloom Rose Gold, $34.95; sunnylife.com.au Kakkoii ‘QBL’ Chrome waterproof wireless speaker, $75, until.com.au

COMPILED BY VANESSA COLYER TAY

LUST-HAVE Launched at Maison et Objet Paris last year, the HOUTIQUE ‘Bonnet’ bevelled Mirror with mineral and resin elements on A Gold-plated structure, $2189, will literally turn heads; montauklightingco.com

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UTTER DECLUTTER There’s nothing like a good, deep purge to kick off the new year. Here, decluttering experts share 10 tips for lightening the load without losing your mind

W

hether the idea of

decluttering sparks joy or makes you break out in a cold sweat, there are plenty of good reasons to schedule a session. “It saves you time, reduces stress levels, improves productivity – and at the very least means you can find things,” says Etty Matalon, psychologist and chief organiser at professional organising firm Dot Org. Here, top decluttering experts reveal 10 secrets to a successful – and (mostly) stress-free – home purge.

organise first, buy later “Often

people will start by heading off to the shops to buy storage solutions like tubs or baskets, but this simply adds to the clutter,” says Linda Eagleton, professional organiser at Creative Surrounds. “Once you’ve made the decision to tackle your mess, it’s best to just get started.” start small If doing a big cull feels too

overwhelming, kick off your purge with a single drawer or box, says Amy Revell, professional organiser at The Art of Decluttering. “This will give you an easy win, build your cluttering muscles and motivate you to stay on task.” stay focused Once you’ve homed in

on your clutter target, a take-no-prisoners attitude is required, says Amy. “Set a timer for decluttering – even if it’s just 15 minutes at a time – and stick to it,” she says. “And switch off any distractions, particularly your phone.” ask tough questions Unsure what

to keep and what to ditch? Amy suggests asking yourself these questions: “Have I used it in the past 12 months?”; “Do I plan 126 | INSIDE OUT

to use it in the future?”; “If it broke, would I buy it again?”; “Do I own a similar item that serves the same purpose?”

a couple of magazine stands on the kitchen wall for important paperwork, such as school notes,” she says.

change your attitude “Be ruthless –

reorganise your wardrobe “First,

if you don’t absolutely love or need something, let it go,” advises Linda. “A common mistake is opening a drawer and simply moving things from one side to the other, with no actual organising taking place,” adds Jo Carmichael, professional organiser and founder of All Sorted Out. “Instead, remove the contents, look at each piece individually and either put it back, discard it or move it to a more appropriate spot.”

pull everything out of your cupboards and put it on the bed,” says Linda. “Sort items into categories, such as T-shirts, pants and dresses, so you can see exactly how many of each you have,” she says. “Get rid of everything that’s damaged, doesn’t fit or you don’t feel good in. Donate items that are still in good condition to charity. “Hang current-season clothing in your wardrobe where it’s easily seen and accessed,” she continues, “and store off-season clothing on upper shelves.”

sort like a pro A few smart

organising strategies can help keep clutter under control, says Jo. “Sort like with like; make a place for everything; don’t put things down – put them away; limit the items in your home to what actually fits; and label everything.” target clutter hotspots No matter

how hard you try, some spots just seem to attract junk. “The hallway is a classic example,” says Jo. Once you’ve returned unnecessary items to their proper homes (and had stern words with those responsible), create easy-to-use storage for hallway paraphernalia. “Use wall hooks for bags and jackets, a hallway table or floating shelves for keys and post, and a couple of wide baskets for school shoes and joggers,” she suggests. “The kitchen benchtop is another clutter magnet,” Jo points out. “Keep it clear by giving everyone their own basket for things like their homework and Opal card, and store these within reach on a shelf or inside a kitchen cupboard. Then create a ‘family admin station’ by hanging

get rid of things “While it can be

tempting to set aside a space where unwanted items can accumulate until the pile is big enough to warrant a trip to the tip or charity bin, it’s only when they are out of your house that you will fully experience the joy of decluttering,” says Amy. “So fill up your car and drop items off straightaway, or book a collection with a charity that will come to you.” new year, new you “In 2020, make

decluttering and organising your new good habits,” Jo advises. “My favourite motto is, ‘Don’t put it down, put it away’ – this encourages you to return things to where they belong instead of putting them on the benchtop or floor, or having to make a decision about where they belong,” says Amy. “If you buy something new, see what you can declutter to make room for it.” And if you don’t turn Marie Kondo overnight, don’t despair. “Like any new habit, being automatically organised will take several weeks’ practice,” says Jo.

WORDS GEORGIA MADDEN ILLUSTRATION CARLA M CRAE


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Q

I’m looking for a functional yet stylish storage solution for all my outdoor tools. Does this exist? James, via email String Galvanised is a modular shelving system that is suitable for outdoor use. The galvanised steel doesn’t rust and can withstand any weather conditions — perfect for keeping those tools in great condition. It’s an extremely functional storage solution to any space, with the option to choose between high or low shelf edges, shallow or deep shelving and floor or wall placement. Customisable accessories, such as hooks, can also be added to the shelves, allowing your outdoor items and garden tools to be stylishly displayed. PETER ERLANDSSON, DIRECTOR, STRING

Smart lock 2.0, $419, Nuki.

Q

String Galvanised shelving system, $3950, Great Dane.

ask an expert Stylish solutions for all your design dilemmas from people in the know In the living area of this Ballarat house by Eldridge Anderson architects, an adjustable floor lamp offers versatile and effective spot lighting.

I’m forever losing my keys. Is there a way I can do away with keys altogether, without having to pay a hefty cost for a full electronic system? Erin, via Instagram If you’ve ever forgotten or lost a key, you know how frustrating it can be. One solution might be to give a spare key to your neighbour. Some people also like to hide their keys under fake rocks, but needless to say, that’s not a secure option. Calling a locksmith can also cost you a small fortune. So what are your options? Innovative smart locks are easily retrofitted to almost any existing door and can even be self-installed. Solutions like the Nuki Smart Lock bring all the benefits of an electronic system to your house, minus the hefty price. It can also be operated via any smartphone (Android and iOS), which means you’re always in control of what’s happening at your front door. In combination with accessories like the ‘Keypad’ or the ‘Fob’, fumbling around for your keys at the door will soon be old news. MARTIN PANSY, CEO OF AUSTRIA-BASED SED NUKI HOME SOLUTIONS

Z-2000 air purifier, $399, TruSens.

Q

I’m currently figuring out where to place my lighting. How can I make sure my rooms will be well lit without wasting light? Rosie, via Instagram Try to minimise downlights. They can be excessive and don’t provide light as well as you might think. Generally, people tend to over-light rooms and put them in places where they’re not really needed. Go back to the old-fashioned way of lighting, with floor lamps and table lamps, which can even be used with timers. If you do use downlights, try energy-efficient wall washers and LED bulbs. Also, group the lights when you’re wiring so you’ll have flexibility to control each light group. ANNA-CARIN McNAMARA, INTERIOR

PETER HUYNH, BRAND MANAGER, TRUSENS ANZ

DESIGNER AND ELECTROLUX AMBASSADOR

128 | INSIDE OUT

EDITED BY KATE HASSETT

PHOTOGRAPHY: DEREK SWALWELL (LIGHTING)

Q

Due to the current climate, I have been looking into air purifiers — but are they worth the hype? And how can they really ‘purify’ the air? Alice, via email Air-purifiers are an excellent way to clean the air in your home. These indoor air cleaners usually have several filters that remove tiny particles and smoke in the air. They include the Pre-Filter (which captures larger particles like dust and pet hair), a Carbon Filter (which captures smoke and odours) and a HEPA Filter (which has the ability to capture particulate matter down to 0.3 microns). The combination of these filters, including the effective fan force, can cycle clean air through a standard-sized bedroom multiple times in an hour.


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THIS DESIGN WON TWO GONGS AT THE RECENT AILDM AWARDS. HANGING CHAIR, DOMO

OUT

spanish style

Party space with a shady disposition

Four years ago the owners of this Sydney home asked landscape designer Peter Fudge to come up with a garden and outdoor entertaining area to match their grand 1920s home. Top of the wishlist was shelter from the sun as their previous garden only had a fully exposed patio with a portable barbecue. The result is this haciendastyle pergola (installed by Fifth Season Landscapes), which is perfect for gatherings or just hanging out. Turn the page to see more.

PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE HUNFALVAY


alfresco

European and local influences mingle to

spectacular effect in this inviting Sydney

mission garden, tailor-made for entertaining as well as quieter moments WORDS CHRIS PEARSON PHOTOGRAPHY NATALIE HUNFALVAY


OUT | GARDEN

Rear aspect (both pages) Pear trees provide height and seasonal colour. They’re underplanted with Japanese box topiary that was shaped on site. Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ (opposite) echoes the home’s peach-pink exterior.

INSIDE OUT | 133


OUT | GARDEN

A

wed by this handsome Spanish-Revival

house on Sydney’s north shore, landscape designer Peter Fudge embarked on a Spanish mission of his own when he created its generous garden. What better way to complement the classic 1920s architecture than with a hacienda-style pergola that would eventually become the focal point? The existing entertaining area off the side of the house was almost non-existent, explains Phil Antcliff of Fifth Season Landscapes, who brought Peter’s design to life. “A large section of paving with a portable barbecue was all the clients had in the way of outdoor entertaining and, with no shade trees or structures in this area, it was almost uninhabitable in summer.” This would become the location for the new pergola, complete with sandstone pillars and weathered hardwood beams and rafters. With its European ambience and massive outdoor kitchen, it has become an impressive entertaining hub. “When we bought the house in 2009, we fell in love with its unique architecture, its craftsmanship, its arched front portico and its history,” says the owner. But the dowdy, uninspired garden didn’t reflect the grandeur of the house and functioned very poorly. As well as lacking outdoor entertaining areas – expected with a house of this size – it had little sense of arrival. “Once you entered the property, there was patchy grass and a narrow stone path leading past the pool to the front door,” says Phil. It was 2015 when Peter and Phil were hired to revitalise the 1440-square-metre grounds. “With four children [now aged from seven to 21], we wanted to create spaces in the garden and around the pool where they could relax with friends and kick a ball,” says the owner. “It was also important for us to have a large outdoor area where we could gather as a family and entertain. So the design had to offer a sense of arrival as well as privacy and seclusion from the busy road beyond. And because we live much of the year in Hong Kong, it had to be low-maintenance.” Peter divided the garden into a series of outdoor rooms, providing spaces for a range of activities, including entertaining, play and quiet contemplation. “My designs are bold and eyecatching yet simple, restrained and organic,” he says. He also likes the grand gesture, such as the pergola here, while embracing natural products like sandstone, gravel and timber. Apart from the hacienda, there is a fire pit on one side of the pool and a generous lawn on the other. The main access is now via a wide path, with strategic pauses to take in the pool, fire pit and lush plantings.

Pergola In the Spanishinspired design, solid timber beams sit atop piers clad in Newport Random Ashlar stone from Eco Outdoor. Trailing Boston ivy softens its lines and lilly pilly provides hedging beyond the pear trees. Table, Domo. Cane dining chairs, Fantastic Furniture.


“The garden had to offer a sense of arrival as well as privacy and seclusion from the busy road beyond”

OWNER

INSIDE OUT | 135


OUT | GARDEN

PLANT LIFE A whole new scheme was required in this garden. Peter Fudge chose hardy, low-maintenance species that offer textural and tonal variety

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku Jima’

Rosmarinus officinalis

Pyrus calleryana ‘Chanticleer’


“We wanted a large outdoor pergola area where we could gather as a family and entertain� OWNER

Outdoor kitchen (both pages) A wood-fired Euro Appliances pizza oven from The BBQ Store has made catering easy. The sandstone pavers are from Gosford Quarries. All the rendered walls are painted Piliga Murowash, a flat, streakfree finish from Murobond.

INSIDE OUT | 137


OUT | GARDEN

Picking up the rustic theme, the garden includes bleached recycled timbers, rusted-steel retaining walls and an adobe-like rendered front fence. By contrast, smart sandstone pavers throughout lend a classic, timeless touch. “I really like the way the old-world feeling pervading from the Mediterranean-style house forms a conspicuous contrast to the new elements, such as the steel walls,” says Peter. The lack of existing trees and plants presented opportunities for a whole new planting scheme. Peter is drawn to natives and exotics that thrive in our dry climate, and he chose hardy trees, shrubs and grasses offering rich textural and tonal variety as well as fuss-free maintenance. His feature-tree line-up consists of olive (Olea europaea ‘St Helena’) and pear (Pyrus calleryana ‘Chanticleer’), while lilly pilly (Acmena ‘Sublime’) lines the boundaries, offering privacy and muffling traffic noise. Mid-level shrubs planted for form and texture include French hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla), French lavender (Lavandula dentata), mock orange (Murraya paniculata) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), while Japanese box (Buxus microphylla), pruned neatly into balls, is dotted throughout, lending an air of formality. Seasonal colour and change comes with beds of glorious pink Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, dwarf maiden grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku Jima’), which changes from silver to tan according to the seasons, and drought-tolerant Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Nafray’. Similarly, the two lawns were planted in Zoysia, chosen for its fine leaf, drought-resistance and hardiness. Now the garden ticks all the boxes for the owner, starting at the front gate. “I love the path as it winds down to the house past the olive and pear trees,” she says. Meanwhile, the pergola gets plenty of use as a gathering point for her family and friends. “My husband loves to cook, so we often have barbecues or feast on one of his homemade gourmet pizzas from the pizza oven. It’s a great space to reconnect as a family.” But the garden also offers opportunities for me-time. “I love sitting on the portico at dusk and looking out over the garden and the vista of trees,” adds the owner. “It’s very peaceful and, when the lights are on and illuminating the plants, it’s magical.” Fifth Season Landscapes is based in Chatswood, NSW; 5thseason.com.au 138 | INSIDE OUT


“I really like how the old-world feeling from the Mediterranean-style house forms a conspicuous contrast to new garden elements such as the rusted steel walls�

PETER FUDGE, LANDSCAPE DESIGNER

Fire pit Custom seats made of recycled wharf beams from Ironwood Australia and naturally rusted steel surround the Angelina bowl by Robert Plumb. Pool area (opposite top) Miscanthus grass and buxus line the path to the water. Burleigh day beds from Eco Outdoor. Wall detail (opposite bottom) Steel retaining walls feature at the side of the house.


OUT | RENOVATE

I ’ V E A LWAYS WA NTE D. . .

A GARDEN SHED

Keen to extend your home’s footprint but in a non-obtrusive way? A multipurpose shed could be the answer backyard and are lucky enough to have space for one, summer is the perfect time to get building. No longer just a steel-clad shack, the garden shed has been elevated to designer heights and can even add value to your property. So, whether you’re a green thumb looking for the perfect place to house your tools, need a place to retreat (hello man cave), or just want to increase your storage options, this versatile structure could be the answer. Here’s what you need to know going in...

1

planning

Before you decide to build, the first step is figuring out if your building requires either a development application (DA) or a complying development certificate (CDC). The majority of projects will likely fall into the “exempt developments” category, due to their small size and purpose. However, this is entirely dependent on your local council’s regulations, so it’s best to get the all-clear from them before you break ground.

2

sizing

A good way to determine what size you want your shed to be is to mark out a footprint using nylon string line and pegs. After placing or measuring some of the bigger items – such as a lawnmower, workbench or even sofa – within the space, you’ll get a feel for how big you need things to be. Don’t forget to account

140 | INSIDE OUT

for the door and windows, and try to leave a comfortable distance in front of any benches and equipment so you can move around with ease. This process will also help you to work out whether your shed needs the paperwork mentioned before.

3

the build

Designing your shed with the help of an architect or local carpenter will allow you to create your ideal space, whether it’s a stylish cube with minimalist timber siding, a sleek concrete pod with modernist accents and wraparound windows, or something completely different – the possibilities are endless. If you’re after a simple weekend project, then kits, which come pre-cut and partially assembled for a straightforward building experience, can be purchased at your local home centre. The third option is to go with a prefab dwelling from a design company. Before any walls go up, you will need to prepare a level and sturdy base of either concrete, structural timber or crushed stone – this is usually the homeowner’s responsibility, unless your builder has specified otherwise.

4

placement

Avoid positioning your shed at the bottom of a slope or hill as it can easily lead to flooding or cause issues with damp. Likewise in a place with low light, as that’s the perfect recipe for mould and mildew. Check the location of your utilities and

septic system and make sure you’re not covering any lines that will need to be accessed at some stage. It’s also important for your shed to meet the minimum setback requirements outlined by your local council. And, for the sake of neighbourly relations, try not to block anyone’s view.

Consider going off-grid and installing solar panels on the roof of your shed

5

details

These depend on what you’ll use the space for, but if you want to avoid general clutter and stay organised, counters and smart storage solutions will help. If your shed is on the small side, a hinged workbench that can be folded up when not in use may suit you. You could also set up large areas of pegboard to hang things on, and consider space-saving sliding doors. If you’ve created more of an outdoor room or work space, think about multifunctional cabinets and furniture that doubles as smart design features. This might be a built-in bench seat housing storage, or a desk space in one clean line. The last thing to get right is the lighting – essential for a work space. Keep the lights stylish but functional and consider installing solar panels to power them. WORDS KATE HASSETT

PHOTOGRAPHY: ARMELLE HABIB

I

f you want to put a shed in your


1

planning Do your research

3

the build Prefab or bespoke?

2

sizing Mark out the space first

4

placement As always, location is key

5

details Finishing touches count

ARCHITECT APPROVED

Sheds are often an afterthought — but not this one. Its steel and perspex sliding door with funky chevron pattern makes a real feature of it. adamdettrickarchitects.com.au


summer in the city The best share plates in Sydney have a distinctly Japanese flavour and now is the time to try

S

ydney’s Cho Cho San is a restaurant inspired by Tokyo

drinking culture, so you can be absolutely certain it has all the ingredients for a great night out. Located in Potts Point (on a ridge above the bright lights of the CBD), it specialises in a food concept called izakaya, which has many different interpretations but loosely translates to ‘a bar serving shared plates with saké’. In Japan, an izakaya is a place for after-work drinking, but in Sydney that can also mean a cold beer or cocktail. The owners of Cho Cho San are Sam Christie and his business partner Jonathan Barthelmess, and both have form in developing hit restaurants. Their current portfolio also includes The Apollo in Sydney and Greca in Brisbane, which are both Greek. Knowing what works is an instinct flexed over years of working in the industry. The consistent factor across all their venues is an interesting drinking culture, with cocktails playing a big part. “Food and booze work so well together,” says Sam. “The Japanese have made dining and drinking an artform, and we’ve tried to channel that here at Cho Cho San.” When the partners talked about launching their izakaya restaurant in 2014, they hired designer George Livissianis – the creative force behind The Apollo’s chic interior – to realise it.

Edamame and cocktails make an awesome starter. OPPOSITE Cho Cho San’s sign-of-the-times entrance by designer George Livissianis.

142 | INSIDE OUT

He came up with a pared-back, contemporary dining room offset by a working collection of 200+ saké bottles artfully arranged along the extended bar. The beautiful stone slab that is the central dining zone draws guests keen to take in the theatre of cocktail-making. Meanwhile, Cho Cho San’s food is straight-up delicious. These are classic Japanese dishes with a twist, offering the kind of satisfaction on a plate that works equally well for a dinner à deux or lively lunch. “We respect Japanese tradition while creatiing unique dishes using only the best Japanese and Australian ingredients, says head chef Max Smith, who is originally from Preston in northern England. “I love living in Sydney,” he adds, “because there are so many fun, casual restaurants and bars with their own unique character. The produce is very fresh here and the people are friendly. There is so much to see and learn.” Smith’s favourite dish is Tonkatsu (deep-fried pork cutlet) and he suggests plenty of beer to go with it, especially if you’re there with a crowd. “Cho Cho San has such a vibrant atmosphere for friends meeting up after work,” he says. “We have a good amount of Japanese whiskys and sakés so you can drink and snack or have a full meal, depending on the occasion.” Cho Cho San is at 73 Macleay Street, Potts Point; chochosan.com.au


OUT | ENTERTAINING

WORD ELIZA O’HARE RECIPES CHO CHO SAN PHOTOGRAPHY NIC GOSSAGE FOOD STYLING STEVE PEARCE


OUT | ENTERTAINING

THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Minimal place settings work with the spare interior. Some of Cho Cho San’s extensive saké selection sits above the bar. Tonkatsu & Japanese curry sauce. Window seats on Macleay Street. The small but scrumptious menu. An extended dining slab down the middle of the restaurant is perfect for sharing dishes. Butterfly art on display. Sous chef Erik Ortolani cooking edamame. OPPOSITE PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Tactile perforated-wood panelling keeps the interior fresh and light. Potato salad with tempura egg. More saké to choose from. Owner Sam Christie and chef Max Smith prepare for service. Yummy Wagyu steak & teryaki sauce.

144 | INSIDE OUT


“Beers, cocktails, wine, saké and whisky all seem to pair perfectly with our cuisine, depending on the mood you’re in” SAM CHRISTIE, OWNER


TONKATSU & JAPANE S E CURRY SAUCE SERVES 4

4 x 250g boneless and rindless pork loins, trimmed ½ cup (75g) plain flour 2 eggs, lightly beaten 2½ cups (225g) dried panko breadcrumbs Vegetable or canola oil, for deep frying 2 cups (160g) shredded green cabbage, to serve 2 tbsp chopped chives Lemon wedges, to serve Hot English mustard, to serve JAPANESE CURRY SAUCE ¼ cup (60ml) vegetable oil 1 tbsp grated ginger 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 small carrot, peeled and finely chopped 1 brown onion, finely chopped 1 tbsp curry powder ¼ cup (60ml) sake 1 tbsp rice malt syrup 2 tsp mirin 1 tbsp soy 1 cup chicken stock ¼ cup (60ml) milk or single cream 2 tbsp lemon juice 1 Using a small, sharp knife, make small incisions all over the meat with the tip of the knife. Working in batches, place the meat between two sheets of non-stick baking paper and use a meat mallet to pound until approximately ½ cm thick. 2 Place the flour in a large bowl. Place the eggs in a separate bowl and the panko breadcrumbs in a third bowl. Dust meat in flour and then dip in the beaten eggs and put straight into the panko breadcrumbs, covering the whole piece. Push the panko into the meat and press down, making sure all the meat is evenly coated. 3 Fill a large deep-sided frying pan with oil until it reaches 10cm up the sides. Place over medium heat until it is 180°C when tested with a deep-fry thermometer. Working with one at a time, fry for 4 minutes and rest, or until golden and cooked through. Place on a rack to rest. Repeat with remaining pork. 4 Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the ginger, garlic, carrot and onion and cook while stirring for 6 minutes, or until soft. Add the curry powder and stir to combine. Cook for 5 minutes.

146 | INSIDE OUT

Add the sake, rice malt syrup, mirin, soy and chicken stock and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the milk (or cream) and mix to combine. Set aside to cool slighlty. While still warm, add the lemon juice, place in a blender and blend until smooth. 5 Serve the pork with the shredded cabbage, chives, curry sauce, lemon wedges and hot English mustard. Tip The Japanese curry sauce recipe will make 2 cups. You can keep any extra sauce in the refrigerator for up to a week.

WAGY U ST E A K & T E RYA K I SAU CE SERVES 4

4 x 200g Wagyu sirloin steaks (grade 6+) 2 tsp vegetable oil Sea salt flakes Olive oil, to serve Green yuzu kosho, to serve* Red yuzu kosho, to serve* Hot English mustard, to serve Wasabi, to serve TERIYAKI SAUCE 1 cup (250ml) mirin ¼ cup (60ml) sake ¾ cup (180ml) light soy sauce 40g piece of ginger, roughly chopped ¾ cup (165g) caster sugar 1 long green onion, cut into 5 cm lengths 1 Remove the steak from the refrigerator and set aside at room temperature for 30 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, to make the teriyaki sauce, place the mirin, sake, soy sauce, ginger, caster sugar and onion in a medium saucepan. Place over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, or until the sauce has slightly reduced and is a little sticky. Strain, discarding the solids, and keep warm. 3 Heat 1 tsp oil in a large non-stick frying pan over high heat until the oil starts to smoke. Sprinkle two steaks with salt. Add the steaks to the pan and cook for 2 minutes on each side for medium rare. 4 Set aside, loosely covered, for 5 minutes to rest. Wipe out the pan and repeat method with remaining oil and steaks. 5 Thinly slice the steaks and serve with teriyaki sauce and a drizzle of olive oil. Serve with the green yuzu kosho, red yuzo kosho, hot English mustard and wasabi. *Green and red yuzu kosho are Japanese chilli condiments. You can find them at Asian supermarkets.


OUT | ENTERTAINING

SQUARE MEALS Head chef Max Smith says he tries to keep things simple and let the great-quality produce speak for itself. As well as Izakaya, there are raw bar menu items, vegetable dishes, meat and seafood options and sweets, some packaged up as a ‘set’ or ‘feast’.


OUT | TRAVEL

GREAT ESCAPE

Lord Howe Island Relaxation is a requirement in this pristine paradise – officially one of the cleanest places on earth – where a weekend immersion in nature can be life-changing WORDS KARLIE VERKERK

W

hen was the last time you switched off

completely? No phone, no email and no social media. In a world where everything is at our fingertips, it’s easy to forget what it feels like to get back to basics – until you step foot on the marine park that is Australia’s Lord Howe Island. Located in the Tasman Sea east of Port Macquarie and less than a two-hour flight from Sydney, the UNESCO WorldHeritage-listed isle is perfect for romantic getaways and familyfriendly escapes, thanks to its sub-tropical climate, spotless beaches, plentiful wildlife and secluded, almost-untapped location. With only 350 local residents calling Lord Howe home and a maximum of 400 visitors allowed at any one time, and zero (yes, zero!) phone reception, it’s easy to completely switch off and slip into holiday mode within seconds of arriving. Relaxing with a good book under the shade of a pine tree is a highly encouraged pastime, as is a dip in the pristine turquoise lagoon, a bike ride from one hidden cove to the next, or a hike up one of the mountains. And if that isn’t enough activities to poke a snorkel at, there’s also a nine-hole golf course and lawn bowls club, plus an Ayurvedic day spa and a beauty salon for those who’d prefer some serious TLC.

where to stay Nestled behind Old Settlement Beach at the northern end of the crescent-shaped island is Arajilla, an all-inclusive retreat with a laid-back ambience. The 12 luxurious suites, which are available in three different sizes and styles, are cocooned among a lush garden filled with kentia palms and native Banyan trees.

Magnificent Mount Gower juts out from the south end of the island. Experienced climbers can book a guided trek to its peak. OPPOSITE PAGE The best way to get around is on a bike — most hotels provide one with your stay.


howe goes it

Sustainable practices at work on the island

PHOTOGRAPHY: ZACH SANDERS/DESTINATION NSW

There is zero air and sea pollution and no litter on Lord Howe Island. To help conserve its natural beauty and uphold UNESCO World Heritage values, the community of locals has designed a range of sustainability and conservation initiatives. These include a cap on tourists, recycling and wastereduction programs, and a world-class waste-management facility that diverts 86% of the island’s waste from landfill. You’ll also find that many of the island’s hotels and homes have solar panels, vegetable gardens and even their own desalination plants.

INSIDE OUT | 149


OUT | TRAVEL

CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW The island’s volcanic pinnacles are covered with plant life. You’ll find plenty of places to snorkel. Stunning Makambo Loft at Capella Lodge has a private plunge pool. Swim with sea turtles in the reef-fringed lagoon or at Old Settlement Beach.

the details

What you need to know before you go

Towards the island’s south side, at the foot of Mount Gower and Mount Lidgbird, is stylish Capella Lodge. The boutique hotel is sophisticated and romantic, boasting views over remote Lovers Bay. If you’re after more of a home-away-from-home vibe, there’s also a range of guesthouses and self-contained apartments dotted around, which are ideal for families and larger groups.

what to do Head down to the lagoon, hire a snorkel and dive straight into the island’s underwater oasis. Swim alongside sea turtles and more than 500 species of fish in the marine park and surrounding beaches. Alternatively, explore the island and hike to Kim’s Lookout and Malabar Hill to see Balls Pyramid, an impressive seven-millionyear-old stone ‘obelisk’ that protrudes from the ocean. In the afternoon, jump on a bike and cruise over to the white sands of Ned’s Beach, where you can stand in knee-deep water and feed schools of fish straight from your hand. 150 | INSIDE OUT

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY (MAIN IMAGE) AND ZACH SANDERS/DESTINATION NSW

Travelling there QantasLink flies direct from Sydney most days. Getting around The hotels offer transport to most key areas. If you want to hire a car, book in advance. Where to eat Arajilla restaurant’s modern three-course menu changes daily; the locally caught fish is a must-try. Some hotels will organise a picnic for you to enjoy at the beach or park??? during the day. Other activities Tennis, fishing, surfing, kayaking, paddle boarding, scuba diving and nature-based guided tours (including one on a glass-bottom boat).


INSIDE OUT | PROMOTION

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INSIDE | HOME & INTERIORS

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The Beechwood Project by Kate Walker Design featuring the ‘Liaison’ Medium Sconce in Bronze with Crackle Glass by Kelly Wearstler for Visual Comfort & Co. Photo by Armelle Habib

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INSIDE OUT | JANUARY 2020


LAST WORD

fresh fruit

Cool off and enjoy a cocktail in this sweet (hot) spot

Welcome to Peaches, a Melbourne bar with an interior that’s as delicious as an expertly made cocktail. Serving up this fun, candy-pink confection is the team from local design practice Pierce Widera, who’ve teamed pendant lights with verdant ceiling greenery to mimic peaches hanging from tree branches, and completed the picture with plush blush seating, terrazzo-flecked tables and elegant brass detailing – perfect for a quick drink or luxe night out. Level 2, 301 Swanston Street, Melbourne; peaches.melbourne

154 | INSIDE OUT

PHOTOGRAPHY DEREK SWALWELL


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