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ISSUE 54 | SEPT/OCT 2019

THE

FASHION ISSUE CHLOÉ MENDEL Life with Billy Corgan And a Faux Fur Empire

ALEXANDRA PAUL From Baywatch Fame to Animal Activist Arrests

INGRID NEWKIRK PETA’s Fearless Leader Explains Fashion’s Costs

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TABLE OF CONTENTS VEGWORLD MAGAZINE | ISSUE 54 | SEPT/OCT 2019 NEWS 10 Royals Going Plant-Based 11 Vegan-Certified Priam Vineyards 11 Plant-Based Companies Popular With Celebrity Investors 12 Three Black Barbers Introduce New Vegan Experience To NOLA 13 LA-Based Vegan Chef Opens New Food Hall in Providence 13 Jaden Smith Celebrates 21st B-Day By Opening A Free Vegan Food Truck In LA 14 Upton's Naturals Sues Mississippi In Response to Labeling Laws 15 The Economist Offers Free Vegan Hot Dogs In NYC 15 New Bill Will Require Vegan Food Options in All New York Hospitals 16 Miley, Ariana, and Lana Just Formed A Vegan Girl Band 17 Jessie J Thanks A Vegan Diet For Helping Her With Pain 17 Kim Kardashian West Ditches Real Fur for Faux 18 Vegan Soccer, Anyone? 19 Alex Morgan Brings Home World Cup Victory 19 Baskin-Robbins Joins the Vegan Ice Cream Arena

BUSINESS 20 Interview With Chloé Mendel 26 Interview With Eddie Garza 32 Big Food Joins Plant-Based Movement 33 $4.5B In Sales Proves PlantBased Food Is Fast Growing 34 Pitch + Plant Finalists for Business Pitching Competition 35 'Just Egg’ Is Best-Selling Liquid Egg

LIFESTYLE 38 42 46 52

An Interview with Alexandra Paul Le Soixante 5 Restaurant Review Alois Lageder Winery Adventures In India With Vegan On The Go! 58 Ask Alison 60 Our Favorite Things Chloé Mendel, by Masato Onoda

© VEGWORLD 2019

STYLE 64 How the 'PETA Push' Is Changing the Fashion & Beauty Industries 72 An Interview with Anna Tagliabue 76 Vegan Fashion Week 78 Philip Anthony Mangan 82 Fashion Forward 84 Celebrity Vegan Fashion and Beauty 88 Hand It Over 91 Volume 92 True Beauty 94 Fashion & The Environment 98 Discover Dressarte Paris 102 Vegan Perfume Industry 106 Your #1 Beauty Bucket List

HEALTH 108 Ten Breast Commandments to Reduce Your Cancer Risk 114 Dear Chef AJ 116 Harvard Finds Plant-Based Diet Significantly Reduces Chances Of Type 2 Diabetes 117 Plant-Based Diet Can Significantly Improve Your Heart Health

FOOD 118 Vegan Tirolean Pressknodel 120 Veggie Tofu Pasta 122 Quesadillas With Cashew Cheese 124 Creamy Herb Mushroom Pasta 126 Rustic Ribollita Soup 128 Apple Roses 130 Ombré Oats Cheesecake 132 Quick Marble Cake 134 Mukti’s Mushroom Curry 137 Baja Tacos 138 Baked Buffalo Cauliflower Wings 140 Thai Green Cauliflower Curry 141 Cream of Cauliflower Soup


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CREDITS VEGWORLD CONTRIBUTORS

Samantha Baker

Tess Chavez

Chef AJ

Amy Cowan

Brandy Edwards

Kristi Funk, MD

Clay Garrett

Courtney Garza

Eddie Garza

Bianca Huan

Cathy Katin-Grazzini

Stephanie Kilbourn

Kathy Kordalis

Daniela Lais

Emma Letessier

Nele Liivlaid

Peter Manley

Cathy McLellan

VEGWORLD TEAM Amy Cowan Editor-in-Chief

Clay Garrett Sharon McRae

Alora Middleton

Sascha Naderer

Ingrid Newkirk

Art Director

Diana Potter Senior Editor

Samantha Baker Digital Media Director

Cathy Katin-Grazzini Food Editor

Toni Okamoto

Diane Pandolfini

Meg Raines

Zak Shelton

Tess Chavez Style Editor

Zak Shelton Business Editor

Courtney Garza Outreach Director

Alora Middleton Editorial Assistant

Michael Taylor

Jeanette Padilla Vega

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Alison Worthen

Beth Williams

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EDITOR’S NOTE

A message from VEGWORLD Magazine Style Editor, Tess Chavez

For many of us, being vegan is first associated directly with food, and fashion and beauty come to mind much later. Fortunately, we’re constantly growing, learning, and implementing new ideas and values, including our vegan awareness, to become the best version of ourselves. It’s both a pleasure and an honor to be VEGWORLD Magazine’s Style & Beauty Editor, introducing the newest vegan products alongside some amazing fashion innovations to keep you all feeling beautiful!

AS OUR MOVEMENT CONTINUES, MY HOPES ARE THAT YOU SUPPORT THESE WONDERFUL BRANDS OFFERING GREAT-QUALITY PRODUCTS AND CLOTHING. HELP SPREAD AWARENESS OF VEGANISM WITH YOUR BOLD FASHION STATEMENTS THAT GET PEOPLE ASKING YOU, “WHO, WHAT, WHERE?” ...AND SURPRISE THEM WITH YOUR FUR-BABY-FREE RESPONSE. INSPIRE OTHERS TO STEAL YOUR STYLE AND COPY YOUR MAGNIFICENT MAKEUP LOOKS WITH CRUELTY-FREE AND VEGAN MAKEUP. SHOW EVERYONE THAT YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE CRUEL TO LOOK COOL! I’d like to extend my sincere gratitude to all of the contributors in this issue, who continue to help pioneer and pave the way for so many to come. And special kudos to all of the designers, innovators, and business owners who took on the challenge of introducing vegan products in a world full of non-vegan ones: Thank you for educating us, inspiring us, and giving us options without compromising our values. I’ve no doubt that in this issue you’ll discover great vegan finds that become staple pieces in your closet and on your makeup counter! With love, not animals,

Style Editor

VEGWORLD Magazine

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LATEST VEGAN NEWS

THE ROYALS APPEAR TO BE GOING PLANT-BASED by Peter Manley

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e are living in truly exciting times. Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, has been teaching Prince Harry how to make vegan food. Meghan Markle has already been following a plant-based diet herself, according to Live Kindly. Although the royals of Sussex surely have access to a royal chef, they actually prefer to cook for themselves. According to Life & Style, a source said, “Harry wasn’t a great cook when he met Meghan, but she’s teaching him all the ropes.” The duchess’ favorite grocery store is

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Whole Foods Market. However, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex also happen to grow their own fruits and vegetables as well. The source said that Meghan only eats organic foods and that she and Harry have built a vegetable garden in Frogmore. Harry was noted to have learned a few gardening skills from his dad, Prince Charles. According to Daily Express, Prince Charles is also very passionate about eating organic food and often has meat-free days. He has been known to have a youthful figure due to his plant-based lifestyle. In fact, during a trip to Barbados, onlookers noted that the 70-year-old Prince of Wales “looked absolutely incredible" and had

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“a physique of a very fit man less than half his age.” Meghan Markle has also adopted a vegan lifestyle for her baby Archie. In fact, a credible source revealed that Meghan wants to raise her baby to be vegan. The Duke and Duchess even decorated Archie’s nursery with a vegan paint option, which is ecofriendly and free from any toxic ingredients. It seems that veganism is spreading into royal grounds as of late. If the Duke and Duchess of Sussex become more public about their decision, it could cause a much-needed spike in vegan and plant-based interest.

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PLANT-BASED COMPANIES POPULAR WITH CELEBRITY INVESTORS

PRIAM VINEYARDS IN COLCHESTER IS NOW VEGAN-CERTIFIED

by Alora Middleton

(NOT ALL WINES ARE VEGAN)

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by Peter Manley

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ecently, the Colchester winery Priam Vineyards was certified as vegan-friendly by the BevVeg! label, which provides certification for vegan beverages, food, and other consumer products. This might come as a bit of a surprise, but not all wines are created vegan. You would think so, considering that wine is traditionally made from grapes. However, many wine producers actually use animal-derived substances to help filter their wines in the fining process. These animalderived substances include casein, gelatin, egg albumen, and bone marrow. However, Ruaan Viljoen, winemaker for Priam Vineyards, avoids using any animal products or substances in the process of making wine, instead opting for vegan materials such as pea protein, mannoprotein, bentonite, or even using cold stabilization techniques. Priam’s wines are very popular and second to none. In fact, Priam’s wines have earned multiple international awards, including several gold, double gold, and silver medals in the 2019 International Eastern Wine Competition. Its most popular wine is its Riesling, which is a perfect blend of sweet and tart. In Connecticut, Priam Vineyards is the first winery to receive vegan certification and distinction.

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lant-based companies have recently seen a considerable rise in popularity and in celebrity investments. Successful alternative meat brand Impossible Foods recently raised $300 million in funding from investors including Serena Williams, Katy Perry, Jay-Z, Jaden Smith, and will.i.am, among others. The burger is currently sold at about 7,000 restaurants across the US, not including the Burger King locations serving the Impossible Whopper. With the demand for their product more than doubled, company officials at Impossible Foods recently apologized for the shortage in supply they’ve experienced while struggling to meet the growing demand. The recent funding round will be used to help the brand scale up to supply its growing customer base. Impossible Foods isn’t alone in celebrity investments. Alternative protein company Beyond Meat, whose IPO is currently the second most successful of 2019, had people clamoring for shares when the company went public May 2. The maker of vegan burgers and sausages has attracted investors such as Leonardo DiCaprio and Bill Gates. Even Snoop Dogg has partnered with the company, driving a Beyond Meat truck around on “Beyond Meat Day” in celebration of the company’s NASDAQ debut. Vegan companies such as HIPPEAS, RightRice, and Daily Harvest have also attracted celebrity investors, while JUST Inc., maker of the vegan Just Egg, is currently considering when to go public. With Beyond Meat’s success in the stock market and the continued support for plant-based alternatives by celebrities, it’s very possible we’ll see more companies become what Bloomberg has dubbed “vegan-aires.”

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LATEST VEGAN NEWS

THREE BLACK BARBERS INTRODUCE NEW VEGAN FOOD EXPERIENCE TO NEW ORLEANS by Peter Manley

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hree black barbers are setting out to bring a unique vegan food experience to New Orleans, with a twist. Barbers Roy Joseph III, Ryan Billew, and Ollie Williams have introduced a unique vegan food concept that takes inspiration from New Orleans’ ever-popular cuisine scene. Essentially, the barbers want to show their community that vegan food doesn’t have to be bland and tasteless. Rather, it can be dressed up to be just as good as, if not better than, animal-based foods. The concept is the brainchild of Roy Joseph III, who decided about a year ago that he wanted to cut out meat from his diet and adopt a more vegan lifestyle. His decision stemmed from the fact that there are many health concerns about meat being announced constantly.

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Roy told Travel Noire, “Every other month there is a recall on meat. I was tired of seeing the same warnings in the media. I decided to stop eating beef, pork, and later chicken.” As Roy experimented with vegan cooking, he decided to bring his delicious vegan dishes to the barbershop to let his co-barbers (and customers) taste it. As time went by, his barbershop colleagues Ryan Billew and Ollie Williams convinced him that he should take his vegan food and create a business from it. From there, Vegan Wit a Twist was born, led by the three black barbers. The barbers-turned-business owners now serve up delicious New Orleans-inspired vegan dishes that have become quite popular in the

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community. They are passionate about inspiring their community to adopt a vegan diet. Roy said, “We want our people to wake up. The Black community is plagued by disease. It’s the food that is giving us these issues. It’s not always genetics. While our food is beautiful, it’s hurting us. It’s time to cut some of that stuff out.” While the trio is on a mission to inspire healthier food decisions in their community, their dishes do not lack in taste and flavor. “We’re from New Orleans, which is known for its cuisine,” Billew said. “When people hear vegan, they automatically think bland. We’re throwing away the bland idea and adding in New Orleans flavor.”

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JADEN SMITH CELEBRATES 21ST BIRTHDAY BY OPENING A FREE VEGAN FOOD TRUCK IN L.A.

LA-BASED VEGAN CHEF OPENS NEW FOOD HALL IN PROVIDENCE

by Peter Manley

by Peter Manley

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atthew Kenney, a Los Angeles-based vegan chef and restaurateur, currently owns a large number of restaurants all around the world, including six in New York alone. Following suit, Kenney is now opening up a new location in Providence, Rhode Island. While one might expect him to simply duplicate his previous restaurant models, Kenney has bigger – and arguably better – plans for his Providence project. The restaurateur is introducing to Providence his new location, Plant City, which Kenney describes as a plantbased food hall. Rather than being one restaurant and concept, Plant City is a food hall that will offer five of Kenney’s best plant-based concepts under one roof. These concepts include a new vegan burger joint, Bar Verde (a Mexican restaurant), and a pizza spot named Double Zero, which has been Michelin-rated. On top of this, Plant City will also feature a grab-and-go grocery marketplace that’s filled with vegan and locally-produced items. Kenney says that he was “inspired by food halls in Europe” and “dreamed of doing a plant-based version.” Rather than describing Plant City as vegan, Kenney prefers to describe it as plant-based so that even omnivores can feel included. The new concept by Kenney has been so well-accepted by Providence that Bar Verde and Double Zero were almost completely reserved for Plant City’s opening night. The 225-seat, 100-percent vegan food market opened in June.

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hile other newly 21-year-olds celebrate their birthdays by partying, Jaden decided to bring in his birthday a little differently.

On July 8th, Jaden – son of Will and Jada Pinkett Smith – celebrated his birthday by launching his first pop-up location of I Love You Restaurant, which is a food truck that provides free vegan meals to the homeless. Jaden introduced the I Love You Restaurant food truck to the homeless community in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles and plans to serve as an aid to homeless communities in other regions by offering free and healthy vegan food. In a photo of the I Love You Restaurant food truck on Smith’s Instagram, he captioned, “I Love You Restaurant is a movement that is all about giving people what they deserve — healthy, vegan food for free. Today, we launched our first one-day food truck pop-up in Downtown LA. Keep a lookout because this is the first one of many.” The young and admirable community activist was praised by many celebrities, including Kevin Hart, Nick Cannon, and Jordin Sparks, for his amazing efforts to aid the homeless. Although not the loudest voice in the vegan community, Jaden Smith has indeed been an advocate for veganism and healthier environmental practices. In May, for example, the popular music artist joined many other celebrity investors in helping fund a $300 million Series E round for the plant-based company Impossible Foods, which the company will use to further increase its production capacity of the Impossible Burger.

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LATEST VEGAN NEWS

UPTON'S NATURALS SUES STATE OF MISSISSIPPI FOR FREE SPEECH VIOLATION IN RESPONSE TO LABELING LAWS by Zak Shelton

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t is becoming more apparent every day that cattle ranchers are shaking in their boots. As someone who grew up on a cattle ranch, this brings mixed emotions. But, at the end of the day, it is just another piece of evidence… we are winning. Upton’s Naturals, an industry leading vegan CPG based in Chicago, filed a federal lawsuit against the state of Mississippi for their right to free speech. This came as a response to the new state labeling laws criminalizing the use of meat analog terms on the packaging of plant-based foods. This law, like laws in many other states such as Missouri, states that using meat terms, such as “sausage,” “bacon,” “meat,” etc. is a felony offense punishable by up to one year of imprisonment per instance (in Missouri, most notably, each offense is punishable by up to two years).

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In a statement to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Andy Gipson, Agriculture Commissioner for the state of Mississippi, said, “As we have seen with many foods in the past, label names allowed to be on new foods can be detrimental to the foods they attempt to imitate, emulate, follow, or profit from.” To further exemplify the fear of the leaders in the industry, Mississippi Farm Bureau President Mike McCormick, after the bill passed, stated: “This bill will protect our cattle farmers from having to compete with products not harvested from an animal.” Industry leaders and lobbyists are realizing what the future holds and are fighting against the eventuality of their downfall… brought about by you, the plant-based and conscious consumer. I had the incredible pleasure of sitting

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down with Nicole Sopko, Vice President and Co-Founder of Upton’s Naturals to speak with her about what this lawsuit means to her and to the future of the plant-based foods industry. Nicole states, “We are not out to deceive anyone with our packaging, as we are very proudly vegan and make an effort in communicating that clearly. Veganism is a selling point for our products, not something we would ever try to hide. Laws to prevent deceptive labeling are already in place and we would never object to those, but we do object to an entire industry using their political influence to their competitive advantage. That is not how either democracy or capitalism works. We will continue to fight for an even playing field for ourselves and all other members of our industry.”

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THE ECONOMIST BRINGS IN SUMMER WITH FREE VEGAN HOT DOGS IN NYC by Peter Manley

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he Economist, a publishing company with a worldwide influence on international business and world affairs, recently dubbed 2019 as the “Year of the Vegan.” Now, the company is proving it was right. To kick off the unofficial start of the summer season, the team at The Economist served up vegan hot dogs made with Beyond Sausage in New York City – for free. The initiative is part of The Economist’s “Feeding The Future” campaign, which strives to inform people about the great benefits of meat alternatives. The Economist partnered with the marketing agency Sense New York to bring the iconic red hot dog cart to life.  The magazine company traveled throughout the city with this red NYC hot dog cart. It toured around the city until the middle of June, serving up plant-based hot dog treats to passersby. Everyone who visited the hot dog cart was given a reduced subscription rate to The Economist magazine at 12 weeks for $12, and could also request that the company plant a tree on their behalf.  The company’s “Feeding the Future” campaign was inspired by a report titled “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Beef” by 1843, a sister publication to The Economist.

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NEW BILL WILL REQUIRE VEGAN FOOD OPTIONS IN ALL NEW YORK HOSPITALS by Peter Manley

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f passed, a groundbreaking new bill would require that all New York hospitals provide patients with at least one plant-based option at every meal. The bill – Bill S1471 – was recently introduced by New York Senator Brad Hoylman and Assembly Member Richard Gottfried. The bill demands that hospitals not only provide plantbased meal and snack options, but specifically list out all vegan options on menus and written materials. On the matter, Susan Levin, MS, RD, Director of Nutrition Education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, said, “The New York Senate’s passage of S1471 is an important step that could soon help hospital patients across the state understand the power of a plant-based diet to fight obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.” The bill follows a recently passed bill in California, which requires all hospitals, prisons, nursing homes, and other government facilities to offer at least one vegan meal option on their menus. We’ll continue to provide you with more updates on whether or not this bill passes. If passed into legislation, Bill S1471 would be a historical step in the right direction for New York.

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LATEST VEGAN NEWS MILEY, ARIANA, AND LANA JUST FORMED A VEGAN GIRL BAND FOR THE NEW ‘CHARLIE’S ANGELS’ SOUNDTRACK by Peter Manley

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or a good while, fans of the three pop stars Miley Cyrus, Ariana Grande, and Lana del Rey scoured the internet in hopes of finding out whether or not they would be featured in the new Charlie’s Angels movie in some capacity. Many rumors have been floating around online as fans tried to put together clues to make sense of it all. According to Teen Vogue, for example, one fan noted on Twitter that if you were to search for either Ariana or Miley in the gif sticker feature on Instagram, you’d see the same “angel” word and gold geometric angle wing logos associated with both celebrities. According to an article by Newsweek, the trio will not be playing as the all-female crime-fighting unit. However, the guessing game is no longer necessary. Recently, Miley Cyrus wrote “We are coming” on her Instagram, confirming that Miley Cyrus, Ariana Grande, and Lana Del Rey are actually forming a vegan girl band for a song on the new Charlie’s Angels soundtrack. The three vegan pop moguls will be collaborating on a song for the Charlie’s Angels reboot, which is based on the successful original show which first aired in the 1970s and featured Farrah Fawcett, Jaclyn Smith, and Kate Jackson. That TV show was followed up by a theatrical release in 2003, which featured Lucy Liu, Drew Barrymore, and Cameron Diaz as the beloved Charlie’s Angels. All three pop stars are not only known for their amazing musical talents, but for their passion for animals as well. Miley Cyrus is arguably one of the most active voices in the celebrity vegan community, along with her alsovegan husband Liam Hemsworth. Ariana, too, has been a vocal advocate for veganism, and according to Happy Cow, Lana Del Rey also follows a meat-free diet and has been doing so for years. The latest theatrical remake of Charlie’s Angels, which will feature the vegan trio on the soundtrack, is set to release on November 15, 2019. More information to come.

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JESSIE J THANKS A VEGAN DIET FOR HELPING HER WITH PAIN by Peter Manley

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et’s be honest. It can be quite challenging to adopt and stick to a vegan diet if you don’t have a big “why” behind it all. For popstar Jessie J, living with a vegan diet has been easy. Why? Because it helps her manage her chronic pain. According to Women’s Health, Jessie J was advised by her doctor that she would have to either live with the constant pain she was experiencing or choose to have a hysterectomy. Rather than opting to undergo surgery, Jessie J decided to take control of the situation by managing her symptoms in a natural way. This led Jessie J to decide to adopt a vegan diet. In an interview with Women’s Health, she says, "I decided to manage the pain and do it naturally. So four years ago, I cut out sugar from my diet to try and stop bacteria from building up in my body. Once I cut out sugar, I realized how much I began to enjoy food when it was good for me – and it was balancing out everything – my health, my moods, my sleep." After first quitting sugar, Jessie J then decided to remove meat from her diet. After about a year of abstaining from meat, the popstar took her final steps toward a vegan diet by removing all other animal by-products. According to Jessie, it took her nearly two years to completely transition to a full-on vegan diet. She has been enjoying this new lifestyle for a little over a year now.

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KIM KARDASHIAN WEST DITCHES REAL FUR FOR FAUX

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n June, Kim Kardashian West shared with her Instagram followers that she had gone fur-free.

The announcement came in the caption of an image of her 5-year-old daughter North wearing an allwhite fur coat. Kim wrote, “Remember when I wore this! She picked out the same look lol but fun fact – I took all of my fave furs and remade them in faux fur.” Kardashian West has worn her fair share of furs over the years, even having a run-in with a PETA activist and a flour bomb while walking the red carpet in 2012. This change to faux furs is a welcome change being seen in the luxury fashion industry, with labels such as Michael Kors, Burberry, and Gucci deciding to stop using real fur. Here’s looking forward to Kim making headlines while wearing cruelty-free furs!

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LATEST VEGAN NEWS VEGAN SOCCER, ANYONE? INTRODUCING THE FOREST GREEN ROVERS by Peter Manley

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hile it’s widely known that veganism is quickly on the rise, perhaps no one would’ve suspected that veganism would enter the world of soccer. However, that is precisely what has happened, as one team is now proudly vegan. While their name is based on the neighborhood where the club used to play soccer when it was founded, the name “Forest Green” has a whole new meaning for the team. The Forest Green Rovers Football Club, which is based in England, is the only truly vegan football club in the world. Not only that, but they are also the first in the world to become a carbon-neutral sports club as well.

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The club is owned by none other than Dale Vince, who is a multimillionaire eco-warrior and pioneer in his space and the founder of Ecotricity, a renewable energy company. While Vince initially didn't intend to own the then-struggling soccer club, he finally agreed to buy the Forest Green Rovers in 2010. From there, he decided to make them operate on his own terms. According to HuffPost, Vince said, “So we said, ‘Alright, if we’re going to do this, we’ll bring our work in the field of sustainability into football, which is an untouched audience for this kind of message.'” From there, he turned the soccer club into an eco-friendly and vegan-centered group and environment. For example, their stadium is now powered

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by 100% green energy, which is mostly provided by solar panels installed on the roof of the stadium. Furthermore, the soccer field is organic with no chemical fertilizers and is trimmed by a solar-powered robot lawnmower. The team also collects rainwater, and the stadium staff recycles cooking oil to be turned into biofuel. As for veganism, the team has since developed a vegan catering company that provides 100% vegan and allergen-free foods to schools across England, with hopes of inspiring children to become more open to the possibilities of a vegan diet. As they move forward, they hope to expand into larger markets, including universities, international schools, and even theme parks.

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VEGAN SOCCER COCAPTAIN ALEX MORGAN BRINGS HOME WORLD CUP VICTORY

BASKIN-ROBBINS JOINS THE VEGAN ICE CREAM ARENA

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by Peter Manley

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n July, the United States Women’s Soccer Team brought home its fourth World Cup title, defeating the Netherlands in a 2-0 victory at the Stade de Lyon in Décines-Charpieu.

The co-captain and vegan animal rights activist Alex Morgan posted a photo on Instagram in celebration of their victory, with the caption, “I think I’m in love. World Champs, baby.” In the photo, Morgan is pictured kissing the World Cup trophy. Co-captain Morgan has also made history. She is only the second player in the Women’s World Cup to score five goals in a World Cup game. During one World Cup game, Alex Morgan scored a whopping five goals, which helped the U.S. Women’s Soccer Team to claim a 13-0 victory over Thailand. Morgan is without a doubt a super athlete who seems to accomplish superhuman feats. While professional athletes can definitely attribute their impressive game skills and endurance to their intensive workout regimen, Morgan owes her great success to more than that. In a recent interview with Time, co-captain Morgan expressed that switching to a vegan diet has done wonders in terms of her performance in the game. She expressed that the reason she initially became a vegan was that “it didn’t feel fair to have a dog she adored, and yet eat meat all the time.” As a literal game-changing side effect, Morgan says that her endurance and overall health have since greatly improved in the process. Many other high-profile athletes have thanked a vegan diet for their success as well. Athletes such as Colin Kaepernick, Venus Williams, Kyrie Irving, and Jermain Defoe are all proud vegans who have expressed that a vegan diet has helped them in their respective games.

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askin-Robbins announces it has introduced two vegan, non-dairy ice cream options to their menu. While they have included vegan ices and sorbets in the past, the two new ice cream options represent the company’s first foray into the ever-growing plant-based arena. We're excited to expand our ice cream portfolio into the vegan space and offer our guests increased options, especially with such high consumer demand for a product like this," Carol Austin, Baskin-Robbins' vice president of marketing, added. Baskin-Robbins has a lot of ground to cover in order to catch up to their competitor Ben & Jerry’s, who in February of this year added two additional flavors, rounding out their line to a total of 12 vegan flavors. According to Food and Wine, Baskin-Robbins’ decadent new flavors include ingredients such as coconut oil and almond butter to make them creamy. Non-Dairy Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough includes cookie dough pieces, chocolate chunks, and a chocolate ribbon, while the Chocolate Extreme is gluten-free. "The Baskin-Robbins culinary team has been hard at work on our non-dairy flavors for over two years. It was important for us to take the time to get it right," Jeanne Bolger, the brand's director of research and development, said in the announcement. "Both flavors are so smooth and indulgent, and the final product delivers the incredible quality that our customers have come to expect from any Baskin-Robbins ice cream. We're very proud of the result." The new flavors became available in Baskin-Robbins shops in August.

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B USINESS SPOTLIGHT


Chloé Mendel

…ON PARENTING WITH BILLY CORGAN AND MANAGING A FAUX FUR EMPIRE Trained by her father, renowned Gilles Mendel, in his atelier, Chloé Mendel represents her family’s sixth generation in the fashion industry. Chloé embraced her family history and created the first luxury faux fur fashion brand that feels luxurious according to the many celebrities who wear her pieces (while rescuing a homeless pet with each sale). When Chloé isn’t working in her amazing fashion empire, her favorite time is spent with son Augustus, daughter Philomena, and partner Billy Corgan, best known for his years in the band The Smashing Pumpkins.

We are so grateful to have the chance to interview you about your family and this amazing vegan fur line that has been such a success. We’ve seen it worn by Kate Moss and rockstar P!nk, among others. You’ve got to be really happy with the direction your business is headed. What was your inspiration for carrying on your family’s tradition with your own twist? I couldn’t find a fake fur coat in the market for me. There was a lot of fake fur, but it was very colorful, trendy, and loud. I just wanted something classic, feminine, and easy. In the same way my family treated fur as a timeless treasure in your closet. As

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someone who grew up in the industry, I knew I could fill that gap with the best-looking fake furs out there. Fake furs that look luxurious, even to old-school furriers. Continuing our legacy was only natural; it was just a matter of modernizing what we do, support good causes, and be more accessible.

Honestly, I would have never seen this trend in faux fur coming. We were so overwhelmed with this incredible movement of faux fur and it was a coincidence that we launched right before this wave of large fashion houses declaring “fur free”...like Gucci, Prada, etc. We’ve been so fortunate with all of the incredible response we have received, just being a 2- year-old company.

When you envisioned your business, you were clearly already an expert on the market, given your family’s expertise and history. What led you to believe that a faux fur line would be so well received? And what do you forecast for the future of both fur and faux fur?

You’ve got a great variety of pieces on your website, and we’ve heard about pop-up stores and runways. We even noticed a Smashing Pumpkin piece made its way into the collection. What has been your favorite design thus far? And which one do you wear most often?

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B USINESS SPOTLIGHT


I love all of our classics! They are all feminine, versatile, and chic. I’m the kind of gal that wears the same coat all day and even to go out. My coats need to look good with “most” of my outfits, and that’s what we do. Your beautiful collection is available online and in pop-up stores… how else can people view and purchase your products? We are currently carried in a few specialty boutiques and websites internationally like Ikram Chicago, Neapolitan, Orchard Mile, Neiman Marcus, and more! Our website carries the largest offering and it is best to keep up with our pop-up locations through social media and email. We really respect that a portion of the profits go to help animals. Will you please share about that? Yes! We are proudly partnered with PAWS Chicago, a leading no-kill shelter in North America. Billy and I have been involved for years, and when we started Maison Atia, I knew that we had to partner with the greatest charity I know that is close to my heart (four of our cats were adopted from there!). Our motto is #BuyACoatSaveAPuppy! With every coat sold you provide a homeless pet free transportation to a no-kill shelter. Thus you save a life. How cool is that? Your love of animals is also evident in the work you and Billy are doing with Chicago PAWS. Please tell us about that. Billy was one of the first people to adopt from PAWS Chicago and has kept a close relationship with the founders and extended PAWS family. There is really something special there that you can’t explain. It’s really worth visiting their center if you are ever in Chicago. It has natural light, large windows, no kennels, open space, and LOVING volunteers and trainers around the clock. It’s really a happy place. So, one home in Chicago, an office and home in NYC, and then a lot of time also spent in your LA home. You are one busy family! It’s evident that you really cherish family time. How do you juggle it all with travel and Billy being on tour still? We technically call Chicago our home base and Facetime, if we are separated, at least two times a day. I don’t know how we balance it, it’s just natural, and we are all family oriented so it’s easy. We make sure that when we are together, to really take advantage of spending quality time together with the kids and be supportive of each other’s ventures. I believe you live once, so you should never sacrifice what you believe or want to pursue. It’s our job as a family to help you achieve dreams collectively. Want to share with our readers your favorite restaurants in those great cities?

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B USINESS SPOTLIGHT Hmm. I cook more than eat out… In LA we love Plant Food + Wine… In NYC I like to go to Hangawi… In Chicago, I have a half-acre vegetable farm so we really enjoy that… But if we do go out, I do love a visit to Del Rio’s in Highwood (it’s a classic and a 1920s timewarp). I know that when you are home as a family, you tend to cook more than Billy… What are your favorite meals to prepare when it is just you…and also when friends come over? I love to cook and grew up with a Taiwanese mom and French/ Jewish dad. Good food is so important to me and it really starts with the quality of your produce. So I tend to make curries, pickled vegetables, noodles.. we love noodles... It’s really a balance of it all. Billy (a true American) loves burgers, hotdogs, etc. … So when he’s back from tour, sometimes I just make a really good burger (with Impossible Burger) and top it with kimchi… roast some sweet potato fries, toss a fresh hydrating salad with arugula/dates/toasted pine nuts/olive oil + lemon, cold brew some iced tea, and listen to some 1950s country music… And when we have guests, that’s when I’m adventurous and try a new cookbook. At times it’s an epic fail...but I always have a safety backup, haha. It’s so impressive that you are able to be a great mother and partner while also running this fashion company. What advice do you have for others in our plant-based/vegan community who might want to create a start-up? Trust who you are always, accept your weaknesses, and take advice/help from experts around you. People want to help, and you don’t have to reinvent the wheel twice. And even if you can do it all, don’t, because you will burn out. Build a great team around you that you are confident in and respect. As a final note, when you and I spoke last, you offered some advice that I found to be quite beautiful. We were discussing acceptance in regard to plant-based/vegan beliefs and our interactions with people we encounter. You had what I feel is the warmest, most profound viewpoint on that. Would you share, please? I don’t remember exactly what I said… But I am always in the belief of never marginalizing people and making them feel like the decisions they are making are negative. If I disagree with your way of life, it is not my place to tell you why mine is better than yours. Love is powerful and we should encourage everyone to make the best decisions they can.

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HAPPY DEVOURING! All we care about is baking the tastiest vegan cookies from the best all-natural ingredients we could sniff out.

fatbadgerbakery.com


EDDIE GARZA

THE MAKING OF ONE OF TODAY’S VEGAN INFLUENCERS by Zak Shelton


B USINESS SPOTLIGHT

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ne of my favorite things about the vegan movement is the sense of collaboration and connection that’s constantly present. I’ve found that, more often than not, people want to work together. Friendships and bonds are formed in the spirit of progress and change, and rapid pathways of communication and work are made. Every once in a while, you meet someone with whom your mission and particular mode of operation click, and you think, “This person is different. There’s something special about this person.” That’s what happened to me when I met Eddie Garza back in 2013. We instantly became great friends and knew that we needed to do things together. Eddie is an incredible chef and influencer making a name for himself and his mission to bring the message of plant-based and vegan living to the Latin American community. It’s been amazing to see his rise to prominence, founded and built on his unwavering passion to make a difference for animals and people. It’s been some time since I spoke with Eddie, so I was happy to have a chance to catch up with him to talk about what he’s been working on as well as some of his more intrinsic thoughts on the state of things in our movement. What follows

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is not only a great conversation between friends but a dive into how the vegan message is shifting, and an example of how we can all use the resources at our disposal to make a difference. Zak: Eddie! Thanks so much for hopping on with me! Eddie: Zak, thanks so much for having me. It’s so exciting to be able to talk to you from this far away. Thank you. It’s really awesome to be here with you guys. I’ve been a big fan of VEGWORLD Magazine for a long time and been a big fan of your work. Actually, I remember the first time I saw you, at an event in Dallas. I was, like, I gotta be friends with that guy. Zak: Oh, that was so much fun. I’m super-excited to catch up and share some of the work you’ve been doing. Tell me what’s going on. And then I’d like to dive into a little bit about you and your history, how you became vegan, and what motivates you. Eddie: Sure, sure. Well, as you know, I’ve been living in Miami for a couple of years, been kind of all over the place. I was living in Dallas I think before you were vegan or at least a part of the vegan scene there. Then I moved to New York to work with Mercy for Animals for a few years. Went back to Texas, met you and a bunch of other cool folks, and then ended up

out here in Miami. So that’s where I am right now. Zak: Love it. Well, for people who might not know, Eddie is a chef. He’s been growing an incredible following and an incredible mission to bring plantbased foods and the message of the health of plant-based living to the Latin community for what, maybe two or three years? Tell us a little bit more about that, exactly what you do, and how did you get started doing that? Eddie: That’s a great question. It’s an interesting situation that I got myself into here, working in this community. As you know, I’m from South Texas, an area that’s largely Hispanic, and it was during my time there that I was doing some work for the Humane Society, and I ended up doing some TV spots out in South Texas. And that brought me to doing a lot of TV work in Miami, which is the Latin American capital for media, which is the reason I ended up moving out here. It’s because I just ended up having an opportunity to go and talk about the benefits of plant-based eating, not just for our health but also for the environment and, of course, for animals. So it’s been really cool to be able to share this knowledge with the Latin community. I’ve been doing a lot of work in Colombia. I’ve also been doing work in Mexico, and we’re going to see

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what’s next. Zak: That’s such an important piece of this is to address…how culture, language, and community play a big role in the way we target our actions from an advocacy standpoint. And so, how have you seen those things shape not only the work you do, but also talk a little bit about the importance of being so immersed in the Latin culture and bringing this message to them. Eddie: Man, I got to say it’s really exciting. I think that for a long time people have considered veganism as a white movement. And I’ve been seeing a big shift in the way Latin people eat, specifically in California where you go to those big markets, those big food festivals, and there’s a large population of Hispanic and Latin people embracing veganism. And I’m seeing this shift not just in the United States, but also in Mexico. If you go to Mexico City, you can find vegan food everywhere, and if you go to places like Medellín, Colombia or Bogotá, you’re also going to see that big shift. So this is a growing movement, not just now for white people, but for everybody. And that’s the thing — it’s really for everybody. Everybody can benefit from eating a plant-based diet to improve their health and also to help the planet. I mean, come on. That’s a huge benefit.

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B USINESS SPOTLIGHT The reason I wanted to work there was because I felt from the very beginning that food was my calling. I’ve been cooking for as long as I can remember. In fact I wrote in my book that I started by making my first French crepes when I was 7 years old and my mother was sick. I had to take her breakfast in bed. And it’s something I’ve always just loved doing. So when I started working at Spiral Diner, it was really an incredible experience, because at Spiral, and this was super cool, we had to read Diet for a New America as one of our training tools. And the reason that Sarah and Amy and Jamey wanted us to have all this in our tool kit was because we needed to be prepared for people in Texas asking questions like Why vegan? What about the animals? What about the environment?

Zak: Yeah, that’s incredible. You started out in Mercy for Animals and doing some grassroots activism. What made you transition into a more food-based approach and more into the role you’re in now? And at what point did you realize that this was what you were meant to do, or that you were deciding this was how to push the movement forward in your way?

It was during that time that I read more and more about the animal agriculture industry and how horrible it was for the environment, how horrible it was for the animals. I took my activism to the next level after I stopped working at Spiral. That’s when I started doing grassroots activism and eventually started working for Mercy for Animals. So my initial activism as somebody who was a vegan foodie turned into a love for helping animals in the way I thought was the easiest way for me to get involved.

Eddie: Well, I can tell you this, I’m back to where I

feel like I originally started as an activist. Before I was a vegan, I was a music teacher in Texas, and one summer I decided to try to get a job at a place called Spiral Diner and Bakery in Dallas. I was really surprised when Sarah hired me, because I was like, oh my God, I’m just a nerdy teacher who’s going in and asking for a job with a bunch of cool hipster kids. And she ended up hiring me!

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Anybody can go out and leaflet, anybody can go out and post stories about what’s going on in animal agriculture on their social media pages. Eventually I ended up going back into the food world through my job at the Humane Society of the United States, where I worked as a food policy coordinator when I first moved back to Texas. And I was working with institutions in Texas, some of the biggest school districts in Texas, to add more plantbased foods. And I worked with an incredible team of dietitians and culinary artists. And then ultimately I brought my skills in the kitchen back into my work: Some of the stuff that I learned at Mercy for Animals was working directly with the media, and I said, “Wow! This is cool! I can blend both of these jobs. I love cooking, I love doing TV work, and let’s do this!” And that’s how I ended up moving back into the food world. I’m still doing a lot of the things that I learned from my days at MFA, but I’m also doing a lot of the stuff that I learned from Spiral Diner and even before that. I’m also incorporating cool techniques that have been used in Latin America for centuries and applying them to what we now know as, you know, this haute cuisine in Latin food and vegan food.

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B USINESS SPOTLIGHT Zak: Wow, that’s amazing. I’m always fascinated by how people come to this realization, whether it’s because of the lifestyle of the community or the mission. You know I grew up on a cattle ranch, and what I’m always shocked or fascinated by is how people can come from such different backgrounds and end up in the same state of mind, end up in the same understanding of what’s right and wrong and how things work. I think a lot of that right now is our connectedness, especially through social media and other information. I know that you’ve been doing this since before social media took over our culture; how has that affected the way you’re able to connect with people and share information? How did you feel about that switch, and how has it helped the movement? Has it hurt it in any way? Eddie: I certainly don’t think it’s hurt it. I think it’s done a great job of just showing the world that there is a community. Back in the day when I started this journey, we didn’t have all the amazing tools that we have now. We just had, you know, powdered soy milk, where we lived; vegan options weren’t something we could find easily. There wasn’t a huge community. When I was living in Dallas, I had to really dig deep to find out what was import-

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ant to me and who were the people that I wanted to connect with. It wasn’t a big enough community for me to find the exact group that I was looking for, but thankfully I met this really incredible dude named James Scott, who ended up becoming the founder

he’s hosting a Vegan Drinks, the groups are so large that there are micro-groups. And that’s what I was looking for. Now, in the day and age of social media, you can have all these communities coming together virtually. You can live in a small town like Brownsville,

Texas, where I grew up, and find that community of people all over the world. Now, if I see somebody following me on Instagram or Facebook who’s from the Rio Grande Valley where I’m from, I automatically add them because, for me, that’s another micro-com-

WHEN I STARTED WORKING AT SPIRAL DINER, IT WAS REALLY AN INCREDIBLE EXPERIENCE, BECAUSE AT SPIRAL, AND THIS WAS SUPER COOL, WE HAD TO READ DIET FOR A NEW AMERICA AS ONE OF OUR TRAINING TOOLS. of the Texas Veggie Fair, the largest vegfest in Texas, and also the founder of Dallas Vegan Drinks and a bunch of other really cool events. When James and I met up one day, it was like a blogger kind of conversation. And then we ended up working together on developing cool events and other stuff. He’s really the guy who turned that small community of maybe three or four of us at the time into a huge group. Sure, there were other vegan groups in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, but nobody with whom I really connected on that level of, “Oh, I’m right there with you. You know how it is. Yeah, it’s so cool!” So now Jamey sees 15,000-plus people at his festival every single year. Every time I’m in Dallas and

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munity, there’s a special connection there. And that’s why I always want to incorporate more people. If I meet somebody from Texas, I automatically start a conversation with them. I think that’s something really cool that social media has done for the movement. Also, what about vegan recipes? I mean, how hard was it in the early days to find the best vegan egg recipe, and now, how many can you choose from? There are so many things that social media has done for the movement that I think are really incredible. Zak: Right, right. Man, that’s such good advice. What do you see as the future of the movement from where you stand, from your perspective? Eddie: From my perspective, I see the movement becoming more and more mainstream every day, all the time. And we’ve got some friends, Matt and Phil Letten from the Vegan Bros, who are always talking about how this is going to be a vegan world. Maybe you’re not vegan yet, but you’re a future vegan. I feel

like that’s really where we’re headed, into a world where plant-based eating is going to be much more mainstream. It’s already working its way into the mainstream, and in a big way. But I think we’re going to see it just explode over the next few years. And I think that’s because there’s a lot of really smart, positive activism going on, which is something I’m really supportive of. It was never going to be good if it came from a place of anger. It came from a place of love, and it came from a place of understanding. And that’s the world that I feel we’re at, at least in the activism world. And it’s really encouraging to see. Zak: Yeah, it is. It’s really encouraging to see, because it’s the same for me. You know, growing up on a cattle ranch, hunting and fishing, I used to do competition barbecue and chili, and my dad and I built our own smoker! So coming from that world, I’ve been vegan for seven years. If I’d been met early on with anger and hostility and non-acceptance, I don’t know that I’d be where I am today, because

I might have shut it off very early on. But because it came from a place of love, like you said, I was able to be approached by it. Okay, last question. You work as hard as or harder than anyone I’ve ever met, and I know that you have a really solid mission, so I want to ask you a question that fascinates me concerning people who are driven the way we are: We’re not going to be here forever. You know, each of us has an expiration date. When you’re gone, when you’re no longer here, what do you want people to say about you? If there’s one thing that you’d want to be remembered for, maybe that you accomplished, what is it? Eddie: I guess all I’ve ever wanted was to do good, and I think that when I leave this space, I want to be remembered as somebody who opened some doors for people who never thought that this vegan world was for them. I think I just want to be an example for some, for more people — more people of color, too — to be voices for this movement in a meaningful way. And I guess I just want everybody

to do good and everybody to feel that they’re doing good and feel empowered to do good without any shame, without having that same stigma that they might have experienced 15 years ago. I really just want to open more doors to expand this vegan world, to make it even bigger. Zak: Right! Well, I think you’re doing a fantastic job. I’m so excited to continue to watch you grow and expand; you’re just doing incredible stuff. What’s the best place for people find you online? Eddie: The best place to find me is on my Instagram page. It’s @TheEddieGarza and there I often share recipes in Spanish. I’m increasingly sharing recipes in English as well. I’ll try to add more of those! Zak: It’s happening. It’s happening. Awesome, Man. Thanks again and we’ll talk soon!

@TheEddieGarza

Look for Eddie's Baja Taco recipe in the food section in the back.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Zak Shelton is a third-generation Texas cattle rancher turned vegan entrepreneur. He loves food, commerce, and fitness. He currently resides in Dallas, TX, where he works with VEGWORLD Magazine as well as owns and operates a digital marketing and visual media agency. @zakshelton_ on Instagram

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BUSINESS NEWS

BETTER LATE THAN NEVER: BIG FOOD JOINS THE PLANT-BASED MOVEMENT by Peter Manley

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ver the past few years, there has been a boom in the vegan, vegetarian, and plant-based industries. There are now more people than ever claiming to be vegan or some sort of flexitarian or vegetarian. Though it goes without saying, the vegan movement is on the rise– and fast. This year alone has been filled with many great triumphs for the vegan industry. For example, Beyond Meat released its IPO, making it the first plant-based company to become publicly traded. The IPO performed well– so well in fact, that it was the best performing IPO in several decades. Beyond Meat also saw success in their recent partnership with Del Taco for their selection of Beyond

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Tacos, which quickly became the fast food chain’s best menu update in its history. Plus, a large protein food provider for grade schools has developed a plant-based chicken nugget that is now available for all school systems nationwide to adopt.

panies are facing stiff competition as many startup companies are quickly claiming their share of the pie.

That’s not all: Impossible Foods has had a very busy year as well. Burger King partnered with the plant-based company to create the Impossible Whopper, a burger that is vegan-friendly. It's available at Burger King restaurants nationwide.Impossible Foods has also partnered with Little Caesars for the Impossible Sausage menu item.

Many established companies are now turning their attention toward vegan demands. Tyson Foods, the large company known for selling chicken and other meat products, is now committing to developing a plantbased line of meat alternatives. Nestlé has also joined the hype by acquiring plant-based companies to diversify its offerings. Even the condiment giant Kraft-Heinz is developing plant-based versions of its current lineup of popular condiments.

And now, Big Food is joining in on the plant-based movement. While veganism is still in its infancy, larger com-

As we move forward, we can only expect competition to increase as the vegan industry continues to rise.

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$4.5 BILLION IN SALES PROVES THE PLANT-BASED FOOD MARKET IS FAST GROWING by Peter Manley

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f you weren’t convinced that veganism is here to stay, perhaps this will provide a little bit of context.

According to figures provided by The Good Food Institute, plant-based food sales have increased by approximately 11 percent in the past year alone, with a total market valuation of $4.5 billion. That’s five times faster than the total United States retail food sales in just last year alone. Of all the plant-based products, plant-

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based yogurt surprisingly saw the most growth at 39%, while traditional yogurt sales decreased by 3%. Refrigerated plant-based meat alternatives were the second-best performing plant-based group, with a total spike in sales of 37%. However, sales in the traditional meat industry (animal products) rose by only 2%. Similarly, sales of plant-based ice cream and frozen sweet products rose by nearly 25% and plant-based cheese sales rose by nearly 20%. At the same

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time, plant-based milk products have spiked in sales by at least 6%, while dairy-based milk dropped by 3%. As you can see, the plant-based industry is quickly becoming one of the fastest-growing and best-performing sectors in the food industry.  As big-league players in the industry continue to increase their reach and efforts, we can only expect to see traditional companies expand their offerings to accommodate the changing times.

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BUSINESS NEWS PITCH + PLANT ANNOUNCES FINALISTS FOR BUSINESS PITCHING COMPETITION by Peter Manley

P

itch + Plant, the first plantbased business pitching competition in the UK, participated in the Plant-Based Business Bootcamp. The event took place on Saturday, July 13th, at the LUSH Studio in Soho, London. The event, created by the plant-based company Vevolution, has amassed a large following and list of entrants, which is a display of just how many people are interested in building a business ethically. In fact, a total of 50 plant-based companies applied for the plant-based pitching competition. Damien Clarkson, Co-founder of Vevolution, said, "We were overwhelmed by the quality of applications this year;

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there is an abundance of entrepreneurs creating exciting plant-based businesses that represent a brighter way of living on the planet." Of the fifty total applicants, only seven plant-based startups were officially selected to participate in the live event, complete with a live audience and a panel of judges. The seven startups included The Green Grill & The Green Butchers, KINGS, Club Cultured, JACKED, Native Snacks, Well-Bean Company, and Five Dot Botanics. These seven well-known UK startups pitched their plant-based business plans to an impressive panel of plantbased judges, including Matthew Glover (Chairman of Veganuary),

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Swatee Deepak (Director of With and For Girls at Purposeful), Damien Clarkson (Co-founder of Vevolution), Grace Regan (Founder of Spicebox), and Jonathan Petrides (Co-founder of allplants). The winners, Club Cultured and the Well-Bean Company, won seed investments in their startups, made by Vevolution as part of an expansion of how it supports the growth of plant-based businesses. "We look forward to investing in the winners of Pitch + Plant and helping them on their entrepreneurial journey,� says Vevolution Co-founder Clarkson.

VEGWORLD Magazine


NOW AVAILABLE NATIONWIDE, 'JUST EGG' HAS INVESTORS SCRAMBLING TO BUY IN by Peter Manley

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urrently, the best-selling liquid egg product in natural grocery stores isn’t actually made of real eggs. The popular brand Just, a plant-based producer of mayonnaise, cookie dough, and dressings, also makes the product Just Egg, which is a liquid egg alternative. Just Egg is outperforming other egg liquid products, according to recent data by Just. According to SPINS data provided by Just, the Just Egg product raked in 40 percent of all profit generated and about 30 percent of all liquid egg product sales in natural grocery stores. Moreover, Just Egg is also the second

VEGWORLD Magazine

best-selling egg substitute in traditional grocery stores, only falling second to the popular product Egg Beaters. The Just Egg product, which is a plantbased liquid egg substitute, is made out of mung beans instead. Just Egg was only recently made available nationwide in Sprouts locations in March and in Whole Foods locations in April of 2019. According to the founders Tetrick and Josh Balk, the amount of Just Egg product sold so far is roughly comparable to about 8.2 million chicken eggs.

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“The idea of finding a plant that scrambles like an egg was conjured up on a couch seven years ago,” said Tetrick. “To see where we are today, what my team has built, and to see that over 8 million of these plant-based equivalents have been sold already makes me incredibly proud. I’m so humbled to see Just Egg taking off in such a short time.” Josh and Tetrick have already managed to raise slightly north of $220 million from investors. As the company continues to grow and expand, expect to see Just Egg become available at more and more grocery chains.

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VEGWORLD EVENTS CALENDAR

Looking for the most exciting, fun, inspiring, and informative vegan events worldwide? Here they are! If you have an event coming up, let us know. Send the details to editor@vegworldmag.com

VegFest OKC

Grand Rapids VegFest

September 7, 2019 Oklahoma City, OK

September 22, 2019 Grand Rapids, MI

October 19 - 20, 2019 Costa Mesa, CA

Vegas VegFest

Central Florida VegFest

Alaska VegFest September 7, 2019 Anchorage, AK

September 28, 2019 Las Vegas, NV

Rochester VegFest September 14, 2019 Rochester, NY

SLC VegFest September 14, 2019 Salt Lake City, UT

Twin Cities VegFest September 15, 2019 St. Paul, MN

Harvest Veg​f​est September 21, 2019 York, PA

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Texas Veggie Fair

October 5-6, 2019 Portland, OR

November 2, 2019 Dallas, TX

St. Louis VegFest

Hampton Roads VegFest

October 13, 2019 St. Louis, MO

November 3, 2019 Chesapeake, VA

Healthy For A Lifetime

Seed Food & Wine Week

October 19, 2019 Omaha, NE

Lowcountry VegFest

September 21, 2019 Honolulu, HI

October 19, 2019 Hilton Head Island, SC

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October 26, 2019 Orlando, FL

Portland VegFest

VegFest Oahu

The Fashion Issue

SoCal VegFest

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November 7 - 10, 2019 Miami, FL

Atlanta Veg Fest November 9, 2019 Atlanta, GA

VEGWORLD Magazine


JOIN THE VEGAN

EVOLUTION ADVERTISE WITH US VEGWORLD is passionate about capitalizing on the growing trend of vegetarianism and vegan eating and building a loyal community of readers. Our regular features are carefully designed to excite readers about being part of the vegan lifestyle; provide the latest news and information on the newest and best veggie products; help ease them through a transition; provide them with cutting-edge information about how to look and feel incredible; show them how to integrate veganism into their lifestyle; give them mouthwatering recipes to share with friends and family; and inject small doses of compassion to help them stay on track.

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AN INTERVIEW WITH

ALEXANDRA PAUL by Amy Cowan

Clearly, choosing acting over her acceptance to Stanford University has paid off for Alexandra Paul. Best known for her roles in Baywatch and Melrose Place, this powerhouse has had an amazing movie career as well. What we love most about her is her passion for those less fortunate, which includes feeding the homeless and being a voice for the voiceless. Her continuous defense of animals resonates throughout the vegan community, and we are grateful for the opportunity to interview this special lady.

I am so glad we are able to talk together about your involvement in the vegan community. Thank you for joining us! The world best knows you for your role in Baywatch and many, many films with other famous personalities such as Dan Aykroyd, Tom Hanks, Kevin Costner, and Pierce Brosnan (who, by the way, I hear is also a vegan or vegetarian). I’m sure our readers would love to know what has been your favorite role to date, and why? Thank you for inviting me to be in this issue. I have been very fortunate to work with lovely, talented people and to be able to travel all around the world filming. Hmmm, I would have to say that the roles I enjoy playing are usually of the darker temperaments — I cannot really pick one but, for example, I played a cokehead in the independent movie 12 Bucks, and it was fun because I was training for the Hawaii Ironman triathlon in real life at the time, so I was super healthy and fit, but in the movie I was skanky trailer trash who manipulated her husband and neglected her children for drugs. Now, for just actual JOY being on the set, I would say Baywatch. I just loved being outside, and being on a series is so great because the cast and crew become your family, the set is a second home, and you know your character so well. We were on set as the sun came up and we wrapped when it went down, and in between we moved fast from scene to scene, which I found exhilarating. Everyone was just very grateful to be there, and David Hasselhoff is terrific to work with — great

VEGWORLD Magazine

sense of humor and a fierce work ethic. I just loved being on that show. It’s my understanding that before acting, there was an acceptance to Stanford University? With all of your famous roles in television and movies, I’m going to guess that perhaps you far more enjoyed the more profound pieces you’ve done, such as the documentary about the population crisis or the public service announcements about the benefit of driving electric cars? Tell us about that if you would. Yes, I had decided I wanted to go to Stanford when I was about 12, so when I was accepted I was thrilled. I had always seen myself going to college and then having a career saving the environment! I took a year off after high school, though, to model in New York, and during that year I started working as an actress. Three weeks before I was expected to show up on campus, I told my parents I wanted to pursue my acting career instead. The admissions director at Stanford wrote to me saying I was throwing my life away! Of course I regret not having that college experience, but I don't regret choosing acting, either. There are so many issues that are important to me, and I have been an activist since I was 7, when I wrote to President Nixon asking him to stop pollution. In my own life, I am earnest and serious, and I have produced educational films on issues like over-population and over-consumption. I co-hosted 150 episodes of an environmental talk

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show, and I now co-host a podcast, Switch4Good, about the benefits of being plant-based. But as an actress, I have to say I loved working on fluffy things like Melrose Place, Baywatch, and the 14 movies for Lifetime in which I have starred. I don't judge the material, I just have fun! The situations my characters get to be in, wahooo! It is a nice contrast to my real life, where I am worried about the fate of the world. We were fortunate enough to catch you between auditions, but we’re also curious, what does Alexandra Paul do in her personal life, when she isn’t acting? I live with an amazing husband, Ian Murray, and 2 cats, Sam and Simon. The four of us go for walks together each day. Ian and I have been together for over 23 years and we are still entranced with each other, so we are happy just lying on the bed together doing the NYT crossword! He is a triathlon coach, so both of us exercise regularly. I am a certified health coach and I have private clients — I love helping people feel better about themselves, their bodies, and their lifestyle! (www.AlexandraCoaching.com) My activism also takes up quite a bit of my time — I was in DC last week giving a talk about the value of lowering the human birthrate so humans can live on the planet in harmony with animals and nature and in turn help future generations of people have a high quality of life. And I am an ardent vegan. … Please tell us more about your involvement in the vegan community, specifically the role you play in advocating for animals, to the degree that you’ve been arrested twice in the past year? That’s really something most of us can’t imagine but admire greatly. I am a supporter of Direct Action Everywhere (DxE), which focuses on many aspects of animal rights including veganism, legislation for animals, education, and boycotts, but it also organizes direct action, undercover

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Arrest after a sit in at an Oakland, CA slaughterhouse.

investigations, and open rescue, all in which I have been involved. All different kinds of advocacy for animals are important, but I am drawn to this kind of activism; it is very grass roots. I have rescued a pig from a factory farm with other DxE activists, a chicken at another farm, and a calf at yet another. I have also been arrested for non-violent civil disobedience on behalf of animals: a sit-in at a slaughterhouse and peacefully trespassing on to a chicken farm.

of animal activism. Which experiences stand out most to you?

In addition to those two situations, you’ve really had a rich past in terms

My brother, Jonathan Paul, has inspired me in terms of animal activism. He was

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I went to Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina to help at Best Friends Animal Society makeshift shelter for the cats and dogs rescued from New Orleans, and my job was mainly to clean out the cat cages. I was only there three days, but that kind of simple, necessary work was the closest I felt to spiritual in my life. http://alexandrapaul.com/aday-in-the-life-october-2005/

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AN INTERVIEW WITH ALEXANDRA PAUL

active in the Animal Liberation Front for years and freed hundreds of animals from labs, and I never knew it because, of course, the ALF is an underground organization. He spent almost 4 years in jail for his work for animals. https:// vimeo.com/44815332 I know you’ve shared with me before that you are also passionate about helping the homeless through a program called Food Not Bombs, and you actually got me excited enough about it that I searched out a branch of the organization in my city. Will

Alexandra speaks at an event for the environment

Simon and Sam were named in honor of the animal activist and philanthropist Sam Simon

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you please share with the readers some of what your group does, and how we can all get plugged in to do the same? Food Not Bombs is a nonprofit with 600 chapters around the world. FNB volunteers cook vegan meals for the hungry. You can start your own chapter where you live! www.FoodNotBombs.net Here in Santa Monica, CA, our chapter feeds 80-130 people every Thursday night. We start cooking at 5:30 p.m., and three hours later we are serving an amazing meal of soup, potatoes, pasta (with sausages donated by Tofurky), mixed vegetables, salad, PB&J, pastries, soy ice cream, fruit. Then we have a table of extra foodstuffs like cereal, cookies, bread, and vitamins that we give away. The local farmers’ market gives us produce, and Whole Foods gives us what they would otherwise throw away (as long as it is not from the meat or dairy departments). Our chapter also recycles and composts anything left over, so our weekly hot meal not only Alexandra and her husband Ian, October 2018 fills up empty bellies but diverts so much from the entertainment, but more importantly waste stream. We never know exactly to set an example of living one’s best what the donations will be, how many life, helping the animals, the homevolunteers will show up, how many less, and really our world community folks we have to feed — but it always in general. Thank you so much for works out. My friend Tom calls it “The talking to us. Is there anything you’d Weekly Miracle,” and it really is. Plus of like to add? course the camaraderie between the people cooking and serving, and the May I make a shameless plug for my interaction and friendships we have new plant-based podcast? Please subdeveloped with those we serve. It is scribe to Switch4Good on iTunes or very rewarding on many levels. most any podcast platform. We have interviewed some very inspiring vegYou are an absolute delight to talk to, ans! Thank you so much for inviting and we are fortunate to have someone like you not only to bring us joy in me to be in this issue of VEGWORLD!

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LE SOIXANTE 5 RESTAURANT QUEBEC’S VEGAN FRENCH CUISINE — MERVEILLEUSE! by Michael Taylor

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rom a vegan employee at our hotel, this was our dinner suggestion for the evening:

“Take the funicular [vertical cable railway] over to the ferry and then hike up the hill. It is totally worth it!” Challenge accepted. And it was. Welcome to Le Soixante 5 (means “65” in English), a French vegan restaurant in the heart of Levis (pronounced Leevee), Quebec. Levis sits across the St. Lawrence River from the very popular tourist spot, Quebec City. Incredibly, a significant part of their customer base does exactly what we did, funicular to ferry and then a hike. As guests approach the restaurant, they see the typical Quebec outdoor seating area with hanging flowers. While for nine months of the year most will not sit outside, it’s a great experience if you can, weather permitting. Inside you’ll find a warm and brightly lit interior with the first bottle-cork bulletin board I’d ever seen. The music is a throwback to the 70s classic rock & roll, because your chef/host, Geneviève Brunet, has had a lifelong infatuation with that genre. The entirely vegan menu is quite eclectic but still distinctly French. Appetizers include the soup du jour; today’s treats

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LE SOIXANTE 5 RESTAURANT

included apple onion soup along with fondue, nachos, and their version of mozzarella sticks. Dinner entrées included ratatouille, lasagna, polenta, linguini, and more, all made with sauces bursting with flavor as you’d expect from a sophisticated French restaurant. I ordered the ratatouille, a very large portion rich with flavors but not salty or oily. My wife had the dans les bois (“in the woods”), a delicious mushroom medley dish, again rich and hearty but not salty. The dessert we ordered, chocolate cake, was exactly what we were looking for: sweet, but mildly so, with much of the sweetness coming from the blueberries that topped it. Le Soixante 5 does not kill cocoa flavors by adding sugar by the truckload. The service is very friendly, patient, and extremely attentive. We felt more welcome each time our server visited our table. Ask them anything, from menu translation to what there is to do in Levis, and they will be happy to help! This cozy restaurant should be a must on your visit to historic Quebec City. Reservations are accepted (and recommended during the weekend), all major credit cards are accepted as well, and there’s parking on the street if you happen to have a car. Bon appétit!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Michael Taylor travels in North America, South America, and Europe for business and strives to dine at the very best vegan restaurants in every city he visits. As a vegan of 10 years and vegetarian for 24 years before that, he has sampled some of the best vegan foods in 47 states and 24 countries. Michael looks for restaurants using the best ingredients (organic preferred), innovative recipes, and vegan outreach.


Alois Lageder Winery

SUPPORTING SUSTAINABILITY AND THE VEGAN LIFESTYLE THROUGH BIODYNAMIC VINICULTURE by Diane Pandolfini

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estled into the rolling Alpine hillside along the Austrian-Italian border is a humble winery with worldwide recognition as a pioneering producer. Established in 1823, the Lageder family winery has been producing wines representative of Italy’s mountainous Alto Adige region for almost 200 years. Overshadowed by the impressive snow-capped Alps, Alto Adige is a land caught between tradition and modernity. The region is best known for apple orchards, of which some were uprooted in order to plant vineyards. It’s no wonder that Alois Lageder Winery is a testament to harmony within the contrasting elements of the region — producing sleek modern wines using worldly natural techniques and a modern view of the market, including the vegan movement.


other major soils, sedimentary clay and sand.

DUALITY OF NATURE Everything about this special place is laced with dichotomy. Alto Adige had been passed from the Austrians to the French prior to becoming part of Italy, mainly due to the fact that it was inhabited by predominantly Italian peoples. Its people are bilingual and trilingual, speaking German, Italian, and/or the local language, Ladin. Geologically, there are steep, mountainous slopes of over 4000-foot elevation and gentle hills on the valley floor under 1000-foot elevation. Even the soils exhibit a duality of Nature, with igneous rock formations and weathered dolomitic limestone, both made of the Alps themselves, contrasting with the

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For us, wine is not only a product of nature but an expression of our philosophy. – Alois Lageder

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Why is the Alto Adige soil important? Wine is a product entirely dependent on terroir, the environmental conditions for growing grapes that contribute to individual wines’ flavor and aroma — and also to vineyards’ ability to be productive year after year. In the summers in the Alto Adige, the weather fluctuates between warm, generously sunny days and cool Alpine nights, a perfect climate for growing a large variety of grapes. This creates balance: for the land itself, the peoples who inhabit it, and the unique microflora and fauna that help keep the vines healthy.

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ALOIS LAGEDER WINERY

Perhaps the ultimate dichotomy: Wine is a consumer product but also a work of art, part of our heritage and a fixture in the culture of our world. The Alois Lageder Winery and family strive always to embody all these uniquely opposing forces and harmonize with them. As the world becomes ever more technologically inclined, this resistance to turn winemaking into a laboratory science is refreshing, and very much in line with vegan thinking. It shows that we can make choices to be in harmony with Nature while at the same time achieving our own goals. This awareness is why we have chosen to be vegan, and it’s comforting to know it has great importance among many of the wine producers of the world. The Alois Lageder Winery is proudly showing their commitment to the preservation of nature, and encouraging others to do the same. Though they do not specifically define themselves as making vegan wines, the wines are produced unfiltered and unfined, using only natural applications in the vineyard, and with energy-conscious winemaking techniques in the winery. The wines are therefore produced in the winery in a sustainable vegan manner, and with a negligible carbon footprint. In this modern world, with so much pressure to create larger quantities at smaller costs, this refreshingly vegan approach goes against our current standard expectations.

a style of agriculture developed in 1924 by Austrian philosopher Rudolph Steiner. He wrote an entire book on it, describing in detail every malady affecting crops and appropriate remedies. Biodynamics is based on the concept that, in order to maintain balance and be at harmony with Nature yet remain in control, one must act within the guidelines set by Nature herself. Fertilization of fields must be done naturally and without man-made chemicals. Crops must be sowed, pruned, maintained, and harvested according to moon cycles, much like The Old Farmer’s Almanac suggests. In between rows of crops, complementary wildflowers, weeds, and grasses should be planted (or allowed to grow in naturally) to create biodiversity for the microcosm of each individual plant as well as for the soil health. These vegan-styled wine-growing and winemaking techniques

are very much at odds with the economics of running a winery day-to-day, as the vineyard and wines require a more labor-intensive regimen of care. Commitment to this style of agriculture is therefore a religion of extremes: Winemakers following Rudolf Steiner’s prescribed method strive to do so down to the last detail, spraying the vineyard with organic tinctures rather than chemical sprays, letting animals run freely through the fields, and interpreting what the crops need by observation.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PAIRING WINES WITH FOOD Local dishes usually pair best with local wines; Clemens suggested an Alto Adige local favorite, Pressknodel pan-fried dumplings, to pair with the Alois Lageder AM Sand Gewürztraminer.

BIODYNAMIC AGRICULTURE The Alois Lageder Winery mainly hews to the tenets of Biodynamics,

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An Interview With Clemens Lageder In my interview with Clemens Lageder, spokesman for the Lageder family, I asked about ways their use of Biodynamic agriculture has benefited them. It’s unusual to find wineries that practice this method on a fairly large scale, and it shows their dedication to protecting the natural environment and growing the highest-possible-quality grapes. I hear Alto Adige is a beautiful place. What is the environment like, and how does that affect your vineyards? Alto Adige lies in the heart of the Italian Alps, at the foot of the Dolomites. The region once belonged to Austria and became part of Italy in 1918. The unique geographical location and special history of the region lead to a range of contrasting elements. We have different cultures, Italian and Austrian, and different languages, German, Italian, and Ladin. The microclimate is very diverse too: We have cool, Alpine nights and cold winters, with very warm Mediterranean summers and over 300 sunny days a year. The vineyards lie between 700-4200 foot [elevation] and are among the highest in Europe. This range of altitude makes Alto Adige a unique wine-growing region with over 25 grape varieties. What led you to Biodynamic Agriculture? We first encountered it in my grandmother’s vegetable garden, but today the philosophy has become deeply rooted in the family’s winemaking philosophy. We have 135 acres of family-owned vineyards that have been farmed biodynamically since 2004.

What aspects of Biodynamic Agriculture are most important? One of the foundations is the concept that the agricultural undertaking is a closed system in which the interaction between plants and animals is of paramount importance. Therefore, we collaborate with mountain farmers who bring their cows and sheep into the winery’s vineyards during the autumn and winter months, following the old tradition of transhumance [seasonal moving of livestock to different grazing areas].

This helps to increase the vitality of the grapes and biodiversity, building up more humus in the soil and enriching it. In our work, harmony with cosmic and earthly forces is very important. What aspect of Biodynamics is most impactful on the health of the vines and on terroir? It increases the health and fertility of the soil, promotes better roots, the ground holds water more efficiently and protects from erosion, the grapes grow and ripen more uniformly, and the soil health gives vitality to the vines and grapes, leading to more expressive wines with a lively and strong character. Overall, everything benefits. What are the biggest challenges of using this method? Implementing Biodynamics means motivating the people. This is tough, as we have over 80 wine-growing partners from all over Alto Adige from whom we source grapes. Everyone has to decide for themselves which way to farm. Currently, over 50% of our partners have chosen to farm Biodynamically, and we have hopes to complete the conversion within the next few years. The biggest challenge is looking at the vineyard from a different perspective and motivating your partners and employees to do the same. What other efforts for sustainability do you practice? We are working without chemicals or synthetic products; we make our own biodynamic preparations and homeopathic infusions instead. We promote biodiversity by sowing ground-cover plants and planting shrubs, introducing animals into the vineyards, and fertilizing the soil with compost. All these measures lead to improved soil quality and vine fertility. Our objective is always to develop and maintain the natural cycle. In the cellar we work in accordance with the strict principles of Demeter Italia. (An international organization called Demeter certifies crops and vineyards as Biodynamic, although there are many wineries that practice Biodynamics that do not have certification.)


ALOIS LAGEDER WINERY

IN SUMMARY Overall, as a medium-sized winery producing 1.2 million bottles (100,000 cases) of wine a year, the Alois Lageder Winery and family are committed to preserving the native environment and producing wines in a sustainable and admirably natural and vegan way. They are

a truly inspirational wine family: In a region filled with opposing features and forces, they’ve allowed nature to harmonize with itself by managing the vineyard with minimal intervention while making wines of the utmost quality — and coaching their partner wine-growers in Alto Adige and surrounding areas to do the

same. This dedication to protecting nature in such a specific and conscious way resonates strongly with our vegan values, promoting a better present and future for us all. Look for the Vegan Tirolean Pressknodel recipe in the food section in the back.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Diane Pandolfini is an Advanced Sommelier through the Court of Master Sommeliers, an organization dedicated to educating beverage professionals all over the world. She strives to shed more light on how the alcohol industry and veganism co-exist, to hopefully make the world slightly more harmonious. In doing so, she is also writing a series of cookbooks. More info @the_vegan_apocalypse or at www.veganapocalypse.com.

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Adventures in India WITH VEGAN ON THE GO! Story and Photos by Cathy McLellan Complex, diverse, colorful, glorious, confusing, frustrating, friendly, beautiful India! India, one of a kind; it will change you, if you let it. Our adventure took us from the Red Fort in Delhi, to the majestic Taj Mahal, into the Thar Desert, and on to the beaches of Goa and the backwaters of Kerala. India is a country of rules and no rules: a paradox of regional diversity that manifests itself in the fashion, food, spices, and unique culture of each region. The same — and yet different. I’m so excited to share highlights of our adventure in India, including what we ate, where we ate, and what we created. Are you ready?


ESTINATION SPOTLIGHT: INDIA WHAT WE ATE The Indian people are proud of their local dishes and how unique they are to the rest of India; that’s true in many ways. Historically, India was mostly rural, and people did not have cars, so they were fairly localized in their traditions, including what they ate and how they prepared the foods. This is still true today. You can have a simple dish like poha (flattened, flavored rice), and it will contain different spices depending on the region where you’re enjoying it. In India they have pure-veg restaurants and non-veg restaurants and some that serve both. Pure veg means vegetarian, plus no eggs. It’s designated with a green dot on products and on signs.

HERE ARE SOME TIPS As a vegan, start with restaurants that are strictly pure veg. Then there’s less of a chance of cross-contamination and only a few ingredients to watch out for like dairy, which is widely used.

Eat at popular pure-veg family-run restaurants. Let them know what you can eat. It will be delicious and cheap. When you order, be specific: If you are vegan, you still need to say “I do not eat anything from an animal”: no ghee (clarified butter), no cheese including curd and paneer, no dairy of any kind. Keep away from street food just for health reasons. We were told by everyone, “Don’t do it.” I know! I wanted to eat street food so-o-o-o bad! OK, I went crazy once and bought some steamed veggie momos from a restaurant stand at the night market. (Obviously, I survived.) I know, settle down, right? Some dishes we enjoyed and ate frequently included pancakes called dosa, stuffed with subzi (potatoes in spicy red sauce); tofu scramble or chickpea omelet; vegetable samosa; chana masala; many types of curries, dals, and veggie stews; parantha (spicy flatbread filled with veggies); falafel; hummus; poha; chapatis; roti; coconut-influenced dishes (especially in Kerala); rice and more rice; and lots of fresh fruit.


ESTINATION SPOTLIGHT WHERE WE ATE — TOP RECOMMENDATIONS There were so many wonderful meals, each unique and flavorful. Here are our top eleven recommendations for eating in India: Hotel Breakfast Buffets – Many hotels have an awesome breakfast buffet, worth every penny. Homestays – Meet the locals and eat a traditional breakfast provided as part of your accommodation. Farmer’s Café – A groovy little café in the Bandra neighborhood of Mumbai. The food was fantastic; we ate here a few times and took dessert home, too; try the chocolate mousse cake. https://www.facebook.com/farmerscafeindia Anohki – The café is full of chatter and is a happening place! Check out this deli-style café in Jaipur for some amazing dishes and sweets, eat in or to go. Peacock Rooftop Café – A busy rooftop café with local music and a 360° view of Jaipur. Go for the sunset and the cool crowd as well as the food. Millets of Mewar – A vegan-friendly rooftop restaurant with a great view of Udaipur. It’s across the footbridge; watch for signs. The Pad Thai rocked! Yummy Yoga – An Udaipur rooftop café, great for dinner. Be prepared to walk up a few flights of stairs. Across the footbridge. Bean Me Up – The only all-vegan restaurant that we found in North Goa. Set in a beautiful outdoor space, and the service was awesome. Try the tofu scramble for breakfast with homemade bread and tahini. https://beanmeup.in or IG @beanmeup.goa Go With the Flow – Loved the name and the vibe of this vegan-friendly outdoor restaurant across the river from Baga Beach in Goa. http://gowiththeflowgoa.com


Cassava Restaurant Kochi Marriott Hotel – Treat yourself. Phone ahead, let them know you’re vegan, and they will create the most wonderful Kerala-influenced dishes you’ve ever experienced. https://www.marriott.com/hotels/hotelinformation/restaurant/cokmc-kochi-marriott-hotel Houseboat in Kerala – We highly recommend that you rent a houseboat on the backwaters of Kerala! You will have your own private cook and driver. You specify what you like to eat, and they create unique dishes just for you — expect a lot of coconut! Absolutely wonderful!


ESTINATION SPOTLIGHT: INDIA


WHAT WE CREATED When you go to India, you gotta take some cooking classes. You will learn about Indian ingredients and local spices as well as how to prepare and cook local dishes, and the best part…you will eat the fabulous Indian dishes you create. Before we went to class at Mukti’s Kitchen Cooking Classes, at http://www.muktikitchen.com, we informed them we were vegan, and they said they could accommodate us. In fact, the whole class cooked vegan. How cool is that?! We learned to make four dishes while learning to cook with Mukti, including mushroom curry, moon dal (green lentils), saag aloo (spinach and potatoes), and veggie pulav (spiced rice with veggies, similar to briryani). We loved the mushroom curry. I’m thrilled to be able to share that recipe with you in this recipe section of VEGWORLD. Go to India, have your own adventure! It really is a life-changing experience! Check out Mukti's Mushroom Curry in the recipe section.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Cathy McLellan is a Rouxbe-Certified Plant-Based Chef and Vegan Recipe Designer and Consultant as well as writer and creator of veganonthego.net, an online resource for those interested in exploring a plant-based lifestyle. Her mission is to encourage a sustainable lifestyle through food that is vegan, accessible, healthy, and delicious. Cathy’s passions include time in the kitchen and with family, the outdoors, gardening, people, and travel. Blog http://www.veganonthego.net IG @veganonthego


Ask ALISON

POWERED BY PLANTS BUILDING MUSCLE THROUGH A WHOLE-FOOD VEGAN DIET So seriously…can I expect to have a body like yours? Training for a competition is HARD, INTENSIVE work and, quite honestly, not a healthy or sustainable lifestyle. I’ll admit I don’t maintain “competition” abs all year ‘round. I like my waffles too much! But on a serious note, my first response is yes, you can do ANYTHING you set your mind to. My second response is that everybody is made differently and responds differently to foods and training. Accepting your body for what it can do, and then moving forward in your training with patience, love, and LOTS of sleep will do a lot more wonders than beating it up and wishing for someone else’s rewards. The competitor in me says: You can achieve your goals with hard work, consistency, determination, persistence, and ridding yourself of any excuses!

You’re a mom, right? How did you find the time to compete, with kids? Oh, yes…I have two sweet babies, ages 5 and 3! They’re a handful, for sure, but they were also my biggest motivators on my fitness journey. It’s so important to make time for yourself that gives you joy and fulfillment that you can then turn around and give to your loved ones. Exercise and clean eating, where I was cutting out foods that did not add to my progress, gave me a control factor that seemed to fuel the mom boss in me! I had a constant that provided me energy, purpose, and success beyond my immediate home life. Again, I go back to my thought process that you can do ANYTHING you want; you can move mountains! The question is, have you cleared your environment of all things toxic that may be holding you back? I’m serious about this one: LET THAT STUFF GO! Whatever is negative in your life doesn’t need to be there, especially if you have GOALS! Drink a glass of water before each meal, and when you feel tempted to sneak in treats that aren’t a part of your plan go for a walk! Changing our surroundings is a creative way to refocus.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Alison Worthen is a fitness enthusiast who has participated in an array of different sports from gymnastics and cheerleading to softball and track, finding herself in love with the sport of running, and is now a yoga instructor and bodybuilder. She is a mother of two, and both her son and her daughter follow her lead in having a passion for being active. During the day she is a full-time lifestyle photographer, and at night she co-owns a vegan catering and product company called The Simple Sprout. She is dedicated to providing her community with the idea that joy is a choice, and compassion and gratitude are wealth.

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OUR FAVORIT E T HINGS From Oprah to Ariana Grande to Julie Andrews, many people look forward to their favorite things. At VEGWORLD Magazine, we are happy to be blessed with so many fun, new products that make checking the mail a little bit like Christmas every day! We are excited to share with you our staff’s favorites, from the amazing new sour cream we stumbled on at Expo West to the incredible new cookbook that you can use to delight both your veg and non-veg friends.

MOTILE VEGAN LEATHER COMMUTER LAPTOP BACKPACK Our Editor is loving the MOTILE Vegan Leather Commuter Laptop Backpack with its timeless design, paired with modern functionality and padded shoulder straps for maximum comfort and ease of wearing. Simple to use double zipper system with vegan leather pulls on a smooth gold toned zipper. Back storage compartment has padded laptop storage and tablet pocket. With an exterior expandable water bottle pocket, top zip pocket for quick access to personal items such as keys, and an exterior phone pocket that leads to an interior power bank pocket, this backpack covers all the bases!

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OZERY FAMILY BAKERY'S ONEBUN Ozery Family Bakery's OneBun gives you the necessary fiber to keep you full and satisfied (unlike standard hamburger buns that are filled with excess calories, but lack real nutritional value). The Multi Grain OneBuns are pre-sliced buns that contain 7 grams of protein, and — like all Ozery products — the OneBun is non-GMO, free of artificial preservatives, and big on flavor. With the 100 Calorie OneBun, you save calories and can splurge a little extra with your sandwich or veg burger sides!

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FAVORITE THINGS

SEAPOINT FARMS ORGANIC EDAMAME SPAGHETTI AND FETTUCINE

EPIC VEGAN

Pasta lovers everywhere – pull up a chair and prepare to savor the tastiest and healthiest alternative pasta on the market today: Organic Edamame Spaghetti and Organic Edamame Fettuccine from Seapoint Farms (www.seapointfarms.com). We love how fast it cooks and the fact that it is flour free!

As a trained thespian and vegan chef, Dustin Harder brings his show-stopping skills to the kitchen with his over-the-top culinary creations in Epic Vegan. Taking timeless comfort food to a whole new level with over 120 nostalgic, plantbased, Instagram-worthy “stunt food” recipes, Dustin’s inspiration stemmed from the extravagant milk shake craze and the ensuing “top that” food photos that continue to flood social media feeds.

ANCIENT HARVEST ORGANIC MICROWAVEABLE QUINOA What an easy way to get fast, healthy protein! With flavors like Sea Salt, Chickpeas & Lentils, Garlic Quinoa, and Southwestern, you’ll love using this instead of rice-based heat-and-eat products. Coconut oil is the tropical superstar behind this amazing product which contains no gluten, GMOs, rice, or fillers.

VEGWORLD Magazine

NUTRAMILK NutraMilk is the game-changing appliance changing the way we make alternative milks at home and in the shop. Make fresh additive-free milks from nuts and seeds.

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The vegan fashion revolution is on the rise, inspiring designers, stimulating creativity, and saving animals as well as, in many cases, the environment. Check out some of the latest trends, timeless pieces, and the up-andcoming innovation of vegan products.


PERSISTENCE PAYS ING G N A H C IS ' H S U P A T E HOW THE 'P S IE R T S U D IN Y T U A E B THE FASHION & by Ingrid Newkirk


PERSISTENCE PAYS

I

t's hard to believe now, but back in 1980, when People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) was founded, fur industry ads featuring celebrities proclaimed that fur was "what becomes a legend most," and it wasn't unusual to see wealthy donors wearing fur coats to humane society functions. If you wanted shampoo that wasn't made by blinding bunnies in a testing laboratory, just about the only place to find it was in a "hippie" store in California. Seriously. We were determined to change all that, and we did, then moved on to change even more! Today, the few people who still wear fur run the risk of being mistaken for an actor on the way to the set of Game of Thrones. And it's not just fur that consumers and designers are shunning but anything stolen off an animal's back: from feathers to wool and leather of all kinds. In February, Los Angeles hosted the firstever Vegan Fashion Week, and in March, the 1,000th company adopted the "PETA-Approved Vegan" logo, which helps consumers identify animal-friendly clothes, accessories, and homewares. And today, cosmetics and personal care products that are not just non-animal–tested but also vegan are right there in your local Target, CVS, or Walmart. Big changes in the fashion and beauty industries are taking place quite quickly.

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Informed consumers are demanding that companies provide ethical clothing and products. How did it all start? In the 1980s, PETA challenged the idea that a person could care about dogs but wear their cousins — foxes — simply to achieve a certain look. At that time, in the days before anyone with a smartphone could pull up videos of farmed foxes frantically spinning in circles inside tiny wire cages, consumers could truly claim ignorance about fur and its production. It was desirable, expensive, chic, and a sign that

you'd "arrived." We had to burst that bubble, and we did. PETA and our international affiliates conducted investigations that showed everyone exactly how workers bludgeon raccoon dogs, electrocute chinchillas, stuff minks' heads into jars to suffocate them, and break rabbits' necks. PETA supporters leafleted and sent out mailings but also crashed fur shows, jumped onto runways, and demonstrated outside fur stores. Celebrities and other influencers sat up and took notice, and over the years, kind people from Kim Basinger and Penelope Cruz to Taraji P. Henson, Charlize Theron, and Gillian Anderson came forward to appear in PETA's head-turning ads.

IN THE 1980S, PETA CHALLENGED THE IDEA THAT A PERSON COULD CARE ABOUT DOGS BUT WEAR THEIR COUSINS — FOXES — SIMPLY TO ACHIEVE A CERTAIN LOOK. The Fashion Issue

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Now, hundreds of designers and retailers — including longtime holdouts Chanel, Gucci, Versace, Burberry, Donna Karan, Michael Kors, and a slew of others — have abandoned fur. Entire cities are siding with animals, too: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Berkeley, and West Hollywood have banned the sale of new fur items, and lawmakers are considering a statewide ban. A bill to stop fur sales in New York City has been introduced as well. Most savvy company executives now understand that once cruel practices have been exposed in their industry, they need to change course or risk losing customers.

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Here's an example. No one had any idea that angora was cruelly obtained until a PETA Asia investigation showed live rabbits on farms in China tied down and screaming as their fur was yanked out by the fistful. That's a video that's hard to watch, but those screams were heard around the world when it went viral. It sent shockwaves through the clothing industry, and stunned retailers, including Calvin Klein, H&M, Tommy Hilfiger, Topshop, and Inditex, which owns Zara, rapidly dropped angora from their clothing lines. Next came our campaign against mohair. A PETA Asia eyewitness investigation into angora goat farms in South Africa, where most of the world's mohair is produced, shows workers dragging terrified goats by the horns and legs, throwing them across the floor, and even cutting their throats while they were fully conscious. More than 300 major retailers worldwide have since dropped mohair, and more will soon. PETA and our international affiliates have also exposed the global wool industry's systemic cruelty in dozens of shearing sheds on four continents, proving that shearing is not "just a haircut." We've shown that workers race against the clock and lose their temper at the slightest impediment — taking out their frustration on the terrified, struggling sheep and lambs.

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PERSISTENCE PAYS

Our exposés show shearers punching and kicking the sheep, slamming their heads into the floor, and inflicting wounds on them, which they sew up without any painkillers. I could keep going. From down to leather to crocodile skin — every time PETA or one of our affiliates investigates a new aspect of the clothing trade, we uncover widespread abuse, and retailers and consumers alike are saying "enough."

We're seeing a similar industrywide shift with cosmetics and personal care products. That all started long ago, too. In 1988, when PETA conducted a groundbreaking undercover investigation into animal-testing laboratory Biosearch, many people saw, for the first time ever, that experimenters torment animals by pouring caustic chemicals into their eyes, rubbing them into their skin, injecting them into their bod-

ies, and forcing them down their throats. They even taped tiny mice to boards, smeared products onto their shaved skin, and burned them under heat lamps. At Biosearch, rats were also locked inside tiny metal boxes that were pumped full of noxious chemicals. Others were force-fed an insecticide and left to convulse while laboratory staff went home to their dinners. Mice were drowned in bottles of cooking oil. Rabbits shook and screamed as corrosive chemicals burned away layers of their skin. That was then. Now, following PETA's decades of protests, meetings with corporate and government officials, funding of high-tech non-animal research methods and much more, we've gone from just nine cruelty-free companies in 1987 to more than 3,900 listed in our Beauty Without Bunnies database. Cosmetics testing on animals has all but ended in the US and is illegal in India, the European Union, New Zealand, and some other countries. By 2020, thanks to the passage of the California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act, it will be illegal to sell cosmetics in California if they were tested on animals. Last year, after working with PETA, Dove — one of the largest personal care product brands in the world — banned all tests on animals, earning a spot on PETA's cruelty-free list, and its parent company, Unilever, is working to end cosmetics tests on animals across the globe. Herbal Essences has joined the Beauty Without Bunnies

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IF YOU KEEP FIGHTING FOR WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN AND NEVER GIVE UP, IT WILL HAPPEN. program, too, and its parent company, Procter & Gamble, has been collaborating with PETA scientists on ways to replace the use of animals in deadly toxicity testing. The tide has turned against testing on animals worldwide, with one exception: China, where tests on animals are still required for

imported cosmetics. However, scientists funded in part by PETA are working with the Chinese government to accept non-animal tests for cosmetics ingredients, and in 2017, a provincial arm of the China Food and Drug Administration opened a non-animal testing laboratory near Shanghai.

Progress doesn't always come as quickly as we would wish, but if you keep fighting for what you believe in and never give up, it will happen. And PETA won't give up until no animals are used as test tubes or clothing anywhere in the world. We thank every person who does something to bring us closer to that day.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Ingrid Newkirk is the president and founder of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. She is the subject of the HBO documentary I Am an Animal and has written eight books about helping animals, including Making Kind Choices and The PETA Practical Guide to Animal Rights. Her new book AnimalKind is due out in January 2020. Her work for animal rights has made headlines around the world. Follow PETA on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and YouTube.

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VEGAN MEANS

WE DON' T USE Vegan fashion means that clothing and accessories are made from non-animal derived sources. Most people only see avoiding fur or leather, but they typically don't think about the lives saved in choosing alternative materials. This is a list of just some of the many animals typically used in the name of fashion.

ANIMAL FABRICS & LININGS FUR

Fox

Rabbit

Mink

Raccoon Dog

Chinchilla

Coyote

LEATHER

Cow

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Goat

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Kangaroo

Sheep

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EXOTIC SKIN

Alligator

Crocodile

Ostrich

Snake

Alpaca

Angora

FABRICS

Silk

Cashmere

Wool

Mohair

Horse Hair

OTHER ANIMAL MATERIALS FILLINGS

Goose

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Duck

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MUCH OF FASHION, ESPECIALLY FAST FASHION, IS AN ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER.


An Interview with

ANNA TAGLIABUE FOUNDER & CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF REFAUXLUTION by Tess Chavez

THE PELUSH PHILOSOPHY The Pelush concept has been created to reposition and transform the boundaries of the faux fur world; a ReFAUXlution. Through meticulous research and the selection of the finest Italian fabrics, and the best man-made pelage, each coat is carefully crafted to create a luxurious and elegant experience.

What inspired you to found Pelush? Love for all animal species combined with the desire to look glamorous with compassion. I didn’t decide to become a fashion designer; it just happened naturally and organically. For several years in my early 20s I worked for the Fendi family in Manhattan. I always considered myself an animal lover and never felt comfortable working with furs, because I knew that behind each coat, jacket, trim, and trinket there was once a living animal. But back then we didn’t have any of the alternatives we have today.  One day Fendi made the most beautiful faux fur, and I immediately fell in love with this exciting new fabric. I found it so cool and innovative, like something from the future. I kept on researching for this product, but it took 18 years for the technology to finally catch up to today’s exceptional

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quality and level of luxury. You get the glamour effects, but without harming anyone in the process. How wonderful this is! One day, while at Prada as a Personal Shopper on Madison Avenue, I found the courage to take on the fur industry and start Pelush, and I’ve never looked back.  What makes Pelush the perfect alternative for those who want to wear fur? Pelush faux furs are not like any other coats. Each piece is one-of-a-kind, with beautiful details, hand embroidery, French laces, vintage buttons, Italian linings, metallic brocades, crochet applications, and extraordinary couture. Many of the colors are custom-made, and some styles can be reversed. Pelush also offers a bespoke monogram program with Japanese glass beadings for clients who want to make their coats truly distinctive and personal. 

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Most important, I wish to recreate the feeling you have when you wear something extremely soft and plush, something that makes you feel fuzzy, cozy, comfortable, and warm, something indulgent, luxurious, elegant, and timeless. We’ve accomplished the most innovative fabric technology, where we can replicate the softest furs that exist in nature and even invent new ones. We are now replicating fox, mink, chinchilla, coyote, Persian lamb, astrakhan/broadtail, sable, and Mongolian lamb plus engineered reptile skins.  Pelush gives the best alternative to real fur, by selecting only the best-quality man-made pelage [mammal fur, hair, or wool] and making exceptional and unique garments that can be passed down from one generation to another. It’s high fashion on the cutting edge of technology and design for the modern woman in search of glamour, comfort, and the warmth of a plush coat without compromising her ethics and moral values.  What exactly is #ReFAUXlution? Faux fur is one of the most exciting textiles of our time. It’s a fur revolution!  And so I created #ReFAUXlution, an anti-fur movement encouraging women to go faux and choose fashion that’s cruelty-free

instead of cruel. #ReFAUXlution embodies the company philosophy of offering the best possible alternatives to real fur, for the best possible reasons. #ReFAUXlution is Fashion in Action, using activism through fashion to promote veganism as the moral imperative of our time, a cruelty-free lifestyle with dignity and integrity that includes beautiful, luxurious, and glamorous garments. #ReFAUXlution is much more than a fashion statement. It’s about compassion and reconnection to the animals and nature. It’s a defender of justice for non-human and human animals alike. It’s the antidote to the fur industry. The production of fur is associated with high environmental costs. How are Pelush products a better option for the environment? Faux fur is always a better choice, environmentally and ethically.  The fur industry did a great job defaming faux fur fabrics with lies and misinformation, but the reality is very different.  Real fur is not environmentally sustainable, it’s not biodegradable, and it’s ranked one of the world’s

We must look forward into the future and completely eliminate animals from the fashion equation and our diet.

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ANNA TAGLIABUE INTERVIEW

five worst industries for toxic-metals pollution. In addition, 85% of the fur industry’s skins come from animals on fur  factory farms, which are  harmful to the environment. Fur farms generate millions of pounds of feces that pollute nearby rivers and streams with toxic phosphorus and pollute the air by releasing thousands of pounds of ammonia into the atmosphere. The energy required to produce a fur-farmed-animal coat is 20 times higher than for a faux fur coat. In contrast, Pelush and the rest of the faux fur industry simply don’t have real fur’s environmental impact. What better option could there be? For some, faux fur is associated with looking lower in quality than real fur. How are the materials used in Pelush products different from those used in fastfashion alternatives? This kind of textile technology didn’t exist just a few years ago. Yet every season the quality and feel keep getting better because of constantly innovating textile fabrication techniques. Faux fur is now as soft, lustrous, luxurious, and glamorous as real fur, making this product a new kind of luxury. The finest-quality faux furs are very expensive, in many cases more expensive than real fur, which is now much cheaper because of China’s worldwide fur exports.

joining the economy of sustainability and recycling. This is extremely exciting news! As a new and upcoming fashion designer and a vegan, I always look for the latest fabric innovation technologies and changes according to the best ethical models. That’s why I choose to make one-of-a-kind, timeless, cruelty-free pieces with minimum waste, using every little piece of fabric as much as I possibly can. The faux fur industry today is a very small, niche industry, representing only 0.1% of the garments created each year. But it will grow as the beauty and glamour of faux fur garments converges with people’s recognition of the harm the real-fur industry is doing to animals and the planet. Many high-end labels and brands have banned fur from their runways and stores. What would you say to brands that have yet to take a no-fur stance? Real fur was never okay before and certainly has no place in the 21st century. New and established designers should embrace the latest discoveries and technologies. What’s happening with the textile industry is incredibly exciting; we are going in the right direction in terms of bio-fabrication, sustainability, and recycling programs. Everyone is looking into it, and it’s just a matter of time before we get it totally right.

I’m of course very concerned about the environmental impact of fashion on the planet. Much of fashion, especially fast fashion, is an environmental disaster. Fast fashion can’t afford to buy high-end expensive fabrics. Large quantities and poor-quality, cheap fashion are the biggest problem; the higher the quantities, the more energy and water are wasted and toxic chemicals used. We must come up with a completely different approach and format. The entire industry needs to change its production management and keep searching for new ways to reuse and recycle materials and fabrics. As consumers we must become more aware and responsible when buying a garment. Buy less, choose quality, make it last, reuse, recycle.

We must look forward into the future and completely eliminate animals from the fashion equation and our diet. Real fur is not relevant anymore; it’s not cool or sexy or fashionable. In fact, wearing it makes you look unaware, old, and outdated, kind of archaic. Real fur is a thing of the past. We must move forward. Consumer awareness is changing, and the perception of luxury is not the same any longer. A new kind of luxury is about to emerge embodying innovation, integrity, authenticity, and the originality of the brand. Ultimately the fashion industry will have to adjust to consumers’ wants and needs and the times we live in.

Just last year the faux fur industry launched a waste-regeneration, eco-efficient, post-fur-fabric technology,

Pelush mantra: Be Kind to Animals, Compassion is Fashion, #ReFAUXlution #JointheReFAUXlution

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Cruelty-free fashion is the future, as it should be.

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THE FIRST-EVER

Vegan Fashion Week T

he fashion industry is increasingly aware that veganism is a growing movement, and now there's a fashion week to spotlight ethical fashion. Produced and curated by vegan stylist Emmanuelle Rienda, Vegan Fashion Week (VFW) has been added to the traditional list of fashion weeks. Even Vogue has been talking about it! Vogue grabbed an interview with Rienda before the February event in Los Angeles. She spoke in powerful words we all can agree with: “Being vegan today is not only about animals — it's about being good to all beings on the planet, humans included. It's not a matter of style anymore. It's a matter of choice.” Rienda’s aim appears to be to keep the event as inclusive and open as possible to avoid the judgmental undertone that can sometimes creep in alongside vegan fashion. On the show’s first night, the guests were able to take a look at some of the vegan fashion pieces while touring the city’s Museum of Natural History. The main show took place the following night at the California Market Center's Fashion Theater, where guests also enjoyed plant-based cocktails and catering by raw-vegan chef Marie-Sophie L. This first-ever Vegan Fashion Week featured exciting clothes and materials including faux leather created from pineapple fibers and apple skins as well as faux fur coats, faux silk products, knitwear, ball gowns,

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and accessories created by a diverse group of designers. With over 50 companies represented at the event, clearly there’s more than enough room in the fashion industry for vegan fashion, and they’re expecting plenty of interested consumers! One company, ENDA, showed a faux shearling design made from acrylic fleece and machine-washable, wool-free tweed. The founder is designer Ran Enda who formerly worked for major fashion labels using real leather and fur; this contradicted her belief system to the point where she left to start her own business. Other brands at VFW included JOZ Couture, who showed wedding dresses made from recycled organic cotton and French lace. Arsayo showed a faux leather backpack made from cork (i.e., the skin of a tree). Of course, MINK was also there — no, not the fur, but the company that designs custom boots for vegan celebrities such as Miley Cyrus. The range of ethical and sustainable fibers and clothing at Vegan Fashion Week was incredible to see, providing yet another reason the vegan movement is growing: the ever-greater availability of beautiful, ethically made fashions that aren’t boring and don’t harm the planet. After all, if “leather” can be made from ground coffee, orange fibers, and mushroom roots, there’s no end to what vegan fashion can do!

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INTERVIEW WITH A TOP VEGAN MODEL PHILIP ANTHONY MANGAN by Tess Chavez

When did you become vegan, and why? I became vegan in June of 2017 after watching a documentary called What the Health. Nutrition had always been a big interest of mine for as long as I could remember, so when I learned about the harmful effects that animal food products have on our health, I felt as if I’d been lied to my whole life.  The following day I jumped right into a vegan diet and haven’t looked back. How has becoming vegan changed your life, both personally and professionally? The best way I can put it is that becoming vegan made me an overall more mindful person, especially about many things that I previously overlooked such as animal welfare and the many environmental issues our planet is facing.  It changed the way I shop for clothes, food, and products, as well as the way I look at waste.  All of that then carried over to my professional life by my wanting to put more of a purpose behind what I was doing in the modeling industry, which is why I created the vegan model platform to teach others what I’ve learned. Do you find that there are any stigmas associated with vegan men? If so, what are they? Yes, but I feel they’re slowly dying as veganism continues to grow, especially with more and more male athletes/role models promoting it.    Some stigmas still exist, though, with vegan men being looked at as weak or feminine, but that’s why I try to be as open as possible with my own personal journey in hopes of breaking that type of thinking.

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Do you find shopping for vegan clothes difficult or easy? How and why? Yes and no.  I think there are a lot of vegan clothing options available, especially much more in the past year, but just not “sustainably made” vegan clothes.  A lot of the options out right now are made of plastic materials and dyed with harmful chemicals, which is great because they’re cruelty free, but still bad for the planet.  Also, a lot of these options aren’t always the most fashionable or form-fitting so that makes vegan clothing a bit more of a challenge to find. Do you have any vegan-fashion staple pieces that are a must in your closet? If so, what are they, and who are they by, or where are they from? My boots from Brave GentleMan, an upcycled chambray shirt from Tact & Stone, and a minimalist bag from TokyoBags are the three things I pretty much wear all of the time, but I have my eyes on a pineapple leather jacket from Altiir right now. Are there any great vegan products that you use and would highly recommend for other vegan men? I honestly make a lot of my own products so I can control the ingredients, but there are some great vegan/waste-free options out there from PLAINE Products, The Mailroom Barber Co., and The Best Deodorant in the World. Do you have any vegan passion projects? Right now I’ve been mainly focused on my website allthatsustains.com, where I offer plant-based nutritional coaching and information on vegan fashion, food, and products.

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IF SOMETHING DOESN’T ALIGN WITH MY VALUES, THEN I WON’T DO IT.

What do you think others would find interesting about being a vegan male model in the fashion industry that they might not otherwise know? Being a male model in the fashion industry is tough by itself, but when you start looking at how many brands aren’t producing vegan clothing, then it becomes a lot tougher.  Basically, if something doesn’t align with my values, then I won’t do it, which can be tough at times, to pass up a paycheck, but to me it’s much more fulfilling to work with a brand that’s focused on doing what’s best for animals and our planet. What kinds of changes would you like to see in the fashion industry? I’d like to see the use of more plant-based materials for the creation of our clothing.  With the amount of clothing that ends up in landfills every year, we need to start thinking not just with cruelty-free in mind, but with the planet as well.  I’d also like to see more brands focusing less on the quantity of items they produce every year and more on the quality of those items and the fair treatment of the workers who create them. 

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F A

S

H

I

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N

by Jeanette Padilla Vega Luxury fashion brands, including Gucci and Burberry, are dropping fur one after another. Even what many consider the mother of all fashion houses, Chanel, decided just at the end of 2018 to drop their use of fur as well as exotic animal skins including crocodile, lizard, snake, and stingray. Back in 2017, when Gucci first announced it would be dropping its use of fur, it was clear the decision was based on feedback from its more ethically minded millennial consumers, which presently make up more than 50% of Gucci’s clientele. The brand’s creative director Alessandro Michele stated, “Fashion has always been about trends and emotions and anticipating the wishes and desires of consumers.” Following this announcement, Gucci has since produced stunning faux fur coats such as this oversized, flamingo-pink, faux fur overcoat presented on their Spring Summer 2019 runway. But iconic fashion houses are not the only ones doing away with fur. Roughly one year ago, on March 21, 2018, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors voted on legislation for a city-wide ban on fur. The ban went into effect on January 1, 2019. Six months after the San Francisco vote, LA’s city council voted to ban the sale and manufacturing of fur by 2020. Fur producers such as Fur Commission USA, which represents mink farmers, report that fur production is way up. However, their numbers reflect only an 18% increase in production in the last 10 years, while prices per pelt have decreased by nearly half, from 65.7 US dollars in 2007 to 36.3 US dollars in 2017. Additionally, according to Weekly International Fur News, the number of mink farms in the US has plummeted from 1,027 in 1988 to fewer than 300 today. When asked about her thoughts on the rapidly dwindling fur trend, designer Stella McCartney, a longtime vegetarian and supporter of animal rights, stated that wearing fur is “cruel, barbaric, and simply incredibly old-fashioned and unfashionable.” In 2018 alone, we saw seven legendary designers drop fur from their brands, including Burberry, Chanel, Diane von Furstenberg, Donna Karan/DKNY, Jean Paul Gaultier, Maison Margiela, and Versace. These designers join a roster of at least a dozen other iconic luxury brands including Armani and Vivienne Westwood. Up-and-coming luxury faux fur brands like Jakke, Unreal Fur, and Charly Calder, just to name a few, are quickly rising in popularity and distinction. Their faux fur pieces rival any designer styles you’d find on the runways during Fashion Week. Just take a look at this eye-catching leopard print faux fur coat by Unreal Fur, whose pieces are PETA approved, by the way. Another notable up-and-coming faux fur brand that is also PETA approved, Pelush, is proving it’s not necessary to use animals to produce high-end, authentic-looking fur coats. Their popular Robin jacket, which is currently sold out but which you can see here, looks just like the real thing but is made of 100% vegan faux fur.

About the Author Jeanette Padilla Vega is a vegan style blogger. She shares her personal style as well as tips and ideas on how to bring more beauty, health, and joy into your life without using any animal products. Her blog by the same name centers primarily on vegan style, fashion, and beauty. @jeanettepadillavega

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F O R W A R D

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Rooney Mara narrated the 2018 film Dominion. Miranda Kerr founded the crueltyfree line KORA Organics. Serena Williams released a veganfriendly athleisure line. Juice Beauty has partnered with Gwyneth Paltrow and her goop line. Justin Bieber created a clothing line called Drew House that’s 100% vegan. Ariana Grande has been seen wearing apparel that directly promotes veganism.

Celebrity FASHION & BEAUTY


LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! CELEBRITY VEGAN FASHION & BEAUTY ARE READY FOR THE SPOTLIGHT by Tess Chavez

FASHION

Miley Cyrus

Ariana Grande

Celebrities are constantly looked to for the latest crazes in fashion and are expected to set the trends for seasons to come. Spotted at fashion shows from Milan to New York, they are constantly photographed as well. From the runway, to the red carpet, to their style on the streets, celebrities attract onlookers every day who want to add not just new, but right-now-trendy pieces to their wardrobes. Most often, when a celebrity is pictured wearing a particular fashion item, it’s sold out within 24 hours. And the waiting list begins.

Miley Cyrus is well known for her vegan fashion statements. With both wild and “tamed” outfits that are constantly on display for the world to see, she’s recently been photographed in vegan leather finds that almost instantly became all the rage. Whether or not she’s your cup of tea, there’s no doubt that she has gone above and beyond to maintain ethical fashion, support vegan brands, and spread the word about veganism. Likely one of the most highlighted vegan celebrities, she’s even influenced her husband, Liam Hemsworth, to become vegan as well. She very vocal about her love of animals and being vegan, which makes us love her all the more. Miley’s a showstopper in brands like MINK, Stella McCartney, Converse, and more!

Ariana Grande seems to be at the peak of her career with hits like “Thank You, Next” and “7 Rings,” but she also receives praise from organizations such as PETA. A peek into her vegan style finds her wearing items by brands such as MAREI 1998, who have launched vegan campaigns including the well-known “I AM FURLESS.” She’s also been seen wearing vegan apparel that directly promotes veganism, showcasing tops that say things like “Never be silent. Find your voice for animals.”

The question arises: While many celebrities are aware of their ability to influence others, are they utilizing their fashion platform only to promote styles and looks, or are they promoting the industry? As we vegans know, the fashion industry too easily profits from the exploitation of innocent animals. It’s most often unethical and unnecessary — yet few celebrities have chosen to use their voices to speak up for the voiceless. But there are a few mighty celebrities who have lent the weight of their opinion to the importance of ethical fashion. These mighty ones include Miley Cyrus, Rooney Mara, Kate Mara, Ariana Grande, and more; they continue to shine light on vegan fashion by raising awareness, demanding change, and showcasing their vegan finds for the rest of us to follow.

Kate and Rooney Mara Sisters Kate and Rooney Mara are vegan activists who are using their public platform not only to help educate, promote, and support vegan causes, but also to encourage cruelty-free fashion. Rooney Mara has helped found and launch a vegan fashion line called HIRAETH, whose pieces are all leather-, fur-, wool-, and silk-free! The line screams luxury, with both a classic and modern feel to each and every style. She’s also joined boyfriend Joaquin Phoenix in pioneering the vegan movement by narrating films such as Dominion.

Not so commonly recognized celebrities who are contributing to vegan fashion include Alicia Silverstone, Justin Bieber, Serena Williams, and Kat Von D. Alicia Silverstone is a wellknown actress who has shared her vegan kitchen with many through her book, The Kind Diet. And she’s shared her dedication to ethical fashion with magazines like Vogue. Justin Bieber created a clothing line called Drew House that’s 100% vegan! Serena Williams released an athleisure line self-titled Serena that’s also vegan-friendly. And Kat Von D has expanded her empire to include the upcoming Von D Shoes, which are made of high-quality vegan leather and crafted in Italy.

BEAUTY The vegan beauty industry seems to be taking off almost as quickly as the vegan food industry did. Although convenience is less of a factor for vegan


beauty products these days, it’s good to know that brands such as Cover FX and Pacifica Beauty are easily accessible at stores like Sephora, Ulta, and Target. However, we’re still waiting for major brands like Fenty by Rihanna or Kylie Cosmetics by Kylie Jenner to come out with vegan-friendly products. Fortunately, some celebrities are already paving the way. The KORA Organics line founded by Miranda Kerr, a well-known Victoria’s

Secret model, is entirely cruelty-free, and the majority of their products are vegan as well. Kat Von D Beauty is another fully vegan line. Juice Beauty has partnered with Gwyneth Paltrow and her goop line, which is formulated without animal-derived ingredients and also gluten-free! Even Drew Barrymore has expanded her beauty line Flower Beauty to include many vegan options, including a skin elixir and drops for cheeks. You can expect to see continuing celebrity collaborations with vegan fashion and beauty companies. The stars don’t always have brands or product lines of their own, but many are becoming more specific about what they’re wearing and with whom they choose to work. Stars like Natalie Portman have begun working with fashion brands like MINK, and the list will continue to grow.

MINK https://www.minkshoes.com/

HIRAETH https://www.hiraethcollective.com/

MAREI 1998 https://www.marei1998.com/

Drew House https://thehouseofdrew.com/

Serena https://www.serenawilliams.com/

Von D Shoes http://www.vondshoes.com/

KORA Organics https://us.koraorganics.com/

Kat Von D Beauty https://www.katvondbeauty.com/

goop by Juice Beauty https://shop.goop.com/shop/collection/brands/goop-by-juice-beauty?country=USA

Flower Beauty https://www.flowerbeauty.com/

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Tess Chavez is an animal advocate, environmental activist, and health enthusiast. Although her love of animals acts as the driving force for her vegan lifestyle, she is just as passionate about the health benefits and environmental welfare. She aims to combine all aspects and apply them to fashion and beauty. Her hopes are to continue to help pioneer the movement while helping others navigate their way. She currently resides in Dallas, TX. @veganduet @veganbitesdfw

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1 Naghedi A luxury line created for women on the go. These bags are both light and multifunctional. The material is neoprene, which makes them very durable. The bags are resistant to wrinkles, mildew, and abrasion.

2 Glass Ladder & Co. These vegan leather bags are targeted for the businesswoman looking to make an impression. With attention to detail, these bags are the perfect portable choice.

3 Angela Roi This luxury handbag brand is in a league of its own. Not only are these bags classic and chic, but they also are still current with the trends. All bags come in a variety of colors, so you are sure to find something you’ll love.

4 White Rhino Bags The magic combination of affordable, durable, and realistic leather-like qualities is what White Rhino Bags does best. Their style is clean and consistent — the perfect add-on to your handbag collection.

5 Alexandra K Unique, versatile, and timeless. They’ve created a first-of-its-kind fabric called Freedom Leather, with a long list of benefits ranging from stain resistance to being hypoallergenic and recyclable, and more.

6 Ashoka Paris A divine staple piece that needs a place in your closet. With attention to detail and a signature style that radiates Paris, Ashoka is likely to be your go-to handbag for making an impression.

7 Von Holzhausen A genre of handbag that is both effortless and intentional. These clean and comfy bags are likely to be well-loved by you for years to come. They have it all, from backpacks and carry-ons to your everyday bag.

8 allTRUEist A breath of fresh air for vegan handbags that showcases a mixture of materials to add dimension. If you want to stand out with small accent and staple pieces, then allTRUEist has you covered.

9 Artifact Eight Texture, design, and mastery. Artifact Eight has created a beautiful, high-end product that many vegans lust for. With its realistic exotic-skin design, you’ll find this brand unparalleled.

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10 BucherBags Newly launched and off to a great start! This well-thought-out brand identifies with multifunction at its best, and a portion of your purchase will go to an animal rights organization or local shelter.

11 JW Pei Trendy and on point with their signature bag, Fiona, that comes in all sorts of colors and collections including classic, croc, and belts. They also have some other gorgeous bags that you’ll be dying to get before they’re gone!

12 Urban Expressions For the girl on the go, look no further! Urban Expressions has it all, from clutches, cross-body, and belt bags to backpacks. And one of the best things is that almost every piece has a variety of colors to choose from.

13 happy genie This brand is truly special: Their bags are made from apples from the South Tyrol in Italy! They have a classic design with a modern twist for their gorgeous handbags, which have a detachable clutch and strap.

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V O L U M E by Brandy Edwards

I’m all about dry shampoo. Why? Because it allows me to wash my hair less often, which has been a game changer in giving my hair more volume and helping it grow longer, too. I love a powder-based dry shampoo as compared to an aerosol spray, because I believe the powder absorbs the oil in my hair better — plus, my favorite brand provides a discount on a refill bottle. So, what is my favorite dry shampoo? It’s Shampure by Aveda, because a little goes a long way and it’s the perfect size for travel. You simply squeeze the bottle and spray onto dry hair towards your roots, then watch it gently puff powder out to instantly refresh your locks. Dry shampoo is basically a perfume-and-shower-in-a-bottle for your hair that saves you time and money. When you wash your hair less, you blow-dry it less, you use less shampoo and conditioner, and you might even use less heat on your hair from straighteners and curling irons, all of which can give you healthier hair and help your hair grow longer. Then there’s the volume you can get after using dry shampoo several days in a row: simply amazing! When you do get ready to wash your hair with water and traditional shampoo, I love using the Volumizing Tonic by Aveda, which you spray on your roots after you wash your hair, while your hair is wet, and then massage into your scalp with your fingertips. The Volumizing Tonic helps provide weightless volume and shine, and it makes your hair smell as if you just left the salon. What happens when you use the Volumizing Tonic and then the Shampure dry shampoo for several days in a row? Prepare to be amazed: The volume you can get with little to no teasing of your hair is nothing short of incredible.

About the Author Brandy Edwards is a Dallas-based attorney turned Empowerment Speaker and Coach with an emphasis on self-love. She created The Self-Love Challenge to motivate, empower, and challenge young girls and women to love themselves while they work on themselves, in all aspects of their lives and without conditions. She is a health and fitness enthusiast who embraces self-love as a lifestyle, is obsessed with the color pink, and considers herself to be a structured free spirit who lives in the moment. Her self-discovery journey led her to follow her happiness, to be strong and courageous, and to take action despite fear to create a life that she loves. Brandy has a passion for life and hopes to share her voice with girls and women all over the world to help them believe in themselves more and understand the power of positivity and self-love.

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T R U E B E A U T Y by Sharon McRae Some of my new favorites this month include products from companies I’ve reviewed in the past. It’s always fun to “dive in” and find new treasures once you’ve found a company that makes products you like. Hush + Dotti has a wonderful body product that I’ve been loving! It’s a cross between a lotion, a balm, and an oil, and it has all the best qualities of each. Organic Body Balm “Halo” includes super-hydrating ingredients like coconut oil, shea butter, Monoi Tahitian Oil, and vitamin E, and it’s lightly scented with Tahitian Gardenia to make you feel like you’re on a tropical island. I was surprised, the first time I used it, that it only took one pump to cover most of my body, and it blends in very easily and feels amazing on the skin. It also works to condition and add shine to your hair! It’s my favorite aftershower moisturizer at the moment, hands down. https://www.hushdotti.com/shop/body-balm-halo/

Next up is a product from the wonderful clean and vegan cosmetic company Au Naturale. I’ve been wearing a lot more lipstick lately than gloss but find that sometimes the color fades faster than I would like. That’s the beauty of Au Naturale su/Stain Matte Lip Stain. It has a wand applicator, like a gloss, but goes on with saturated color. I like to apply to my lower lip and press my lips together for just the right amount of color. It really does last, even through a meal! There’s a beautiful and comprehensive selection of shades, from light nudes to saturated berries and purples. My favorite of the moment is Kauai, a saturated berry plum that I like wearing for nighttime. It’s also not at all drying, which is an added plus! Au Naturale has recently introduced their products in Whole Foods Markets around the country, so it’s nice that you have the opportunity to see and play with the shades in person! https://www.aunaturalecosmetics.com/products/su-stain-lip-stain

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My favorite of the moment is Kauai, a saturated berry plum that I like wearing for nighttime.

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I especially loved using Soothing Touch Peppermint Rosemary Herbal Salt Scrub on my tired feet!

Lastly, I recently co-hosted a fairly large plant-based educational event in NYC — and was I ever feeling deflated after it was over and the adrenaline rush faded. What I really needed was a spa day, but I couldn’t work it into my schedule. So I did the next best thing and indulged in a product that made me feel like I was at the spa! Soothing Touch Peppermint Rosemary Herbal Salt Scrub really energized me and helped to clear my head at the same time. It has a very pleasant feel, not at all harsh, and with its exfoliating action to remove dead skin cells, it leaves skin feeling soft and silky-smooth. It’s also packed with antioxidants (organic argan and sea buckthorn oils) and also contains an Ayurvedic organic blend of oils that help to moisturize and protect skin. I especially loved using this on my tired feet! This is a great, inexpensive home spa treatment that I’ll be using regularly. I found a 20 oz size in Whole Foods Market that should last forever! There are other scents available, too, including Lavender and Tangerine, which I’m sure I’ll be trying at some point. http://www.soothingtouch.com/salt-scrub-organic-peppermint-rosemary.html?Session_ID=9117e4d5b3e176824394e9ae1828a688

About the Author Sharon McRae is a wife and mother of three teens as well as a certified health coach and PCRM Food for Life instructor, residing in Columbia, MD. She has been adopting and applying principles of health and nutrition in her own life for more than three decades. She became a health coach to fulfill her passion of helping others take control of their health by making better lifestyle choices and adapting a whole-foods, plant-based vegan diet.

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FASHION AND THE

ENVIRONMENT T

he UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has released a new report with a different temperature limit for global warming than you may be used to seeing. The 2016 Paris Agreement states that all those who signed will aim to keep global warming at 2°C or below; however, the new report states that the limit actually appears to be 1.5°C. It's thought that human activity has already caused an estimated 1°C increase in global temperature compared to pre-industrial levels. Overall, the IPCC report predicts less risk of harm to the planet and its ecosystems if warming does not exceed 1.5°C compared with a rise to 2°C. Clearly, governments aren't yet focusing enough on the current climate crisis. As vegans, we already help to reduce how much climate-affecting pollution is added to our world by stopping our consumption of many of the products that cause it. However, there is always more that we can do when the options present themselves. The fashion industry is changing in response to the public’s concerns. New players enter the game on a regular basis. As a result, new synthetics and natural fibers, including vegan fibers and fabrics, are becoming more commonplace. Take a look at these vegan fabrics and fibers that are growing in popularity.

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FASHION AND THE ENVIRONMENT

FABRICS In order to make clothing, there must be an extraction of materials that will always result in some waste. The point is to minimize it by making better choices and being aware of the way fabric choices impact the environment. RECYCLED FABRIC. This is made from recycled fabrics and consumer waste (such as plastic), which reduces waste being added to landfills; however, an energy-intensive process must be used to produce the fabric. Despite this, recycling is still better than extracting new raw resources, and the fabric is one of the best kinds of vegan choices. ECONYL®. A recycled nylon fiber created from plastic waste typically taken from oceans and landfills. ECONYL cleans up ocean waste; unlike nylon, is not made with oil; and does not require any new resources to make. The parent company of ECONYL is Aquafil, a major synthetics producer that cares about sustainability and the environment. HEMP. This is a fantastic plant. It's fast-growing and requires very little water, fertilizer, pesticides, or GMO seeds. It also comes to harvest age quickly and produces more fiber per hectare (about 2.5 acres) than cotton. There are other uses for hemp besides clothing, too, including food, building materials, paper, water purification, natural weed control, and a lot more. However, it does get associated with cannabis, since they both come from the same species of plant, and some countries can be very strict with industrial hemp as a result. Still, this is a fabulous vegan fabric from a plant that has a vast number of environmentally friendly uses.

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AS VEGANS, WE ALREADY HELP TO REDUCE HOW MUCH CLIMATEAFFECTING POLLUTION IS ADDED TO OUR WORLD BY STOPPING OUR CONSUMPTION OF MANY OF THE PRODUCTS THAT CAUSE IT.

ORGANIC COTTON. Although it does reduce the use of pesticides, which is important for local and global health of waterways, growing organic cotton uses a lot of water, which gives rise to the same water-wastage arguments as are used against the animal agriculture industry. Still, if you must wear cotton, it's better to look for products made from organic plants to minimize the damage. GREEN FIBERS. These are made from cellulose (plant-based) materials including fast-growing grasses and sustainably managed trees, which also makes them biodegradable. Green fibers are entirely vegan and decompose without creating pollution; however, the process to turn them into fabrics uses a lot of chemicals and energy. So there’s a trade-off to consider in choosing them. POLYESTER. It’s cheap to make, accounting for its popularity in the industry; plus, it’s made of plastic, so it will always be a safe vegan option. The big downside is that it takes a very long time to decompose, and it sheds plastic microfibers that help put plastic into every food chain on Earth. Made from oil,

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it's also not very energy efficient to produce. For the sake of the environment, avoid this fabric as much as possible. MIXED-FIBER FABRICS. These are popular with brands that make “fast fashion”; however, something like poly-cotton cannot be recycled due to the different fiber components, which need different processes to be converted into new materials for reuse. This ultimately means that these clothes can only be sent to a landfill; they cannot be recycled into new materials or clothing. We can assume that most mixed fabrics will be vegan but, as you can see, that doesn't mean they're a good thing — in fact, they’re the complete opposite. Definitely something to avoid! When in doubt, there are apps and websites that can help when it comes to working out if a brand is ethical or not. For example, the Good On You app lets you see the ratings for different brands based on their ethical and sustainable practices. Always handy to keep on your phone!

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DISCOVER DRESSARTE PARIS CUSTOM-MADE CLOTHING WITH A VEGAN TOUCH by Nathalie Neuilly

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D

ressarte Paris is the first sustainable virtual atelier to produce clothes according to clients’ body measurements (and, by request, even their own designs), which also eliminates two of the biggest issues in the fashion industry — overproduction and waste.

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DISCOVER DRESSARTE PARIS

I’ve always believed that when we wear clothes that are well made, we feel better and more confident. Dressarte Paris encourages women to express their style, identity, and self-confidence by allowing them to modify or create designs and adapt the clothes to their own body measurements. This year we’ve designed a special vegan-friendly collection that is having huge success among industry influencers. When creating collections, Dressarte works with biodegradable fabrics that are naturally hypoallergenic and that also, unlike many synthetic materials, decompose harmlessly. I grew up having my clothes tailored in an atelier run by my mother; I created our online brand after realizing that there might be women out there who, like me, wanted clothes that were customized and cut to their body measurements but who had no time to visit a tailor. As far back as I can remember, I’ve always struggled to find my right size in clothes. My measurements weren’t standard, which was very frustrating. I’ve also found that many women tend to blame themselves for not having measurements that fit fashion-industry standards. It’s time for that to stop and high time for us to embrace and love our individual uniqueness; wearing Dressarte Paris clothes shows the world how good women can feel about themselves.

cotton), ramie fabric breathes well and makes comfortable clothing for warm and humid summers. It’s also a highly sustainable fiber source, which makes it a wonderful ecofriendly alternative to pollution-causing synthetic fibers. As for Piñatex, it’s an innovative leather-like textile made from pineapple leaves! This cruelty-free material is 80% biodegradable, making it a sustainable alternative to pollution-causing synthetic materials. Our vegan-friendly leather-like jacket is a very popular alternative to one made of real leather. Dressarte Paris also makes it possible to feel the fabrics’ texture and quality by sending samples to our clients before they order. Our custom-made approach makes it possible to produce only what a client needs, focusing on the quality of each garment. The result is beautiful, “bespoke” clothing at affordable prices. Most of our clothes are manufactured in my family’s Dressarte Paris atelier, which has specialized in tailored clothing for 20 years, and we also use family-run and small ateliers with extensive experience who share our commitment to social, environmental, and ethical responsibilities.

NO OVERPRODUCTION, NO INVENTORY, NO WASTE — AND, FOR US AND OUR MANY HAPPY CLIENTS…NO REGRETS. Dressarte Paris recently launched our FOR YOU service, which allows clients to order clothes of their dreams quickly online. We have a number of lovely styles ready to order, or, when they submit photos or designs of clothes they'd like to have, our Dressarte Paris stylists create garments especially for them. Among the many fabric options we offer are vegan fabrics like ramie, organic cotton, hemp, Piñatex®, and linen. While linen and cotton are well-known, ramie may sound unfamiliar. Ramie fibers come from the stem of a nettle plant called China grass (Boehmeria nivea). Extremely absorbent (much more than

Dressarte Paris believes that one of the best ways to produce clothes sustainably is to make them on demand according to our clients’ preferences. No overproduction, no inventory, no waste — and, for us and our many happy clients…no regrets. Website vegan-friendly collection: https://www.dressarteparis.com/vegan-ethical-clothes/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dressarte/ For more information: contact@dressarteparis.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Nathalie Neuilly is a founder of Dressarte Paris, the first sustainable virtual atelier. On a day-to-day basis, she and her team make shopping more personal, sustainable, and fun. In contrast to mass-market retailers, they pay attention to every client’s needs and help them to create their perfect wardrobe. The choice of fabrics to work with has always been her top priority. Having very sensitive skin and knowing that it’s a problem for many people, from the first day Dressarte was founded she chose not to use synthetic fibers. Her clothing cut from plantbased fibers is very popular not only for its style but also for its ethical, environmental, and health benefits.

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BOOTS MADE FOR MORE THAN SCOOTIN’ Cruelty Free Western Wear That Gives Leather The Boot!

PURVEYOR OF HANDMADE VEGAN GOODS KATMENDENHALL.COM


PERFUME WHAT’S HAPPENING NOW, FROM A VEGAN POINT OF VIEW


by Tess Chavez Smell is our fifth sense. We “digest” a scent as it travels from a rose through the air to our nose. Smells have been shown to connect us to mood, memory, and emotion, and certain scents have been tied to regions, cultures, and trends. In addition, our sense of smell can be a type of alarm system, signaling danger when there are toxic fumes in the air.

Perfume and cologne When it comes to fragrance, often perfume or cologne comes to mind, meant to attract or impress those around us with scents from zesty to floral and everything in between. Perfume has even been shown to reduce levels of stress and increase confidence. Gianni Versace once said, “Perfume puts the finishing touch to elegance — a detail that subtly underscores the look, an invisible extra that completes a man and a woman’s personality. Without it, there is something missing.” When a fragrance mixes with your own body chemistry, you create your own customized eau de parfum.

What makes some scents nonvegan? Most often, fragrances cannot be deemed vegan because they contain the following ingredients: •

Honey and/or beeswax

Musk from the glands of a musk deer

Civet excretions from a tiny, caged civet

Hyraceum, fossilized excrement from ancient African Hyrax species

Castoreum, yellowish exudate from beavers caught and killed for their castor sacs

Ambergris, a waxy substance derived from sperm whale digestive secretions

Fortunately, those ingredients are less popular now and, except for honey and beeswax, can also be created synthetically.

Vegan and cruelty-free perfumes For a perfume to be considered vegan, it must not contain any animal derivatives. Because many companies do not declare a large percentage of their ingredients on the label, it’s always safest to stick with a brand that declares itself as vegan and cruelty-free.

Natural and organic perfumes vs. those that are not Another issue to consider in selecting perfumes is how natural and organic they are. Since skin is the body’s largest organ, we have to be careful about what we put on it. Some perfumes contain ingredients that are not healthy for our bodies, such as parabens, phthalates, sulfates, and formaldehyde, while others contain ingredients that can trigger allergic reactions. Parabens are a widely used preservative. They are known to disrupt hormone function and have been linked to breast cancer and reproductive toxicity.  Phthalates are often used in fragrances as solvents and fixatives. Studies are still being conducted, but observations suggest that they contribute to damage to the liver, kidneys, lungs, and reproductive system.  Sulfates enable two or more immiscible (not mixable) liquids to mix into an emulsion for combining things like water and oil. Sulfates have been linked to cancer, although nothing has been proven. They are also known to dry hair and irritate skin. 


PERFUME INDUSTRY

Formaldehyde has been related to increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and nervous system damage. Many people are allergic to perfumes and colognes, creating a challenge to working in companies where people wear them. Some companies have even banned wearing fragrances in their offices. Fortunately, there are brands that have taken these concerns into consideration and created perfumes that are vegan, organic, hypoallergenic, cruelty-free, and sustainable. Organic perfume is typically made with organic sugar-cane alcohol or organic essential oils.  Here are some reliably vegan perfumes to choose from:

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VERED Organic Botanicals Produced in eau de parfum and perfume oils, these are made from all-natural essential oils. The scents include Blue Violet, Deep Citron, Divinité, Sacred Love Oil, and a Signature Scent that’s a mixture of rose, jasmine, orange blossoms, and vetiver.

orange blossom, rose amber, vetiver elemi, grapefruit lime, patchouli citrus, jasmine neroli, and vanilla woods.

Skylar Specializing in clean, natural scents, their fragrances are vegan, hypoallergenic, and paraben- and cruelty-free. Their five scents, Arrow, Capri, Isle,

The 7 Virtues All their ingredients are fair trade, and because they source them from countries that are being rebuilt from war and destruction, they’ve coined the term Peace Perfumes. Their series of Original and Contemporary perfumes are hypoallergenic, organic, and phthalate- and paraben- free. Their seven scents include

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Willow, and Magic, range from warm and seductive to juicy and tart.

Pacifica Beauty They currently carry ten spray perfume scents and five “Aromapower” spray scents as well as nine roll-on scents. You can easily find their perfumes in Target and Ulta Beauty.

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Perfume puts the finishing touch to elegance. Without it, there is something missing.

Ecco Bella They only use essential oils from flowers, fruits, herbs, and spices. Their scents include Ambrosia, Bourbon Vanilla, Organic Lavender, and Organic Lemon Verbena.

Clean Beauty Collective They take pride in their perfumes as simple, trustworthy, and eco-conscious since their fragrances contain only essential oils, nothing more. They carry three lines of perfumes that include: Clean Classic, a casual and light line; Clean Reserve, farm-to-fragrance blends; and Avant Garden, a garden-to-fragrance line of blended pairs. All are cruelty-free, vegan, phthalate- and gluten-free, and non-toxic.

- Gianni Versace

My Daughter Fragrances They create 100% natural perfumes free from phthalates, parabens, and colorants. They currently have five scents: Always Loved, Bloom 23, Joyful, My Wild, and Mandarin and Frankincense. You can sample four of them with the Love Notes – Four Travel Sized Scents package.

LOTUSWEI This extensive line of fragrances are flower elixirs, infusions of flowers that you can use two ways: by smoothing onto your skin or releasing a few drops into your mouth (they taste like honey!). Scents are named after the moods they’re intended to evoke, such as Quiet Mind, Inner Peace, and Joy Juice.

Kat Von D They have two scents, Sinner and Saint. Saint is reminiscent of romance, fusing jasmine, Tiaré flower, mandarin, caramel, sparkling Mirabelle plum, vanilla, sandalwood, and creamy musk. Sinner provides more of a sultry scent of cinnamon, vanilla, and white florals, with “darker” nuances from vetiver, wood, and patchouli.

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Y O U R #1 B E A U T Y B U C K E T L I S T by Stephanie Kilbourn This year has been full of new, high-quality, must-have makeup launches and products worth trying. Here are just a few makeup essentials from this year that you’ll want to check off your beauty bucket list. Each brand mentioned is 100% cruelty-free, including their parent companies, and of course all products are vegan-friendly.

M A K E U P

M U S T - H A V E S

The Makeup Revolution Renaissance Flick Eyeliner Pen is highly pigmented, matte black and does not budge, smudge, or fade throughout the day. Available at Ulta Beauty, this rose gold eyeliner pen glides on seamlessly and holds up all day long, giving you the perfect flicked, winged, or graphic eyeliner. It retails for only $9, affordable for a long-lasting eyeliner.

The Colourpop No Filter Matte Concealer has a full-coverage formula and comes in 30 shades from Pure White to Deep Dark. The formula is creaseproof and lightweight with a natural matte finish. The 30-shade range is impressive and contains three tones: cool, neutral, and warm, so there is a shade for everyone. It won the 2018 Acne Award by Teen Vogue and retails for only $6 at Ulta Beauty. Wrapped in zero-waste packaging, the Aether Beauty Crystal Grid Gemstone Eyeshadow Palette has 12 shades infused with crystal gemstones in shimmer and metallic finishes. All ingredients are organic, free trade, and gluten-free. The crystals are infused with diamond, amber, amethyst, topaz, and tourmaline for light-reflecting radiance, and the coconut oil and shea butter create a creamy, buttery-smooth application. Retailing at $58 at Sephora, it is a luxury palette but a must-have if you enjoy clean, sustainable, stunning eyeshadow that holds all day.

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Cover FX Brightening Booster Drops will enhance your makeup with its lightweight, Vitamin C–rich formula to provide instant radiance and brightening benefits. These drops are customizable and can be used under makeup as a primer, mixed with makeup, or over makeup as a setting product. It brightens the complexion, improves skin clarity, and offers all-day hydration to keep makeup looking flawless. Only a small drop is needed per use, so the $45 bottle will last a long time.

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L A T E S T P R O D U C T S W O R T H T R Y I N G The Milk Makeup KUSH High Volume Mascara has nourishing, hemp-derived cannabis oil with heart-shaped fibers to create high-volume, clump-free lashes. The formula is lightweight, and the cannabis oil makes lashes soft, airy, and healthy. For $24, this product meets the hype for healthier, fuller-looking lashes.

The 100% Pure Bamboo Blur Powder is a must-try since it is made with 100% pure bamboo silica powder that makes your complexion look silky and poreless. This talc-free finishing powder is great for setting makeup or wearing alone with no flashback or caking. It is oil-absorbing and filled with vitamins and antioxidants for healthier skin, and it retails for $41.

For $16 per bottle, the Pacifica Beauty Alight Clean Foundation offers a natural, non-toxic, oil-free formula with a satin finish. The foundation comes in 30 shades and gives full coverage for more radiant, healthy-looking skin. Its key ingredients are hyaluronic acid to provide moisture, coconut water to balance the skin, and rose leaf extract to provide antioxidants. In the clean beauty realm, this foundation is definitely worth a try.

About the Author I’m Stephanie Kibourn from Free The Bunnies, one of the top cruelty-free resources available online today. I am passionate about spreading awareness of the importance of choosing cruelty-free and offering 100% cruelty-free alternatives in beauty and lifestyle. I provide up-to-date cruelty-free and vegan shopping guides as well as product reviews to tell you about the latest must-have products. www.freethebunnies.com

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@freethebunnieslife

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Ten Breast Commandments TO REDUCE YOUR CANCER RISK by Kristi Funk, MD


BREAST COMMANDMENTS

W

omen commonly believe that family history and genetics determine who gets breast cancer. However, for most people, inherited mutations like the BRCA gene cause only 5 to 10% of the disease. In fact, 87% of women diagnosed with breast cancer do not have a single first-degree relative who has it. In addition, sadly, cancer even occurs in those who “do everything right.” Thus, until that elusive cure or preventive vaccine shows up, our best efforts will be thwarted occasionally by unrecognized causes. Nevertheless, you have significant power over this disease! Research shows that a solid 50% of all breast cancers — and perhaps more than 80% — could be eliminated from planet Earth if all women recognized that daily choices such as food, drink, exercise, weight, toxic exposures, and mind-set create the environment inside the very cells of our breasts, which either stay healthy or turn malignant. This means that every single day, you make countless choices that either bring you closer to cancer or move you farther away. Let’s start distancing ourselves by embracing these 10 commandments:

1

WHAT YOU UNLEASH INSIDE YOUR BLOODSTREAM IS AN ARSENAL OF PLANT-BASED PHYTONUTRIENTS THAT RUN AROUND YOUR BODY AND TAKE AWAY WHAT CANCER REQUIRES.

Eat Healthy Food

You simply chew and swallow a broccoli floret, but what you unleash inside your bloodstream is an arsenal of plant-based phytonutrients (with important chemical-sounding names) that run around your body and take away what cancer requires. These nutrients help fight

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against inflammation, squelch free radicals that damage DNA, stop growth hormones, block estrogens that fuel 80% of breast cancers, and halt angiogenesis, cancer’s ability to create new blood vessels to nourish and sustain itself.

Commandment 1: Consume wholefoods, plant-based meals: lots of fruits and vegetables (especially broccoli, leafy greens, and berries), legumes (lentils, beans, peas), non-GMO wholefood soy (inactivates estrogen effects on breast cancer cells), healthy fats (avocado, nuts, seeds, olives), ground flaxseeds (one tablespoon a day), and 100% whole grains.

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2

Avoid Meat, Dairy, and Eggs

All meat (red meat, chicken, turkey, even fish), dairy (milk, butter, cheese), and eggs spike insulin-like growth factor (IGF–1), the chief cause of all illness inside your body. Animal protein and animal fat also cause a cascade of inflammation and oxidative stress that stoke cancer’s microenvironment. Commandment 2: Don’t eat meat, dairy, or eggs. In addition, minimize your intake of saturated fat, simple sugars, and processed foods.

3

Lose Weight for Health Reasons

Overweight and obese adult women have a 50 to 250% greater risk for postmenopausal breast cancer than normal-weight women. Are you one of the nearly 70% of overly- chubby American adults? To find out, calculate your BMI at pinklotus.com/bmicalculator. Commandment 3: Get to your ideal body weight and stay there forever.

4

Move Your Body to Reduce Your Risk

Sedentary women have a 30 to 40% higher risk of breast cancer. Every week, strive for five hours of exercise if you can both breathe comfortably and chit-chat while working out, or 2.5 hours if you’re super-sweaty and breathing so heavily, you can’t carry on a conversation.

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BREAST COMMANDMENTS

Commandment 4: Keep moving so breast cancer can’t catch up!

5

Drink a Lot of Liquids (Yes, it really is important)

Water moves toxins into your lymph system and then boots them out the doors of excretion via your stool and urine, so the more you drink, the fewer toxins lie in wait in your body. Three cups of green tea a day slashes breast cancer risk in half; squeezing lemon in it boosts the antioxidant content five-fold. Commandment 5: Sip 60 ounces of water daily. If you drink alcohol, keep it to less than one glass a day (favor red wine, which contains cancer-fighting polyphenols and resveratrol and reduces estrogen levels). You can also limit some of alcohol’s carcinogenic effects by taking methylfolate or a supplement containing it, such as Cosmo Companion (vegan).

6

Try Fasting

When food is temporarily withheld from yeast, worms, flies, mice, and monkeys, they live longer and become healthier than organisms fed a normal diet. Incredible, right? But it’s true: They adapt to the stress by activating mechanisms that increase longevity and wellness. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that we humans create the same responses given the same stimulus. Commandment 6: In addition to focusing on what you eat, plan  strategically for when you eat. Don’t take in any calories for 13-16 hours daily, so you’re eating only during the time remaining. Twice a year, consider doing an extended five-day (or longer) fast. The scientifically proven fasting mimicking diet (FMD) allows for caloric intake while your cells stay in a fasted state, getting all the detoxification and cellular rejuvenation of a pure water fast without feeling hungry. (See pinklotus.com/fmd to learn more about FMD.)

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BREAST COMMANDMENTS

7

Keep Your Environment Clean

Potentially toxic environmental exposures such as radiation, industrial emissions, pollutants, pesticides, and countless synthetic compounds abound. Commandment 7: Limit their impact: Wash your hands frequently, dust and vacuum, replace plastic with glass and steel, filter your water, hang detoxifying houseplants, and choose organic food, household products, and cosmetics when possible.

8

De-stress to Strengthen Your Immune System

How we handle life’s struggles, large and little, directly impacts our physical well-being. Three hundred studies confirm that stress impairs immunity. Commandment 8: Devote attention to these immunity-boosters: prayer, meditation, deep breathing, tai chi, yoga, sleeping well, forgiving others, being grateful, and — smiling!

9

Hormone replacement therapy controls menopause symptoms, but due to cancer-causing estrogens, its risk can outweigh its benefit.

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10

Love and Connect as Much as Possible

Breast cancer patients with high levels of social support and religious/social participation are 58% more likely to be alive 10 years after diagnosis than those with low levels of support. So enjoying high-quality friendships bodes well for our health, happiness, productivity, and longevity — but dysfunctional and harmful relationships hold just as much power to produce opposite outcomes. Commandment 10: Seek out positive-thinking and supportive friends, family, faith-based groups, and social support networks. Had breast cancer? Check out pinklotus.com/breastbuddies.

A FINAL WORD

Avoid Hormone Replacement Therapy for Menopause Symptoms

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Commandment 9: Rather than hot-flash your way through moody days, consider herbs (Menopause Miracle [vegan], ginseng, melatonin, black cohosh), non-psychotropic cannabinoids, soy, acupuncture, and exercise to relieve your symptoms.

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Although it’s not possible to prevent all breast cancers through optimal living, robust scientific evidence backs up all the above assertions. Following these 10 commandments should substantially reduce your odds of developing breast cancer. If you do, my hope for you is that thou shalt not die…of something that’s under your control.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr. Kristi Funk, board-certified breast cancer surgeon and co-founder of the Pink Lotus Breast Center in Beverly Hills, is an expert in minimally invasive diagnostic and treatment methods for all types of breast disease. She has helped thousands of women through breast treatment including well-known celebrities, such as Angelina Jolie and Sheryl Crow, who have turned to her for her surgical expertise.  When she authored the national bestseller, Breasts: The Owner’s Manual: Every Woman’s Guide to Reducing Cancer Risk, Making Treatment Choices, and Optimizing Outcomes, Dr. Funk’s extensive research about whole food plant-based eating led to her entire family switching to a vegan lifestyle. After graduating with distinction from Stanford University in 1991, Dr. Funk received her medical degree from the UC Davis School of Medicine. She completed her surgical residency in Seattle, WA, followed by a surgical breast fellowship at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where she excelled as a surgeon and Director of their Breast Center for 7 years.   In 2009, Dr. Funk, alongside her entrepreneurial husband Andy Funk, opened the Pink Lotus Breast Center in Beverly Hills. Dr. Funk is also the Founding Ambassador of the Pink Lotus Foundation, whose sole mission is to provide low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women 100%-free access to breast cancer screening and care. A sought-after presenter and TV personality, Dr. Funk frequently co-hosts The Doctors, is the go-to breast expert for Good Morning America, and has appeared on The View, the Today Show, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, and The Rachael Ray Show and in countless news articles and stories. She resides in Santa Monica, CA, with her husband and three sons.

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Dear CHEF AJ What’s the best plant-based pasta that does not carry all the carbs? Do you have a favorite quick and easy dish in which you use this pasta? A healthy whole-food plant-based diet should be about 80% of calories from UNPROCESSED complex carbohydrates (like potatoes, rice, and beans), not processed, refined “carbs” like sugar and flour.  There are single-ingredient pastas made out of things like lentils or edamame, but I recommend using spiralized zucchini in place of pasta.  What people really love is the sauce anyway, so these “zoodles” can be used just like pasta.  There also shirataki noodles (made from Konjac, a Japanese tuber) and kelp noodles, available in the refrigerator section of many stores. If you would like a pasta-like low-carb option, I have two YouTube videos you can watch: Zoodles Pomodoro and Zoodles Arrabbiata. Is bread off-limits, or are certain whole-grain varieties like Ezekiel sprouted bread okay to eat to still expect to lose or maintain healthy weight?

If you’re struggling with your weight or food addiction, I do not recommend bread and flour products with a high caloric density of about 1,500 calories per pound — three times that of the whole grain from which they are made. Rice is only 500 calories per pound and will fill your belly and activate your mechanisms of satiety.  When you grind it into flour, it takes 1,500 calories to fill the same space in your tummy.  Sugar and flour go through the same refining process as drugs and alcohol, so for those who are vulnerable to the effect of refined-food addiction, they can be more drug-like than food-like, and they also perpetuate food cravings and overeating.  For optimal health, weight loss, and weight management, my advice is not only to eat whole, unprocessed plant foods but to eat them WHOLE

Love & Kale, Chef AJ

ABOUT THE CHEF Chef AJ has been devoted to a plant-exclusive diet for over 41 years. She is the Host of the television show Healthy Living with Chef AJ and the YouTube show Weight Loss Wednesday. She is the creator of the Ultimate Weight Loss Program and conference and the author of the popular book, Unprocessed, and the bestselling book, The Secrets to Ultimate Weight Loss. In 2018, she was inducted into the Vegetarian Hall of Fame; she is proud to say that her IQ is higher than her cholesterol. Watch the free summit: https://therealtruthaboutweightloss.com

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www.EatUnprocessed.com

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HEALTH NEWS

HARVARD RESEARCHERS FIND A HEALTHFUL PLANT-BASED DIET TO SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCE CHANCES OF TYPE 2 DIABETES by Alora Middleton

R

esearchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, have conducted a study analyzing nine separate studies involving 307,099 participants with 23,544 cases of type 2 diabetes. Through their analysis, they found that there is a significant decrease in the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes for those following a plant-based diet. What makes this study unlike others that came before it is the fact that the study also differentiated between

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healthy and less healthy plant-based foods. Foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes made up the healthy category, while the less healthy category was made up of potatoes, white flour, sugar, and modest amounts of animal products. Nutritionist and senior author Qi Sun stated, “Higher adherence to plantbased eating habits was associated with lower risk of Type 2 diabetes, especially when only healthy plantbased foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and

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nuts, were included in the definition of plant-based.” Sun added, “Overall, these data highlighted the importance of adhering to plant-based diets to achieve or maintain good health.” The researchers explained that the reason a diet consisting of healthy plant-based foods reduces the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes comes down to the fact that these foods improve sensitivity to insulin, reduce weight gain, combat inflammation, and are rich in antioxidants that protect against diabetes.

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EATING A PLANT-BASED DIET CAN SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE YOUR HEART HEALTH by Alora Middleton

H

eart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. Every year in the U.S., about 610,000 people die because of it, meaning that 1 in every 4 deaths is a result of heart disease. According to the CDC, about 47% of Americans have at least one of the three key risk factors for heart disease – high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking. Luckily, there are ways to help reduce your risk of heart disease. One of those ways is by eating a healthful plant-based diet. In an article from Mayo Clinic, studies found that eating more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains helped

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to improve participants' cholesterol levels and weight significantly, diets higher in fruit lowered the risk of developing high blood pressure, eating more fruits and vegetables daily reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease, and that people who ate more vegetables had a smaller risk of chronic heart disease. Studies done by researchers at New York University School of Medicine and at the Icahn School of Medicine at New York’s Mt. Sinai Hospital also found plant-based diets to have a positive impact on heart health. The study at New York University found that the participants who followed a vegan diet experienced a 20% drop in the concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein, which is an

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important marker for chronic inflammation, compared to the participants who followed the recommended diet from the American Heart Association, which allowed some lean meat, eggs, and low-fat dairy. Results were similar in the study at Mt. Sinai, finding that those who followed a plant-based diet had a 42% decreased risk for heart failure over the course of the study’s four years, compared to participants who ate fewer plant foods. The studies are clear, eating a healthful diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is a surefire way to improve your heart health and reduce your risk of the leading cause of death in the United States.

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VEGAN TIROLEAN PRESSKNODEL INGREDIENTS • 1 cup white bread cubes (gluten-free works for this recipe, too) • 1/2 cups grated vegan mozzarella • ½ cup onion, finely chopped • 1/3 cup vegan butter • 1/3 cup almond or soy milk, unsweetened • 1/3 cup flax egg (2 Tablespoons ground flax and 2 Tablespoons cold water, mixed) • ½ teaspoon sea salt • ¼ teaspoon black pepper • ¼ cup fresh oregano • ½ cup chopped parsley

DIRECTIONS 1. In a sauté pan on medium heat, melt the vegan butter and add the onion, stirring and cooking until the onions just start to brown. Remove from heat and place mixture into a large bowl. 2. Add bread cubes to the bowl, along with your nut or soy milk, flax egg, sea salt, black pepper, oregano, parsley, and mozzarella. Mix all ingredients well until a dough starts to form. If the dough is too dry, add more almond or soy milk, 2 Tablespoons at a time until you are able to form a dough ball. 3. Heat your sauté pan back to medium heat, then add a little more vegan butter. Let it melt. 4. Form dough balls and flatten them into medallions. 5. Place the dough balls in the pan and fry until golden brown on both sides, adding more vegan butter if needed. Serve warm! Pair with a bright, young, aromatic white wine, such as the Alois Lageder AM Sand Gewürztraminer.


VEGGIE TOFU PASTA by Toni Okamoto


T

he inspiration for this pasta came from my friend Grace’s meal plan based on Plant-Based on a Budget. I had never had tofu in pasta, and it was a game-changer for me. It adds a uniquely delicious ricotta-like texture while boosting the protein. Win-win! Cook Time 10-15 minutes

Makes 6-8 servings

From Plant-Based on a Budget by Toni Okamoto (BenBella Books, 2019)

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1 pound of your favorite pasta

½ Tablespoon canola or vegetable oil (or 3 Tablespoons water)

1. In a medium pot over medium-high heat, cook the pasta according to the directions on the package.

½ cup diced red, white, or yellow onion (about ½ medium onion) 1½ teaspoons minced garlic (about 3 small cloves)

2. While the pasta cooks, begin the veggie sauce. Heat oil (or water) in a large pot over medium-high heat. 3. Add onion and garlic and sauté for 2-3 minutes or until onion is tender and translucent. Add spinach and let it wilt.

“When I became a vegan in 1987, I was making $2,500 a year and spending $10 a week on food. And amazingly, I ate well! This book shows how easy it is to eat well and be a vegan without spending a ton of money.” —— Moby, singer and songwriter “Plant-based eating has never been easier—or more affordable—than now. Buy this book and let Toni Okamoto help you keep your stomach and wallet full at the same time.” —— Klaus Mitchell and Robbie Lockie, co-founders of Plant Based News “Toni Okamoto gives you the truth what too many large health charities are afraid to: eating a plantbased diet can help save your life. She also shows you how it can save your finances, too.” —— Kip Andersen, co-creator of What the Health “Whether or not you’ve got money growing on the trees in your life, if health is wealth—and I believe it is—than this book will give you the great gift of wealth that you deserve.” —— Dr. Michael Greger, New York Times bestselling author of How Not to Die

4. Using your fingers, crumble tofu into pot and cook another 5 minutes.

3½ cups packed chopped spinach

1 (14-ounce) block extra-firm tofu, pressed

2 teaspoons dried oregano

7. While sauce cools, check on pasta. When it’s cooked, remove from heat and drain.

1 (25-ounce) jar marinara sauce

8. Divide pasta into bowls and top with sauce.

5. Stir in oregano. 6. Add marinara sauce and cook 5 minutes.

TONI’S TIPS: You can keep the stems on your spinach. But if you choose to take them off, save them to add extra nutrients to your smoothies!

ABOUT THE CHEF Toni Okamoto is the founder of Plant-Based on a Budget, the popular website, food blog, and meal plan that shows you how to save dough by eating veggies. She’s also author of the cookbook  Plant-Based on a Budget  and  The Super Easy Vegan Slow Cooker Cookbook. Plant-Based on a Budget has been featured in  Reader’s Digest,  US News and World Report, and more. Toni’s also a regular presence on the FOX affiliate in Sacramento, where she teaches viewers how to break their meat habit without breaking their budget. Toni is a burrito enthusiast, and spends her free time swing dancing across the county. She resides in Sacramento with her wonderful partner, Paul Shapiro.

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121 Michelle Cehn


QUESADILLAS WITH CASHEW CHEESE by Bianca Haun and Sascha Naderer Melted cheese between two tortillas: How can you go wrong? A quesadilla is a simple, delicious meal that will get you through even those sad days or nasty hangovers. For the cheesy component of the quesadilla, we use our homemade cashew cheese. For the filling, we use a mix of veggies such as red bell pepper, scallions, garlic, and corn, but you can use whatever you have at home. Just make sure you cook the fillings first to make them nice and soft for the quesadilla. Prep Time 40 minutes plus soaking overnight

Makes 2 quesadillas

Bake Time 4-6 minutes

MAKE THE CASHEW CHEESE* INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1. Soak cashews in water overnight. 2. Next day, rinse and drain cashews. 3. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. You might have to scrape down the sides a few times. 4. Transfer cheese mixture to a saucepan and bring to medium heat. Keep stirring until it gets stretchy.

• • • • • •

1 cup (130 g) raw, unsalted cashews soaked overnight (see DIRECTIONS) 4 teaspoons tapioca starch 2 small garlic cloves 4 Tablespoons nutritional yeast ¾ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons lemon juice ½ cup (125 mL) water

5. Set aside.

MAKE THE FILLING

DIRECTIONS FOR SERVING

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • • • •

1. Heat canola oil in a large pan over high heat.

1 teaspoon canola oil 1 red bell pepper, diced 1 scallion, thinly sliced 1 garlic clove, minced ½ cup (85 g) corn ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon cumin cayenne pepper to taste 1 teaspoon cilantro, chopped 4 (9-inch) tortillas

2. Add chopped veggies and season with salt, cumin, and cayenne pepper. 3. Once vegetables are soft, add chopped cilantro and combine.

1. Spread cashew cheese onto four tortillas all the way to sides. 2. Add roasted veggies on two cheesy tortillas. 3. Top each filled tortilla with a second cheesy tortilla; press together until filling sticks to tortillas (thanks to the cheese). 4. Bake each quesadilla in a lightly oiled pan for 2-3 minutes until crispy, then flip and bake on other side until golden and crispy. 5. Cut into quarters and serve.

*NOTE: You won’t need all the vegan cheese for this recipe, but I’ve doubled the ingredients to make it work in a regular-size blender. If you’re using a blender with a small container, feel free to halve the cheese recipe. Excerpted from Cravings Made Vegan: 50 Plant-Based Recipes for Your Comfort Food Favorites by Bianca Haun and Sascha Naderer, with permission from Skyhorse Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2018 by Bianca Haun and Sascha Naderer. Photographs by Bianca Haun and Sascha Naderer.

ABOUT THE CHEFS Bianca Haun is the food blogger behind Elephantastic Vegan, where she shares her favorite plant-based recipes and spreads the word about veganism without being too preachy about it. Together with her boyfriend, Sascha, they are a foodie couple that, after adopting a plant-based diet, fell in love with food all over again.

Sascha Naderer is the stew-cooking, breadstick-eating, avocado-craving side of this dynamic vegan duo. To him, cooking is about creativity, spontaneity, and tons of garlic, and he sees decadent vegan food as the perfect way to enjoy great food without having to compromise his ethics. He and Bianca currently reside in Linz, Austria.

https://www.elephantasticvegan.com/ FB/Insta: @elephantasticvegan Twitter: @elephantasticV Cravings Made Vegan available at https://www.skyhorsepublishing.com/9781510739321/cravings-made-vegan/


CREAMY HERB MUSHROOM PASTA by Robin Paone and Ameera Ataya

Photo by Ameera Ataya


Rich, velvety, and bursting with flavor, this Creamy Herb Mushroom Pasta is total wholesome comfort food! Pasta drenched in a decadent cashew herb sauce and topped with earthy sautéed mushrooms makes for perfect weeknight dinners with the family or elegant dinner parties — delicious. Prep Time 7 minutes

Cook Time 23 minutes

Makes 4-5 servings

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1. In a large ceramic/enamel-lined Dutch oven/pot or similarly large stockpot/skillet, add sliced mushrooms and tamari.

• • • • • • • • • • •

12 ounces mushrooms of choice, sliced (see Note) 2 Tablespoons reducedsodium tamari 1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped ½ cup vegetable broth or water 1 Tablespoon minced garlic 2 Tablespoons flour/thickener of choice ½ cup vegan white wine 1 cup unsweetened plain plant milk ½ cup water 1 Tablespoon white miso 1/3 cup raw cashews 10-12 ounces pasta of choice, cooked

SPICES AND HERBS • • • • • • •

1 Tablespoon dried minced onion flakes 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon dried crushed thyme leaves pinch of crushed rosemary 1 teaspoon sea salt (+/-) ¼ teaspoon black pepper

OPTIONAL TOPPINGS • •

Freshly chopped parsley Vegan parmesan cheese

2. Sauté over medium-high heat for 5 minutes to allow mushrooms to release their water. 3. After 5 minutes, remove mushrooms from the pan (including any remaining liquid/ mushroom juice), set aside. (For a more mushroom-y flavor, you can add the mushroom juice back in with the mushrooms in step 11. We do not add the juice back in.) 4. In the same large pot or skillet, add finely diced onion and sauté over medium-high heat for 5-7 minutes until the onions are tender. (If needed to prevent sticking, add a splash of vegetable broth or water.) 5. Add the minced garlic and sauté for 1 minute. 6. Sprinkle flour over sautéed onions and garlic and sauté for a few more minutes.

7. Add the spices and herbs, stirring constantly for 30 seconds more. The contents will look like flour-covered lumps, and that’s fine! 8. Stir in white wine, stirring constantly to allow the sauce to thicken. It will look like a gooey lump. 9. Add plant milk, water, miso, and cashews, simmer for 10 minutes, then remove from stove to cool slightly. 10. Place sauce into a high-speed blender and blend on high for 1 minute to make mixture creamy and smooth, then return to cooking pot. 11. Gently fold in 2/3 of sautéed mushrooms, keeping 1/3 of mushrooms for topping. 12. Cook for 1-2 minutes, then stir in the cooked pasta. 13. Top

with

the

remaining

mushrooms and serve immediately. Also top with freshly chopped parsley and/ or vegan parmesan cheese if desired.

NOTE: For us, the best flavor combination was 4 ounces of white button mushrooms, 4 ounces of shiitake mushrooms, and 4 ounces of cremini mushrooms.

ABOUT THE CHEFS Robin Paone and Ameera Ataya are a mother-daughter blogging team. Their blog, Monkey and Me Kitchen Adventures, is a recipe and lifestyle blog for healthy vegans and those who follow a whole foods, plant-based diet. Their blog showcases posts that are fun and whimsical and are coupled with beautiful food photography and wholesome recipes. https://monkeyandmekitchenadventures.com

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https://www.instagram.com/monkeyandmekitchenadventures

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RUSTIC RIBOLLITA SOUP by Meg Raines and Beth Williams

Photo by Meg Raines


R

ibollita — “reboiled” in Italian — is a famous peasant Tuscan soup thickened with stale bread. A simple meal to make, ribollita is a warming dish with root vegetables, cannellini beans, Tuscan kale, and, of course, bread. This simple Italian classic is cheap and nourishing, making it perfect for family get-togethers or a casual meal with friends. Prep Time 20 minutes

Cook Time 40 minutes

Makes 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for serving

1. Put olive oil, garlic, and red pepper flakes (if using) in a large pot over medium heat.

2 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional)

2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and cubed small

2 large carrots, washed, scrubbed, and cubed small

6. Add canned tomatoes, cannellini beans, vegetable stock, salt and pepper, and stir.

1 large yellow onion, peeled and diced small

7. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer at least 15 minutes until all vegetables are very soft.

1 large fennel bulb, fronds removed, diced small

8. Stir in the fresh lemon juice, turn off the heat, and stir in the bread chunks.

1/2 pound Tuscan kale (aka dino kale, lacinato kale or cavolo nero), stems removed and roughly chopped

9. Cover and let sit for 5 minutes so the bread can absorb the liquid.

1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes

2. Sauté until garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Be careful not to fry the garlic or it will turn bitter. 3. Add potatoes, carrots, and onions. Stirring frequently, cook until the vegetables soften, about 8 minutes. 4. While continuing to stir, add fennel and cook for an additional 5 minutes. 5. Add kale and cook until it is completely wilted, about 3 minutes.

10. Taste and adjust seasoning if required. 11. Finish each bowl with a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil. 12. Stir well and serve immediately. Buon appetito!

1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed

TIPS

4 cups vegetable stock

½ teaspoon salt, plus extra if needed

¼ teaspoon fresh ground pepper, plus extra if needed

It’s an informal dish using leftovers, so don’t hesitate to make use of what you have on hand. For example, if you can’t find all the ingredients listed, you can use celery instead of fennel, sub navy beans in place of cannellini beans, or swap Swiss chard for Tuscan kale, and so on.

Use toasted bread if you don’t have stale bread.

2 large handfuls stale bread, torn into chunks

juice of half a lemon

The bread will continue to absorb liquid as the ribollita sits, so you may want to add some extra broth or water when reheating — or don’t, and eat it practically solid like the Tuscans do!

ABOUT THE CHEFS Beth Williams is a food writer and recipe developer. Born and raised in Paris, France, Beth is obsessed with travel and good food and has a photographic memory for outstanding meals. She lives in Barcelona, Spain, with her husband. Click on her portfolio or Instagram for more information.

Meg Raines is a food photographer and recipe developer. Originally from Buffalo, NY, she travels abroad to find inspiration for her recipes and delectable food photography. Meg lives in Chelan, Washington, with her husband and three dogs. Click on her portfolio or Instagram for more information.


APPLE ROSES by Cathy Katin-Grazzini

Photo courtesy of Giordano Katin-Grazzini


E

very fall, one of our family rituals is to frequent nearby orchards to pick apples, berries, and pears. Eating them fresh is best, but if you have a surfeit of apples on hand, as I often do, it’s fun to also stew ‘em, stuff ‘em, or bake ‘em up in a little dough. Here’s a beautiful, plant-based version of apple roses, low in fat, without refined flours or sugars, eggs, oils, or butter. Apple roses are a fanciful, eye-catching, tasty way to dress apples up for a treat! Prep Time 25 minutes Bake Time 40-50 minutes Makes 6 roses

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 375°F/190°C.

1¼ cups whole wheat pastry flour or your favorite gluten-free flour or blend, plus a bit extra when rolling out dough

1½ teaspoons baking powder

4 teaspoons date sugar, ground finely

1½ teaspoons Ceylon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1 banana, sliced

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 red organic apples

1 lemon, juiced

2/3 cup water

4 Tablespoons date or apricot paste from ½ cup dried fruit, or your favorite fruit preserve

½ cup raisins, rehydrated in water for ½ hour, drained

drops water if dough is too dry or wet.

TO MAKE THE DATE OR APRICOT PASTE:

3. Cover a board with parchment, dust lightly with flour.

1. In a nonmetallic bowl, barely cover dates or apricots with water and microwave for 2 minutes. Cool.

4. Cover dough ball with parchment and roll to 1/8” thickness.

2. Process both the fruit and soaking water in a food processor or highspeed blender until very smooth.

TO MAKE THE APPLE ROSES:

2. Spread a generous layer of fruit paste/preserves.

TO PREPARE THE APPLES 1. Pour lemon juice into a medium-large microwaveable bowl; add water. 2. Quarter and core apples, then cut into 1/8-inch-thick slices with a mandoline or by hand. 3. Immediately toss apples in acidulated water and microwave for 2 minutes on high, or cook on a stovetop over low heat for 5 minutes or until apple slices are softened and pliable but not mushy.

TO MAKE THE DOUGH:

Date sugar to sprinkle before baking

1. In food processor, combine flour, baking powder, date sugar, spices, and banana.

GARNISH: very light dusting of Ceylon cinnamon, date or confectioner sugar (optional)

2. Run processor until dough is uniform and gathers into a soft, moist, and light ball. Add flour or a few

1. Cut dough into 2-inch x 9-inch strips. For each strip:

3. Shake apple slices dry and, with rounded apple edges outward, overlap slices half on/half off upper edge of dough. 4. Sprinkle raisins lightly over dough. 5. Fold up bottom edge of strip over the bottom of the apple slices to secure them. 6. Roll up apples and dough like a jelly roll, moistening the edge to seal. 7. Bake in muffin tin lined with parchment paper at 375°F/190°C for 40-50 minutes or until fully cooked and lightly colored on the edges. 8. Serve at room temperature or, better yet, warmed. Garnish, if desired, with a light sprinkle of Ceylon cinnamon and powdered date or confectioner’s sugar, and delight your guests!

ABOUT THE CHEF Cathy Katin-Grazzini, Food Editor at VEGWORLD Magazine and owner of Cathy’s Kitchen Prescription LLC, creates beautiful, healthful dishes that help us look and feel our best. Certified in Plant-Based Nutrition from the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies at Cornell and a graduate of Rouxbe Cooking School’s Professional Plant-Based Program, Cathy has a BA from the University of Chicago, attended graduate school at Harvard University, and received an MA from Johns Hopkins University. Cathy lives with her husband Giordano in Ridgefield, Connecticut. She loves to run, hike, and adventure travel atop their trusty Ducati. Cathy’s original recipes, cooking videos, and nutritional blog can be found at: https://www.cathyskitchenprescription.com/ http://www.instagram.com/cathyskitchenprescription https://www.facebook.com/cathyskitchenprescription

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OMBRÉ OATS CHEESECAKE by Nele Liivlaid

Photo by Nele Liivlaid


R

egular cheesecake is made from dairy cream cheese and lots of sugar. But my version uses soaked cashews and coconut manna for creaminess, xylitol for sweetness, and oats for texture. The oats totally hit the spot and keep the cake’s texture stable and homogeneous. For a real showstopper, follow my easy instructions to achieve the ombré effect!

Prep Time 2 hours

Cook Time 20 minutes plus 4 hours to chill

Makes 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE CRUST • 1 ounce (30 g) walnuts or other nut • Pinch Himalayan salt • ¼ cup (20 g) rolled oats • 1 Tablespoon peanut butter or other nut butter • 1 teaspoon coconut nectar or other liquid sweetener

1. Soak cashews for filling at least 2 hours. Drain and rinse.

HOW TO CREATE OMBRÉ

2. For the crust, process walnuts with salt in a food processor to create fine crumbs.

1. Choose a color and a corresponding powder from the ingredients list.

FOR THE FILLING • 1 cup (135 g) raw cashews • 2 Tablespoons (30 g) rolled oats • 1/3 cup (80 g) almond milk or other plant milk • 1½ Tablespoons lemon juice • 1/8 teaspoon Himalayan salt • 2 Tablespoons (25 g) coconut butter, aka manna • 2 Tablespoons xylitol or coconut, date, or raw cane sugar FOR THE OMBRÉ EFFECT (optional, choose one color) • Pink/Red - beetroot powder or pink pitaya powder • Blue/Purple - blue matcha, blue spirulina, butterfly pea powder, açai powder, blueberry powder, or blackcurrant powder • Green - matcha, barley grass, wheat grass, or spirulina • Yellow - turmeric or Dunaliella salina powder

3. Add remaining crust ingredients and process until you have a loose dough that sticks together when squeezed between fingers. 4. Press mixture into a 4” (11 cm) springform pan and place in the freezer. 5. For the filling, soak rolled oats in almond milk for about 10 minutes. Alternatively, grind oats into flour or use oat flour instead. 6. Process cashews, oat mixture, and remaining filling ingredients in a blender or use an immersion blender. Blend until smooth. 7. Remove springform pan with crust from refrigerator. 8. Pour filling onto crust and spread evenly (or see below for ombré effect). 9. Freeze 4-6 hours before serving.

EFFECT AS SEEN IN PHOTO:

2. Stir chosen powder into filling and transfer a thin layer onto the crust, spreading evenly. 3. Divide the remaining filling into two bowls. 4. Add a bit more powder to one of the bowls of filling mixture so that the color turns a bit darker/more intense. Transfer a thin layer over the first layer. Spread evenly without mixing the layers. 5. Continue alternating layers until filling runs out. I used blue spirulina powder first and added some butterfly pea powder at the end. To create the galaxy effect, I melted 10 g of coconut butter and colored it with pink pitaya powder. I drizzled this mixture on top of the cake and spread it out with a spoon in a swirl so that the pink got blended with the blue.

Nutritional information (1/8 of cake): 204 kcal, 12.3 g carbohydrates (24.2% of kcal), 15.2 g fats (67.4% of kcal), 5.78 g protein (11.4% of kcal), and 2.07 g fiber.

ABOUT THE CHEF Nele Liivlaid is author of PLANT-BASED MADE EASY: The Complete Practical Guide to Transitioning to Healthy Whole Food Diet. She is also a plant-based certificate graduate from eCornell and a featured blogger and researcher. On Instagram and her blog https://www. nutriplanet.org/, Nele shares easy-to-follow recipes, video tutorials, and both regular and Candida/blood sugar meal plans as well as articles about healing Candida naturally.


QUICK MARBLE CAKE by Daniela Lais and Jérôme Eckmeier

Photo by Brigitte Sporrer


T

his delicious sponge cake comes together quickly and makes a striking dessert to serve!

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).

Prep Time 25 minutes Cook Time 50-60 minutes Makes 8-10 servings

2. Carefully grease a large (12-inch) loaf pan and dust with flour. TO MAKE THE LIGHT CAKE BATTER: 1. Combine flour, sugar, and baking soda in a bowl.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE LIGHT CAKE BATTER:

FOR THE DARK CAKE BATTER:

• 1¾ cups allpurpose flour, plus extra for dusting

• 1¾ cups all-purpose flour

• ½ cup fine cane sugar • 1 teaspoon baking soda • 1¼ cups soy milk • grated zest of 1 organic lemon

• ½ cup fine cane sugar • 1 teaspoon baking soda

3. Carefully fold wet ingredients into dry ingredients until just combined. TO MAKE THE DARK CAKE BATTER:

• ¼ cup vegan cocoa powder

1. Combine the flour, sugar, baking soda, and cocoa in a bowl.

• 1½ cups soy milk

2. In a separate bowl, whisk together soy milk and corn oil. Add vanilla extract. Carefully fold wet ingredients into dry ingredients until just combined.

• 2/3 cup corn oil • 2-3 teaspoons vanilla extract

TO COMBINE THE BATTERS FOR BAKING:

• 2/3 cup corn oil • 2-3 teaspoons vanilla extract

2. In a separate bowl, whisk together soy milk, lemon zest, and corn oil. Add vanilla extract.

ALSO: • vegan margarine, for greasing the pan

Excerpted from Easy Vegan Baking, reprinted by permission of DK, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. Copyright © 2018 by Jérôme Eckmeier and Daniela Lais.

1. Add 3 Tablespoons of the light batter and then of the dark batter into the center of the pan, alternating this way until all batter is in the pan. 2. Bake the cake in center of oven for 50-60 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the cake comes out clean. Allow to cool in pan on a wire rack about 15 minutes before turning out from pan.

ABOUT THE CHEFS Daniela Lais has been vegan for more than 16 years and is passionate about ethical eating. She worked for many years at one of the oldest vegetarian/vegan restaurants in Graz, Austria. She has been a journalist for over 10 years. She splits her time between Portland, OR, and Austria. She is also the co-author of DK's Vegan Easy Baking (2018). Find more of Daniela’s recipes at https://www.facebook.com/laisdaniela.

Jérôme Eckmeier has been cooking vegan food and following a vegan diet for many years and regularly conjures up inspirational new vegan dishes for his online cooking show and blog. He has trained as a chef and food technician and worked in numerous prestigious restaurants in Germany and elsewhere. He is also the co-author of DK's Vegan Easy Baking (2018). Find more of Jérôme’s recipes at http://www.jeromeeckmeier.com/


MUKTI’S MUSHROOM CURRY by Cathy McLellan

D

uring our recent trip to India, we had an amazing experience with Chef Mukti when we joined her for one of her cooking lessons. The value was exceptional; we received recipes and tips, had such fun, and got to enjoy the delicious dishes that we created!

INGREDIENTS •

6-8 cups 1-inch cremini mushrooms (or vegetable of your choice), cleaned and diced 2 medium onions, diced

Her mushroom curry was one of the most popular recipes. It has quite a bit of heat, so adjust the spices to suit your palate. This recipe is quite versatile—you can substitute the mushrooms with any vegetable, combination of vegetables, tofu, tempeh, etc. It all works! And to top it off, this curry is glutenand oil-free.

Vegetable broth or water to deglaze pan

2 fresh tomatoes, diced

1 Tablespoon ginger/garlic paste (6 cloves of garlic and about a ½-inch piece of fresh ginger blended into a paste)

You will need a big fry pan or pot. I used my wok because it has a tight-fitting lid.

1 small bunch cilantro, roughly chopped (include the stems)

For sides, I served steamed rice infused with turmeric, fresh veggies, and flatbread. It’s a simple, Indian-influenced feast ready to enjoy!

1 teaspoon turmeric powder

1 teaspoon chili powder (or to taste)

1 teaspoon coriander powder

If you’re in Goa, I hope you go see Mukti. But, wherever you travel, be sure to take a cooking lesson.

1 teaspoon salt (optional)

1 teaspoon black mustard seed

Prep Time 1 hour Cook Time 45 minutes Makes 4 servings

¾-1 Tablespoon garam marsala spice blend

DIRECTIONS 1. Prep all ingredients. If you’re serving with rice, have it ready to start when the time is right. Prepping makes the cooking experience more enjoyable; you can relax and enjoy the aromas that you are creating. 2. Heat a pan on high for about 5 minutes. 3. Dry sauté the mustard seeds in the hot pan, put the lid on and let the seeds pop, shaking the pan so they don’t burn. This takes about one minute. 4. With pan still on high, dry sauté onions. Add salt (if using). When onions begin to stick to the pan, add a little vegetable broth or water to deglaze. Stir for 2 minutes with the lid off, followed by 3 minutes with the lid on.

CHEF MUKTI’S TIPS

5. Lower heat to medium. Add ginger/garlic paste – while stirring, cook 1 minute with the lid off followed by 1 minute with the lid on. 6. Add tomato and cook for 2 minutes with the lid off, stirring occasionally, then for 2 minutes with the lid on. 7. Set heat on low. Stir in turmeric, chili powder, and coriander. 8. Add mushrooms, raising heat to medium-low for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. 9. Set heat to low again and add garam masala. Cook with lid on about 7-10 minutes. Stir once or twice. Taste to ensure veggies are cooked to your liking.

• Cook this recipe with and without the lid equally. • When cooking Indian food, the heat should be on low before adding spices.

ABOUT THE CHEF Cathy McLellan, a Rouxbe Certified Plant-Based Chef, Vegan Recipe Designer, and Consultant, is the writer and creator of veganonthego.net which is an online resource for those interested in exploring a plant-based lifestyle. Her mission is to encourage a sustainable lifestyle through food that is vegan, accessible, healthy, and delicious. Her passions include time in the kitchen, family, the outdoors, gardening, people, and travel. Blog http://www.veganonthego.net IG @veganonthego For more about Chef Mukti visit http://www.muktikitchen.com.


CAULIFLOWER Recipes


BAJA TACOS

By Eddie Garza

S

urrounded by the sea, the peninsula of Baja California is well-known for its sun, surf, and fish tacos. There’s vigorous debate over which port town originated the tacos, but one thing’s clear: They’re a big part of the Baja California experience. My vegan Baja tacos — with a crunchy, beer-battered outside and soft cauliflower inside — are a perfect alternative to those fried fish bits. Top them with fresh red cabbage, avocado, pico de gallo, and spicy chipotle mayo, and you’ll feel like the sun and surf are right there with you. Prep Time 20 minutes

Cook Time 20 minutes

Makes 12 tacos

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE BATTER

TO MAKE THE BATTER

• • • • • • •

1. In a large bowl, whisk together rice flour, baking powder, cumin, chili powder, garlic powder, salt, and pepper. 2. Pour in 1½ bottles of beer and whisk well. The batter should resemble a slightly thick pancake batter. If it’s too thick, add a little bit more beer to loosen the batter. Use batter right away. 3. Toss cauliflower into batter and coat well by mixing it with your hands.

2½ cups white rice flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper • 2 (12-ounce) bottles of Mexican lager (I like Modelo Especial or Tecate) • 1 head cauliflower, cut into bite-sized florets

FOR THE TACOS • 4 cups vegetable oil, for frying • Salt • 12 corn tortillas • 2 cups red cabbage, julienned • 1 cup vegan chipotle mayo • 2 avocados, peeled and sliced • 2 cups pico de gallo

TO MAKE THE TACOS 1. Heat oil in a large pot on medium heat to 350°F. Use a thermometer to check the temperature. 2. When oil has reached the right temperature, carefully drop in a few pieces of cauliflower, one at a time, and cook 3 to 4 minutes each. 3. When pieces are nicely browned, remove with tongs and place on a heat-resistant, paper-towel–lined plate, or a roasting rack, to allow excess oil to drip.

4. Repeat until all cauliflower is cooked. (You might need to increase heat to keep oil at a constant temperature.) 5. Lightly sprinkle the fried bits with salt. 6. To build the tacos, place 3 to 5 cauliflower florets in the center of each tortilla. Top with a pinch of shredded cabbage, a dollop of the chipotle mayo, sliced avocado, and some pico de gallo. 7. Repeat to make all 12 tacos.

COOKING TIP If you prefer a lower-fat or non-alcoholic version, mix the rice flour, baking powder, cumin, chili powder, garlic powder, salt, and pepper with 2 Tablespoons of olive oil, toss with the cauliflower to coat, and roast the florets in a 400°F oven for 20 minutes.

ABOUT THE CHEF Eddie Garza is Senior Manager of Food & Nutrition for the Humane Society of the United States and is a leading figure in the movement to reform food systems in Latino communities. He's a sought-after speaker, culinary coach, published writer, and thought leader on issues related to Latino health, and has lectured and presented at top universities, public school forums, and major conferences.

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BAKED BUFFALO CAULIFLOWER WINGS by Rebecca Seal, John Vincent, and Chantal Symons


F

iery and unbelievably irresistible. Try serving the wings with vegan mayo, garlicky aioli, or ranch dressing.

Prep Time 15 minutes Cook Time 35 minutes Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• 1 cauliflower

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and grease it lightly with oil. 3. Remove the leaves from cauliflower and break it into fairly large (1½-2 inches) florets. 4. In a bowl, whisk the milk, vinegar, and 5 Tablespoons of the oil together. 5. In a large bowl, mix together the flours, sweet smoked paprika, dry mustard, garlic powder, salt, and plenty of pepper. 6. Stir wet ingredients into dry and mix to form a smooth, thick batter. 7. Put the panko bread crumbs into a separate bowl. 8. Dip each floret into the thick batter and use your fingers to work it into the crevices. Scrape off any excess batter — each piece should be thoroughly coated, but not thickly. 9. Dip each floret into bread crumbs, rolling to coat it all over, then place on baking sheet. Repeat with the rest of the florets. 10. Whisk the remaining oil and the hot sauce together in another bowl and set aside. 11. Bake florets for 15 minutes, turning once halfway through. 12. Using tongs, dip each floret in the hot sauce, turning to make sure all the bread crumbs are well coated in the sauce, then return it to the sheet. 13. Cook for another 20 minutes, turning twice, until cauliflower is just tender and coating is deep-red and crunchy. 14. Put onto paper towels for 3-4 minutes to drain the excess oil. 15. Let cool slightly before serving.

• 1/3 cup unsweetened dairyfree milk • 1 teaspoon vegan apple cider vinegar • ½ cup cooking oil, plus extra for greasing • ¼ cup all-purpose flour • 1 Tablespoon cornstarch • 2 teaspoons sweet smoked paprika • 1 teaspoon dry mustard • 2 teaspoons garlic powder • ½ teaspoon salt • 2 cups panko bread crumbs • ½ cup vegan buffalo wing sauce or vegan hot sauce (we love Frank’s Red Hot) • freshly ground black pepper

ABOUT THE CHEFS Rebecca Seal has written about food and drink for The Financial Times, The London Evening Standard, The Observer, and The Guardian, Red Magazine, and The Sunday Times. Her cookbooks include Istanbul: Recipes from the Heart of Turkey and Lisbon: Recipes from the Heart of Portugal, as well as LEON Happy Soups, which she co-authored with John Vincent. She is one of the food and drink experts on Channel 4’s (UK) Sunday Brunch. She believes that with the right skills, and just a bit of knowledge, everyone can eat well and hopes that her writing goes a little way towards helping that happen. She lives in London with her husband and two small daughters. John Vincent is Co-Founder of LEON, which now has more than 55 restaurants including restaurants in Amsterdam, Utrecht, Oslo, and Washington, D.C. He wrote LEON Naturally Fast Food with Henry Dimbleby, LEON Family & Friends with Kay Plunkett-Hogge, LEON Happy Salads and LEON Fast & Free with Jane Baxter, and LEON Happy Soups and LEON Happy One-Pot Cooking with Rebecca Seal. He believes food has the power to delight, invigorate, and bring people together — like him, Rebecca, and Chantal. Chantal Symons’ passion for cooking was ignited when, as a teenager, she was diagnosed as allergic to dairy, eggs, and wheat. She believes everyone should take joy and satisfaction from food, and so she specializes in free-from cooking. Chantal has worked as a personal chef, caterer, and restaurateur as well as in food product development. She is also a champion barbecuer and has won several competitions, including Jamie Oliver’s “Big Feastival.”

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Photo by Mowie Kay ©️ Ryland Peters & Small.

Aromatic, creamy, fresh, and zingy — just like a good Thai curry should be! The addition of liquid aminos in place of the traditional fish sauce adds a depth of flavor and extra umami goodness. Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

THAI GREEN CAULI CURRY by Kathy Kordalis

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 Tablespoons coconut oil 2 Tablespoons vegan green curry paste 1 red onion, sliced 4 garlic cloves, crushed 7 ounces cauliflower florets 1 red bell pepper, deseeded and thinly sliced 2 carrots, peeled and sliced diagonally 2 baby bok choy, halved 3½ ounces snow peas 1 Tablespoon sugar 1 Tablespoon liquid aminos (or tamari) 1 can coconut milk (14 ounces) 3 kaffir lime leaves freshly squeezed juice of 1 lime salt and freshly ground black pepper

TO FINISH: • • • •

bunch of purple Thai basil sambal oelek (optional) cooked rice lime wedges

From Cauliflower Power by Kathy Kordalis, Ryland Peters & Small

DIRECTIONS 1. In a large pan or wok over medium-high heat, heat 1 Tablespoon of coconut oil, being cautious of its spitting. 2. Stir curry paste into coconut oil and fry for about 1 minute. 3. Turn heat down and add onion. Cook until slightly translucent, about 8 minutes. 4. Stir in garlic, then add second Tablespoon of coconut oil. 5. Add cauliflower, bell pepper, carrots, bok choy, and peas. 6. Add sugar, liquid aminos (or tamari), and some salt and pepper. Stir everything together. 7. Reduce heat to medium and cook down, stirring, until the carrots are tender-crisp, about 10-15 minutes. 8. Add coconut milk and kaffir lime leaves, stir and let simmer for about 5 minutes. 9. Squeeze the lime juice over, stir, then remove from heat. 10. Stir in purple Thai basil and sambal oelek, if using. 11. Serve over rice with lime wedges.

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VEGWORLD Magazine


Photo by Mowie Kay ©️ Ryland Peters & Small.

Vegan heaven in a bowl! This dreamy, plantbased soup contains nutritional yeast, which gives a delicious, savory cheese flavor without the use of dairy. Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS • 2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil • 4 cloves garlic, crushed • 1 onion, chopped • 1 head of cauliflower, cut into florets • 1 potato, peeled and chopped • 2 cups vegetable stock • 1 cup unsweetened plant-based milk • 4 Tablespoons nutritional yeast (or to taste) • salt and freshly ground black pepper TO FINISH: •

1 Tablespoon oat cream or unsweetened plant-based creamer

CREAM OF CAULIFLOWER SOUP

handful of chives, finely snipped (optional)

handful of fresh pea shoots (optional)

crushed green peppercorns (optional)

by Kathy Kordalis

1. Heat oil in a large pan and add garlic and onion. Cook over medium-high heat until golden brown.

DIRECTIONS

From Cauliflower Power by Kathy Kordalis, Ryland Peters & Small

2. Add cauliflower, potato, stock, and milk and bring to a boil. 3. Cook over medium-high heat about 15-20 minutes or until cauliflower is soft.

ABOUT THE CHEF

4. Add nutritional yeast, salt, and pepper.

Author of Cauliflower Power, Kathy Kordalis is a freelance food stylist, recipe writer, and graduate of Leith’s School of Food and  Wine. Her food style draws inspiration from her Australian and Greek heritage. Kathy’s clients include Tesco Online and Waitrose Food Magazine as well as Australian celebrity chef Bill Granger.

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5. Using a hand-held blender, blend until smooth. 6. Serve with a swirl of vegan cream and a sprinkling of chives, pea shoots, and/or crushed green peppercorns

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VEGWORLD 54 - The Fashion Issue  

For many of us, being vegan is first associated directly with food, and fashion and beauty come to mind much later. Fortunately, we’re const...

VEGWORLD 54 - The Fashion Issue  

For many of us, being vegan is first associated directly with food, and fashion and beauty come to mind much later. Fortunately, we’re const...