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VOL. 54 NO 2. WINTER 2019 $25.00 (inc GST)

wa

grower Japan market insights

WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948

HortConnectWA events Save the Dates!

New Vegetable Fee for Service rates Effective 1st July 2019

This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by vegetablesWA together with: • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA


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inside Your vegetablesWA magazine

4

100

50 3

VegNET IEO: Update

40

Pest management

73

CEO’s Report

4

Best & brightest

42

Citrus galls

74

President’s Report

5

Drone registration requirements

44

Huanglongbing 76

YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

APC Vegetable Producers Committee 6 YOUR PRODUCTION

9

WA POTATOES

45

STONEFRUIT WA

79

President’s Report

46

Picking-pruning-planting

80

Phosphate reserves

10

Executive Officer’s Report

47

Summerfruit Exports

81

Chemical Q&A: Part 2

12

Seed for Schools

48

Strategic Direction

82

Fight against fruit fly

15

Standing together on biosecurity

49

DPIRD gains new researcher

16

Global movement underway

50

Management options for CGMMV

18

WA seed potatoes open for business 52

Virus and bacterial diseases

20

Grower tour

Soil wealth and ICP

22

Managing important weed species

24

POMEWEST Executive Manager’s update

54

YOUR BUSINESS

83

Control your focus for success

84

FreshcareOnline

85

Freshcare and market access

86

57

iAuditor

88

58

Managing young workers

92

The 2019 BRAVO™ season blasts off! 60

Record keeping saves time and tax

94

27

Antioxidants

62

Labour supply for horticulture

96

Robotic apple harvester

28

Orchard clean up time

64

Haifa online services

30

Autumn 2019 Future Orchard Walk

66

Farmer on Your Plate

67

Donnybrook Apple Festival

68

Permits 115 TOOL TIME

YOUR INDUSTRY

31

WA’s Hottest Foodie Destination

32

Plant biosecurity

34

WA CITRUS

69

HortConnectWA 36

From the Chair

70

Digital transformation

38

Business

72

Horticulture biosecurity focus

39

National industry event

72

YOUR MARKET

99

Sales and opportunity for leeks

100

Japan market profile

102

FOODEX Trade Show Japan

106

Export Facilitators Project update

108

VIETNAMESE TRANSLATIONS

110

WHAT'S ON

120

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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VOL. 54 NO 2. WINTER 2019

WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948


YOUR CONTACTS

contacts vegetablesWA

Management Committee

702-704 Murray Street, West Perth WA 6005 t: (08) 9486 7515 e: office@vegetableswa.com.au

President

Chief Executive Officer John Shannon m: 0488 111 526 e: john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au

Maurice Grubiša m: 0413 050 182 Metro North

Operations Manager Rebecca Blackman t: (08) 9486 7515 e: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au COVER IMAGE: Jim Trandos, WA Corn Growers in Japan

Published by vegetablesWA This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by: • vegetablesWA • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA

© 2019 All articles and other material published in this magazine is vegetablesWA copyright (unless otherwise stated) and may not be reproduced in part or full without the written permission of the authors and publisher. DISCLAIMER: vegetablesWA make no representations and expressly disclaims all warranties (to the extent permitted by law) about the accuracy, completeness, or currency of information in WA Grower. Reliance on any information provided by vegetablesWA is entirely at your own risk. vegetablesWA is not responsible for, and will not be liable for, any loss, damage, claim, expense, cost (including legal costs) or other liability arising in any way, including from any vegetablesWA or other person’s negligence or otherwise from your use or non-use of WA Grower, or from reliance on information contained in the material or that vegetablesWA provide to you by any other means.

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

Vietnamese Industry Extension Officer Truyen Vo m: 0457 457 559 e: truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au Industry Extension Officer Sam Grubiša m: 0427 373 037 e: sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au Benchmark Lead Bryn Edwards m: 0417 409 821 e: bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au Quality Assurance Coordinator Joel Dinsdale m: 0417 857 675 e: joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au Finance & Administration Officer Sandie McLeod t: (08) 9486 7515 e: sandie.mcleod@vegetableswa.com.au Export Development Project Lead Manus Stockdale m: 0448 897 652 e: manus.stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au Life Members A.J. Anderson*, D.J. Arbuckle, J. Arbuckle Snr*, J.H. Arbuckle* (M.B.E.J.P), H.R. Ashby*, S. Calameri, M. Dobra, A. Harris*, A. Ingrilli, G. Kiriros*, R.G. Leach*, F. Natoli, S. Sawle*, R.M. Schultz, C.P. Stevens, W.R. Stevens* (M.B.E.J.P) and J. Turley. * Deceased

Dan Kuzmicich m: 0408 910 761

Carnarvon

Vice President Committee

Peter Dobra m: 0408 616 515 Gingin Lauren East m: 0419 047 371 Manjimup Paul Glavocich m: 0413 922 287 Gingin Peter Ivankovich m: 0428 919 211 Myalup Anthony Lieu m: 0401 558 886 Metro North Duc Nguyen t: (08) 9941 8376 Carnarvon Paul Shain m: 0419 041 045 Carnarvon

Agricultural Produce Commission APC Manager Ingrid Behr t: (08) 9368 3127 e: APCManager@dpird.wa.gov.au

Advertising For information on WA Grower advertising rates and sizing please go to: www.vegetableswa.com.au/wa-growersmagazine and click on the download media kit link.


your

industry associations

Your industry associations

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

CEO’s Report BY JOHN SHANNON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

W

e have had one of our greatest victories — to their great credit the state government has decided not to introduce water licensing fees for horticulture and agriculture. vegetablesWA lead a campaign supported by Wines of WA, WA Farmers, Pomewest, WA Citrus, and Potatoes WA. I also have to thank individual growers who took the time to attend any of the consultation meetings or sent the Department or the Minister their own feedback or by using the proforma letter that vegetablesWA had supplied. This result comes about a decade after vegetablesWA last defeated government attempts to introduce licensing fees.

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WA Grower AUTUMN 2019

Most growers will have saved tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars since then and because of our work now will save tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars into the foreseeable future.

Minister Kelly and the Department have listened to industry feedback and we look forward to continuing a really productive relationship going forward.

in association with Bryn Edwards, our Benchmarking Lead. The benchmarking project is proving to add a lot of value for participating growers who are, after all, business owners. The financial analysis separate to the benchmarking data has been revolutionary for individual businesses because it provides clear feedback as to how to improve profitability so more money stays in the pocket of the growers. If you’ve read this far then you obviously care about your business and the broader industry. If you’re interested please give Bryn a call on 0417 407 821.

The benchmarking project is proving to add a lot of value for participating growers.

Unfortunately we are about to lose the services of Claire McClelland, our Market Development Manager. As many growers know, Claire has been an asset to our industry during her time at vegetablesWA. However, I am sure that she will bring her Western Australian experiences to assist in her new role in the recently created Australian Fresh Produce Alliance. I am also pleased to say that our Export Development Lead, Manus Stockdale, will ably step into the role and also have his role expanded to business extension

MORE INFORMATION John Shannon, phone 0488 111 526 or email john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

President’s Report U

BY DAN KUZMICICH PRESIDENT, VEGETABLESWA

p here in Carnarvon the weather is beautiful this time of year, harvest season has begun for the vegetable industry. The Carnarvon Races have begun so the social scene is building in Carnarvon and we still have the Gascoyne Food Festival Long Table Lunch to come in August.

The range of events the Gascoyne Food Festival has this year is extensive and I would urge you to check them out and attend as it is great highlight of the region and produce available. Check page 32 to see the events for the festival.

I have noticed the migration of backpackers in town and they are consistently looking for work which is a good thing for the growers. The number of seedlings been planted in the region has been reduced this year, especially tomatoes and capsicum. Some growers did find it difficult last year and as a consequence planted less this season and some have left the industry. The prices so far look good and are remaining steady, so it will be interesting to see how this season goes, let’s hope there isn’t too many aphid incursions throughout the season here.

The vegetable growers south of the state are winding up their harvest season, it seems the tomato prices have been good for them towards the end of their season.

I strongly urge growers to take a look at the updates, if you have any queries with the information provided on the website contact inci@marketwest.com.au or contact vegetablesWA and express your concerns. To catch up with vegetablesWA, staff are proactive in keeping our growers updated via YouTube.com with the monthly wrap up reports if you have a chance take a look and leave a comment, more feedback from growers and industry gives the vegetablesWA staff more insight to be able to assist. If there are growers with any concerns within industry please contact the vegetablesWA office to assist you.

Take a look at our monthly wrap up reports on YouTube.com

I hope the growers have had a good season and a profitable one. Having a look at Perth Market Daily Pricing Report, I have noticed they have made updates in the report and is in a threemonth public test phase.

On a sad note, Claire McClelland is moving back to Melbourne and is leaving vegetablesWA. I’m happy for Claire as an opportunity has arisen for her to progress in this industry. I would like to thank Claire for all her hard work at vegetablesWA as Market Development Manager, she will be missed.

Just a reminder to all growers that Bryn Edwards can help growers with streamlining their business and become more efficient through Benchmarking if you are interested get in contact with Bryn (bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com) please do so, it won’t cost you anything but your time. Time to go back to work as my capsicum seedings have arrived and I need to get them in the ground, last lot of planting for the season. I would like to wish all the growers best of luck for this coming season and stay well. MORE INFORMATION Contact Dan Kuzmicich on 0408 910 761 or damir.kuzmicich@bigpond.com

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

APC Vegetable Producers Committee (APC-VPC)

Fee for Service

A

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

s you will be aware from previous communications the APC-VPC has been in the process of reviewing the vegetable Fee for Service. During February and March there were seven regional meetings held to discuss the changes and the potential outcomes with growers and retailers. The APC-VPC then had the decision to make the change approved by the APC Commissioners and the Minister for Agriculture.

The change to the fee for service is effective 1st July 2019. The change includes the rates and the categories of payment (Table 1). The APC-VPC will be able to provide deemed weight listings for anyone who wishes, please contact rebecca. blackman@vegetableswa.com.au for your copy. MORE INFORMATION Contact Rebecca Blackman at: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au or apcwa.org.au

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

New rates and the categories of payment effective 1st July 2019.


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

TABLE 1 Fee for Service categories 2019–20

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

CATEGORY A

CATEGORY B

CATEGORY D

CATEGORY F

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.005

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.0009

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.0065

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.0035

Bamboo shoots Beans — broad Beans — fava Beans — other Beans — runner Beanshoots Bok choy Capsicums Chillies Choysum Daikon — radish top Eggfruit Fennel Horseradish Luffa Pak choy Paprika Paprika — red Peas Radish — Chinese Silverbeet Snow peas Sprouts Tomatoes Wasabi Water spinach Wong bok

• Beetroot • Gourds • Melons — watermelon • Parsnips • Pumpkin —butternut • Pumpkin — Japanese • Pumpkin — Kent • Pumpkin — other • Pumpkin — Queensland Blue • Swedes • Sweet potatoes • Turnips

CATEGORY C

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Artichokes Asparagus Babyleaf — all varieties Chicory Endive Kale Kohl rabi Leafy greens Lettuce Lettuce — mixed salad Micro greens Okra Rocket Spinach — English Taro Watercress

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.0024

CATEGORY E

• Brussels sprouts • Cabbage • Cauliflower • Cauliflower — fancy • Cauliflower — Romensco • Onions • Radish • Rhubarb • Radicchio

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.004 • • • • • • • •

Choko Courgettes Cucumber Cucumber — Lebanese Marrow Melons — honeydew Melons — rockmelon Melons — other

Are you a Vegetable Levy payer? Are you practicing precision agriculture, such as: • Controlled Traffic Farming • Crop Sensing/Imagery • Soil Mapping • Variable Rate Inputs • Yield Monitoring? Are you thinking of adopting any of the above in your vegetable growing business? Are you prepared to share your ideas with the vegetable industry? A Grower Study Tour of South Australia, Victoria and Tasmania from the 4th to the 11th of September will give you the opportunity to visit case study farms and share experiences in getting the most out of PA technologies for your vegetable growing business. Flights, accommodation, coach travel and attendance at the Society for Precision Agriculture Australia (SPAA) 2019 Symposium in Launceston, Tasmania are included and covered by the tour.

• Broccoli • Broccolini • Celeriac • Celery • Chard • Garlic • Leeks • Shallots • Spring onion • Squash • Squash — spaghetti • Sweetcorn • Whitlof — Chinese cabbage • Zucchini

CATEGORY G $ RATE PER KILO: 0.0008 • Carrots

CATEGORY H $ RATE PER KILO: 0.01 • Other vegetables

Expressions of Interest Registration now open VG16009: Adoption of Precision Systems Technology in Vegetable Production Grower Study Tour of South Australia, Victoria and Tasmania 4th to 11th of September 2019 *Limited places available*

EOI deadline extended to the 28th of June 2019

For further details and to register your interest, contact Celia van Sprang or Gayathri Rajagopal, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries. Celia.vanSprang@daf.qld.gov.au or 0459 862 266 Gayathri.Rajagopal@daf.qld.gov.au

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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What is the vegetable Fee For Service and where does it go? Fee For Service: Paid at the first point of sale of fresh produce. Paid to the Agricultural Produce Commission (APC) by your market agent, retailer or you can choose to remit as the grower. The Vegetable Producers Committee [APC-VPC] works with vegetable growers to decide what needs to be achieved in the industry and then allocates the Fee for Service to fund those services.

THE APC-VPC WA IS A COMMITTEE MADE UP OF WA VEGETABLE GROWERS.

Biosecurity Fund SUPPORTS AND ADVOCATES FOR WA VEGETABLE GROWERS IN THE FIELD AND IN THE PARLIAMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE PROVIDES EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES AND BUSINESS TOOLS

SUPPORTING HEALTH AND HAPPINESS IN KIDS PROGRAMS TO SUPPORT THE VEGETABLE AND WATER INTAKE IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS

FUND SET ASIDE FOR USE IN THE CASE OF AN INCURSION AND UTILISED IF NEEDED


YOUR PRODUCTION

your

production Your production WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Phosphate reserves in vegetable farms

es rc u so re e bl a lu va e es th ee fr to ow h -

P

BY VO THE TRUYEN VIETNAMESE INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

hosphorus, presented under Phosphate compounds in fertilisers, is the energy distinguished conductor that drives photosynthesis, plant immunity and flavour. However, when apply to our crops the water soluble phosphate rapidly forms insoluble compounds which makes it unavailable to the plant.

Within six weeks of application, over 75% of this soluble phosphate is lost. In fact, the CSIRO estimate that ten billion dollars of applied phosphate now lies locked up in farming soils. A nutrition and irrigation study in tomatoes in 20161 in North Perth showed that there is massive, frozen reserve of Phosphorus in all investigated vegetable farm land (Table 1).

How does most of what growers apply become part of this massive, frozen reserve? In water soluble form minerals in compound fertilizers and other elements break up to electric charged particles such as NH4+, NO3-, K+, PO32-, PO43-, Fe2+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Al3+, Mn2+, Mg2+, SO42+, Cl, CO32- etc. All minerals can create bonds with other minerals due to their respective positive and negative 1 The survey was conducted by Neil Lantzke, an independent agronomist working for Perth Region NRM and Vo The Truyen the vegetablesWA’s Field Extension Officer.

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

33BENEFICIAL fungi like Mycorrhizal play a crucial role in root mineral uptake.

charges, i.e., the positively charged particles are attracted to the negatively charged. The strength of the bond is related to the number of positive or negative charges involved. The fertiliser mineral with the most negative charges is phosphorus. It has three charges, and this means it is strongly attracted to positive charged particles with two or more charges.

When the bond forms it becomes insoluble and no longer available to the plant. There is a pH link to this phenomenon. In soils with a pH above 6.4 (as most of the soil samples in Table 1), the most likely casualties of this pairing will be calcium and phosphorus. Hence, both calcium and phosphorus are unavailable to our crops. This is not funny because

TABLE 1 High phosphate reserves in vegetable farm, North Perth Soil samples codes pH

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

6.5

6.3

7.5

5

6.8

6.4

7.2

7.1

EC (salinity)

dS/m

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.4

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

Organic carbon

%

0.7

1

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.5

0.7

0.9

Nitrate -N

mg/kg

68

26

10

105

22

24

32

47

Phosphorus

mg/kg

75

109

88

114

50

125

86

134

Potassium

mg/kg

61

47

37

110

16

72

70

87

n Low n High


YOUR PRODUCTION

calcium and phosphorus are two of the most important minerals for the most important process of crop growth — photosynthesis. In contrast, the triple negative charged phosphate binds with minerals like iron, manganese and aluminium in more acidic soils. Also, underground water in some areas contains a large load of iron oxide. Iron often has a triple positive charge, so it is three on three, and the insoluble iron phosphate created is very difficult to break apart.

Strategy where we can reclaim some of this frozen bank account and way we can minimise this 75% loss2 Having soil testing and check for total phosphorus levels If you have a history of regular phosphate fertilising, this test will typically reveal huge reserves of phosphate in your soils. However this bank account is in locked-up and insoluble forms (Table 1). Selecting your P source and stabilising your investment The first step in improving phosphorus management is choosing the most suitable phosphate fertiliser for your situation. If you are dealing with a short cycle crop (like most of brassicas, spring onion, cucurbits) where you need an immediate phosphate hit, along with some nitrogen to kickstart root growth and vigour, then DAP/MAP has a role. Otherwise you are much better off using a slower release P source like Soft Rock, guano or reactive rock phosphate where crops occupy land all year round. These materials may take a few weeks to kick-in. Thus, the slower release phosphorus inputs should be applied six weeks before planting. An USDA study, where a water-soluble phosphate fertiliser was compared to a rock phosphate in term of P release over a 13 year period, showed that the Triple Super Phosphate released more P in the first year, but the rock phosphate released an average of 9.5 times more phosphate each and every year in the subsequent 12 years.

Stimulate the soil-life Adding organic compounds and humic acid is of integrative soil management practices to stabilise unstable P and to bring up beneficial fungi like Mycorrhizal which play crucial role in root mineral uptake. Mycorrhizal fungi are effectively a massive root extension involving a network of fungal filaments, attached to your roots. These filaments increase root surface area tenfold. This hyphal root extension offers greater access to nutrients and moisture, while constantly releasing supportive biochemicals to nurture its host. The hyphae also release mild acid exudates, which break the bond between locked up calcium and phosphorus, and then transport the escapees to the plant. The big benefit from combining humic acid with phosphate fertilisers relates to the stabilisation of unstable P by a formation of a phosphate humate. Cocktail cover cropping Applying cover crops to improve soil wealth has been practicing over the world. Literature report profound soil improvements3 by practicing cocktail cover cropping such as:

A cocktail cover crop involves the inclusion of five plant families in a seed blend, and preferably, involves several species from each family. The five families are cereals, grasses, brassicas, legumes and chenopods. It is reported that the plant roots release phenolic compounds that sparks a flurry of microbial activity. Essentially, the soil-life goes into hyperdrive and the multiple benefits of cover cropping manifest much more rapidly. One of those benefits relates to increased access to our phosphate reserves4. The legume component of the cocktail blend releases acidic exudates that can break the bond between locked up calcium and phosphate, and increase uptake of these key minerals. A second benefit is linked to the diverse stimulation of Phosphate Solubilising Bacteria (PSB), associated with the range of root exudates pouring from the five families. These bacteria will also contribute to a constant trickle feed of phosphate that will sustain your crop. MORE INFORMATION Contact Truyen Vo on 0457 457 559 or email truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au

1 Improve soil structure 2 Add cheap nitrogen

3 Recover and store left over fertiliser 4 Soil pest and disease control 5 Weed control and protect the soil

from wind and water erosion.

3 www.soilwealth.com.au/resources/fact-sheets/ soil-nutrition-and-compost/summer-covercrops. Retrieved 16 May 2019.

4 https://blog.nutri-tech.com.au/phosphatefacts-how-to-stabilise-p-and-free-your-frozenreserves-2 Retrieved 16 May 2019.

2 Phosphate Facts — How to Stabilise P and Free Your Frozen Reserves (Part 1 and 2). file:///C:/ Users/Truyen/Documents/ARTICLES%20 FOR%20VEGWA%20MAGAZINE/Truyen%20 articles/May%202019/Phosphate%20Facts%20 –%20How%20to%20Stabilise%20P%20and%20 Free%20Your%20Frozen%20Reserves%20 (Part%201).html; Retrieved 15 May 2019.

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Chemical Q&A 2 Part

An annual MRL test must be completed by a NATA accredited laboratory.

12

WA Grower WINTER 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

BY SAM GRUBIŠA 1 AND JOEL DINSDALE 2 1 INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER 2 QUALITY ASSURANCE COORDINATOR VEGETABLESWA

I

n the Autumn edition of WA Grower, we discussed how to select the appropriate chemical for use on a production crop to get adequate control while meeting the requirements of the FSANZ Code and other compliance criteria. In this edition, we will discuss how to apply the chosen chemical(s), what to look out for, what to record and validate. Unit calibration and nozzle check Prior to every chemical treatment event, it is best practice to test your application gear, to confirm that it is operationally sound. This means that you should inspect the equipment in a safe manner to ensure that there are no leaks, nozzles are functioning correctly and the desired pressure is being reached. Any required repairs should be made before you begin the chemical treatment. You must complete and document a full unit calibration at least once a year or when adjustments are made to your sprayer. For growers adopting Freshcare FSQ4, this can be captured using the F8 Calibration record template. The captured data should include ground speed and nozzle output, to certify the actual measurements are aligned to the desired quantities. Once your unit is operating precisely and the weather conditions are suitable for applying chemicals, you can safely apply your chemical(s) onto the desired target(s).

33GROWERS should record information after every purchase and application of chemicals to a crop, failure to complete these records could result in prosecution under the FSANZ legislation.

Note that if your calibration is out, you are at risk of applying too little or too much chemical to your crop. The outcome of incorrect chemical application (such as ineffective control of pest/disease or chemical burns) can have adverse effects on your business, resulting in possible financial losses.

For details on how to calibrate your application unit, please see WA Grower Vol. 53 No. 1, Autumn 2018 Calibrating your spray unit. Spray records It is critical that prior to application, you verify you’re meeting all the authorised requirements outlined in the label or permit, i.e. application rate, mixing instructions etc. Once you have completed the chemical treatment, you are required to document the information in order to verify Food Safety Compliance (i.e. Freshcare FSQ4). Chemical application records are critical and are also required by law. Growers should record information after every purchase and application of chemicals to a crop by logging the details of what was applied. Failure to complete these records could result in prosecution under the FSANZ legislation.

Using Freshcare as the example, growers need to maintain the following records: 1 F4 Chemical inventory record; 2 F4 Chemical authorisation record

(this should be on display in your chemical storage area);

3 F4 Preharvest chemical application

record; and

4 F4 Postharvest chemical application

record (this record is only required when applying a chemical after the harvest event — i.e. fruit fly treatment).

Correct chemical application is verified by undertaking an MRL analysis. Many end point customers and retailers achieve compliance through their own independent MRL testing, so growers must ensure they comply with the APVMA permit directions and record the details of each spray event. A breach in the MRL results, causes the producer to be in violation of the FSANZ Code, provoking a complete product recall. Failure to execute a recall, on a non compliant product, can result in prosecution under the code.

Residues, contaminants and MRL’s Under the Code of Practice for Freshcare FSQ4, an annual MRL test must be completed by a NATA accredited laboratory. This, in turn provides independent, third-party evidence that chemical application has not resulted in a breach of MRL’s. WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Most agricultural production systems depend on multiple chemical inputs, as well as contending with possible exposure to environmental contaminants. Current analytical technology can detect extremely low chemical concentrations, consistent with usage patterns that indicate whether or not Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) was used or, in the case of environmental contaminants, whether good mitigation of risk is in place.

• Hormonal growth promotants used as veterinary medicines or to improve growth in livestock.

Residues

• Microorganisms.

Generally described as a small amount of agricultural chemicals or by-products that remain in or on an agricultural product. In a broader, food safety sense, that residue can be defined as a contaminant. Whether residue or contaminant, both may be found in/on food either through natural circumstances or as a consequence of industrial/agricultural activities. Chemical residues • Antibiotics used to control bacterial diseases in animals • Anthelmintics used to control internal parasites in animals • Fungicides used to control fungal diseases in plants and plant products • Insecticides used to control insect pests in crops, protect stored grain and control external parasites on animals

Natural contaminants • Residues, in soil, arising from the use of pesticides and veterinary medicines • Heavy metals (e.g. mercury, cadmium, lead) • Naturally occurring chemicals such as mycotoxins (toxins produced by certain fungi) Determining which chemicals require monitoring Chemical-commodity combinations considered to have high risk profiles are included in residue monitoring programmes. • Australian Standards for residues, market access requirements of trading partners • Likelihood of residues occurring in the product (potential for misuse; persistence in the crop, animal or environment; extent of use; use pattern) • Extent and results of previous monitoring for chemical-commodity combination • Availability of suitable sampling and analytical methods

• Herbicides used to control weeds in crops

• International and domestic perceptions of the chemicalcommodity combination as a possible health hazard.

• Fumigants used to protect grain and sterilise soil, sheds and bee hives

The three standards used for residues in Australia

33RESIDUES are small amounts of agricultural chemicals or by-products that remain in or on an agricultural product.

It is important to note that if you import/export products, you must

be aware of international standards. These vary from country to country often as a result of different climates, pests and diseases. A residue or contaminant is considered ‘present’ if its concentration is greater than the Limit of Reporting (LOR) established within Australian standards. • Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) — maximum level of residue accepted to pose no risk to human health • Extraneous Residue Limits (ERLs) — residues originating from environmental sources of pesticides that are no longer registered • Maximum Levels (MLs) — an effective environmental risk management function for foods. Consistent with the protection of public health and safety which is achievable through sound production and natural resource management practices. Maximum residue limits These are important in highlighting potential problems, such as inappropriate use and can aid in improving farm practices. By ensuring MRLs are routinely performed industry, the consumer and government authorities can be assured of food safety accountability • APVMA sets MRLs for agricultural and veterinary chemicals registered for use in Australia • Set at levels that pose NO RISK to human health and are unlikely to be exceeded if used in accordance with MDS/Label directions • APVMA prepares the MRL Standard document list for all animal and plant commodities • Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ) and Australian New Zealand Food Regulation Ministerial Council (ANZFRMC) consider and endorse the MRL Standard for adoption into the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (ANZFSC). MORE INFORMATION If you have any questions, please contact Joel Dinsdale on 0417 857 675 or Sam Grubiša on 0427 373 037.

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Innovative science

is key in the fight against fruit fly

R

esearchers are investigating how to implement sex selection in fruit flies in a bid to trump up control and eradication measures for the Australian horticulture industry’s most costly pest.

In what has been referred to as ‘genetic sexing’, a team of national scientists and international collaborators are looking to identify the genetic code that enables the elimination of female fruit flies in overseas Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programs, so that these characteristics can be bred into a selection of Australia's Queensland fruit fly. Funded by Hort Innovation, the project is worth more than $4.7 million. Macquarie University is leading the project. Partners at the United States Department of Agriculture (Hawaii), Giessen University (Germany), and Insect Pest Control Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture will lead efforts to identify genes in overseas species, while partners

at CSIRO and the South Australia Research Development Institute will lead efforts to develop these traits in the Queensland fruit fly.

environmentally benign approaches to the management of Queensland fruit flies was urgently needed to protect Australia’s fruit production and trade.

Hort Innovation’s SITplus program coordinator Dan Ryan said millions of sterile flies were already being produced at the Port Augusta factory and released to support the prevention and reproduction of pest populations and outbreaks.

“Producing male-only sterile fruit flies will be far more efficient and cost-effective in the fight against this destructive pest,” he said.

“Qfly costs the Australian horticulture sector $300 million per annum in lost markets by impacting production in two ways — damaging produce in the field leading to yield loss, and by affecting the market access or acceptability of the crops in international markets,” he said.

“We are looking at innovative science to produce male only flies for release, which will in turn, greatly reduce production and release costs and provide a framework of integrated ecological and behavioural science which can maximise the impact of sterile flies when deployed in Australia.”

SIT involves the strategic release of millions of sterile fruit flies to greatly outnumber the wild male population and, as a result, limit the opportunity for wild females to mate with wild males.

“This research is important because it has been shown that SIT is more effective if only males are released.”

The outcome of this disruption to mating is the suppression of subsequent generations of wild flies.

While naturally bred male-only ‘genetic sexing’ strains are available for some overseas fruit flies, this project aims to develop the technology for the Queensland fruit fly, which is the most significant insect threat to Australia’s $12.9 billion horticultural industry.

Using SIT to combat Qfly also gives greater protection to the honeybee industry through reduced chemical impacts and increased pollination rates.

Professor Phil Taylor from Macquarie University’s ARC Centre for Fruit Fly Biosecurity Innovation said sustainable,

MORE INFORMATION www.horticulture.com.au

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DPIRD gains new researcher in water use efficiency

R

esearch officer David Rowe has recently joined the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) horticulture team where he is working to support growers to increase their water use efficiency with technologies and improved management practices.

With a background in soil science from the University of Western Australia, David brings with him experience from his work in the department’s Land and Water division. 33CATCH cups set up for a uniformity test as part of system assessment.

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Currently in focus are growers in the North Wanneroo area where the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation (DWER) has proposed a 10% reduction in groundwater allocations by 2028. DPIRD aims to support these growers adjust to the reduction by demonstrating how best practice management and technologies such as soil moisture sensors can improve water use efficiency (WUE). “Water use efficiency (WUE) is fundamentally about applying only the water required for optimal crop growth and minimising additional water application that may be unnecessary. Using water more efficiently reduces pumping and fertiliser costs, which results in greater returns for the grower, David said. “From a business perspective, WUE is about returning more profit per unit of water used. This can be achieved by increasing crop yields using the same amount of water, or using less water to grow the same amount.

“However, increasing WUE is not without risk as under-watering a crop, even slightly, can have a significant impact on yield or quality. In addition, periodically watering in excess of plant requirements is necessary to prevent the accumulation of salts in the root zone, which can lead to nutrient toxicity and reduce the plants ability to take up water.

Understanding plant water requirements is essential to optimise WUE. Plant water use is determined by crop and environmental factors that can change from one day to the next. Daily pan evaporation multiplied by the relevant Crop Factor (CF) provides a good estimate of how much irrigation should be applied to replace what was used by the crop. DPIRD’s online Irrigation Calculator expands on this calculation and can be used to estimate the total water requirements of various crops.


YOUR PRODUCTION

33AN important aspect of WUE is applying the required amount of water to the crop as evenly as possible.

Soil moisture sensors can improve water use efficiency. 33INSTALLING soil moisture monitoring gear in a celery crop.

“An important aspect of WUE is applying the required amount of water to the crop as evenly as possible. Having an irrigation system with high distribution uniformity (DU) reduces dry spots within a crop and allows the right amount of water to be applied to the whole crop in the shortest time. This results in a more even growing crop, reduced pumping and fertiliser costs, and reduced water use.”

This article forms part of a series that will cover the basic concepts of WUE. The next issue will cover the components of plant water use and how it can be influenced through management practices.

Irrigation system assessments As part of supporting growers adjust to the proposed water allocation cuts, David Rowe has been working with Irrigation Australia’s Paul Willmott to conduct irrigation system assessments for growers in the North Wanneroo area.

The assessments focus mainly on the pump and application efficiencies of the irrigation system. Assessment results are provided to growers in a report that rates aspects of their system against industry benchmarks and aims to highlight potential areas for improvement. MORE INFORMATION Assessments are free of charge and results are confidential. Growers in the North Wanneroo area interested in undertaking an assessment, please contact DPIRD’s Research Officer David Rowe at david.rowe@dpird.wa.gov.au or Director, Horticulture Science and Industry Development Rohan Prince at rohan.prince@dpird.wa.gov.au.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION INDUSTRY

VG15013 Improved management options for cucumber green mottle mosaic virus Facilitators Project VG15013 was completed by the Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Resources with support from NT Farmers and state organisations from Queensland, Victoria, Western Australia and New South Wales.

Introduction The discovery of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in cucurbit crops in northern Australia in September 2014 resulted in affected properties being quarantined in order to prevent the spread of the highly transmissible virus. Recognising the impact of the incursion on cucurbit growers, researchers in Project VG15013 investigated ways to manage the virus through on-farm biosecurity practices as well as improving the speed and accuracy of CGMMV diagnostics.

About the project Following the detection of CGMMV in cucurbit crops in 2014, it was concluded that the primary cause of the incursion was through contaminated seed. However, researchers quickly discovered that the virus was a highly stable particle which could persist in plant material, soil and water, which made it very easy for the disease to spread mechanically between crops. “In the period after the incursion, we really set out to find out as much as we could about how the virus survived, what crops it infected, and how to best manage its spread to other plants, which led to our investigation into how that might actually happen,” Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Resources Principal Plant Biosecurity Officer Dr Lucy Tran-Nguyen said. According to Dr Tran-Nguyen, one of the objectives of Project VG15013 was to identify potential hosts for the virus.

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“As well as developing a list of known CGMMV hosts, including potential weed hosts, we also sought to identify nonhost species that growers could plant in the event that the virus made growing cucurbits unviable in the area.”

Due to the highly transmissible nature of CGMMV, fast and accurate detection of the virus became an increasing concern for growers.

The first was a better understanding of the nature of the transmission of the CGMMV virus, which led to the compilation of on-farm management practices that growers can use to minimise the risk of spread of the disease between farms. The second was the validation of a new dipstick diagnostic test kit to provide a fast and accurate in-field diagnostic solution for the detection of CGMMV. This kit is commercially available.

“During the incursion, we felt that the existing field diagnostic tools were inadequate and didn’t offer sufficient accuracy for detection of the virus. It was clear that we needed to investigate alternative technology for use in the field,” Dr Tran-Nguyen said.

Another interesting finding during the research was strong evidence that honeybees had a role in moving CGMMV, leading to the development of management practices for beekeepers to minimise virus transmission to cucurbit crops.

Major findings

“Hive testing found that CGMMV was present in all hive products, including adult bees, brood, honey, pollen and wax; but only the live virus in honey, adult bees and pollen. However, questions still remain regarding how the bees move the virus around the environment,” Dr Tran-Nguyen said.

VG15013 resulted in a number of important outcomes for the management of CGMMV. 33HIVE testing found that CGMMV was present in all hive products, including adult bees, brood, honey, pollen and wax; but only the live virus in honey, adult bees and pollen.

There is strong evidence that honeybees have a role in moving CGMMV.


PHOTO © Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Resources

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“We still don’t understand whether honeybees can move the live virus from their hive to infect clean plants, which would present a significant risk if hives are moved between locations.”

Conclusion By better understanding the life cycle of CGMMV, the researchers were able to develop some on-farm biosecurity practices to better manage the disease and its impact on the industry. Dr TranNguyen said that growers have been proactive in implementing biosecurity practices on-farm, such as restricting farm visitor access, minimising entry and exit of vehicles, using footbaths and cleaning and disinfecting tools and machinery. “We’ve been very pleased to see the increase in these on-farm practices, as well as other measures such as removing potential weed hosts, and disposing of suspect plants using methods that reduce the risk of infection.

“Growers now also understand the importance of sourcing their seed from reputable sources, reducing the risk of crop contamination in the future.” Dr Tran-Nguyen has developed a series of fact sheets for growers and beekeepers outlining the outcomes of the research, including management practices that cucurbit growers can use to prevent the spread of CGMMV and strengthen on-farm biosecurity. These fact sheets are available online at dpir.nt.gov.au.

The bottom line Project VG15013 sought to understand the mechanism for the spread of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in cucurbit crops and the identification of management practices to prevent its spread. Researchers identified host plants, including weeds, which were susceptible to the virus, as well as a number of crops that were not impacted by the virus that could be grown as alternative crops. The project also identified the need for new in-field diagnostic technology to provide faster and more accurate detection of the virus. A new dipstick test kit is now commercially available. Researchers also identified the potential link between honeybees and the spread of CGMMV, however more research is required to draw conclusions regarding the mechanism for transmission between beehives and crops. A series of fact sheets have been developed outlining on-farm management practices for the prevention of the spread of CGMMV, and are available online.

PHOTOS © Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Resources

33PLANTS infected with the cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

MORE INFORMATION For more information, please contact Dr Lucy Tran-Nguyen from the Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Resources at lucy.tran-nguyen@nt.gov.au. To access the project’s fact sheets please visit dpir.nt.gov.au.

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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Extending the message on virus and bacterial diseases in vegetables Black rot survives in crop debris and in the soil for a long time.

K

ey to implementing useful and strategic management strategies to control diseases in vegetable crops is the correct identification of the problem and also avoiding new problems entering crops. As part of the Horticulture Innovation Australia funded project ‘Area Wide Management of virus and bacterial diseases’ (VG16086), the project team lead by DPIRD’s Dr Craig Webster have started grower and industry workshops in vegetable growing areas across WA. These workshops are being run in collaboration with vegetablesWA and AUSVEG with a focus on understanding and implementing biosecurity practices to manage diseases and pests.

At the workshops in Wanneroo, Myalup, Manjimup and Albany, Callum Fletcher (AUSVEG) explained about biosecurity threats to the horticultural industry and biosecurity measures that farms should be put in place to reduce their risk. He also talked about Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) and how to identify the pest.

Following this Dominie Wright (DPIRD) took participants through practical aspects of on-farm hygiene and disease identification with Craig Webster discussing the use of sticky traps to monitor aphids, thrips and TPP. Early monitoring of insect movement, forewarns growers about the possibility of virus infection in crops.

33BROCCOLI affected with black rot caused by Xanthamonas campestris.

Craig showed participant’s plant samples infected with common viruses such as cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and why it is important to identify which virus is present in crops. Other workshops are planned for Geraldton, Carnarvon and Kununurra later in the year. Surveys of vegetable crops to identify the major virus and bacterial problems affecting WA vegetable growers across south west of WA have been done on a monthly basis. Tomato spotted wilt virus was found infecting capsicum, eggplant and tomato crops in south west. This virus is spread by thrips, including the western flowers thrips, and cause losses in fruit yield and quality.

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YOUR PRODUCTION

from Raitech, Kununurra; and Rachel Lancaster from Environmental and Agricultural Testing Services, Bunbury). Craig and other team members will be visiting vegetable growers in the south-west, Geraldton, Carnarvon, and Kununurra to survey crops for virus and bacterial diseases. Each grower will receive results from testing completed on their crops, along with information on management options from any diseases found. MORE INFORMATION

33TOMATO infected with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV).

Xanthomonas campestris (Black rot) was found in broccoli. This bacterial disease affects many types of brassica crops. It survives in crop debris and in the soil for a long time. Soft rot caused by either Pectobacterium carotovorum or Pantoea agglomerans was also frequently detected in brassica crops. These bacteria also survive in crop debris and in the soil.

The bacteria enter the crops through wounds or natural openings. To reduce the risk of infection it is important to reduce the wetness and the length of time crops are wet. The WA project team includes DPIRD Plant pathologists (Craig Webster, Dominie Wright, Monica Kehoe and Brenda Coutts), and regional horticulture consultants (Annie van Blommestein from Carnarvon Growers Association (CGA); Rebecca Clarke

All samples are tested free of charge. Any grower interested in participating in the survey contact: Craig Webster: 0499 997 563 craig.webster@dpird.wa.gov.au Annie von Blommestein: annie@cga.com.au Rebecca Clarke: 0413 616 029 rebecca@raitech.com.au Rachel Lancaster: (08) 9721 7170 rachel@eatswa.com.au Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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Soil wealth and ICP

From Tasmania to the USA – tillage, erosion and weed management innovations

Photo © Theresa Chapman

33THE ripper mulcher in action in north-west Tasmania.

T

he Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection (ICP) projects work with growers nationally to put soil management and plant health research into practice.

In this edition we hear from experts in the US on strip-tillage, head to our north-west Tasmania and Cowra, NSW demonstration sites for an update, as well as provide cutting edge innovations in weed control technology. Soil Wealth ICP Phase 2 (VG16078) is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund.

Erosion control machinery — Harvest Moon, TAS case study demonstration site Vegetable cropping can leave topsoil vulnerable to significant erosion.

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The project team has developed an exciting package of resources to explore a unique machine, the ripper mulcher. Invented and built in Tasmania by Bill Cotching to control erosion on sloping ground under cultivation. The ripper mulcher is one of the soil health tools being used by Harvest Moon, an intensive vegetable production business in north-west Tasmania. You can read the fact sheet and listen to our first podcast in a series on the website to find out more.

Soil moisture the real winner in a hot, dry summer at the Cowra demonstration site, NSW The Cowra demonstration site in southern NSW is focussed on improving soil health through cover crops and improved tillage. Wildeye moisture monitors assess the volumetric water content (VWC) in the soil, which is simply the ratio of water volume to soil volume. They are relatively inexpensive and

simple to install, and readings are automatically uploaded to the internet. The sandy loam soil in Cowra can hold approximately 40mm available water in 30cm of topsoil. Wildeyes were installed in both the control area and the ryecorn cover crop areas. A 24mm storm rain event on the night of 11 January 2019 showed a big difference in infiltration rates and soil moisture retention between fallow versus ground cover. Read the full update to find out more about the soil moisture monitoring results for summer 2019 following a ryecorn cover crop being sown in winter 2018 on the project website.

Strip-tillage for vegetables and potatoes with Steve Peterson (USA) and Ben Pogiolli (webinar recording) Strip-tillage combines the best of no-till and conventional tillage in the one operation.


YOUR PRODUCTION

adjustable for a wide variety of crops, conditions, and farming methods. Ben Pogiolli is an experienced strip-till farmer from the Atherton Tablelands, QLD. Ben is passionate about tillage solutions and all the benefits of striptillage. Together, Steve and Ben combine decades of experience to discuss equipment innovations for vegetable cropping. You can watch the webinar recording on our website.

Learn from industry experts on how strip-till will save you fuel and time, increase soil organic matter, reduce erosion and compaction, and how fertilisers can be banded at multiple depths. Steve Peterson is a fourth generation farmer and manufacturer of innovative strip-till equipment in Illinois, USA. One of Steve’s fundamental goals has been to reduce the number of passes through the paddock using equipment that is

Technology for controlling weeds — Global Scan and Review The Soil Wealth and ICP project is scanning global technologies to bring you some of the most interesting and practical advances in weed management. Most new technology for controlling weeds will be a positive step forward for soil health and the environment, and will play an important role in our fight against herbicide resistant weeds.

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This global scan and review provides guidance on non-selective fallow paddock weed control, as well as selective In-crop weed control, and delivery technology. MORE INFORMATION You can access all the resources in this article, as well as news and events from around the country at soilwealth.com.au. For more information, please contact project leaders Dr Gordon Rogers on (02) 8627 1040 or gordon@ahr.com.au and Dr Anne-Maree Boland on (03) 9882 2670 or anne-mareeb@ rmcg.com.au.

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au. Project Number: VG16078

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Managing important weed species on Australian vegetable farms BY MICHAEL COLEMAN, PAUL KRISTIANSEN, CHRIS FYFE, BRIAN SINDEL UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND

T

he team completing the Hort Innovationfunded project VG15070 ‘A strategic approach to weed management for the Australian vegetable industry’ are preparing detailed management guides for ten of the most important weeds of the Australian vegetable industry.

Problematic weeds in the industry Weeds are a persistent and ongoing problem in Australian vegetable production. This is due to the favourable growing conditions found for weeds within vegetable crops (regular water and fertiliser input and soil disturbance) and the lack of registered herbicides able to selectively control broadleaf weeds in many broadleaf vegetable crops. Vegetable production tends to favour growth of heavy-seeding annual broadleaf weeds, which function in a 33WILD radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) is another common winter weed in WA vegetable production, and is shown here growing in a carrot crop near Myalup.

Weeds are a persistent and ongoing problem in Australian vegetable production.

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33CHICKWEED (Stellaria media) is commonly found in winter vegetable crops in WA, and can compete heavily with these crops, as this leafy crop near Gingin illustrates.

very similar way to the vegetable crops they infest. Often, these weeds are able to complete their life cycle and produce seeds within the growing period of the vegetable crop, and continue to reinfest future crops by replenishing the weed seed bank.

Weeds can reduce vegetable crop yield and quality, interfere with sowing and harvesting operations, and host pests and diseases. They can become very costly for farmers both in terms of final crop yield and sale value, and with regard to direct costs of weed control. Previous national industry consultation by the UNE team determined a series of ‘priority weeds’ on the basis of their impact as well as how common they are across Australia. The most commonly reported and high impact weeds of Australian vegetable production tended to be annual or biennial broadleaf weeds, with the exception of the sedge nutgrass (Cyperus rotundus).


YOUR PRODUCTION

The following guides will be available once the project is completed in late 2020:

Management guides, free to download!

• Fat hen (Chenopodium album); available now

• Chickweed (Stellaria media); coming soon

• Dwarf nettle (Urtica urens); available now

Each guide provides:

• Nutgrass (Cyperus rotundus); available now • Pigweed (Portulaca oleracea); available now • Mallow (Malva parviflora); coming soon • Amaranth (Amaranthus spp.); coming soon • Wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum); coming soon • Blackberry nightshade (Solanum nigrum); coming soon • Common sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus); coming soon

Management guides for priority weeds The UNE team are currently preparing detailed management guides for ten of these high-priority weed species. Some of these guides are freely available for download now, while others are still in preparation. Many of the weed species covered are commonly found on Western Australian vegetable farms.

• information on how to identify the weed species at different stages in its life cycle;

MORE INFORMATION Please visit the project web page (www.une.edu.au/iwmvegetables) to download the available guides. Availability of new guides will also be promoted via Facebook (www.facebook.com/ iwmvegetables).

• ecological characteristics of each weed species and implications of these for their management; • Australia-wide distribution of each weed species, and their impacts within vegetable crops; and

The UNE team welcomes feedback on these materials to ensure they are relevant to vegetable farmers. A full manual on Integrated Weed Management is also being prepared and will be published in 2020.

• management of each weed species via tillage, herbicides, various other cultural practices, and a suggested integrated approach taking the particular characteristics of the weed into account.

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INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT

“Cover cropping: implications for weed management� Save th

eD

Western Australian vegetable industry field day - 2019

ate Find ou t how c over cro may be ps us your In ed as par t of tegrate d Weed Manag ement strateg y All Wel

come!

Thursday 20th June, 10.00am Ivankovich Farms, 6684 Forrest Highway, Myalup (Opposite Crooked Carrot Cafe) The University of New England and vegetablesWA are hosting a field day at the Hort Innovation project VG15070 cover crop trial site, Ivankovich Farms.

Presentations will include

Learn more about this two season winter cover crop trial.

Principles and relevant weed tactics: Integrated Weed Management in vegetables (UNE)

Six cover crop treatments have been tested for their ability to suppress weed germination, growth and seeding. Discover key results from this trial, and implications for your farm. Learn about other current Australian trials of cover cropping benefits for vegetable production. Morning tea and lunch provided.

To register, visit vegetableswa.com.au/event-calendar/

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Key objectives and outcomes of project VG15070 (UNE)

Cover crop implications for weed management: WA and national trial results (UNE) Cover crop agronomy for soil health (with Marc Hinderager, VG16078) Local cover crop trial activity (David Grays Perth) Field walks and discussion, Ivankovich Farms cover crop trial site (all presenters)


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TOOL

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your

production WA Grower WINTER 2019

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World’s first commercial robotic apple harvest

T&G’s Hawkes Bay orchards with Abundant Robotics BY BELINDA ABERNETHY CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER, T&G GLOBAL

I

n a world-first, T&G Global is using a robotic harvester for a commercial apple harvest, reflecting the company’s commitment to innovation-led growth. It is the culmination of four years of working with US-based technology partner Abundant Robotics, which T&G’s parent company BayWa AG invested in two years ago as part of its strategy to expand digitisation across its agribusiness.

T&G Global Chief Operating Officer Peter Landon-Lane says the company is delighted to have reached this significant milestone in the evolution of the global apple industry and for T&G’s home operations in New Zealand to be at the forefront. “Automation enables us to continue to scale to meet increasing global demand for food, in the face of current and future labour market challenges. We’ve been actively driving towards this for the past few years, including preparing our orchards to be robot-ready. “This is in addition to the investment our parent company BayWa AG has made in Abundant Robotics, reflecting confidence in the technology, which has been developed with the apple industry from the outset,” says Mr Landon-Lane. High density planting and specific pruning methods have been

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33THE Abundant Robotics technology is being used to pick a range of apple varieties which are destined for supermarket shelves in New Zealand and overseas.

implemented at T&G’s Hawkes Bay orchards to make them suitable for Abundant Robotics’ technology. Canopy innovation and trialling of different ways of achieving automation compatibility has been a feature of orchard expansion initiatives since 2017.

“Developing an automated apple harvester requires solving a number of complex technical problems in parallel, from visually identifying harvestable fruit and physically manipulating it to pick without bruising, to safely navigating the orchard itself.

Abundant Robotics CEO Dan Steere says the company evolved from its research-based origins after delivering a proof of concept prototype in 2015 and approached the commercialisation of the technology as a global opportunity from the start.

“Our relationship with growers and access to real-world conditions on partner orchards through the development and testing process has been key to getting the technology to the point where it is now commercially viable,” says Mr Steere.

Abundant Robotics is an exciting step forward for the apple industry.

“With T&G Global we are able to run a year-round development programme leveraging work with US apple growers and New Zealand orchards during the complementary northern and southern hemisphere harvesting seasons.

The Abundant Robotics technology is being used to pick a range of apple varieties including T&G’s proprietary JAZZ™ and Envy™, which are destined for supermarket shelves in New Zealand and overseas.


TOOL TIME

Mr Landon-Lane says it will be some years before all T&G orchards are harvested in this way, but this first harvest with Abundant Robotics is an exciting step forward. “Apple-picking is tough physical work and it’s seasonal. Robotic technology complements the work our people do with its ability to pick a large proportion of the fruit, much of it at the upper levels of the trees, reducing the physical demands of the work for our people as well as boosting productivity. “This will enable us to continue the exciting growth that is being achieved in the apple industry, without being constrained by the current shortages of labour,” says Mr Landon-Lane. MORE INFORMATION Belinda Abernethy, T&G Corporate Communications Manager, phone: (02) 7564 7436

About T&G Global Established 121 years ago, T&G Global is one of New Zealand’s largest growing, packing, shipping and marketing companies with a global footprint. Our success comes from consistent and sustainable growing practices, committed growers, valued customers and a passionate team of people around the world. Our apples, including the premium, kiwi-bred varieties Jazz™ and Envy™, are grown in 14 countries and sold in more than 60 countries year round. We’re passionate about growing healthier futures through fresh fruit and vegetables.

About Abundant Robotics Abundant Robotics’ mission is to automate orchard agriculture, starting with apple harvesting. Tree fruit growers operate a $200+ billion dollar per year industry, which has not benefited from automation as extensively as other sectors of agriculture, and is grappling with urgent problems including rising standards for high-quality produce and scarcity of agricultural labour. Abundant Robotics is headquartered in Hayward, CA and is backed by leading venture capital and agricultural industry investors.

Robotic technology reduces the physical demands of apple harvesting and boosts productivity.

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Haifa online services and mobile apps BY SAM GRUBIŠA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

W

hile I do not promote any one company or service over another, sometimes ‘tools’ come across my desk that are too good to keep to myself. Haifa’s — My Tools is one of these. With a focus on optimal fertiliser application, an article on NutriNet was what drew me onto the Haifa website. An exclusively web operated fertigation and irrigation programming tool, its aim is to aid in correct crop nutrition, growth and irrigation. The main features are: • Crop nutritional requirements — The database includes nutritional data for 80 common crops • Expected yield — To help predict future input usage and profits • Growth conditions — The software considers growth in open field, tunnels and greenhouses • Soil data — Entering more precise soil details generates a more finely tuned program output • Climate conditions — Uses a large variety of worldwide meteorological stations to provide a wealth of climactic data • Irrigation schedule — Offers irrigation programs based on crop water requirements, soil type, climactic conditions and type of irrigation equipment.

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33DEFICIENCY Pro assists in identification of possible nutritional deficiencies in your crop

The added bonus is it is free! Also, being able to store your fertigation programs from different growth stages, in one place, will aid in yearly budgeting. It similarly allows you and your Agronomist to review the previous years inputs, to assess seasonal needs and integrate them with real time, on farm soil/water analysis. In addition to the NutriNet program the website also offers: • Deficiency Pro — An image library to assist in identification of possible nutritional deficiencies in your crop • FoliMatch — A foliar feeding mobile app to aid in correct calculations of recommended crop specific foliar sprays • FertiMatch — A mobile app that helps determine fertigation composition using input data like equipment control head, choice of

33FERTIMATCH™: Your assistant in fertigation calculations.

reference elements and fertilisers in use. This is just one of many online tools available to bolster your neverending quest for optimal nutrition, yield and input budgeting. It is worth searching around on the net, just to inform yourself of what is out there in the world of online/app assistance. I would suggest speaking with your Agronomist or a trusted plant nutrition specialist before implementing any new programs. Computer software is intelligent, adaptable and makes life easy, however it is no substitute for dirty hands and the human eye. MORE INFORMATION www.haifa-group.com


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your

industry Your industry WA Grower WINTER 2019

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The Gascoyne WA’s Hottest Foodie Destination Gourmet travellers being lured north by Food Festival and Fruit Loop Drive Trail

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n Sunday May 26 the Gascoyne Food Council and Carnarvon Visitor Centre launched the Gascoyne Food Festival, Fruit Loop Drive Trail and Carnarvon and Coral Bay Destination Guide to an audience of around 80 industry and media invitees at The Sunshine Harvester Works in Fremantle. The initiatives targeted at encouraging the state’s 400,000 annual gourmet travellers to hit the road and sample some delicious northern delights. 32

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Championing top quality produce from the region, the event showcased the Gascoyne’s fresh produce, rangelands goat and Shark Bay seafood with special creations such as Homestead Hampers famous goat pies and Brendan Pang’s dumplings. There was also a selection of handmade condiments and dried fruits from Carnarvon’s many farm shops available for sampling.

MC for the evening, RedFM’s Alana McLean announced that the Gascoyne Food Festival will host its largest lineup yet of events across the region throughout August and September. Locations including Dirk Hartog Island, Exmouth, Mount Augustus and Carnarvon, with new events lined up to give a real taste of the outback at Wooramel River Retreat and Quobba Station.

“The launch was a great opportunity for us to show people in Perth what they can enjoy from the Gascoyne region. Whether it’s supporting local restaurants as part of Buy West Eat Best’s Plating Up WA program, sampling products along our amazing Fruit Loop Drive Trail, or attending an event during the Gascoyne Food Festival. There is something for everyone to enjoy in our sunny town,” says Stephanie Leca, Carnarvon’s Visitor Centre Coordinator.

Spokesperson for the Gascoyne Food Council, Doriana Mangili said that tickets are expected to sell fast for festival events.

Gascoyne Food Festival, Fruit Loop Drive Trail and Carnarvon and Coral Bay Destination Guide launch.

“This year even more visitors will have the opportunity to sample our beautiful produce, incredible seafood and beef, lamb and goat as well as explore unique tourist attractions. With landscapes as diverse as the oasis of plantations


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33CHEF Stuart Laws and Nic Wood.

Festival chefs

1. Stuart Laws (Showcase Events WA) 2. Melissa Palinkas (Young George) 3. Chase Weber (The Standard)

in Carnarvon, the mighty Gascoyne River, the Ningaloo reef, working Pastoral Stations, the incredible Mount Augustus (the biggest Rock in the world), country race meetings and Western Australia’s most remote surf beach, the Gascoyne is the perfect destination,” she said. Chef Stuart Laws and partner Phoebe Pun will once again be integral to the festivals’ success through their business, Showcase Events WA.

“We are very proud to be coming back to the region for the third year in a row to continue to develop the festival program and offer something exciting to visitors,” Stuart said.

4. Leigh Nash (Vans, Cottesloe) 5. Nic Wood (Santini Bar & Grill) “This year we are focusing on bringing great chefs to learn about the region and create amazing dishes that completely honour the quality ingredients that the Gascoyne offers. The event is as much about education as it is about having fun in the sun,” said Stuart.

6. Gord Kahle (Cook and Mason) 7. George Cooper (Tiller Dining) 8. Russell Blaikie (must Winebar) 9. Marie Fisher (Froth Craft Brewery) 10. Tyler Little (Froth Craft Brewery)

MORE INFORMATION Tickets and event information: www.gascoynefood.com.au/gascoynefood-events/gff2019 Launch sponsors: The Sunshine Harvester Works, Buy West Eat Best, Fins Seafood, Sweeter Banana and Homestead Hampers.

The Sunshine Harvester Works The Sunshine Harvester Works is a food and retail incubator on the corner of James and Beach St in Fremantle. Sunshine is focussed on providing a platform for small businesses to grow and ultimately succeed in a very tough industry. In collaboration with the Mantle, Sunshine will look to be an everyday destination for families, food enthusiasts and locals who can experience the labour of peoples passions.

Fresh from Carnarvon

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M Research initiative ramps up investments to secure

ore than $27 million has been invested into research, development and extension projects through the Plant Biosecurity Research Initiative and partners since its inception just 18 months ago.

The initiative was developed to encourage collaboration and investment in plant biosecurity research, with a focus on managing threats to Australia’s plant industries and their environment.

y t i r u c e s plant bio Disease and weed threats to plant production systems could have a catastrophic effect on Australian farm businesses.

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The national value of plant industries at risk is valued at almost $30 billion per annum across the horticulture, wine, broadacre and forestry industries. The PBRI program director Dr Jo Luck said pest, disease and weed threats to Australia’s plant production systems could have a catastrophic effect on Australian farm businesses, employees and the surrounding regional communities. “Established to support cross-sectoral RD&E, the PBRI has formed new collaborations across seven plant industry research and development corporations (RDCs), Plant Health Australia (PHA) and the Department for Agriculture and Water Resources,” she said.


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“We have seven major projects underway delivered through co-investment from state-based primary industry agencies, CSIRO and Australian universities. A further five projects valued at over $21 million is currently under consideration.”

Dr Luck said this is an enormous feat in such a short period of time — a clear demonstration of the commitment of the RDCs, and the value that the PBRI was bringing to industry. The current projects include: • A leadership project assessing strategic ways to coordinate RD&E across sectors to leverage investments, promote collaboration and avoid research duplication • A national cross-industry surveillance project to monitor and report on the presence of airborne pests and diseases affecting horticulture, grains, cotton, sugar, wine and forest plantations • Two new projects to protect horticulture and wine industries from Xylella, an exotic bacterium that threatens more than 350 commercial, ornamental and native plant species in Australia. They are the appointment of a Xylella coordinator and a state-of-the-art diagnostic project to have ready the most accurate and sensitive method of detecting this disease • An investment into improving plant industries’ access to new genetics through faster and more accurate

▶ $27 million has been invested into plant research, development and extension projects.

biosecurity screening using Next Generation Sequencing • A review of the biosecurity plan and manual for the viticulture industry including wine and table grapes • An R&D symposium showcasing current plant biosecurity research supported by the PBRI member organisations. A further $21.7 million of RD&E is being considered in the following areas: • Two novel detection methods for brown marmorated stink bug, which is not established in Australia, but poses a high biosecurity risk due to their tendency to hitchhike in sea cargo • Understanding the potential of native insects to transmit Xylella if it was introduced into Australia

• Business continuity for farmers affected by emergency plant pest incursions. PHA Executive Director and CEO, Greg Fraser, said the level of commitment into current and future investment for the PBRI was representative of the importance that industry placed on the initiative. “It is clear that PBRI is here for the long run, investing in strategic and long-term RD&E projects that will help to protect Australia’s valuable plant industries into the future,” he said. MORE INFORMATION A two-day Plant Biosecurity Research Symposium on 15-16 August 2019 will showcase research supported by the PBRI member organisations and delivered by research teams in Australia and New Zealand.

• Boosting national diagnostic capacity for plant production industries

ORGANIC

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HortConnectWA – why should you get involved

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BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

ogether, we will future-proof the Horticultural Industry of Western Australia. So, you may ask ... what is HortConnectWA? HortConnectWA is an initiative of vegetablesWA in collaboration with WA Potatoes, WA Citrus, Pomewest and WA Stonefruit, the peak industry bodies of Western Australian horticulture. HortConnectWA collaborates, shares information, offers professional development and support across the WA produce industry.

And what do we actually do? HortConnectWA aims to bring together like-minded young horticulture professionals to engage in social and professional networking. It’s about connecting young Growers and Industry stakeholders to help them share knowledge and innovative ideas, create valuable professional networks and empower them to ‘own’ the sector, which has traditionally been dominated by an older demographic.

Our Industry Ambassadors We would like to welcome our Industry Ambassadors, Sam Grubiša and Joel Dinsdale.

33INDUSTRY Ambassadors Sam Grubiša and Joel Dinsdale.

Sam Grubiša Sam is a third generation vegetable grower in Carabooda and worked full time with her Dad and Uncle on the property. They grow rhubarb on 30 acres and on the remaining 20 acres they grow spring onions, silverbeet and capsicums. The Grubiša family are the largest rhubarb grower in the state with product grown all year around. Sam had the Farm Operations Manager role until two years ago when she started working for the industry within vegetablesWA as the Industry Extension Officer. Sam is passionate about ensuring the industry continues and is a valuable ambassador as she has first hand experience of working within a family farm.

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• July 18th — Gingin Beer and BBQ open to all members and non members • August 16th — Perth HortConnectWA 1st Birthday • August 29th — Donnybrook Beer and BBQ open to all members and non members • September 5th — Harvey Beer and BBQ open to all members and non members • October 18th — HortConnectWA Brunch, Crown Towers.

Joel Dinsdale Joel has had a range of roles in the agriculture sector since graduating from Curtin University with a BSc (Applied Science) Viticulture and Oenology. Joel worked in viticulture throughout various wineries in Australia and has first hand experience working on farm. He has supported growers in the Quality Assurance domain since 2013 while working for the Potato Marketing Corporation of Western Australia. Joel is well known in the industry throughout horticulture and we look forward to being able to hardness his passion and extend the industry going forward. HortConnectWA has a number of events coming up from June to October so make sure you mark the dates in your calendar now!

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Events

Membership Membership is now open for 2019, if you are a new member you can get June for FREE, membership is $65 (inc GST) and provides access to the events along with industry experts. MORE INFORMATION For further information on HortConnectWA head to the website www.hortconnectwa.net or contact Sam Grubisa on 0427 373 037 or Joel Dinsdale on 0417 857 675 or email office@hortconnectwa.com. HortConnectWA HortConnectWA


Membership information and benefits What is HortConnectWA? HortConnectWA aims to bring like-minded young horticulture professionals together to engage in social and professional networking. An initiative of vegetablesWA, WA Potatoes, WA Citrus, StonefruitWA and Pomewest the HortConnectWA group will collaborate, share information and offer professional development across the West Australian horticulture industry.

Partnership with WA Farmers and AgConnectWA HortConnectWA’s purpose is to connect young horticulture professionals in Western Australia. To maximise the benefits of this network, HortConnectWA is aligned with WA Farmers AgConnectWA initiative. This will provide members of HortConnectWA access to some social events hosted by AgConnectWA to enhance cross industry collaboration.

Events & Activities • • • • •

Regional Workshops and Sundowners Annual Industry Summit Conferences Annual End of Year celebration AgConnectWA events including Heart of WA and annual Cocktail Party

HortConnectWA Membership information and benefits

Membership model and benefits Direct membership fee of $65/year One year membership July 2019 to June 2020 Membership benefits include: WA Grower magazine subscription (annual) Reduced rates for social and industry events Access to regional workshops (free with registration) Annual Christmas Party

Interested and want to know more? You can check us out on Facebook or Twitter but for a more personal touch, you can get in touch with the team at vegetablesWA on (08) 9486 7515 or email office@hortconnectwa.com

HortConnectWA 702–704 Murray St, West Perth, WA, 6005 P: +61 8 9486 7515 E: office@hortconnectwa.com HortConnectWA HortConnectWA


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Digital transformation of the Carnarvon horticultural industry

H

itachi Australia were recently engaged to develop an analytics platform that to provide an area wide surveillance system that monitors the presence of pests and diseases for the Carnarvon horticultural area of Western Australia. This project was developed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) to act as an early warning system so as to provide growers in the industry with an understanding of pests and disease levels so that appropriate management actions can be taken. The work will be carried out in conjunction with the local agricultural consultancy, Field Capacity, who will be responsible for implementing the monitoring program.

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It is anticipated that this project will form one component of an analytics platform that will be the starting point for the digital transformation of the Carnarvon Horticultural Industry, based on the principles of Hitachi Process Intelligence that will be developed for the industry which will include, but not be limited to: • Establishment of a region wide IoT sensor-based data collection network; • Integration of web based data sources and available APIs into a single platform;

This broader project will involve participation from the following organisations: • Carnarvon Growers Association • Sweeter Banana Co-operative • Gascoyne Food Council • Department of Water and Environmental Regulation • Gascoyne Food Council • Carnarvon TAFE. • AUSVEG.

• Irrigation scheduling system;

MORE INFORMATION

• Supply chain analytics;

Derrick Thompson (Senior Manager, Key Accounts & Business Development), Hitachi Australia Pty Ltd. Phone 0428 507 164 or go to www.hitachi.com.au

• Product traceability and quality assurance processes; and • Market analysis. The initial phases of this project are being carried out at DPIRD’s Gascoyne Research Station and will then be expanded to growers’ properties.


YOUR INDUSTRY

Horticulture biosecurity focus at inaugural meeting

K

ey stakeholders from across Western Australia’s fruit and vegetable industries have come together with government to consolidate biosecurity efforts to protect the State’s highly valued sector.

The newly formed Horticulture Biosecurity Advisory Committee met for the first time in April to examine horticulture biosecurity risks and opportunities. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) Biosecurity Executive Director Katherine Clift said horticulture production in Western Australia was valued at $909 million in 2015–16, with an export value of $119 million.

“The sector is experiencing strong growth driven by demand for healthy, safe and clean produce,” Dr Clift said. “Producers need to demonstrate high standards of biosecurity to secure domestic and international markets, with traceability and certification for food products becoming commonplace. “Improving capability and capacity to respond to biosecurity incursions is also critical for industry market access, profitability and sustainability.

33PARTICIPANTS of a recent horticulture biosecurity meeting.

“The Horticulture Biosecurity Advisory Committee has been established to provide a forum for communication and provision of advice on biosecurity and related matters, and to facilitate the building of strong relationships between horticulture biosecurity stakeholders.” Membership includes the department, Agricultural Produce Commission, vegetablesWA, WA Citrus, Pomewest, Avocado Producers’ Committee, Carnarvon Banana Producers’ Committee, Potato Growers’ Association, WA Seed Potato Growers’ Association, WA Stonefruit, Table Grapes Producers’ Committee, Wines of WA, Strawberry Growers’ Association of WA and Nursery and Garden Industry, WA. DPIRD Chief Plant Biosecurity Officer and committee chair Sonya Broughton said key topics of the meeting included risks and opportunities around biosecurity in Western Australia,

updates from the WA Biosecurity Council and the department’s Boosting Biosecurity Defences Project, along with discussion on national fruit fly programs and horticulture industry liaison officers. “The aim of the committee is to increase understanding of biosecurity and related issues facing the State’s horticulture industries, as well as stakeholders’ capability and capacity to respond to future challenges; provide advice on biosecurity priorities for Western Australia’s horticulture industries; and advise on and support stakeholder communication and engagement strategies,” Dr Broughton said. MORE INFORMATION Contact Jodie Thomson, media liaison on (08) 9368 3937. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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VegNET IEO Update

BY SAM GRUBIŠA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

W

inter is coming! No, that is not a reference to a popular, medieval, fantasy drama series. However, as the temperature drops, like the Lords of the North we enter a new season of caution and surveillance. As the warmth of summer abandons us, the icy mornings and drizzly days bring a different set of troubles to our farm gates. Frost, hail and water logging along with ‘super fun’ bacterial and fungal diseases, become a potential threat. Ensure a solid spray regime is in place and that you are rotating through different active ingredients, to

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minimize chemical resistance. Also, be careful with your own personal safety. While muddy boots, wet tractor steps and slippery concrete are a ‘fact of farm life’, they can also be the cause of nasty injuries… a concussion or broken arm isn’t going to help your bottom line! While the weather cools, things in the vegetablesWA office have started to heat up. A Food Safety workshop, MC’d by our own Joel Dinsdale, with Dr SP Singh as the star attraction was both engaging and informative. The research into ensuring our produce is as ‘clean and green’ as our reputation suggests is rather impressive. Organised by vegetablesWA, the event was open to all industry stakeholders in Horticulture. We had in attendance: growers, industry body representatives, Government department representatives, industry service providers and market agents, which shows how important the issue of food safety is to the whole supply chain. There has been a slight focus on the southern regions of late with Karnup, Myalup, Donnybrook and Manjimup getting multiple visits from myself

33SP Singh talking at the Food Safety workshop in Canning Vale.

and various members of the VegWA Team. Two of the stand outs were the four man (okay — three men and one woman) dash down to Manjimup covering all areas of extension. Export, benchmarking and QA, while far less glamourous than farm work, have been kicking goals on many fronts.

The other ‘bang for your buck’ extension run were the biosecurity/area wide management workshops held in Wanneroo, Myalup and Manjimup. We were happy to host AUSVEG Biosecurity Coordinator Callum Fletcher, who is the man in the know when it comes to state and national biosecurity incursions and plans. Adding to the info blitz were Craig Webster, Dominie Wright and Monica Kehoe from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) Area Wide Management (AWM) Project. With bugs in bottles as one of many pest inspired props, the DPIRD crew


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nailed ‘interactive extension’! With the threat of another incursion always in the back of a growers mind and the challenges of plant diseases we all face, the Area Wide Management Project offers a small glimmer of light with free produce testing. A few growers have taken advantage of this testing as a result of the information gained in the workshops. If you would like further information, please contact either myself or Truyen Vo. Another win for the West is the upcoming UNE — Weeds in Veg, Cover Crop Field Day. With information collected from many of our growing regions and the trial site in Myalup, UNE and their associated project/ industry stakeholders are offering a very interesting snapshot into the WA ‘weed scene’. With the release of fact sheets covering some of the country’s most prolific horticultural plant-based pests, continued research into seeding and germination suppression of weeds and now a field day; WA is getting some valuable additions to its weed management information arsenal.

If you are interested in attending the field day on 20th June at Ivankovich Farms in Myalup, check out the vegetablesWA Facebook page, website or shoot me an email.

HortConnectWA… have you heard about it? Do you want to get involved and learn more? Then come along and ask a question, while having a beer at one of our next events!

I don’t miss waiting for my gumboots to warm up in front of the heater or the ‘Rudolph Red’ nose of pre-dawn on the farm, however packing for a grower visit to the very southern and very cold Albany is proving to be a challenge. Farm Sam could chuck on her thickest, daggiest trackies, layer up under her favourite plush flanno and pull on her woolliest ‘old faithful’ beanie to cover her rain hating, crazy, ethnic hair; Extension Sam isn’t as lucky or feral! If you could try not to laugh too hard at my chattering teeth, excessive use of scarves, the way I lovingly cradle a cup of hot coffee or my ‘softness’ in general… that’d be great!

HortConnectWA… have you heard about it?

With Ambassadors from across Horticulture, we are hoping to serve up inter-industry collaborations and networking with a side of socialising and support. While farewelling our founding Industry Ambassador, Claire McClelland leaves us with heavy hearts; the two-man crew of myself and Joel Dinsdale are keen to ‘connect with Hort’! For further information and to find out who your Industry Ambassador is see page 36.

MORE INFORMATION Contact Sam on 0427 373 037 or email sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au.

edp australia pty ltd modernizes its manufacturing here in Australia a local supplier for 70 years to the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry. www.edp.com.au

edp has incorporated major new developments in digital innovation on our factory floor. With recent upgrades including: • New 135 tonne x 4 metre brake press. • New 4 metre x 10 mm guillotine. • New GT 2600M CNC turning centre, with heavy duty auto 12 station tool turrets. • New DNM 5700 CNC 4 axis Vertical Machining Centre. • New airconditioned CNC Machining Room. (Depicted) • 95kw Roof top solar array

These and many other additions all contribute to keeping edp competitive in the world market of Australian Manufacturing.

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Best& brightest

in Australian horticulture to be celebrated at Hort Connections 2019

A

n extensive list of nominees has been announced for the National Awards for Excellence — the Australian horticulture industry’s most prestigious recognition — with 70 growers, marketers, businesses, researchers and industry representatives nominated in 10 award categories, including the highly-coveted Grower of the Year and Marketer of the Year awards. The Awards will be announced on Wednesday 26 June at the National Awards for Excellence Gala Dinner, the capstone event for Hort Connections 2019. The Awards highlight the accomplishments of the industry’s leaders and are an opportunity for the wider industry to celebrate the best and brightest in their field. They cover a range of areas in horticulture, including recognising outstanding growers and marketers in multiple

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categories, as well as researchers, innovative agribusinesses and the industry’s leading exporters. The Gala Dinner is expected to attract over 1,300 horticulture industry members. “All nominees for the different award categories have demonstrated their commitment to the Australian horticulture industry and have made a valuable contribution to its ongoing growth and success,” said Hort Connections spokesperson Nathan McIntyre.

of their hard work and dedication to the industry.” A joint initiative between AUSVEG and the Produce Marketing Association Australia-New Zealand (PMA A-NZ), Hort Connections 2019 is the premiere event for the horticulture industry, encompassing the vegetable, fruit, cut floral and nursery sectors.

Registrations are still open! hortconnections.com.au

“They are all deserving nominees who have been recognised by their peers and colleagues for their achievements. Given the high calibre of each nominee, it will certainly be tough to pick a winner in each category. “To be nominated for an award at Hort Connections is a great honour, and I would like to congratulate each nominee and wish them the best of luck. I would also like to thank those who nominated their peers and colleagues for an award in recognition

The conference, which will be held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre from 24–26 June, caters to all members of the horticulture industry, from primary producers to retailers and the entire supply chain. It is an opportunity for growers and industry members to come together in one central location to build their knowledge and networks, and find new ways to improve the productivity and profitability of their farms and secure the future of the industry. MORE INFORMATION Registrations are still open and those who are interested in attending any of the three days can also register in person at the event. For more information or to register, please visit hortconnections.com.au.


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Nominees for the 2019 National Awards for Excellence Grower of the Year

• Christopher Maisel (QLD)

• Josh Langmaid (TAS)

Proudly sponsored by Syngenta

• Daniel Hoffmann (SA)

• Mark and Darren Schreurs (VIC)

• Anthony De Ieso (SA)

• Daniel Jackson (QLD)

• Symons Clark Logistics (SA)

• Catherine Velisha (VIC)

• John Hearman (WA)

• Tim Walker (TAS)

• David Wallace (VIC)

• Josh Langmaid (TAS)

• Deon Gibson (Tas)

• Luke DePaoli (QLD)

• Ian MacLaughlin (QLD)

• Michael Evans (VIC)

• Jason Shields (VIC)

• Stephanie Corrigan (VIC)

• Jeremy Haw (VIC)

• Stephanie Tabone (QLD)

• Marco Mason (VIC) • Mark Pye (SA)

Produce Plus Marketer of the Year Proudly sponsored by Produce Plus & PMA • Olivia Grey from Hort Innovation for the ‘Hailstorm Heroes’ campaign • Zespri’s Australian Sales & Marketing Team for the ‘Zespri SunGold Kiwifruit’ campaign • Sona Padman from Freshmax Australia for the ‘Modi Apples’ campaign

Researcher of the Year Award Proudly sponsored by Bayer • Anne-Maree Boland (VIC) • Barbara Hall (SA) • Cherie Gambley (QLD) • Chris Monsour (QLD) • Jenny Ekman (NSW) • Joanna Howe (SA) • Nigel Swarts (TAS)

Innovation Partner Award • Felicity Turner (VIC) • Katy Landt (SA) • Mark Pye (SA)

Women in Horticulture Award Proudly sponsored by Boomaroo Nurseries • Bec Whittaker (WA) • Bianca Marrone (SA) • Carmel Ingram (VIC) • Catherine Velisha (VIC) • Cecilia Diaz-Petersen (QLD) • Claire McClelland (WA)

Environmental Award

• Deborah, Monica, Jennifer and Christine Camilleri (NSW)

Proudly sponsored by Butler Market Gardens

• Neena Mitter (QLD)

• Karen George (QLD)

• Foodbank Australia (NSW)

• Sharon Coutts (VIC)

• Michael Evans (VIC)

• Stephanie Corrigan (VIC)

• Wayne Ingram (VIC)

• Stephanie Tabone (QLD)

Industry Impact Award

Community Stewardship Award

Young Grower of the Year

Proudly sponsored by Visy

Proudly sponsored by E.E. Muir & Sons

Proudly sponsored by Corteva Agriscience

• A&D Australasia (SA)

• Foodbank Australia (NSW)

• Cecilia Flores Paez from T&G Global for the ‘Orchard Rd Brand Launch’ campaign • The Costa Avocado Team for the ‘Lovacado Launch’ campaign

• Alistair Gracie (TAS)

• Karen George (QLD)

• Anthony De Ieso (SA)

• Anne-Maree Boland (VIC)

• Karl Riedel (VIC)

• Carl Young (VIC)

• Felicity Turner (VIC)

• Ned Tesic (NSW)

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Eyes turned skyward:

CASA’s new drone registration requirements

F

BY ANDREW GILL PARTNER, MINISTERELLISON

rom July 2019, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) will require mandatory registration for all commercial drones regardless of weight and recreational drones weighing more than 250 grams.

Key changes include: 1 Registration will be on an annual basis and cost approximately $20 for recreational drones and between $100 to $160 for each commercial drone. 2 All drone operators without a current remote pilot licence must pass an online accreditation course. 3 All drones must be registered by 1 November 2019.

Farmers operating drones on their property will now need to register and be accredited before 1 November 2019.

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These changes will be in addition to the current drone regulations which require any ‘commercial’ drone operator to be licensed and certified by CASA. A drone is deemed ‘commercial’ if any form of remuneration (for hire or reward) is provided in exchange for flying the drone. Farmers operating drones (under 25kg) on their property have been previously exempt from CASA’s licencing requirements, but will now need to register and be accredited before 1 November 2019. CASA’s new requirements seeks to address the ongoing drone disruptions in regulated airspaces such as airports and military bases.

Flyer data would assist Australian authorities to more effectively track drone usage in Australia and identify unauthorised drone operations.

The use of commercial drones is on the rise in Australia, notably with Google’s first food delivery service launching in Canberra. While the current implications for the agriculture industry is limited to registrations and accreditation, the future of drone airspace regulation is likely to increase in the coming years. MORE INFORMATION Go to https://farmers.org.au/blog/ eyes-turned-skyward-casas-new-droneregistration-requirements/


WA POTATOES

potato

update WA Grower WINTER 2019

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WA POTATOES

contacts Potato Growers Association Vaughan Carter President

Busselton

m: 0417 092 505

Daniel Omodei Vice President

Pemberton

m: 0427 761 121

Mia Rose Treasurer

Myalup

m: 0409 112 245

Colin Ayres

Albany

m: 0428 451 014

Garry Bendotti

Pemberton

m: 0427 569 903

Roy Humfrey

Gingin/Dandaragan m: 0427 148 832

Committee

Christian de Haan Manjimup

m: 0429 436 361

Potato Producers Committee Glen Ryan Chairperson

Terms 2016–19 m: 0428 827 126 e: glenjr@bigpond.com

Dominic Della Vedova 2016–19 Sam Calameri

2016–19

Terry Ackley

2016–19

Mathew Cocciolone

2017–20

Mia Rose

2017–20

Processing potatoes — local and export

$6.00/t

Seed potatoes — local and export

$150/ha

Ware (fresh) potatoes — local

$8.00/t

Ware (fresh) potatoes — export

$6.00/t

Projects approved 2018–19

46

Part funding for PGA

$285,500

Delivery of Registered Seed Potato Certification Schemes & Virus Testing

$96,000

WA Grower WINTER 2019

BY VAUGHAN CARTER PRESIDENT, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

ell the election is over and the result was not how I thought it would pan out, nor anyone else for that matter. Let’s just hope that the agriculture sector receives good support both at federal and state levels. Our engagement with AgWA Consulting has moved forward quickly. As everyone is aware the CoM is investigating other opportunities in the potato sector besides the fresh market.

Fee-for-service charge 2018–19

Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid (PSTVd) surveillance of the Seed Scheme

President’s Report

W

Agriculture Produce Commission Member

33ROYAL Blue seems to be a variety in demand with merchants busy trying to secure tonnes.

We are currently exercising phase 2 of the export development plan which sees the investigation into two business models. This involves due diligence for the two options, communication plans for informing industry, trade missions, trade access and biosecurity to support export. AgWA Consulting has just recently returned from New Zealand visiting Zespri investigating its operating business model. This will help determine what will succeed for our industry. Other models will be looked at in the coming weeks.

While it’s seems daunting due to the time frame AgWA Consulting and PGA are working hard to hit timeline schedules. We are currently on track and are determined to remain that way. Estimated time of roll out will be early 2020 and in its final form it will just be a matter of hitting the start button.

I am confident that the work done so far has shown a real possibility to create a window in export for WA growers. The next eight months will be exciting to see it unfold. On the local fresh market front it would seem supply may have tightened up slightly. Royal Blue seems to be a variety in demand with merchants busy trying to secure tonnes. Manjimup district is all but finished supply and by all accounts it was fairly tough on returns. Busselton is delivering currently and Myalup are close to being in full production . In closing I can only hope for a decent rain soon that pushes far and wide to alleviate some of the anxiety in the rural sector. Till next time. MORE INFORMATION To contact Vaughan call 0417 092 505 or email marybrook438@gmail.com


WA POTATOES

Executive Officer’s Report From individualistic and isolated — to collective and structured

T

SIMON MOLTONI EXECUTIVE OFFICER, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

his summarises the structural change required to achieve success for the WA potato industry in the international market. AgWA Consulting has delivered the Export Development Plan (EDP) for WA Potatoes. This comprehensive examination of the industry and its potential has identified several options to best optimise the opportunities in the export market. The plan will be going to print shortly and distributed to all members.

growers will be kept up-to-date with our progress. Thank you to all growers who spent time with AgWA Consulting during the process. Biosecurity continues to be a concern nationally with an outbreak of Dickeya dianthicola in Victoria. Too often biosecurity is seen as somebody else’s responsibility. To be effective, all agencies, industry bodies, and participants along the supply chain, need to be actively playing their role. The consequences of an incursion can be catastrophic which has caused considerable distrust between Industry and the respective Agencies. This is a significant issue that is not fully addressed by participation in the Emergency Plant Pest Response Deed. There is along way to go to improve this situation.

AgWA Consulting has delivered the Export Development Plan (EDP) for WA Potatoes.

Our Committee of Management has endorsed stage two of our Export Development and requested AgWA Consulting undertake due diligence on the two preferred options as identified in the EDP. Stage two includes market access, market development, and biosecurity work and a comprehensive communication plan to make sure

Recently I attended the National Potato Industry Biosecurity Surveillance Strategy Workshop in Melbourne. The workshop examined what is happening now, who does what, when and how? And how this can be improved. Many issues have been identified and discussed and future meetings will be held to change and improve surveillance to prevent and manage future incursions.

Here in WA a meeting was held in April to form the Horticulture Biosecurity Advisory Committee. The committee is made up of representatives from all horticultural groups and DPIRD. The role of the committee will be to; ·· Open discussion between stakeholders ·· Support biosecurity practises ·· Support biosecurity response preparedness ·· Identify priority pest and disease risks ·· Advise on responsibility and cost sharing arrangements.

This will be an important access point for our growers to impact decision making in this critical area. A workshop was held in Melbourne in early May with representatives from all the potato industry sectors. The purpose of the workshop was to establish the process to develop a National Potato Industry Strategy. An industry strategy can be an important step in helping better unite the various sectors who currently operate independently from each other. MORE INFORMATION Contact Simon Moltoni on 0447 141 752 or email simon@wapotatoes.com.au

Beta Spud’s 25th Anniversary Beta Spuds recently held a wellattended function at their premises to celebrate their 25th Anniversary. A good time was had by all. Well done and we look forward to the company’s 50th! 33MATTHEW, Carlo and Jason Cocciolone

Congratulations WA Grower WINTER 2019

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Seed for Schools hits a new record!

T

he team at WA Potatoes has been kept very busy this year with a huge number of registrations coming through for the annual Seed for Schools educational garden program.

See Perth Urban

A record 572 packs were sent out in early May, reaching up to 17,000 children in schools across the state including as far as Esperance, Kalgoorlie, Geraldton and the Ngaanyatjarra School located near Warburton (Figure 1). This year the packs included new materials such as a large wall poster showing the supply chain of the potato.

KILOMETRES

Perth Urban

0

50 KILOMETRES

Perth Surrounds

Schools also received an updated educational guidebook featuring a range of potato facts, as well as fantastic recipes submitted by the schools themselves last year. Thanks to support from Bunnings Warehouse and the State Governments’ Buy West Eat Best program, the packs also included some extra fun items such as gardening gloves, rulers, seasonal produce charts and more. The Seed for Schools program has grown from strength-to-strength over the years, making continual improvements to try and meet the varying needs of classrooms and different age groups.

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10

0

See Perth Urban 200

0 KILOMETRES

FIGURE 1 Locations of where our seed for schools packs have gone this year in Western Australia

See Perth Surrounds


WA POTATOES

For example, this year the WA Potatoes team will be working towards establishing a library of resources on the Todatoes website to allow teachers to access fresh materials throughout the year. To incentivise students, Bunnings Warehouse is once again providing a School Sustainability Visit as a reward. The visit includes supply of plants, soil and hands-on assistance, provided to a school that best answers the question “What would you miss in a world without potatoes?” to fit in with the Imagine a World Without Potatoes global campaign.

WA Potatoes are very proud to be working with the community to deliver this program and will be monitoring crops over the course of the next few months. Seed for School’s gives young kids from all backgrounds a chance to get their hands dirty, spend some time in the garden and encourages them to consume more potatoes everyday. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT A huge thanks to Colin Ayres for coordinating the supply of seed for the program.

Australian potato industry recognises importance of standing together on biosecurity

I

n the first week of May, AUSVEG, Plant Health Australia and RMCG’s Doris Blaesing facilitated an industry consultation workshop with all sectors of the potato industry to understand the who, what and where of the industry’s approach to surveillance of exotic and notifiable pests and diseases.

The workshop was one of the first steps towards developing the National Potato Biosecurity Surveillance Strategy, and included members from the ware, processing and seed potato industries in relevant states and territories. Word f

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Funded through the Australian Government’s Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper, the aim of this strategy is to improve crop monitoring outcomes for potato production in both commercial and urban/peri-urban areas; improve grower capability to detect and report exotic pest incursions; identify issues and opportunities for the establishment of a national potato biosecurity surveillance program. After an introduction to the project’s plans for the strategy and an outline of the workshop, attendees jumped straight into a series of interactive tasks designed to capture awareness and current crop monitoring approaches within the industry. These activities generated a lot of discussion, and with such a diverse collective of industry

representatives, enabled the organisers to capture well-rounded feedback to a variety of themes covered throughout the day.

Overall, the Australian potato industry recognises the need for a unified front to combat issues surrounding biosecurity. It was acknowledged that sharing data and information collected during crop monitoring is important for the success of the industry. The project team is now putting together all of the valuable information collected during the workshop, and will apply that to the development of two industry-based pilot surveillance programs to be rolled out in the middle of the year. The team will continue to consult with industry to deliver a strategy the potato industry can be proud to stand behind. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Article supplied by AUSVEG.

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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WA POTATOES

Global movement underway to inspire consumers not to take potatoes for granted BY GEORGIA THOMAS PROJECT MANAGER, WAÂ POTATOES

33L–R: Marc De Beaufort, Campaign Director of the Imagine a World Without Potatoes program and the potato display at the Hort Expo in Beijing that runs from April to October and receives over 10,000 visitors a day.

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

T

his May the Potato Growers Association of Western Australia (PGAWA), with support from AUSVEG have welcomed Marc De Beaufort, Campaign Director of the Imagine a World Without Potatoes program to Australia. The program is coordinated by the International Potato Center (known by its Spanish acronym CIP) in Peru and aims

to lift the profile of the humble potato and remind consumers not to take it for granted with the overarching goal to increase consumption. Major players and market competitors, such as PepsiCo and McCains are on board with the goal to deliver the same message worldwide and ask their customers to imagine their lives without potatoes. The campaign has signed on over 50 partners in 28 countries and has led to ambitious strategies to promote potato consumption in China, India, Belgium and Peru amongst others.


WA POTATOES

Lifting the profile of the humble potato and reminding consumers not to take for granted.

The campaign will kick into gear later this year and hopes to bring together even more potato sectors in other nations to promote and raise awareness of the benefits of this crop. As the only members of the program in Australia currently, the PGAWA are working on a range of activities utilising the campaign to benefit the WA industry. Including developing a strong international network to support future activities, especially related to exports, as well as using the pro-gram to initiate discussions within Australia around marketing and promotion of potatoes. “We learned about the Imagine a World Without Potatoes program late last year and it immediately rang a bell for us,” said PGAWA Project Manager, Georgia Thomas. “WA is currently the only state in Australia with a generic marketing program for potatoes so the opportunity to link with our international counterparts and learn from their experiences was very attractive.”

“So far we have started to incorporate messaging from the program into our own activities and are hoping to link with more partners across Australia following Marc‘s visit,” said Georgia. Marc has worked as a consultant for the CIP on a variety of projects related to major media out-lets like the BBC and other campaigns related to the potato. He has a wide ranging experience in communications having directed various social and political campaigns in different countries around the world. “I was very excited to visit Australia and talk to people about the potential of the campaign. The program has already proved to be an incredible opportunity for potato industry members, including many competitors, across the world to learn from each other and work towards a common goal. We are excited to see how this campaign will impact the market for potatoes over the next couple of years,” said Marc.

display at their Hort Expo in Beijing, that runs from April to October and receives over 10,000 visitors a day. The display has gained a great deal of interest through the Chinese media and provides a great opportunity for the Imagine A World Without Potatoes message to be shared. WA Potatoes have been able to join in showcasing their industry through the China expo and hope to visit during the next few months. Moving forward, the program will be ramping up around September, with some major activities to commence with global partners. MORE INFORMATION Industry organisations and businesses are able to find more information and join the program through the website: worldwithoutpotatoes.org Contact: Georgia Thomas, WA Potatoes, at georgia@wapotatoes.com.au, phone (08) 9481 0834 or go to todatoes.com.au.

Recently Marc has working with the potato industry in China to develop a major potato WA Grower WINTER 2019

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Seed certification

Western Australian seed potatoes open for business BY MIKE DAVIES SEED TESTING AND CERTIFICATION MANAGER, DPIRD

Best practice seed potato certification schemes

WA has undergone a rigorous surveillance program over the past three years, trapping many thousands of psyllids and testing for the presence of the zebra chip disease.

DPIRD has played a pivotal role in the delivery of the industry’s seed potato schemes since its implementation around 1994. Our scheme’s rules are based on the National Standard and allow us to implement a higher standard where we consider it necessary.

The statistically significant monitoring effort has shown that the disease is not Western Australian seed present in WA, a position accepted at a national potatoes can now enter level by the Department eastern states markets and of Agriculture and Water trade has resumed. Resources.

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

The successes in recent years are wellreflected in the results of ongoing virus testing (Figure 1) and the absence of blackleg symptoms and other diseases across the WA schemes.

4.0 3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5

Year

FIGURE 1 Western Australian seed potato Gen 3 virus testing results Source: Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

2018–19

2017–18

2016–17

2015–16

2014–15

2013–14

2012–13

2011–12

2008–09

2007–08

2006–07

2005–06

2004–05

2003–04

2002–03

0 2001–02

While WA has continued to export highquality seed to international markets, the domestic borders were closed to the state in light of TPP detections. While not a significant pest in its own right, TPP can be a vector for the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) which causes zebra chip in

4.5

Percentage

Since that time, the seed potato industry has fought to overcome adversity through good practice. With support from the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) and the Minister for Agriculture and Food, it has returned to producing high-quality potato seed that takes its place among the best in the world.

WA seed potatoes can now enter eastern states markets and trade has resumed.

This best practice process overseen by DPIRD incorporates training, field inspection, tuber inspection, high traceability through specialised databases and strong record keeping to support the industry and to facilitate the expansion of our export markets.

2010–11

The WA potato industry has been through a tough time over the past few years. The demise of the Potato Marketing Corporation in 2016 and the 2017 detection of tomato-potato psyllid (TPP) in the Perth metropolitan area as well as Dickeya dianthicola in WA had direct impact on potato producers and created uncertainty within the industry.

potatoes and ultimately can result in significant loss in the industry.

2009–10

T

he Western Australian Certified Seed Potato Scheme plays a vital role in the state’s potato industry, and has overcome recent challenges to continue to produce quality, clean seed.


WA POTATOES

Virus levels at an all-time low WA has conducted long-term virus surveillance within our seed potato schemes. This surveillance has been funded by the potato industry in WA through the Australian Produce Commission Potato Producers’ Committee. Surveillance of generation two sown crops (producing generation three seed) enables the schemes to identify potential virus problems before they become widespread. Any virus detections can be eliminated out of the schemes early. The focus and commitment to virus elimination is reflected in the near zero level in 2018-19. Samples are collected and tested in the DPIRD virology laboratory. There were no detections of potato leaf roll virus, potato virus Y, potato virus X or potato virus S across the surveillance program and only one detection (at low levels) of tomato spotted wilt virus. These results assure our markets that virus levels are negligible in WA seed.

Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid (PSTVd) PSTVd is known not to occur in WA seed potato producing areas. Over the past three seasons, DPIRD has conducted surveillance for this pathogen on behalf of industry.

Every property producing seed potatoes has been sampled and tested for the presence of PSTVd. There have been no detections of the pest. This surveillance provides important data to support the claims that PSTVd has not been detected in WA potato growing regions.

No detections of blackleg in WA seed schemes Blackleg caused by Dickeya dianthicola and Pectobacterium spp. is an emerging issue for Australia. In 2017, WA had a detection of Dickeya dianthicola within the schemes. This initiated an incident response from DPIRD and a tightening of the WA seed schemes with relation to blackleg. Since 2017, inspectors have been vigilant in the assessment of crops and no symptoms of blackleg have emerged. MORE INFORMATION Contact Mike Davies on (08) 9368 3505 or michael.davies@dpird.wa.gov.au or visit agric.wa.gov.au.

Colin Ayres: Representing seed potato producers in the west Colin Ayres is Chair of the Seed Potato Growers Association of Western Australia, an advocacy group that looks after the interests of the state’s seed potato growers and the wider industry. As a respected third-generation potato grower in his own right, Colin runs a 100-hectare certified seed potato operation under a state scheme that he describes as ’robust’. “Having an independent certification body in WA has been one of our biggest assets, from an industry point of view. And we’re looking for that to continue,” he said. “The biggest asset of DPIRD doing the seed certification is when we trade overseas, we have Department of Agriculture labelling, which is pretty transparent. It gives customers confidence that what they’re buying is authentic. “Since the introduction of pathogentested mini-tubers, we've seen the virus levels really cleaned up, and this is now to a point where our virus levels are very low in WA. The WA scheme is probably well ahead of the game.” The scheme is ever-evolving, and WA seed producers can have their say on what changes should be implemented. “We're continually looking at different things to improve, so the scheme is a work in progress at any given time. It certainly hasn't been written and forgotten,” Colin said. “We have a voice there and if there’s a rational, reasonable argument, chances are it will gain some traction. There are some good checks and balances along the way to keep that scheme coming along.”

Colin said that hygiene and traceability are key to growing clean, quality seed potatoes. Paddock planning is a must to avoid intergenerational contamination — ensuring mini-tubers, low-generation crops and high-generation crops remain separate. It is also vital to clean machinery when moving between paddocks, varieties and generations. Recently Colin, his wife Janine and son Chris invested in a state-ofthe-art potato seed grading line after seeing it in action in Europe. The Visar Optical Sorter can sort unwashed potatoes consistently and efficiently, and recognise up to 16 types of defects in an unwashed potato. It can also allow for manual input to tailor the size of any tuber in a particular line during grading. Colin said that high-quality grading is relative to producing highquality seed, and it is vital to have a consistent product — particularly with the opportunity of increased domestic and international trade. “It gives us an option to grade to a very high standard without the labour costs. We can size to whatever our customers require. It gives us a lot more options to give our seed a better outcome for our growers.”

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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Grower tour

Psyllid takes centre stage on Australian potato grower tour BY ELIZABETH WHARTON SEBRIGHT ADVENTURES

A

ustralian potato industry members embarked on an overseas adventure to New Zealand’s Canterbury region from 12-15 February, where 19 representatives from Victoria, Tasmania and Western Australia gained an insight into Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) and how the New Zealand potato industry has managed this pest.

This potato industry tour to New Zealand was proactively designed by Seed Potatoes Victoria (SPV) in response to grower concerns of their preparedness for TPP if it is detected in the eastern states of Australia. Organised by Sebright Adventures, the tour provided an overview of TPP research, in-field management and supply chain implications. Participants also discovered the diversification and 33THE group at Terrace Downs Resort. BACK ROW (L-R): Michelle Trigg, Elizabeth Wharton, Callum Fletcher, Ashley Labbett, Pauline McPherson, Darryl Smith, Chris Ayres, Simon Moltoni, Peter Britt, Patrick Fox, James Downey and Stuart Jennings. FRONT ROW (L-R): Daryl Johnson, Tony Trigg, Alan Parker, Gary Crick, Stewart McKay and Mark Peters.

irrigation practices of New Zealand farmers, which are vastly different to those currently used in most parts of Australia. Seeing these differences enabled participants to broaden their thinking about possibilities for their own farms, and spread business risk by having many income streams from a range of agricultural sources.

Industry insight Plant & Food Research New Zealand’s Lincoln site was the first stop for the group. Kerry Hughes, a director at seed potato merchant Alex McDonald, provided an overview of the seed potato industry to help attendees understand the dynamics and intricacies of potatoes in New Zealand. The group also met with New Zealand’s key scientific team leading TPP research for a Q&A session. TPP samples were shown under microscopes to provide growers with the opportunity to see this insect first-hand. During a visit to New World Lincoln supermarket, the group met with Fresh Produce Manager Navjeet Sharma. Participants marvelled at the elaborate packaging used to sell potatoes and the depth of information available to consumers through in-store signage on potato varieties and on product packaging. Such marketing is not currently practiced in Australia but was seen as an opportunity for extensive value-adding, with potential to boost sales and customer awareness.

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WA POTATOES

33THE coolstore at Turley Farm.

33A Q&A session with TPP scientists at Plant & Food Research New Zealand.

Innovation in focus

33HAMISH McFarlane shows the group a crop of Innovator potatoes.

Later that evening, the group enjoyed a presentation from TPP researcher Jessica Dohmen-Vereijssen, who provided more in-depth knowledge of this pest.

Growers’ field day On day two, the group headed southeast to the scenic seed growing region around Methven, and spent time on-farm visiting growers and trial sites. Aberdeen Farm, owned and operated by the families of Richard and Hamish Redfern, demonstrated the importance of crop diversification and good farm hygiene. Richard is currently Chairman of the New Zealand Seed Potato Certification Authority, and grows pasture seed, wheat, barley, seed potatoes, and 5,500 prime lambs among others on the 530-hectare property. The group also visited Andy Innes at Innesfields Farm where they saw potato coolstores, grading equipment and machinery for potato cropping. Travelling to Rakaia, the group met with Tim Pike from Mid Canterbury Growers to discuss TPP management, soil nutrition and crop management practices. Participants heard how TPP has impacted each grower’s operation differently and is being managed on a case-by-case basis.

After lunch, participants joined New Zealand potato growers at the annual grower field walk organised by Potatoes New Zealand and Plant & Food Research. The first site visited was a TPP-infected crop where scientists were on-hand to run through the impact of TPP on plants and pest identification.

Growers found this visit immensely useful to identify the insect, infected tubers and plant symptoms. The second site south of Ashburton is trialling a Teralytic soil nutrient probe, which uses worldfirst technology to gather detailed data that is relayed back to the farm manager or others as required. There is potential for Australian growers to adopt this technology in the future.

Farm visits continued throughout day three. At Hewson Farms in Pendarves, participants received the opportunity to see the only Grimme Spudnik 6621 machine in the southern hemisphere. Ross Hewson and Nigel Prattley from Landpower explained this extensive farming operation and demonstrated potato harvesting in action. The Spudnik 6621 is capable of separating stones from potatoes and soil in-field to harvest 1,000 tonnes of potatoes per day. Tour members were keen to see how potato harvesting and growing practices compare with Australia, and whether such technology could be made available back home. Hewson Farms is fully irrigated using mostly centre pivots and laterals, which enable large-scale vegetable and arable crop production. Next, Hamish McFarlane greeted the group at one of his properties near Orton. McFarlane Agriculture is in partnership with McFlynn Potatoes, which has diversified across different crops and livestock enterprises. Blackcurrant crops were on show as well as a crop of Innovator potatoes, where Hamish took the group in-field to highlight crop management techniques and tuber characteristics.

Teralytic soil nutrient probe technology trial.

The day culminated with a dinner, which brought together 50 industry stakeholders from Australia and New Zealand to strengthen networks and develop prospects for industry collaboration. Canterbury District Mayor Donna Favel welcomed guests while Potatoes New Zealand CEO Chris Claridge emceed the evening. United Kingdom potato agronomist John Sarup also provided an insightful presentation about the UK’s potato industry and possibilities for the industry moving forward.

The final farm visit was a 2,800-hectare property owned and operated by Murray Turley. Turley Farms highlighted the importance of thinking ahead, working together with other industry members for the greater good, and spreading risk. Onion grading and harvesting was on show, as well as in-field discussions with Murray. Attendees marvelled at the enormous storage facilities on-site and custombuilt storage bins, with the sheer scale of the operation hard to fathom. After a busy day on-farm, the group relaxed over dinner in Timaru where they were joined by AUSVEG CEO James WA Grower WINTER 2019

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WA POTATOES

Whiteside, Chair Bill Bulmer and Deputy Chair Belinda Adams. Their attendance provided insightful contributions to conversations throughout the evening and valuable insights into agricultural industries. The guest speaker was Seed & Field Services New Zealand Potato Agronomist Duncan McLeod, who provided the perfect summary of TPP in New Zealand, bringing together all the information and sites that participants had experienced over the previous days. On the final day, the group visited vertically-integrated business Heartland Crisping to hear its story, and how the founding Bowan family decided to take their potato growing Fallgate Farm and invest vertically through the supply chain to own and operate a processing company and manage distribution of their product. This visit was the highlight for many attendees, who were greatly appreciative of the Bowan family sharing their business insights.

A collaborative effort Throughout the tour, New Zealand seed potato manager Iain Kirkwood and Landpower Grimme Machinery specialist Nigel Prattley joined the group, sharing their significant expertise. The time, assistance and support of Potatoes New Zealand, Plant & Food Research, Grimme, Alex McDonald, and all the farms and sites visited is greatly appreciated and made the whole tour experience possible. The support, knowledge sharing and collaboration from industry, both in Australia and New Zealand, makes such tours possible, and ensures that responses to pests such as TPP can be managed using the latest research and industry practices. This will enable faster and more effective action across the supply chain. It is hoped that similar tours can be held in future to assist other industry members to learn more about a specific topic of interest, and to assist them to become more competitive in their industries. MORE INFORMATION Article supplied by AUSVEG. Contact Sebright Adventures Chief Experience Officer Elizabeth Wharton on 0484 902 702 or email sebrightadventures@outlook.com.

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Case study

Patrick Fox travels across the ditch for psyllid experience Farmer Patrick Fox Location Yarloop Western Australia Enterprises Seed potato grower

PERTH

YARLOOP

Western Australian seed potato grower and exporter Patrick Fox attended the tomatopotato psyllid (TPP) tour of New Zealand to learn from international growers who are managing Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), the bacterium vectored by TPP which causes zebra chip in potatoes.

“Luckily it hasn’t been detected over here yet, but it’s something that we’re going to have to deal with in future years,” Patrick said. The highlight for Patrick was talking to his New Zealand counterparts about TPP and zebra chip, and discussing the crop protection products and regimes they are currently undertaking to fight this highly destructive pest and disease. It wasn’t all bad news though. “Despite them having the psyllid and CLso, it’s still manageable and it’s not the end of the world if you do get it,” Patrick said. “New Zealand growers have implemented some really good procedures and spray programs, and surprisingly enough we heard it (TPP/CLso) apparently isn’t their biggest issue of concern with growing potatoes over there. That was more PVY, which was quite reassuring to hear and gives you a bit of confidence moving forward. “The detection of TPP/CLso has actually improved their overall domestic seed industry as

now commercial growers have implemented strict weekly insecticide programs whereas previously they were doing the minimum, if at all, which has now resulted in decreased virus levels.” Patrick said the New Zealand potato industry worked well together in a cooperative spirit. “They bounce ideas off each other, which is probably something we don’t do here in Australia. There are a lot of points we can pick up from the New Zealanders, including any practices we can implement back here to make our operations more successful and viable.” Another benefit of attending the tour was the ability to network with other growers from Australia. Patrick has attended two international grower tours and has remained in contact with other participants. “It’s always good to get the industry perspective from the east coast and bounce ideas off each other. That’s a valuable tool.”


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pome

update Pomewest

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From the Pomewest

contacts Pomewest Committee and Officers Harvey Giblett, Chair

e: newtonbros@wn.com.au

Mario Casotti

e: mario@casottigroup.com

Wayne Ghilarducci

e: strathspey@modnet.com.au

Jason Jarvis

e: twinpack@bigpond.com

Sam Licciardello

e: sam@orchard1sixty.com.au

Mark Scott

e: markpscott@bigpond.com

Susie Murphy White, Project Manager e: susan.murphy-white@dpird.wa.gov.au

Executive Manager

Season update

Nardia Stacy, Executive Manager e: nardia@fruitwest.org.au Natalie Gallagher, Executive Assistant e: natalie.gallagher@dpird.wa.gov.au

APC–Pomewest FFS Income 2018–19 Project General Account Budget Biosecurity Account Budget

$ 450,000 60,000

APC-Pomewest major projects 2018–19 Project

$

New Technology Project (Susie Murphy White)

88,860

Innovative Orchardist Group Project

28,000

Markers, Markets and Validated Nutritional Qualities of Australian Apples

20,000

Market Access Projects

116,280

Annual Meetings and Communications

14,500

Medfly Surveillance Trapping Network (Ashmere Consulting)

60,000

Codling Moth (DPIRD)

36,000

Maturity Standards Legislation and Compliance

80,000

Industry Sponsorships and Association Memberships

4,800

Promotion & Publicity Local Project (Fresh Finesse)

37,500

Natural Mite control/Baseline fungicide resistance — Apple Scab

17,680

Administration APC Administration

185,000 45,000

APC fee-for-service charge POME FRUIT effective from 1 January 2015

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Type of fruit

$/kg

Fresh fruit — apples, pears, Nashi, other

0.015

Processing fruit

0.005

Biosecurity FFS for fresh fruit

0.002

Biosecurity FFS for processing fruit

0.001

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BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

his period marks the end of this season’s harvest. The lingering sunny days have made for optimal picking conditions.

Harvest volumes are surprising higher than expected and it seems no impact is evident with fruit size. Growers remain upbeat and quietly confident about the upcoming marketing cycle and the prospects for the year ahead.

The shortage of fruit supply earlier this year has meant a genuine start to the new season. There is an abundance of freshly picked quality produce on offer. This has caused much excitement in the retail category; and the influence of ‘fresh to market’ is the best incentive to entice customers back to the apple aisle. Pleasingly, prices have remained elevated and stable, the industry is optimistic that this will continue. In the meantime, the old adage approach of supply and demand will be a wait and see situation. It is likely that we will have the capacity to manage and fill our own markets. It is the general view of the local industry. This year’s the Committee’s objectives will be reflected in this financial year’s budget, which is at the time of writing this article are still the processes of

being finalised and approved by the APC’s Pome, Citrus and Stonefruit Producers’ Committee. As such, the projects & FFS service charge rates column will be updated next edition — but will essentially will remain the same. There are no new projects planned for this year, the industry’s focus will remain with the existing projects supporting market access, orchard extension, biosecurity and promotional activities.

Committee and staffing changes The incoming financial year will see some changes in the Pomewest Committee and staffing arrangements. After the last meeting of the Committee held 14 March in Manjimup (minutes are available to Pome FFS payers on request) Mario Casotti, Sam Licciardello and Harvey Giblett’s position renewals were discussed. Mario and Sam have since decided that they would re-apply. It is with regret that I announce that Harvey Giblett will be stepping down as the Chair of Pomewest. We are hopeful that Harvey will remain in some capacity on the Committee as his experience and knowledge is almost irreplaceable. A tribute to


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Harvey is planned for the next edition of this magazine, but I know there are many of you who will join me in saying that Harvey’s contribution to the industry over the years has been colossal and truly inspirational. I am happy to say that Deputy Chair, Mark Scott has agreed to take over the reins as the new Chair. I would like to welcome Mark to the position. This marks a new era for the Committee, which will pay homage to the high standards set by Harvey. I also advise at this time, I will be shifting my focus back to the wider pome industry activities and moving back to my full time position at Pomewest. This means I will be relinquishing my role as Executive Officer for the Fruit West Co-operative. Unfortunately, will mean saying goodbye to our much loved administrative officer Natalie Gallagher, who has been supporting me whilst I have been working in the shared positions. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Natalie for her assistance and hard work during her year and a half tenure and I know that she has captured the respect of the industry with her passion and commitment to the role.

includes our APC’s fee for service funded market access projects: 1. Medfly Surveillance Trapping Network that feeds into The National Systems Approach Project also supported by Pomewest DPIRD, HIA and CSIRO; and 2. Disinfestation for Market Access Apple Quality in the Cold Chain data sets that feeds into the Export Competitiveness Grant (ECG) Cold Chain disinfestation and quality management of BRAVO™ apples for market access jointly supported by Pomewest DPIRD and the Fruit West Co-operative Ltd.

Quality and promotion We have seen better results in fruit quality overall in the market this year and we would like to think that is because our growers are embracing learnings from our future technologies projects and embracing our maturity standards program.

APAL Industry Forum and Hort Connections 2019 Melbourne 24–26 June.

Growth through exports The BRAVO™ branded apple juggernaut continues this year with over 75 growers nationally and volumes increasing rapidly. The dark burgundy apple is now being sold nationally in the major retailers and independent outlets, whilst still demanding premium prices and sound returns to growers. It is the export program which remains the greatest success story so far, this year approximately 15,000 cartons of BRAVO™ will be exported into Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai UAE. This represents 19% of this year’s crop. With BRAVO™ as the flagship, opportunities for other varieties in these premium markets have already started. Market access remains the focus of our funding budget this year. The Committee and industry have identified that expanding our export markets remain our long-term aspiration and goal. We continue to support projects that collect data to use to gain WA entry to premium quarantine restricted markets. This

Of course, working together collaboratively to make sure that ‘when you taste a WA apple it will be a great apple,’ is key. This will come to fruition, if we continue our commitment to quality testing before harvest and keep the testing process going with fruit and storage and managing temperatures in transport and retail handing along the value chain. So far, our approach has been commended and published nationally in the APAL’s Fruit Grower magazine and the program has been reported and communicated in local media and promotional events. It even made mainstream news on Channel 10’s The Project.

Work safe Pomewest has been invited to engage in a WorkSafe project to engage the Orchard industries. The project is designed to assist employers to meet their duties by providing information and ensuring understanding of their obligations under the occupation safety and health legislation.

Biosecurity and border control We continue to flesh out a shared industry biosecurity officer’s role with the support of DPIRD funding. Susie Murphy White has some scope in her current role to assist this process.

She is looking into working with other industries in order to carry out some of the identified duties. The role will include activities around attending state and national meetings, communication back to industry with concerns, preparing case studies, reviewing abandoned orchard management, reviewing state border practices and surveillance activities in WA and finalising the priority pest lists. It is envisaged that the role will also include workshops on on-farm plans and response processes.

Innovative Orchards Project This project is coming to an end this year. I congratulate Susie for her continued passion to enthuse growers to learn about new ways of producing high quality fruit. This year Susie organised some awesome tours and sponsorships that many growers have taken full advantage of during the year. This has increased their capacity in leadership and skill development, ability to embrace new technologies and provided valuable industry connections.

APAL Industry Forum and Hort Connections 2019 Melbourne 24–26 June 2019 The WA Industry will be well represented at this upcoming event. Susie’s innovative orchardist projects have sponsored some of our growers to attend. John Hearman and Bec Whittaker are nominees this year — so watch this space.

Industry engagement dinners – August 2019 This year the Committee will be organising three dinners in each of the growing regions. These engagement sessions have been popular in the past and will enable us to receive feedback and suggestions on how we can improve your FFS benefits and discuss future projects and directions.

This edition We report on some of our recent promotions and the latest Future Orchard Walk, On-Farm Clean up information, Antioxidants are more powerful in name than fact, and the latest news on BRAVO™. In closing the this report, I again welcome you to contact myself, Susie or Committee members at any time to discuss any industry matters. MORE INFORMATION Contact Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@pomewest.net.au

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The 2019 BRAVO™ season blasts off!

Retail launch The 2019 BRAVO™ branded apple season launched at Fresh Provisions Mt Lawley on Wednesday 24 April by The Hon Alannah MacTiernan MLC, Minister for Agriculture and Food. The WA Minister has been a long time and passionate supporter of the BRAVO™ apple and the apple-breeding program in Manjimup. This event marks the start of the fourth commercial season of the BRAVO™ brand. The stage was set to introduce the newly developed premium gift box. The concept was designed specifically for the burgeoning export markets. The box highlights BRAVO™ as a truly premium product being beautifully presented as gift of good health for many gifting purposes. Brand recognition for the apple has intensified this year with a strong retail demand for BRAVO™ both domestically and internationally. Consumers are now actively seeking it out in supermarkets and outlets, and not only for the stand out good looks but increasingly its the sophisticated taste profile that keeps people coming back for more.

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Events Live Lighter Donnybrook Apple Festival This was the perfect springboard opportunity to preview the season’s official launch. This occasion featured locally grown BRAVO™ as the draw card to the fresh produce tent. Local growers assisted in providing tastings and engaged in conversation with show goers.

Promotions Local and national in-store promotions and consumer profiling have commenced in the major supermarkets and independent retailers and will continue throughout the season. International in-store demonstrations and consumer profiling exercises are now underway in Hong Kong, Singapore and Dubai UAE. This year about 75,000 cartons will be sold which is approximately double last year’s sales.


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Media/social media With the launch of the new season, local WA media has picked up the launch release with two grower-centric stories. The first, the West Australian under West Business Section featuring John Vetta of La Valle Orchards in Karragullen and the other in the local Bridgetown/Manjimup Times featuring Manjimup grower Lucy Fontanini. Other online media have been sharing information on the usual industry feeds.

The social media campaign — Facebook and Instagram commenced on April 1 offering teaser posts to countdown the season launch. Stories and posts have featured BRAVO™ apples being quality tested, harvested, along with launch events and retail information. So far, on-line interaction and ‘likes and shares’ have been excellent on both platforms. 33JOHN Vetta, La Valle Orchards in Karragullen and Manjimup grower Lucy Fontanini.

The Fruit West Co-operative has also recently been awarded a further grant from Asian Market Success via DPIRD to bolster the previous project and assist to fund in-store promotions of the apple and gift box along with some additional HIA funding to focus on build on consumer profiling in these markets. In addition, the Fruitwest Co-operative, Pomewest and the DPIRD have co-invested in the Export Competiveness Grant project — to measure the cold chain disinfestation and quality management of BRAVO™ apples for market access. The purpose of this project is to provide cold

To further boost this activity, innovative and exciting engagement plans are in the pipeline. These will be used to generate and maintain interest in the brand during this season. Growers, merchants and consumers are encouraged to continue to share information with the BRAVO™ marketing team to promote and boost content.

Sweet & Juicy

Projects updates The International Grant International Competitiveness (IGIC) project issued by the Agricultural Sciences R&D Fund managed by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) Western Australia, to introduce the BRAVO™ apple to high value Asian consumers and define market pathways to consumers has concluded. The outcomes and findings resulting from the project have been utilised to expedite and supplement this year’s Asian BRAVO™ apple export program.

The wait is nearly over

treatment of Mediterranean fruit flies (Medfly) in BRAVO™ apples for access to quarantine restricted markets. As well as preserve apple quality by using appropriate science and technology for quality management in the cold chain and minimise potential impacts of static and in-transit disinfestation. This work is on target to capitalise on opportunities as the production volumes increase. Grower Grant Research and Development Grant issued by the Agricultural Sciences R&D Fund, also managed by DPIRD, successfully introducing the BRAVO™ branded apple to the World project is also coming to a close. As result ANABP 01A growers will be able source a good practice guide to grow the ANABP 01A variety. The results of clinical trials of the BRAVO™ apple and its wellness benefits, particularly to cardiovascular health, will be useful to validate health claims for marketing. Other brand awareness, consumer profiling and value adding information and outcomes will be available to source and develop strategies for future marketing success.

Bold. Daring. Different.

Exports After a successful series of trial shipments in 2017–18, 2019 will be the start of a concentrated export program to Dubai UAE, Singapore and Hong Kong. The program is currently underway and this year approximately 15,000 cartons representing 19% of the crop, have been allocated to supply the already strong demand for BRAVO™ in these countries. More information on the outcomes of these activities resulting from grant funding will be forthcoming.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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in l u f r e w o p re o m e r a name than fact

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here is no doubt the term antioxidants has a powerful marketing pull. More and more foods are being marketed as antioxidant-rich, functional foods or superfoods.

Foods with a function was recently one of the top food trends on Google1, and antioxidants are now apparently a market sector of their own, with a global value set to reach >US$4 billion by 20222. 1 Google Food Trends (2016). Available at: www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumerinsights/2016-food-trends-google 2 Antioxidants Market (2016). Available at: www. alliedmarketresearch.com/anti-oxidants-market

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So clearly, there is value in the term antioxidants, but does that mean we should believe the rhetoric? For the fresh fruit industry, a more important question is whether the term actually devalues the valid dietary health effects of your produce? If so, how can we express the positive message of the nutritional value of fresh foods without stepping into rhetorical half-truths? This question of how to faithfully market fresh, healthy food is becoming increasingly vexing. This article brings some current context to the challenge. You may be aware of the research that The University of Western Australia (UWA), and now Edith Cowan University (ECU) have done in partnership with the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD),

Pomewest and Fruit West Cooperative Ltd on Australian-bred apples, including Cripps Pink (Pink Lady™) and ANABP 01A (BRAVO™). If not, in brief we have shown that consumption of apples can significant improve cardiovascular health (these studies are ongoing but those to date have been summarised here3, including links to the original publications).

So what? The focus of these studies were a select group of flavonoids, which are the most abundant form of antioxidants in plant foods.

3 Apple flavonoids and human health (2016). Available at www.agric.wa.gov.au/pome-fruit/ apple-flavonoids-and-human-health


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this theory has been widely debunked5, however the clinical importance of our diet is increasingly evident. To add context to why we see antioxidants linked to our foods, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) played a big role. In the early 2000s the USDA funded a large database of foods listing the ‘Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity’. In fact you can still download the 2nd release from 2010 here6. But by 2012, the online version was replaced with a solemn apology;

“In 2012 USDA's Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) removed the USDA ORAC Database for Selected Foods from the NDL website due to mounting evidence that the values indicating antioxidant capacity have no relevance to the effects of specific bioactive compounds, including polyphenols on human health... …There is no evidence that the beneficial effects of polyphenolrich foods can be attributed to the antioxidant properties of these foods”. … and now this apology has also been removed7. However, the important fact is sustained; fresh fruits and vegetables do make a significant contribution to our health. 33NEW selections being trialled at the Manjimup Research Horticulture Institute’s Australian National Breeding Program.

Ah ha, so it’s true, antioxidants are good! Well, they can function as antioxidants, but the reality is that their anti-oxidant ability has very little if anything to do with how these compounds aid the nutritional value of foods such as apples or other plant foods. Historically, the importance of antioxidants in our diet was raised in the 1950s, with the “Free Radical Theory of Aging”4, which outlines that aging is caused by accumulation of damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The corollary was that antioxidants, including those you put on your face or eat, reduce this damage and increase your lifespan. Strictly put, 4 Harman D (1956). Aging: a theory based on free radical and radiation chemistry. J Gerontol 11: 298-300.

So how do we capture this for the fresh food industries? Clearly the term ‘flavonoid’ is not as catchy as antioxidant, and it most likely never will be. The Federal Government, through the Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) authority, recently revised the health claims legislation to allow new applications for validated high level health claims8.

5 Gladyshev VN (2014). The free radical theory of aging is dead. Long live the damage theory! Antioxid Redox Signal. 20:727-731. Available at https://doi.org/10.1089/ars.2013.5228 6 USDA Database for the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of Selected Foods, Release 2 (2010). Available at www.orac-infoportal.de/download/ORAC_R2.pdf 7 Cunningham E (2013). What Has Happened to the ORAC Database? J Acad Nutr Dietetics, 113: 740. Available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j. jand.2013.03.007 8 Reviews of food-health relationships for high level health claims. Available at www. foodstandards.gov.au/consumer/labelling/ nutrition/pages/reviewsforhighlevelc3090.aspx

At present, there are 13 pre-approved high level health claims, one of which states “a diet high in fruit and vegetables reduces risk of coronary heart disease”. The ECU and UWA are currently completing further clinical studies with BRAVO™, which will establish whether regular consumption of BRAVO™ apples results in an improvement in markers of blood vessel health. With the data our group have and are continuing to amass, there is a very real possibility of applying for a high level health claim specifically for apple intake. However, this alone may not be the most effective means to capture this value for the industry in the way of increased value or volume. Hence, the UWA have also undertaken market research to understand how consumers ascribe a health value when shopping for foods. We have already showed that the perceived health value of apples is more important than whether it is organic9. But how do consumers decide whether an apple or other fruit or vegetable is healthy when presented in a supermarket or growers market? Early insights into our most recent studies suggest a that both colour and origin are important. These results, as well as the BRAVO™ clinical studies, will be reported in upcoming editions of the WA Grower magazine. One other important context is how we might improve these health values. We have shown that different varieties contain vastly different levels of flavonoids9. UWA are now leading a national funding application to develop new breeding technologies to speed up the process of breeding and identifying new, high-value apples in the DPIRD Australian National Apple Breeding Project. This research will focus on flavonoids, but create data that will also underpin accelerated breeding for other high-value traits. The intention is to later extend this path to other important fruit and tree crops in WA and Australia. MORE INFORMATION Contact Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@pomewest.net.au

9 Considine M (2015). Bridging the knowledgegap to breed high-value flavonoid-rich apples. Horticulture Innovation Australia Ltd (AP12036). Available at www.horticulture.com.au/growers/ help-your-business-grow/research-reportspublications-fact-sheets-and-more/ap12036

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Orchard clean up time BY SUSIE MURPHY WHITE PROJECT MANAGER, POMEWEST

W

inter is a good time to get your biosecurity plan in place to protect your property from pests, diseases and weeds. Farm or orchard biosecurity is a set of measures designed to protect your property from the entry and spread of pests, diseases and weeds. Farm biosecurity is your responsibility, and that of every person visiting or working on your property. Producers play a key role in protecting Australian plant and livestock industries from pests and diseases by implementing sound biosecurity measures on-farm. If a new pest or disease becomes established on your farm, it will affect your business through increased costs (for monitoring, production practices, additional chemical use and labour), reduced productivity (in yield and/or quality) or loss of

Reduce apple scab spores through winter by helping leaves break down more quickly.

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markets. Early detection and immediate reporting of an exotic pest or disease increases the chance of effective and efficient eradication.

Cleaning up in the orchard after harvest must become a routine practice for the control of apple scab as it is for the management of other pests and diseases such as pear scab, Mediterranean fruit flies and Alternaria spp. For apple scab the spores mature over winter on infected leaves on the orchard floor which then reinfect trees during the early spring. The number of spores that survive through winter can be

reduced by helping the leaves to break down more quickly. A postharvest application of foliar urea at early leaf fall to increase leaf nitrogen levels encourages microbial breakdown of the leaves. Sweeping and mulching of pruning’s, leaves and fallen fruit in winter is recommended to reduce the spore 33FOOTBATHS are essential when entering the orchard on every occasion to stop the spread of diseases, pests and weeds.


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Make sure there is a designated parking area away from production site to contain the entry of new pests, diseases and weeds. It is also good practice to provide wash down facilities if vehicles are required to enter the orchard. Make yourself and your staff aware of the pests, diseases and weeds threats to your orchard this includes those that are exotic to Australia and those that we don’t have here in WA.

Ensure all propagation material is from trusted sources and farm inputs are fully tested, pest-free and preferably certified. Keep good records of orchard inputs.

3 Keep it clean

Practicing good sanitation and hygiene will help prevent the entry and movement of pests onto a property. Workers, visitors, vehicles and equipment can spread pests, so it’s important they are clean before entering and leaving the property. Have a designated visitor’s area and provide vehicle and personnel washdown facilities.

Monitoring your orchard of anything new and unusual and reporting to the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline: 1800 084 881 will help protect the biosecurity of your orchard. The Plant Health Australia Orchard Biosecurity Manual for the Apple and Pear Industry contains information to help producers to implement biosecurity on-farm. The manual contains an overview of biosecurity, fact sheets to identify the high priority pests of a crop, tips on crop management, and how to manage people, vehicles and equipment to minimise biosecurity risks. The manual contains a biosecurity self-assessment list, and templates to record pest surveillance records and visitors.

5 Abide by the law

Respect and be aware of laws and regulations established to protect the apple and pear industry, Australian agriculture and growing region.

6 Report anything unusual

If a suspected new pest is spotted — report it immediately to the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline: 1800 084 881.

Pests 6

High prio rity exo

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rosy purp nge from 0.5 ferred hosts le and mm to 2. • Leaf black sym 5 mm in colo in length mould ptoms inc ur as • Affec on the surfa lude curling, they deve and from dark discoloura lop green to • Seve ted fruit cluste ce tion and re infesta rs ar appearan tions cane severely dis ce of soo Fire blig damage torted an ty ht (Erw up to 50% d growth inia amy OVERAL of fruit in is stunted lovora) • Infec L RISK – an orcha HIGH ts a rang rd • Dam age occue of pome fru • Infec it species rs on leav tion infected results in tissu es, branc tissue e death, hes, shoots, • Infec ted shoot together blos • Spre with bact soms and fru ad with in s often bend it tissue erial ooze • Esta near the blishmen fected pla droplets o t of Fire b nt materia tip to form a ‘sh n Cedar l and thro light ephe apple rust (Gym would impact ugh wind disprd’s crook’ sha OVERAL market a ersal pe nospora ccess • Only L RISK – ngium infects ap HIGH juniperi hosts ples -virginia • Infec to complete and cedar nae) (Juniperu ted fruit a its life cycle s virgin and in nd le iana), • Lesio some varie aves develop and requ ties ires both • Stem ns are raised spore-pro yellow-orange ducing • Galls s may developand can crac tufts also lesions on the with fing a slight s k as the f surface deve • Spre ruit enlarg lop ad with in er-like projectio welling es fected pla ns a nt materi re produced o al or by w n ce ind disperdar hosts sal

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OVERAL h (Lym antria • Very L RISK – dispar) wide hos HIGH • Egg t range, w mas yellow or ses laid on an ith over 6 light tan y available 50 know • Cate fuzz rpilla solid surfn hosts and blue r is large (50-6 ace and ) along 5 mm • Moth usually co their back long) and s ha vered in hairy wit with grey ve greyish-bro h two row markings wn wings • Larv al sta s of spot (40-7 (30-4 s (red produce ge causes he 0 mm wing 0 mm wing large amo span) avy d in fema span) in males Apple unts of efoliation of tre les or white brown webbing es and s rot (Mo OVERAL hrubs, an nilinia d may fructige • Infec L RISK – HIGH ts a rang na) • Prod e of fruit trees uces simi • Fruit and berr lar sympto dev to/into elop rapidly s ms to Br ies preading own rot i • Rott rotting , firm, bro n stone fr ing areas wn spots uit covered often or s that prog • Infec in concentri c circle urrounded ted fruit c ress by cream • Bligh s ted twigs an becom y-white p • Spre e mu ustules, ad by win with cankers mmified can also on the tre d, rain an Apple develop e d with infe maggot cted plan (Rhago OVERAL t materia letis pom • Fruit L RISK – l onella) fly that pr HIGH • Crea m coloure imarily attack throu s apples d leg • Sma gh fruit flesh less larvae (up ll bla to 10 mm spot on t ck fly (up to 5 long) leav he back mm long • Sunk e brown t and ) with en d rail fruit follow imple-like four irregular yellowish spots an or zigzag head an ing • Dam d discolo d leg blac aged fruit egg laying urations k bands s, a white drop premand larva Europea develop o on the win aturely l feeding n can n the surf gs ker (Neo OVERAL ace of nectria • Econ L RISK – galligen omically d MEDIUM a) • Redd ish brownamaging fung-HIGH scar, us worldw lesio ide that ca • Lesio spur or prun ns develop on ing uses small bra • Cank ns develop int wounds nches, us up to 60% yie • Rot ers can girdle o cankers tha ually arou ld loss may dev trunk t cause d nd leaf • Long elop in tr s of youn dista g trees c ieback of affe often sympnce dispe ees or on fruit cted ausing tre tomless) rsal likely thro e death braches ugh mov fruit ement of infected ( though

Bugwoo d.o

2 Use pest-free propagation material

Knowing the usual appearance of the orchard and trees will help recognise new or unusual events and pests. Keep written and photographic records of all unusual observations. Constant vigilance is vital for early detection of any exotic plant pest threat.

H.J. Larsen,

It is good practice to provide scrubbing brushes and footbaths so that people entering the orchard can clean their boots. The footbath solution we use at Future Orchard walks is a strong mix of household bleach you could also use methylated spirits or Farm Cleanse. Everyone entering the orchard needs to have clean boots including; casual workers, overseas travellers and contractors who visit orchards on a regular basis. It is also a good plan, not to take your work boots from home when travelling interstate or overseas so that you don’t bring back unwanted pests, diseases or weed seeds.

Make sure all orchard workers are familiar with the most important exotic apple and pear pest threats. Conduct a biosecurity induction session to explain required hygiene practices for people, equipment and vehicles in the orchard.

the orchard and monitor trees 4 Check frequently

Statewi de IPM

Fungal spores and bacteria of pests and diseases can be carried on people between orchards and horticultural regions and can spread on vehicles, equipment, clothing and shoes. It is good practice to maintain a visitor register and ensure all visitors are free from soil and plant material before entering or leaving the orchard.

1 Be aware of biosecurity threats

Jack Kelly Program Clark, UC

Once orchard clean-up is complete its then time to make sure there is plan in place to protect the orchard from visitors entering the property. Signage at the orchard front gate, external entrances and visitor parking areas can inform visitors of the impact of their visit and your commitment to orchard hygiene. A PDF of the sign can be sourced from Pomewest and printed through the local sign printers.

Plant Health Australia has identified six easy ways growers can reduce the threat of new pests impacting on their property.

Clemso n Extensio University USDA n Slide Cooper Series, Bugwoo ative d.org

Ensure winter pruning is completed to increase air flow for quicker canopy drying time and to improve spray penetration.

Reducing the threat

Univers ity Bugwoo of Georgia Plant Patholo d.org gy Archive,

load. Mulching can be combined with a ground application of urea. The slashing of the weed strip in late winter will also help to break up leaves and allow enough time for weeds/grasses to grow some new height to potentially inhibit spore dispersal.

MORE INFORMATION A copy of the manual can be found at the PHA website: www.planthealthaustralia. com.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/ Orchard-Biosecurity-Manual-for-theApple-and-Pear-Industry.pdf

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Autumn 2019 Future Orchard Walk

Climate, quality and post-harvest

BY SUSIE MURPHY WHITE PROJECT MANAGER, POMEWEST

A

rainy day in the middle of the Gala harvest what else could we want for but a Future Orchard Walk talking about the impacts of climate change, fruit quality and post-harvest. Rick Derry from T&G Global who manages the Jazz and Envy brands in Washington State USA spoke about his goal to achieve success on retail shelf amongst all the other competitors in the commodities and processed snack market. He said “this could only be achieved if everyone along the supply

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chain was participating in the quality program from the growers through to the orchard and packhouse managers and their staff along with the marketers and retailers. Consistency is key and this starts in the orchard, if you get it right in the orchard, packouts will improve”. The Jazz and Envy model was a good example of a single desk succeeding in a competitive market. Steve Spark from Ag First NZ spoke about the impacts of climate change that we will experience here in WA including; lack of winter chill, frost, hail, heat stress and drought. As Steve Spark said, “the key thing was to have a good weather forecast and to make sure orchards were managed to minimise the impact of changing climate. The key is to prepare for the climatic disaster before they strike”. The afternoon included a short bus trip across to John Hearman’s nursery while the rain stopped. John has diversified into growing his own apple trees in

recent years. Setting up a nursery on their property and now being able to supply other growers with high quality apple trees.

John’s is growing bench graft apple trees within a year in bags that can be transplanted without the shock that goes along with uplifting bare root trees. The establishment of these trees into new orchards or as fillers into recent plantings at anytime of the year is succeeding as trees are fast tracked and established much quicker than bare root trees. It was then back on the bus to the orchard where everyone was impressed with John’s new planting of Pipa Boo Pears. The in orchard presentations included an introduction to Tom Frankcomb from the Australian Pome Fruit Improvement Program who independently evaluates


POMEWEST

1

WA Apples go to town at...

Farmer on Your Plate BY NOELENE SWAIN FRESH FINESSE

2 1 Rick Derry T&G Global Washington Jazz and Envy brand manager. 2 John Hearman with his one year old nursery trees.

new varieties and certifies propagating material and rootstocks. Tom has recently taken on this role from Mark Harkin and has been visiting trial sites here in WA. Next Future Orchard Walk is on Monday 1st July 2019 Climatic events — Ways to mitigate climate risk with guest speakers Dean Rainham and Ross Wilson AgFirst NZ. MORE INFORMATION Contact Susie Murphy White: (08) 9777 0151 or susan.murphy-white@dpird.wa.gov.au ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Thanks to Orchard Walk host John Hearman.

W

A Apples joined 20 food producers and farming advocates at the annual Farmer on Your Plate event staged in Forest Place on 4th April 2019. Coordinated by Farming Champions, the full day event aimed to raise awareness of the importance of family farmers to all Australians in the city and country. The day was launched by Minister Alannah MacTiernan MLC, and was well supported by a range of politicians, farming advocates, industry representatives, media and social media influencers.

With lively entertainment from chef cooking demonstrations, live music and an animal farm, the event attracted locals and tourists of all ages, with a particularly strong attendance of office workers during traditional lunch hour. Visitors to the event were particularly interested to discover more about the local apple season, apple varieties and the local launch of the quality maturity testing program that has been rolled out in WA this season. MORE INFORMATION Contact Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@pomewest.net.au

Future Orchards® is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Apple and Pear Fund. It is funded by Hort Innovation using the apple and pear levy and funds from the Australian Government, and is delivered by APAL and AgFirst.

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This year over three tonnes of fresh fruit were sold!

33NARDIA St acy with Terry and Carol Martella .

Donnybrook D

BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

onnybrook hosted their annual Apple Festival over the Easter Weekend 29–21 April, and despite a weather forecast of doom and gloom, the sunshine prevailed and attendance was up almost 40% on previous years.

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Pomewest, an avid and long-term supporter of the event, again donated $2,000 to the fresh food sale and display. These funds assisted the main event and heart of the show — the Fresh Food Tent. Show goers were able to sample and help themselves to freshly picked apple and pears in a $15 per box deal, which was extremely popular. This year over three tonnes of fresh fruit were sold and the traditional show fare of toffee/caramel apples, and apple pies were sold out! The BRAVO™ apple was able to make its 2019 debut, and for the first time the stars aligned between the festival and harvest this year. Separate sales and tastings of the BRAVO™ apple were offered which assisted to build brand awareness for the apple. Thanks to the Martella and Sheehan families and the Fruit Barn for the dedicated work over the weekend.

It was fantastic that the consumers we able to meet and talk to the farmers one-on-one. It is so important our industry to communicate perspective and the importance of supporting local producers. In addition, celebrity chef Anna Gare fed over 500 samples to show goer’s and featured local apples, pears and ciders, Sabrina Hahn chatted about horticulture for over four hours, and children enjoyed free entertainment all contributing to making this event an extreme success. MORE INFORMATION Contact Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@pomewest.net.au


WA CITRUS

citrus

update WA Citrus

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contacts WA Citrus Committee Producer Committee Members Richard Eckersley, Chair m: 0417 911 534 e: chair@wacitrus.com.au Shane Kay Mary Ann O’Connor Andrew Sorgiovanni Daniel Ying Cliff Winfield

Affiliate Committee Members Damien Guthrey Brett Heather

WA Citrus Office Building 16, 3 Baron-Hay Court, SOUTH PERTH WA 6151 Bronwyn Walsh, Industry Development Manager m: 0400 873 875 e: industrymanager@wacitrus.com.au Kate Cox, Administrative Services m: 0439 899 600 e: admin@wacitrus.com.au Helen Newman, Biosecurity Officer e: biosecurity@wacitrus.com.au

what’s on... 2019 HortConnections WHEN June 24–26

WHERE Melbourne

Industry Day - Varieties WHEN July 15 WHEN July 16 WHEN July 18

WHERE Harvey WHERE Manjimup WHERE West Gingin

Citrus Australia Regional Forum WHEN November 26

WHERE Swan Valley TBC

2020 Citrus Australia National Market Outlook Forum WHEN March

WHERE TBC

International Citrus Congress WHEN November 8-13 WHERE Turkey

Please note dates and location of industry events are subject to confirmation based on availability of speakers, venues and attendance.

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33AUSTRALIAN delegation see first hand Asian citrus psyllid and HLB symptoms during USA tour.

USA HLB study tour.

From the Chair BY RICHARD ECKERSLEY CHAIR, WA CITRUS

M

any more heads are down in the West Australian citrus industry now that navel and mandarin season has started. This year new challenges of labour changes and data bars face the industry. Topics covered at the Tech Forum in Adelaide are in the Autumn edition of the Australia Citrus News magazine. The Forum allowed the chance to catch up with many WA growers and industry representatives. I took the opportunity to thank Nathan Hancock and his team for organising such a great event. The efforts of WA industry staff were acknowledged when Bronwyn Walsh received a mention from Nathan Hancock when receiving his Biosecurity award early in March for her contribution to the citrus canker response. Well done Bron. Lastly it was good for WA to have the opportunity to join the USA Huanglongbing (HLB) study tour in March. Thank you to Bronwyn and Helen Newman for taking the time and representing the WA industry.

Learnings from the travels of WA growers and staff are in this edition, thanks to all for their contributions. All the best for the season. MORE INFORMATION Contact Richard on 0417 911 534 or email chair@wacitrus.com.au


WA CITRUS

APC Citrus Sub-Committee News

33NEW national citrus canker levy commences July 1, 2019.

WA Regional Advisory Committee

BY MICK MANN CHAIR, APC CITRUS SUB-COMMITTEE

BY DAMIEN GUTHREY CHAIR WARAC, CITRUS AUSTRALIA

the economic damage that could have occurred.

Joseph Ling, member of Citrus Sub-Committee, joined Bronwyn and other APC Producer Committee representatives at the annual meeting with Agriculture Produce Commissioners. Hearing from each industry highlighted that labour is a shared challenge across multiple industries as is biosecurity.

From this month’s Citrus Australia eNews, Nathan Hancock reported in the CEO Update:

A fine of $25,000 and two years in prison could have been applied and I have contacted the Federal Department of Agriculture to seek an appeal of the sentence.

In June the approved recommendation on citrus FFS rates from the Pome, Citrus and Stone fruit producers committee for 19–20 were submitted to the APC Commissioners. The recommended rates were arrived at after discussion with members of WA Citrus Committee, the CSC and wider Pome and Stone fruit Producer Committee representatives.

In particular, it has been recommended that the biosecurity FFS rate be reduced for 19–20 to offset the new national citrus canker levy that commences July 1, 2019. The points considered in justifying this recommendation were that the budget could bear the reduction in rate given services required to date, that there would be monitoring and annual review of the national levy and biosecurity FFS rate and it was a function for addressing the biosecurity issue for WA growers. Approval for the rates by the Commissioners is pending.

“Citrus Australia is extremely disappointed at the ‘slap on the wrist’ issued to an Australian resident who attempted to smuggle citrus budwood into the country. John Victor Bigg was fined $7,000 for importing the prohibited item and providing false and misleading information to Customs officers.

Under new legislation Australians who now fail to declare plant or animal matter can receive fines up to $63,000 and up to five years in jail. The penalty is ultimately decided upon by the courts and they have to weigh up extenuating circumstances; however, I have written to both the Agriculture Minister David Littleproud and Shadow Agriculture Minister Joel Fitzgibbon and asked for their support in future cases of this nature by publicly recommending more severe penalties that would act as a deterrent to others.”

$7,000 fine for Australian resident who attempted to smuggle citrus budwood into the country.

The citrus plant cutting tested positive to two viruses Huanglongbing (HLB) and Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV); both are viruses that could cause serious impact to the citrus industry. The concealed material also contained insects. Although I’m grateful to the customs officer who found the cutting, I am extremely disappointed the judge did not take the opportunity to issue a severe penalty as a warning to others. A fine of $7,000 for importing a prohibited item and providing false and misleading information to Customs officers is grossly inadequate when you consider

Nathan also wrote to both Minister Littleproud and Mr Fitzgibbon to outline Citrus Australia’s position in key areas, including biosecurity, labour, water and chemicals, and where Government policy can assist our industry. MORE INFORMATION Media releases from Citrus Australia can be found at https://citrusaustralia.com.au

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Business By now many growers will be aware of the changes to the Horticulture Award rate for casual employees that have forced growers to look at their labour needs and the fit within tight budgets. Industry benchmarking has already identified Labour as a major component within costs of production so any increases in labour costs without increased returns from sales will add further pressure. For WA growers the application of these Award changes will depend on whether their business is a company, trust or sole trader. More information is on the FairWork website, www.fairwork.gov.au/contact-us. A message heard from the Tech Forum was that “Robotic picking technology in Israel is not far off commercial trials”. This technology may reduce the labour cost but increase capital or related investments in orchard structure for example. An article in the ACN outlines key points in relation to the role of technology and labour into the future from Ben Haslett from Woolenook Fruits.

The first set of data gathering from remote imaging of a WA citrus orchard is being analysed as part of a pilot study using satellite and fixed wing aircraft images. The second set will be done at harvest. This will investigate the use of this technology for measuring variation across an orchard block as well as its potential application for labour saving and improved accuracies in crop forecast. Along with reviewing the labour line item in business budgets, growers attending the Tech Forum reported, “Growers need to start planning their response to the detection of HLB/ACP in Australia. Do they want to remain in the citrus industry? Options need to be considered now so that when HLB/ACP is detected and tree production declines, eventually needing to be removed, growers will have an alternative source of income”.

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Growers benefit from attending national industry event A group of WA growers met in Mildura to join a wider grower group visiting orchards, pack sheds and juice plant between Mildura and Adelaide. They then also heard two days of presentations at the Tech Forum in Adelaide. Everyone who participated said they would recommend attending the Citrus Australia Tech Forum. Growers that attended with support from WA Citrus had the following comments: “This is every second-year forum, which I highly recommend for latest updates and trends in the industry along with networking with other growers.” “Anyone will learn something – catching up with other growers and seeing what they’re up to. You don’t get to hear from them if you stay in WA, it’s good to see if we’re on the right track.” “Only time of year that isn’t ‘bad for us’ so we could manage being away from the farm.” “A lot of interesting speakers on some good topics.” “I find that it is a good way to see how things compare to our orchard. You hear lots of stories about how much better the industry is over east and to see it with your own eyes is good.” “We were quite surprised at the amount of young people that attended the forum, which we have since

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kept in contact with and shared what we are doing on either side of the country.” “I had the opportunity to meet some new growers and trade exhibitors, which I will be able to contact and share information with.” “The event was a great success where we gained a lot of new knowledge and met a lot of new beneficial contacts.” “The biggest benefit from the forum was by far the networking with other growers from around the country.” Participants with WA Citrus support who contributed to articles were: • Mary Ann and John O’Connor • Michael Kay • Andy Hinton • Andrew Pergoliti • Richard Eckersley. Over the coming year different regions have their own industry days and next year is the Citrus Australia National Market Outlook Forum, International Citrus Congress and potentially some international visits by interstate groups. Based on the experience of growers in the recent tour, WA growers, or their representatives, are encouraged to consider attending these events or their own trips and may be eligible for support from industry.


WA CITRUS

Reminder to protect pesticides and use other tools for pest management “We will be Dan Papacek, Entomologist from Bugs for Bugs reported at the Forum that over a period of 20 years growers in Queensland steadily adopted IPM. Resistance in red scale and mites meant populations became uncontrollable. This drove innovation in IPM such as Aphytis mass rearing and systematic monitoring procedures for both pest and beneficials. Predatory mites and cultural practices also became important components. More recently several new compounds have become available to citrus orchardists, as very powerful and effective products. During this time the industry has been moving back towards reliance on ‘silver-bullet’ chemical solutions. Dan posed the question whether industry was heading for another ‘time of resistance’. More about Dan’s presentation is in the ACN. “Chemicals are not the problem — the way we use them is the issue.”

reviewing our own spray application — to look at coverage,” WA grower participant.

Justin Lane from Mildura Fruit Company talked about chemical use to protect available chemistry. MFC have developed a pesticide strategy for their 140+ growers to ensure all fruit delivered is within MRLs for all available markets. They encourage the use of IPM and pest scouts and assess the spray diaries of all growers before each season. See ACN for more information. Enroute to Adelaide, the WA group visited Costa Exchange orchards and were treated to an in-field spray demonstration. Matt Strmiska of ADAPTIV demonstrated the importance of checking spray coverage within the canopy to ensure efficacy of the applied product. Some of the key points were included in the ACN Autumn edition. WA Citrus has invited Matt to visit WA to present at an industry day.

33PAPER showed limited penetration of spray if factors for good coverage aren't met.

Training staff in pest and beneficial identification, of both existing and biosecurity threats, were identified as actions to take from the Forum.

During the visit to Pyap Produce tour participants learned the Arnolds are looking at growing interrow crops to provide safe homes for beneficial insects in an attempt to combat this problem. Building on Dan’s message that IPM is a robust solution, Geoff Cornwell from FMC explained the mode of action and uses of their new product Exirel. Exirel is registered for the control of Light brown apple moth (LBAM) and Kelly’s citrus thrips, and for the suppression of Fuller’s rose weevil. Exirel offers a new mode of action which may help in managing insect resistance to other commonly used chemicals. Then Kevin Bodnaruk, AKC consulting, spoke about the challenges coming our way regarding future access to chemicals for pest control. Regulatory pressures, data gaps, new chemistry and lack of MRLs are some of the challenges.

Water and nutrition There were limited presentations on nutrition and water management at the Tech Forum however Trade displays included Elders, EE Muir & Sons and chemical companies. During the preforum tour, a visit to Pyap Produce, revealed that the netting had reduced crop water use by around 30%. With good irrigation and nutrition practices and application of stress at the correct times, they have not seen a delay in colour development under the netting. The irrigation deficit research was also discussed and presented during the tour and at the Forum. This is in the latest Australian Citrus News (ACN). In WA research into remote management of irrigation systems is being investigated and a new topic of discussion is new software being developed by some firms. WA Grower WINTER 2019

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During the visit to Pyap Produce in Loxton, South Australia, WA growers were reminded to be vigilant and keep their orchards free of citrus gall wasp. An interesting point raised at this site was that systemic chemical control of citrus gall wasp (using group 4 chemicals) has caused some other citrus pests to become a problem. A WA grower commented: “They tried to control it with pesticide sprays which seemed to have killed off a few wasps but there were galls that looked fresh. We need to make sure this is not an issue in WA. We need to keep our eyes open to make sure we don’t get gall wasp and that we are ready to act. Our staff need to understand what it is they are looking for. So, a picture in the staff room needs to be up so people understand how damaging it can be.” In WA it is time to look for galls caused by gall wasps. From June galls are easiest to see. They tend to be more abundant in the lower canopy close to the skirt line. A good monitoring technique is to check underneath the canopy and look for shoots growing at a right angle from the main branch.

What to do • Monitor for gall wasp in your orchard from April, the easiest time to see and remove them is in June • Remove galls as soon as you find them — preferably in autumn and winter • Mulch any branches that are cutoff after mid-July to kill the wasps inside the galls • If you find gall wasp in your orchard, please report it to DPIRD. MORE INFORMATION Citrus gall wasp or any other pest or disease can be reported to the DPIRD Pest and Disease Information Service on (08) 9368 3080 or email padis@dpird. wa.gov.au or by using the MyPestGuide app https://mypestguide.agric.wa.gov.au/ reporter/#/

33GALLS from citrus gall wasps, exit holes from wasps are visible.

Image © Plant Biosecurity CRC

Look for citrus galls now

Managing fruit fly update

Don’t be caught off guard by fruit fly. Monitor and bait for fruit fly, especially in mandarins.

At the Tech Forum Dan Papacek from Bugs for Bugs, explained that good results are possible with fruit fly control if you understand the biology and behaviour of the pest and take a system approach to management. Tools available in a systems approach: • Protein bait sprays • Monitoring • Male annihilation • Sanitation.

In WA it is time to look for galls caused by gall wasps. From June galls are easiest to see.

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Area Wide Management via ‘Fruit Fly Force’ has been in place for around 15 years in the Central Burnett QLD. It is industry funded and has seen a steady reduction in fruit fly pressure over time. It is now rare for growers to experience fruit fly damage if they ‘get it right’. MORE INFORMATION An update on SITplus fruit fly research and development from Dan Ryan, Program Director, is included in the latest ACN.


WA CITRUS

Free quality testing for WA citrus fee-forservice payers.

33KEEP monitoring the internal maturating rates of fruit closely for new varieties to ensure it meets Australian Citrus Standards before harvest.

ty li a u q t i u r f g n i v o r p Im Some good results from testing WA fruit and preharvest sampling have started with this season’s navels and mandarins. Keep monitoring the internal maturating rates of fruit closely for new varieties to ensure it meets Australian Citrus Standards before harvest. Imperial mandarins have been variable in results in previous seasons so be vigilant. Supplying fruit that does not meet these standards places poor eating quality fruit into the mouths of consumers. The resulting consumer backlash has impacts on the entire citrus industry.

WA citrus fee-for-service payers can have the internal quality of fruit independently tested without charge (two samples per variety per grower). Just drop your samples to any agent at Market City, Canning Vale, or direct at TQAS in Canning Vale ‘over the road’ from the markets. On external quality, WA growers heard from Ryan Arnold of Pyap Produce that when they lost their windbreaks due to drought, there

was a related drop in pack outs, and along with the need for seedless Afourer mandarins helped in the decision to net 20ha of the orchard. A WA grower noted that east coast was Netting a lot more for seediness issue in afourers. Under the netting the Arnolds are achieving a 70t/ha pack-out on their Cara Cara navels; other navel varieties have also done well. They have also achieved seedless Afourer mandarins but say the netting hasn’t had a noticeable impact on the imperial mandarins. Also, an increase in quality from 40% grade 1 to 70% and higher. Research in improving premium fruit pack outs is on-going in WA with a report due this year. A trial investigating the use of drape net on mandarins to reduce seediness is also underway, due for harvest in late August. While the impact of this style of netting solution on reducing wind blemish is still being analysed its impact on reducing seediness is clear.  MORE INFORMATION Contact Bronwyn Walsh on 0400 873 875 or industrymanager@wacitrus.com.au

Afourer mandarin management At Costa Exchange farms Andrew Harty took tour participants for a look at the Afourers and talked about the issues they are having. Trees that have got to an age of 10 years have started to reduce volumes. They have been trialling different ways of pruning such as hedging and Y-pruning to see if they can rectify the issues. So far “Y” pruning helps but this caused them problems as the regrowth is too fast and they pretty much get back to the same point before pruning, as the regrowth is so vigorous. The site visit was complemented by presentation by David Stevens and Andrew Harty at the Tech Forum. MORE INFORMATION An article is in Autumn edition of Australian Citrus News.

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Lessons from the USA battle with Huanglongbing - nurseries, orchards and the public

At the Tech Forum, Peter Creaser from the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources gave an overview of the increasing pressures the Australian quarantine system is under and some of the challenges we face at the border. Some of the national statistics are:

20.5 million international travellers cleared at sea and airports

158 million mail items checked

The system in place tackles the impacts of trade, tourism and migration. Funding in 2018–19 Budget provides $313 million for biosecurity and agricultural trade and there is a planned import container levy. Where a pest/disease isn’t captured by the quarantine system, there is a lag-time between its arrival and its detection, allowing it to spread.

33THREE day Huanglongbing conference.

18,000

international vessels inspected

45,000 sea containers inspected

Additional presentations included Nerida Donovan, Citrus pathologist from NSWDPI, who highlighted the major threats to Australian citrus biosecurity and local publications to help with awareness and detection. Auscitrus Manager, Tim Herrmann, presented as well as showed tour participants around the new and expanding budwood facility at Dareton NSW.

340,000

items of biosecurity concern seized from travellers

25,000 diagnostic tests performed

Historically, budwood at Auscitrus was grown outdoors and was tested regularly for graft transmissible disease. This system offered no protection from insect borne disease or insects. A risk analysis undertaken by the Auscitrus board identified the need to move to a fully enclosed protected structure capable of excluding insect vectored diseases such as Huanglongbing (HLB), which pose an ever-increasing biosecurity threat to the Australian citrus industry. Wayne Parr talked about nursery best practice and the role of protected nurseries as part of HLB management. The impact of the presentations was obvious as a common message brought back by WA growers from the Tech Forum, was ‘Be proactive, plan and be prepared’ for a biosecurity outbreak. Josh Clementson from Nutrano presented on the measures they had taken in implementing a biosecurity plan, an important measure for their business in the citrus canker response. Two passionate and informative presentations by Nate Jameson from Brite Leaf Nursery, Florida, about the USA experience of HLB are captured in the Australian Citrus News (ACN) magazine. Visiting Nate in the USA was also part of the industry study tour that immediately following the Forum in March.

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WA CITRUS

Be proactive, plan and be prepared’ for a biosecurity outbreak.

All stakeholders are part of the puzzle when it comes to managing biosecurity: growers, government, nurseries, retailers and home owners. A safe, clean nursery industry is a critical part, however if all stakeholders are not taking action trees will quickly become infected in the field. In Florida, many growers thought if trees were produced disease free, they could control psyllids with spray programs and the industry would be normal. This has not been the case, and one of the mistakes was not addressing the other stakeholders sooner. Many of Nate’s message rang true to those involved in the current National Citrus Canker response. Some of the measures implemented in the USA are already being undertaken in Australia, such as the actions by Auscitrus mentioned earlier. See more information in ACN.

Bronwyn and Helen joined the study tour to California and Florida to see first-hand what symptoms look like and hear from experts on progress to manage this serious disease. The tour was funded by HIA project CT18003, CAL and individuals. A comprehensive report is being finalised on the tour with the following information: • How the disease spreads and its distribution • Characteristics of ACP and HLB • ACP & HLB detection, incl canines and PCR

Comments from WA growers who attended the Forum were: “To make sure we follow procedures now to ensure we do not get these issues in the future. I think we have been quite relaxed over the years and need to ensure we get it right and get it right early. As it will always be easier to keep issues out rather than trying to remove the issues afterwards.” “To make improvements to our current biosecurity. For example: an automatic gate. Better signage for potential visitors to the farm especially the general public that just turn up.” “Review current practices & procedures & look at response options.” “Make changes to our biosecurity on farm with a more robust plan and restricted vehicle movements on farm.” • Controlling the spread: policy directions • Research: control and management. A WA industry representative will be on a national biosecurity sub-committee being formed by Citrus Australia. Closer to home, as part of the current National Citrus Canker Response, Susanna Driessen, General Manager Emergency Preparedness and Response, Plant Health Australia is visiting Kununurra in June to visit local citrus growers affected by the citrus canker national response. Nathan

“Time frame from detection of HLB/ACP to progression to nonproductive trees.” “Looking at alternative sources of income.” “A lack of information at the time of an outbreak can lead to a ‘Let’s stop until we learn more’ response. This loses valuable time in making decision and acting promptly. Today we have time and can be proactive, not reactive. Start by discussing options. Don’t reinvent the wheel. Travel and see what others have done and learn from their mistakes,” WA grower participant at TechForum, adapted for clarification.

Hancock, CEO Citrus Australia will be joining her as national industry representative on the response. Susanna will also meet with DPIRD staff and WA industry representatives while in WA. Jeff Milne, Biosecurity for Citrus Australia, will be visiting WA to help growers conduct a biosecurity risk assessment and develop a biosecurity plan for their business. MORE INFORMATION Contact Bronwyn Walsh on 0400 873 875 or email industrymanager@wacitrus.com.au

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Good hygiene in pack shed sanitisation is, so we will be reviewing our cleaning procedures in shed,” WA citrus packer. Benefits listed by WA packers were: • Lemon degreening and cold storage procedures and guidelines • EE Muirs postharvest knowledge and support

33THE separate sterile packing room at Woolenook Fruits packing shed.

WA growers visited three packing sheds as part of the tour in March: Mildura Fruit Company (Mildura VIC) and Woolenook Fruits (Murtho SA) and Costa Exchange.

Woolenook have also upgraded their shed and have separated the grading from the packing in a separate, sterile room.

Each shed had excellent general hygiene practices to maintain control of postharvest pests and decay with regular monitoring and rotation of fungicide groups. Each had also recently incorporated additional chlorine washing/bathing facilities to improve management of postharvest decay and to remove quarantine pests for international markets. Costa Exchange has also incorporated a warm oil bath into the packing line to remove mealybug nestled around the fruit calyx for the Korea–China–Thailand export market.

The visit highlighted the cost savings possible with new technology. Mildura Fruit Company have upgraded their shed allowing them to reduce the pack shed workforce from 36 to 18 people. A presentation by John Golding, NSWDPI, during the forum also reiterated the message of the importance of shed hygiene. More information in ACN. This message was certainly received by WA packers who attended the tour and Forum: “John Golding, NSWDPI explained how important pack shed cleaning and

• Catching up with John Golding and attending his talks about fungicide applications, Sanitisation and chemical demonstrations! We were also lucky to have him on the bus with us so got to talk about our shed and what practices we should be doing to reach our goal of better fungicide control • Information about ‘Chairman’ which is an upcoming postharvest fungicide • The highlight of the trip was attending Woolenook packing shed facility which really opened our eyes to his shed layout and his hygiene practices —— As a result, we have come back with a new outlook on shed hygiene and sanitisation ideas • MFC shed tour and looking at their new tray filling machine. Lastly, the roles sheds can play in the biosecurity system, that staff from the pack shed must be trained in the identification of exotic biosecurity threats.

Future varieties to meet market demands Mara Milner from Citrus Australia presented results from the tree census, in particular reporting that afourer and lemon plantings were on the rise. See the ACN for more information.

We will be reviewing our variety mix on farm because of the tree census information.

WA grower attending TechForum.

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Consumer demand and trends are important drivers for choosing varieties. David Monks from NSWDPI will be visiting WA in July to visit evaluation sites and discuss variety evaluation results at Industry Events. Last year was the first year of fruit for some varieties of new valencias, navels and red flesh navels in the program. He will also report on updates on mandarins and other fruit in the program. Growers visiting the Dareton Research Stations in March heard from Dave Monks about variety evaluation work underway at the research station. Two mandarin varieties that have

shown tolerance to HLB in Florida are part of the evaluation. Also, at the Dareton Research Station, Tahir Khurshid spoke about his current rootstock evaluation project (HIA project CT17002) aimed at testing the performance of new rootstocks across the country in a range of soil and climate conditions. Among the rootstocks on trial are some HLB (citrus greening) tolerant stocks from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). It is hoped that more rootstocks will become available from the USDA and University of Florida for inclusion in the trial.


STONEFRUIT

stonefruit

update

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STONEFRUIT

Picking to pruning and now planting

contacts Stonefruit Sub-Committee Danny DiMarco, Chair e: dimarconson@gmail.com Anthony Caccetta

e: antc83@hotmail.com

Bruno Delsimone

e: bdelsimone@mercermooney.com.au

Sebastian Fiolo

e: fiolo@bigpond.com

Anthony Fullam

e: afullam@wn.com.au

Michael Padula

e: mickpadula@yahoo.com.au

Mark Scott

e: markpscott@bigpond.com

Shay Crouch, Value Chain Facilitator

e: shay.crouch@perthnrm.com p: (08) 9374 3306

APC fee for service charge Stone fruit effective from 1 November 2009 Type of fruit

$/kg

All fresh stone fruit (apricots, cherries, loquats, nectarines, peaches and plums)

0.015

Processing fruit

0.006

what’s on... 2019 Indonesia Grower Tour WHEN 9-13 July WHERE Jakarta, Indonesia A delegation of stonefruit growers will visit Jakarta to meet with current and potential WA plum buyers to learn and understand their expectations, the workings of the supply chain and the Indonesian market.

BY SHAY CROUCH VALUE CHAIN FACILITATOR, STONEFRUIT 33AUTUMN sunset over a local orchard.

W

ith the season all wrapped up we have now moved onto pruning and hoping those opening rains are followed by consistent rainfall over the winter, allowing us to plant exciting new varieties, or those which have continued to perform well. The 2018–19 season saw the build of a recognisable logo and brand emphasising local in season WA stonefruit. This assisted with good sales in stonefruit throughout the picking season, though it is to be noted that yield was considered lower than the previous year. Hail, Rainbow Lorikeets and rain during

Hort Connections WHEN 24-26 June WHERE Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre With the theme ‘Growing Our Food Future’ horticultural industry members will be inspired to aim high as they hear from keynote speakers, network and visit the trade stands.

Asia Fruit Logistics WHEN 4-6 September WHERE Hong Kong, Asia World Expo Where every link of the international fresh fruit and vegetable supply chain meets face to face each year to make contacts and do business.

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33HAIL damage to nectarines in October 2018, costing tens of thousands of dollars to the industry.

picking caused ink-staining of fruit and played a role in decreasing yields and grower returns over the season. Below is an image of the hail damage which occurred in the hills in October 2018. Thinning had already taken place across these varieties making it even harder to find a saleable piece of fruit on the trees.


STONEFRUIT

Australia’s

Summerfruit Exports A Summerfruit Australia report from February 2019 already had Australia exporting 29% more summer fruit over the 18–19 season compared to the previous year. This increase has a lot to do with the increased market access to China which recorded an 89% increase on the volume of fruit, to the same time last year. Nectarines are the largest stonefruit type exported with 7,934 tonnes being moved, though the biggest increase has been seen in Peaches with an increase of 38% up to 5,226 tonnes between July and February.

33EXAMPLE of the in-store posters which were produced which show a clear brand for West Australian stonefruit.

Point-of-sale materials have been produced for all the shops, these posters are now printed and ready to be used across stores come the new picking season. They have our recognisable logo and brand across them and highlight the joy eating a great piece of local stonefruit can bring.

The addition of the Buy West Eat Best logo also adds to its value as the logo is recognisable by 70% of WA shoppers. The posters are designed to increase the in-store visibility of stonefruit and encourage people to include fresh, in-season WA stonefruit into their regular shopping. The high quality of the stonefruit supplied by growers will be essential in creating repeat business. ●

An aim for the next season is to increase the number of people going to the shops and buying quality stonefruit.

The results of this analysis from Summerfruit Australia also showed that prices were up an average of 9% to $4.07p/kg. The export of summerfruit brings in approximately AUD$74.34m with this expected to increase significantly as growers establish their businesses for greater export access.

Currently China receives most of their fruit from the east coast and makes up 46% of the Australian export market.

WA growers are yet to fully take advantage of this open market through are looking to do this in the coming seasons. For those that are interested in sending to China next season, it is necessary for you to be thinking about setting up your blocks, pest management systems and registering through the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR). ● Summerfruit Australia contract Fresh Intelligence Consulting for this export market research.

A Summerfruit First Through DPIRD’s Asian Market Success project we have successfully secured funding to carry out in-market research for improving our export capacity for plums into Indonesia.

The project will work with DPIRD, the WA Trade Office in Jakarta, WA exporters, Summerfruit Australia and other supply chain links to engage growers with Indonesian retailers and buyers. The trip will improve grower understanding of the entire supply chain for plums, and other stonefruit, into Indonesia and what requirements are necessary for our WA products to continue having a presence in their markets. It will be the first time the WA stonefruit industry has coordinated such a project for its growers, and we are looking forward to this opportunity to improve

our current market situation and build a strong working relationship with one of our closest neighbours. Indonesia already buys WA plums and we are looking to improve this supply and partnership into the future.

The participating growers will be required to report back and present their learnings to other growers upon their return. This engagement will further the knowledge and learnings from those who went to Jakarta to those who were unable, allowing individual growers to assess if the Indonesian market is one which fits into their business model. The funding also includes producing promotional material for use in stores and for the Indonesian retailers for the 2020 plum season.

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Strategic Direction

Points of interest

T

he WA Stonefruit Committee has been focussed on founding a strategic plan to underpin industry direction for the years to come. It will underpin the project work which is to be carried out to ensure the industry continues to improve and become sustainable into the future. The committee workshopped the strategic plan with Paul Bodlovich, CEO of Perth NRM, as the facilitator to deliver on a draft plan which was presented to the growers at the AGM in late May.

The plan includes; a purpose of the committee, the vision for the industry, as well as actions and goals to achieve this vision. Once the feedback from the AGM is consolidated into the strategy and recirculated, it will become a document which the committee works with and checks any upcoming projects to, making sure they align with the long-term goals and vision of the industry. We thank all those who participated in providing feedback, completing the grower survey and having those conversations with your committee members which all fed into the production and workshopping of this document. ●

33APC Stonefruit Sub-committee workshopping the Strategic Plan.

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APPLY NOW!

Register your orchard and packhouse.

Register for China now China is open for business and if you are looking to export into this market in the 19–20 season you need to be making contact to register your orchard and packhouse. This starts by making sure you are a member of Summerfruit Australia Limited (SAL) followed by filling out an application. You need to be registered well before the season has started as you need to be carrying out the required pest and disease management while the crop is growing. ●

APC Annual meeting with Committees Every year Danny and Shay sit down with the other APC committees to discuss how the seasons have transpired over the past 12 months. This year the meeting was led by a presentation by Austral Fisheries CEO David Carter about the social licence to farm. They have built a brand around ‘Caring for our People, our Product and our Planet’ and demonstrate this through actions that could be considered beyond core business but are essential to ensuring they are able to continue fishing for many years to come. They are custodians of the ocean and take responsibility for its condition. David’s presentation about their on-going battle with illegal fishers could be relatable considering the current situation surrounding animal welfare and modern slavery claims within agriculture. These were some of the issues raised as all committees had the chance to discuss their progresses and constraints, over the 18–19 year. ●

Grower email updates Grow stonefruit and get this magazine but not the grower email updates? Make sure you contact Shay so she can add you to the email list. The regular emails include all that she has been up to of recent, any pressing issues that are of concern to the stonefruit industry, updates from the markets and any upcoming opportunities. A great resource for all stonefruit growers, email shay.crouch@perthnrm. com to make sure you’re not missing out. ● For more information contact Shay via email or phone (08) 9374 3306.


YOUR BUSINESS

your

business Your business WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR BUSINESS

Control your focus for success BY BRYN EDWARDS BENCHMARK LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

W

hile analysing the Financial Planning and Benchmarking data last year, I was really intrigued in what were some of the key elements that resulted in the Top 25% profitable growers actually being in the Top 25%.

While we identified some key management practises relating to robust management record keeping and holding yourself accountable to financial budgets and plans, I still wanted to go deeper than this. What were some of the traits and habits among the Top 25%? As you may or may not know, before becoming the benchmarking lead at vegetablesWA, I spent the previous 15+ years as a business consultant focused on fixing business problems and challenges. I entered this through

studying psychology, in particular Business Psychology. So a key element of my work previously was focusing on the individuals within an organisation — this is important as the majority of businesses are NOT machines, but a collection of individuals centred around delivering an outcome (although I know many business owners wished it was just a machine!).

I’m a firm believer that ‘success leaves clues’ and that by understanding a successful person’s mindset and approach then you can model it for yourself to receive similar results. Reflecting across conversations with all the individual business owners that had participated, what I noticed was a key differentiating factor was whether an individual choose to focus on issues that could be controlled or not. Growers in the Top 25% of profitability focused mainly on areas and issues that they could control while growers in the Bottom 25% of profitability focused mainly on issue that they couldn’t control (Table 1). Furthermore, when challenged to respond by arising issues that were genuinely out of their control, Top 25% growers found ways to bring as much of their response back into their control and reduce the impact than the Bottom 25%*.

TABLE 1 Things you can manage

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33MANAGING and leading a vegetable business is a fully involved and large job. Your time, focus and resources are scarce and it’s your job to deploy them as effectively as possible to achieve the best return.

On one level this makes sense, but it’s worth thinking about this more deeply to truly understand it so that you can adopt this for yourself. Managing and leading a vegetable business is a fully involved and large job. Your time, focus and resources are scarce and it’s your job to deploy them as effectively as possible to achieve the best return. If your focus of a day, week or month is centred on issues and items that you believe you can’t control or take action towards then this is wasted energy and focus and progress will reduced. If your focus is deployed towards taking control and action to regain control and move things forward, then progress will accelerate.

Things I can control

Things that are out of my control

How can I bring them back into my control

Choice of vegetables I grow

Pest Invasions

Strong biosecurity plan

Time of year I grow my vegetables

Weather events

Choice of variety

Production volume

Market price

Agent/merchant negotiation

Who I employ

Employee capability

Thorough induction and training program

Irrigation system

Bore pump malfunction

Regular servicing

Choice of inputs

Over supply in the market

Grow less in the future

WA Grower WINTER 2019


YOUR BUSINESS

FreshcareOnline

your access to the latest Freshcare resources Ensure your employees are capable with thorough induction and training programs.

So this sounds great as a concept but ‘give me some examples!!’ I would be demanding right now if I were in your boots. I know many would like the answer to why the Top 25% are in that bracket to be something more complex and less basic but that in itself tells the same story. MORE INFORMATION Happy to discuss this further or have you prove this theory wrong by participating in the Financial Review and Benchmarking project — give me a ring on 0417 409 821. * Remember Top 25% of profitability averaged 19% Return on Capital and average return of $74,191/ha, while the Bottom 25% of profitability averaged -6% Return on Capital and average return of $50,198/ha].

A

ll businesses participating in the Freshcare program have access to the latest Freshcare Standards, training resources, forms and factsheets via logon to FreshcareOnline. FreshcareOnline can be access from the Freshcare website: www.freshcare.com.au

2. Certificates — allows you access/ download your latest Freshcare certificate(s).

Once you are on the Freshcare website, you will need to click on the link at the top right ‘FreshcareOnline Login’. The browser will then take you to page that will ask you to login to your FreshcareOnline account. FreshcareOnline is best viewed from a laptop or desktop computer; however, it can also be access from handheld or mobile devices with internet access.

3. Customers — allows you to view/edit the list of customers that are linked to your profile and have access view to your current certificate.

All registered Freshcare businesses are provided with FreshcareOnline account details which include a username and password that are emailed out upon joining.

4. Audits — details the business audit history and list of corrective action records (CARs) if applicable. 5. Certification Bodies (CB) — allows you to view the contact details of your most recent CB. 6. Training — allows you to view ‘My Training’, a list of courses that have been completed by members of the business; also displays ‘Linked Training’ that has been undertaken by other trainees linked to the business.

If you are having trouble finding your logon details — try the forgotten username and or password options on the website of call Freshcare on 1300 853 508 or (02) 8039 9999 for assistance.

7. Resources — this section allows you to download Freshcare resources including the Standard, Forms (in word or pdf) and Factsheets for each of Freshcare programs.

Once logged in, you will notice that your business details should be at the top right of screen and to the left there will be a ‘select’ box that you can click on for a dropdown menu providing access to the following:

I would encourage all growers to take the time to login and familiarise yourself with the FreshcareOnline content and functions as it will make servicing your Freshcare system a whole lot easier!

1. Freshcare profile — gives you access to view the current details Freshcare has for your business; you can also update your details here if required.

MORE INFORMATION For further information, please contact Freshcare Ltd or email Joel Dinsdale at joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au.

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YOUR BUSINESS

Freshcare

underpinning compliance and market access

F

BY CLARE HAMILTONBATE GENERAL MANAGER – INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT, FRESHCARE LTD

ood safety compliance is a fundamental requirement for businesses across all sectors of the Australian fresh produce supply chain.

Freshcare is Australia’s largest and most widely adopted fresh produce assurance program, at the forefront of domestic and international food safety compliance, underpinning confidence in the safety and quality of Australian fresh produce from paddock to plate.

“It’s important that Freshcare achieves and maintains the GFSI benchmark recognition, to ensure ongoing market acceptance by the major Australian retailers. It also demonstrates that Freshcare’s food safety systems are aligned with world best practice, which is another boost in confidence for Australian fresh produce.”

Benchmarking to GFSI has meant changes to the Freshcare on farm food safety and quality standard, with FSQ4.1 due for release on the 1st July 2019.

“At Freshcare, our standards are continually reviewed to ensure they comply with the requirements of all key stakeholders across the supply chain, incorporate the most recent science, and remain practical and relevant for industry,” General Manager of Industry Development, Clare HamiltonBate explained.

“We recognise growers have worked hard to meet the existing requirements of Freshcare FSQ4. We aim to ease the transition to FSQ4.1 by providing participating businesses with the information and resources needed (factsheets, templates etc) to meet the new requirements. Our eLearning modules and training resources will also be updated,” Ms HamiltonBate explained.

Since 2016, Freshcare has been recognised as one of the base schemes under the Harmonised Australian Retailer Produce Scheme (HARPS). To maintain this approval, Freshcare is in the final stages of benchmark assessment and compliance against the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) — the international benchmark model for best practice in food safety systems.

The move to FSQ4.1 will require updates to management records, policies and procedures. There are also additional requirements related to managing food safety risk, particularly risks related to worker health and hygiene requirements. Businesses will have the remainder of 2019 to transition to the updated standard. From 1 January 2020, all Freshcare on farm audits will be conducted against FSQ4.1.

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FSQ4.1 is due for release on the 1st July 2019.

What to expect in Freshcare FSQ4.1 Freshcare will continue to update industry on the changes to come with FSQ4.1 as the GFSI benchmarking process progresses. As we advance to the final stages of the benchmark process there are likely to be some small additional changes to the standard. Once all GFSI feedback is incorporated, the standard is scheduled for release to industry in early July. Once released, FSQ4.1 will be available for download from the Freshcare website, along with updated Freshcare Rules and resources to assist in implementation including: transition guide, factsheets and forms. Current businesses registered to the Freshcare FSQ4 Standard will also receive a hard copy of the FSQ4.1 transition guide and forms via post.


YOUR BUSINESS

Important info: • Freshcare FSQ4.1 will be released in July 2019, businesses are required to transition over from FSQ4 to FSQ4.1 for their 2020 audit • All audits from the 1 January 2020 will be to FSQ4.1 • Freshcare will provide resources to assist participants in the transition to FSQ4.1, updates to come via monthly e-newsletters and the Freshcare website • Freshcare trainers can be contacted to provide businesses with assistance in the new requirements and in preparation for audits in 2020

So, what are the areas of change and what will it mean for your business? In FSQ4.1 businesses will need to establish a ‘food safety policy with measurable objectives’, a document that will encompass and expand on the existing ‘commitment statement’. This change links business policy with objective measurements of performance that can be monitored, such as reduced customer complaints; reduced levels of rejections etc. A management review process has also been introduced to the FSQ4.1 standard, requiring the owner or senior management within each business to review the food safety and quality system at least once a year. Again this is focussing on business performance in areas such as: compliance with procedures and records; internal and external audits; corrective actions; rejections. One of the major changes in FSQ4.1 will be the requirement for businesses to document procedures or work instructions for activities that impact

food safety. What does this actually mean in practice? It means a business needs to write down the requirements for activities such as: handwashing; the operation of wash baths; flumes and treatment tanks; labelling and traceability. The documented procedures help to demonstrate a consistent and correct approach to food safety management. Freshcare will provide templates for key procedures. Another new area for Freshcare FSQ4.1, is a focus on incident management. An Incident management plan will detail the steps to be taken in planning for, during and after an incident or event to minimise the impact on the business. It is intended to help businesses anticipate, prevent or prepare for disruptions such as: fire; flood or storms; transport issues; computer or system crashes; or illness; product contamination (micro, allergens, chemical residues); supply chain interruptions; and detail how to respond and recover from them. Freshcare will continue to keep you updated on the changes to come and what they mean for your business.

• Certification Bodies are not required to offer audits to FSQ4.1 until 1 January 2020. It will be an individual business decision and they will be using the lead up time to upskill their audit teams in the new requirements. If you would like to go to audit to FSQ4.1 ahead of January 2020, please first check with your Certification Body and where necessary, contact Freshcare for assistance in scheduling.

MORE INFORMATION For further information on the GFSI benchmark process, including questions & answers, visit: www.freshcare.com.au/gfsi You can also contact the Freshcare Team at info@freshcare.com.au or phone: 1300 853 508 or (02) 8039 9999.

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YOUR BUSINESS

iAuditor

Build checklists, conduct inspections, file reports iAuditor functions are:

D

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

o you have forms which need to be completed regularly for Freshcare or your Quality Assurance system? Instead of you having lots of spreadsheets there is a Cloud based option which can make your life easier.

iAuditor is a solution which The Loose Lettuce Company have been trialling for four months, it has saved them time and money and countless files of paper. Laura Dobra, Quality Assurance Manager has converted the old forms into online forms which are accessed by processing and field staff via an iPad and login and this has made it easier for staff which provides a dashboard for Laura to manage.

One of the forms which would be relevant to most growers would be your spray record, you can set up an online form which will prompt you for all of the information required and then save it in the cloud. When it comes to audit time you can run a report for the auditor or you can show them the forms online. If you are a smaller business with only one person then this is a free option for you and setting up the forms is easy as you can upload your current form for it to convert or start a new one. With easy online help options, why wouldn’t you give it a try!

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Empower your workers to be your eyes in the field iAuditor is an inspection app used to empower your workers in the field. Combined with the web platform, iAuditor provides visibility and insights to help raise safety and quality standards across an organisation. Your team can collect consistent data, standardise operations, send reports, identify failed areas and get problems resolved.

Setup checklist forms in minutes Convert your current paper checklists or Excel™ spreadsheets into smart inspection forms in minutes. Our drag and drop template builder makes it easy to create customised forms.


YOUR BUSINESS

The inspection software behind every great team Empower your team to conduct inspections and collect detailed information.

Take pictures and annotate them Capture photos using your device’s camera, quickly snap and attach images to an inspection.

Add logic to make your forms smarter Make your inspections quicker and easier to complete by showing and hiding form fields as needed. Smart fields

Dynamic fields

Add conditional logic to display or hide fields based on previous responses.

Add a set of questions that can be duplicated on the fly as needed.

Add your location information GPS functionality makes it easy to identify exact locations during an inspection. Drop a pin to generate an address with coordinates.

Access inspection forms anywhere, any time Instantly access the most up-to-date forms from any location. Complete inspections regardless of whether you have internet access or not. Access inspection forms on any iOS, Android, or Windows smartphone or tablet. Type or dictate free form notes Write up additional notes inside a text box by typing or using your device's microphone to dictate notes faster.

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YOUR BUSINESS

Record and track safety action items Create a corrective action on the spot for an issue that needs resolving. Assign actions to people, set the time, date and priority level for the next task.

Include time and date stamps Record date and time information to accurately capture when inspections have been done.

Share reports immediately After an inspection is complete, an instant shareable report is generated. Share with the tap of a finger. Look up reference information View relevant information while inspecting. Either reference plain text, an image, or click a link to an external website.

View performance and trends Sign off with digital signatures Confirm information with sign offs and have accountability with digital signature capture.

Automatic syncing between mobile devices and desktop platform provide real-time analytics dashboards. Get visibility into your productivity, compliance, accuracy and more.

MORE INFORMATION https://safetyculture.com/pricing/ for up to five users — it’s free! For more information contact Rebecca Blackman or Joel Dinsdale (08) 9486 7515.

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WA crates The professional packaging service for WA’s finest fresh fruit and vegetables

0 email: service@wacrates.com.au


YOUR BUSINESS

Managing s r e k r o w g n u o y Fair Farms advocates that no child under the age of 13 should be employed.

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YOUR BUSINESS

A

rite of passage for many Australian teenagers is their first part-time or casual job. These jobs have numerous benefits: they develop skills and experience, prepare them to be productive members of society and increase their self-esteem and resilience.

Health and safety

Work environment

You should consider the age and skills of young workers, to make sure the tasks and responsibilities they undertake are appropriate. In considering this, workers under the age of 18 should not:

Teenagers’ minds are still developing, so you should be careful and make sure the work environment is appropriate. This includes avoiding exposure to:

 ork with or around W harmful chemicals

• Lacking experience to judge risk • Hesitant to ask questions or report issues

Use or operate machinery

Work without supervision

Child labour

Work in very loud environments

State laws Each State and Territory has their own youth employment laws that cover when minors can start work, and any restrictions on what hours they can work. At a minimum, work should never interfere with minors attending school. You can find more information here: www.fairwork.gov.au/find-help-for/ young-workers-and-students/whatage-can-i-start-work

• Images or conversation of a sexual nature

These and other important topics are covered in the Fair Farms Standard, which sets out the accepted principles of fair and ethical employment in horticulture.

For more information, including how to become a Fair Farms certified employer, visit: www.growcom.com.au/fairfarmsinitiative or email us at fairfarms@growcom.com.au

So how do you effectively manage young workers to ensure they learn valuable skills and stay safe?

Fair Farms advocates that no child under the age of 13 should be employed. Children are at high risk of injuries, especially on farms. You should check the ages of all workers and keep a register as evidence of this.

• Non-prescription drugs

MORE INFORMATION

• Enthusiastic to make a good impression.

Fair Farms promotes some keys processes and behaviours to ensure work does not interfere with minors’ education, health, development or safety.

• Alcohol

The key to making sure all of these procedures work is to create and foster a culture of awareness and consideration. Talk to other workers when you employ minors and discuss the special considerations everyone has to ensure a safe and productive workplace.

Despite these benefits, workers under the age of 18 are particularly vulnerable in the workplace. In fact, the agriculture industry has the highest rate of serious injuries for young workers. This may be because they are: • Still developing their skills

• Vulgar language

Make sure you also pay special attention to how long minors work for, when they work and any additional or tailored training they might need around safe work practices.

Fair Farms Project Implementation Update Fair Farms Training and Certification is the horticulture industry’s proactive response to identified problems around workplace compliance. This important industry-led initiative is scheduled to go live on 11 June 2019. From this date we will take registrations from growers and other participants who can then begin their training and certification pathway. The official launch of the program will take place at this year’s Hort Connections conference in Melbourne from 24–26 June. If you are attending, please feel free to come for a chat and meet the Fair Farms team at Growcom’s trade booth (stand 110, 111). We look forward to seeing you there!

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... rd co re en ok br a ke li g n di n u so t ou h it W

... good record keeping saves time and tax

G

ood record keeping is essential for any business and makes it easy to manage your cash flow and meet your tax obligations. By law, businesses must keep records that explain all transactions, be made in writing (electronic or paper), written in English or in a form that can be easily converted, and be kept for five years (some records must be kept longer).

Electronic records Small businesses can keep invoicing, payment and other business transaction records electronically or on paper, though electronic records will make some tasks easier to manage (and will be essential in some instances once single touch payroll comes into effect).

• reports • back-up processes and security. If you have and accountant or registered tax agent, it is important to invest in electronic software that is compatible with their software. The ATO recommends you search online reviews when considering software packages and their website has a list of tax related software products which meet their requirements. It is important if using electronic record keeping software that you ensure you regularly back up and secure your data.

Manual records

• produce invoices, summaries and reports for GST and tax purposes • report information directly to the Australian Tax Office (ATO) online

• sales dockets or cash register tapes • receipt books

• save space on physical storage space

• petty cash books

• back up records in case of flood, fire or theft. When considering software for your business, it is important to consider the following: • managing sales, voids, refunds and exchanges • tracking and managing stock, work in progress, orders, jobs or other task management requirements • producing invoices and receipts • payroll requirements, including wages, annual leave and long service leave • doing budgets and cash flow forecasting

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• stock records • sales reconciliations • cash books • bank reconciliations. It is important to keep these records in a safe place where they will not be damaged or lost.

By law, businesses must keep records that explain all transactions, be made in writing, in English and be kept for five years.

Keeping manual records may require you to spend more time on paperwork. Typical paper records you might need to keep include:

Electronic record keeping software can:

• wages and superannuation payment records

Happy new financial year Whether just starting out in business, or an experienced small business owner, the end of the financial year is generally a busy time.

To help simplify the issue, here is a checklist of records that must be retained. • accounting/bookkeeping program files • bank statements indicating the nature of each deposit and expense, total interest received/paid, and closing balance as at 30 June


YOUR BUSINESS

• reconciled cashbooks, including any drawings taken from the business before banking • debtor listings as at 30 June (and a list of unrecoverable debts) • creditor listings as at 30 June • stock value as at 30 June • dates and cost of any purchases made during the year and/or proceeds from the sale of any assets (plant equipment or property) and details of any finance arrangements including hire purchase or chattel finance • list of all business assets showing: date of purchase, price, description and details of any finance arrangements; costs of any additions or improvements; details of any repairs and maintenance

past few years so check the ATO website for full details • Reviewing and postponing some of your invoicing for the current tax year, if appropriate • Topping up your voluntary superannuation contributions • Reviewing your debtors and writing off any unrecoverable debts • If applicable, deducting any startup expenses — such as obtaining legal or accounting advice on your business structure, and fees in relation to establishing the structure (e.g. ASIC company registration fee).

• If you’re currently using a manual/ hard copy records system you’ll need to move to an online payroll process. The ATO has a list of available lowcost solutions

When STP is in place, the ATO will receive ongoing notifications of employee payments as they are made.

• copies of payment summaries and annual salary/wage reconciliation.

The ATO recently acknowledged that some small businesses may find the transition to STP more difficult than others.

Taxing times made easier Having a tax plan in place before 30 June will enable strategic decisions to be made to maximise returns come tax time.

• Taking advantage of the instant asset write-off, which enables you to immediately deduct assets you purchase for your business costing less than the associated threshold (whether the asset is purchased new or second-hand). This opportunity will be available until 30 June 2020. Thresholds have changed over the

There are a number of ways you can prepare your business for single touch payroll (STP). This includes:

• Using a registered tax agent or payroll service provider that can report using STP.

• copy of statements for all loans owed by the business (and total interest paid for the year) with balances as at 30 June

• Prepaying some of your 201920 expenses (such as your rent, insurance or subscriptions to professional associations) in the 2018-19 financial year. Up to 12 months of the following year’s expenses can be deducted in the current tax year

From July 2019 all businesses will need to report electronically to the ATO on their payroll transactions. Small businesses have, however, been granted a three month transition period to allow them to prepare for the new reporting requirements. This now means they now have until 30 September 2019 to start using STP.

• Updating your existing online payroll software (which in most cases should provide the functionality needed to be STP compliant)

• details of any governmentrelated payments, grants or rebates

If you are expecting to have a higher income this financial year, compared to your projections/expectations for the next financial year, you can talk to your accountant to consider:

Single touch payroll on its way

If you are expecting to have a higher income next financial year (2019–20), you can talk with your accountant to consider: • If it’s appropriate to do so, bringing forward any invoicing into the current financial year for scheduled work that will be carried out in the next financial year • Paying your expenses as they are due, rather than pre-paying them in advance during the current tax year • Purchasing any required equipment or business assets in this year. If you decide to purchase business assets, you should base this decision on the needs of your business. For example, you might need to purchase a vehicle for deliveries to help expand your business operations in order to achieve business goals, or because it is in line with your business plan.

Micro business owners (with fewer than five employees) are able to use alternative reporting options, such as using registered tax or BAS agents to report via STP quarterly, rather than every time a payroll process is run. Other exemptions to STP may apply if local internet access is unavailable or unreliable. MORE INFORMATION The Small Business Development Corporation is here to help. For more information on how to plan for the end of the financial year, contact one of our business advisers for a free one-to-one session on 13 12 49 or visit smallbusiness.wa.gov.au.

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Labour supply for horticulture: Are we really short of workers?

C

BY PETER ANGEL HARVEST TRAIL, STATE MANAGER, MADEC

alls for agricultural visas and stories of fruit being left to rot on trees because growers can’t find pickers all speak to the need for a good labour supply for horticulture.

But is there really a shortage of labour? Or are we just needing to do a better job of finding the right labour for seasonal jobs and take better advantage of existing sources.

with finding and employing staff. Plus employers want workers who are willing and able to turn up and do the job well.

Finding the right labour is hard

From the workers’ perspective, casual seasonal work in the fruit and vegetable industry can be hard — working outside all day in sometimes extreme heat or cold.

There’s no doubt that growers can experience challenges in finding and employing seasonal workers — it can be a time-consuming task taking growers away from their core business of production. Add to that the need to keep up with employment and wages law, labour hire licensing and visa changes, as well as managing piece rates, training new staff, checking people’s work eligibility and all the other human resources bits and pieces associated

It’s little wonder that growers find sourcing the right labour difficult.

Inconsistent or irregular work is also an issue, with naturally short seasons being compounded by sudden changes to the start and finish of the season due to a multitude of factors.

Finding and employing seasonal workers can be a time-consuming task.

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YOUR BUSINESS

14,000 12,000 10,000 Workers

8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 FTEs*

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

2016–17

2017–18

673

1,956

2,957

5,444

6,329

5,625

7,625

10,452

12,495

11,923

11,311

11,710

13,271

* Figures for this graph have been calculated by dividing the number of 417 and 462 second-year visas granted by 4 (to represent ¼ of a year’s work or three months’ work per person) and the number of SWP visas by 2 (to represent ½ a year of work or six months’ work per person). This graph does not represent the full workforce of seasonal workers which may also include Australian workers, working holiday makers choosing to do additional rural work and those employed illegally.

FIGURE 1 The estimated full time equivalent (FTEs) of seasonal farm workers including second year 417 and 462 visa holders (3 months/person) and SWP visa holders (6 months/person)

The Seasonal Worker Programme offers workers from Pacific island countries and Timor-Leste the opportunity to work in Australia. They comprise a big pool of reliable and enthusiastic people sitting on our international doorstep just waiting to be invited over.

Sources of workers However, there are many people who are attracted to seasonal harvest work (Figure 1).

SWP visa numbers are increasing at a rapid rate. After 1,473 visas were issued when the program was introduced in 2012, they have about doubled every two years since (Figure 2 and 3). In 2017–18, 8,459 SWP visas were granted, and this year (2018–19) we can expect the numbers will again increase. Moreover, people on SWP visas during this time worked twice

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

In 2018–19 changes to visas to facilitate more seasonal workers have been announced or already put in place. From 1 July 2019, people on ‘Working Holiday’ or ‘Work and Holiday’ visas may stay for a third year if they do an additional six months horticulture work in certain regional areas. Implementation details are yet to be confirmed, but the Government announced and committed to this change in November 2018.

Visas granted

50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000

Seasonal Worker Programme (SWP) visas 462 Work and Holiday - second visa 417 Working Holiday - second visa

Year

FIGURE 2 Proportion of Working Holiday (417), Work and Holiday (462) and Seasonal Worker Program visas granted

Seasonal Worker Programme (SWP) visas 462 Work and Holiday - second visa 417 Working Holiday - second visa

8

7 20

17 –1

6 20

16 –1

5 20

15 –1

4 20

14 –1

3 20

13 –1

2 20

12 –1

1 20

11 –1

0 20

10 –1

9 20

09 –1

8 20

08 –0

7 20

07 –0

6

06 –0

05 –0

20

20

–1 8

–1 7

20 17

–1 6

20 16

–1 5

20 15

–1 4

20 14

–1 3

20 13

–1 2

20 12

–1 1

20 11

–1 0

20 10

–0 9

20 09

–0 8

20 08

20 07

–0 7

-

20 06

20 05

New sources of labour

60,000

–0 6

Visas granted (%)

People wanting to extend their ‘Working Holiday’ (subclass 417) and ‘Work and Holiday’ (subclass 462) visas from one year to two (and shortly a third year will be available) are one such group. Backpackers who have been granted a second-year visa and therefore have completed threemonths’ work in seasonal jobs in regional Australia, may have declined from a high of more than 45,000 in 2013–14, but they still exceeded 36,000 in 2017–18. These second-year visas continue to provide an important source of labour to horticulture.

as long (six months) in seasonal rural jobs compared to the mandated three months of rural work required for second-year ‘Working Holiday’ and ‘Work and Holiday’ visas. SWP workers can now do up to nine months.

Year

FIGURE 3 Actual granted number of second year Working Holiday (417) and Work and Holiday (462) visas, and Seasonal Worker Program visas WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR BUSINESS

The Australian Government has funded the national Harvest Trail for over 15 years which helps redistribute seasonal workers through the regions in need, with most vacancies filled within days, and some merely in hours. The Harvest Trail is available at no cost to growers by simply calling 1800 062 332. So, is there a genuine shortage? Yes, in peak harvest time in some regions temporary shortages can occur. But for most of the time growers who know where to source labour and are prepared to pay correct award wages or fair piece rates and treat workers well will almost always find sufficient, committed, motivated workers.

33REGARDLESS of the labour source, growers must pay and treat their workers fairly.

Plus, as of 5 November 2018, SWP workers can now stay for nine months in total, adding to the labour supply pool. SWP visa numbers are expected to keep climbing due to the popularity of the program, and the productivity and work attitude of the people. There is no cap on the number of SWP visas that can be issued — providing an excellent source of labour.

Regardless of the labour source, growers must pay and treat their workers fairly. This will help to attract and retain staff and build a sustainable industry. Given the new and under-utilised sources of labour available, growers have no excuse to employ people illegally.

Need a hand finding workers? We can help. 1800 062 332 www.harvesttrail.gov.au

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR Peter Angel, State Manager — Harvest Trail, MADEC Harvest Trail connects growers with workers and is provided as a no-cost service through a call centre and website. Harvest Trail is funded through the Australian Government and managed by MADEC, a notfor-profit organisation that aims to facilitate stronger communities through employment and education.


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your

market Your market WA Grower WINTER 2019

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Summer sales and opportunity for...

leeks

Leek is a versatile vegetable, it can be used in barbeques and salads throughout summer.

BY MELANIE NORRIS SENIOR MANAGER, FRESH INDUSTRY

L

eek, like its more well-known cousins, onions and garlic, is packed with essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and dietary fibre.

Although similar in nutritional value, leek imparts a more delicate flavour in cooking and is often used as a flavour base for hearty winter dishes such as leek and potato soup or chicken and leek pies. This delicious and versatile vegetable, however, has an opportunity to be used in meals all year round.

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In the year ending 26 January 2019, 27.8% of Australian households purchased leeks. Leek volume (kg) sales were down by -3.2% versus the previous year, driven by a -4.4% decline in the number of households purchasing. In dollar terms, annual sales held steady at +0.2% due to an increase in the average price.

Household purchasing trends for leek shows a seasonal pattern with distinct peaks in the colder months between May and October (Figure 1). Not surprisingly, soup is rated by consumers as the most popular cooking option for leek, followed by sautÊing/ stir frying. Of all the vegetables, leek is used for making soup the most. 50% of leek-buying households make soup with their leeks.


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8.3%

8

7.9% 7.4%

7

7.6%

7.5%

7.0% 6.7% 6.1%

5.6%

5 4.2%

4

4.2%

4.4% 3.7%

3.4%

4.5%

4.5% 3.8%

3.4%

3

2.8%

3.1%

3.0%

2.6%

2.8%

26/01/19

29/12/18

01/12/18

03/11/18

06/10/18

08/09/18

11/08/18

14/07/18

16/06/18

19/05/18

21/04/18

24/03/18

24/02/18

30/12/17

04/11/17

07/10/17

09/09/17

12/08/17

15/07/17

17/06/17

20/05/17

22/04/17

25/03/17

25/02/17

2

02/12/17

2.3%

27/01/18

Percentage

6.3%

6

7.8%

Four week end date

is a versatile vegetable and a suitable substitute for onions with the benefit of not overpowering other flavours due to its sweeter, milder taste.

FIGURE 1 Leek % of buying households Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks to 26/01/19

Retailer performance Greengrocers make up 20% of total dollar sales for leeks (Figure 2), well above the average across total vegetables where greengrocers’ share of trade is 15% (Figure 3). Greengrocers are growing dollar and volume (kg) sales of leeks faster than major supermarkets.

Promoting the consumption of leeks in the warmer months has the potential to drive category sales. If the percentage of buying households increased by 2% in summer, that would equate to an additional $1.4m dollar sales. Providing easy-to-cook summer recipes and meal solutions in-store that use leek could assist in the development of leek as an all year round vegetable option.

Chris Schreurs, from Schreurs & Sons in Victoria, says that there are opportunities to grow the appeal and popularity of leeks among shoppers — especially in summer where leeks can be used in barbeques and salads. Leek

Total Australia

NOTES:

0.2%

•  Major supermarkets are defined here as the sum of Woolworths, Coles and ALDI •  Other supermarkets are defined here as all other full-service supermarkets

-2.1% -5.6%

Other supermarkets

SOURCES

6.8%

• N  ielsen Homescan 52 weeks to 26/01/2019

0.4%

Greengrocers & specialty stores

5.9%

-6

-4

-2

Vegetable % dollar growth

0

2

4

6

8

Leek % dollar growth

FIGURE 2 Retail group dollar growth

Percentage

Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks to 26/01/19

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

15% 9%

71%

Total veg dollar share of trade

Leek dollar share of trade

FIGURE 3 Retail group share of trade

•  Attitudinal reports prepared by Nielsen for Hort Innovation, survey sample n=300, fieldwork from 08/11/2018 to 15/11/2018 (leek) and waves spanning July — November (other vegetables) for the Australian market. Copyright © 2019 Horticulture Innovation Australia.

20% 9%

76%

Major supermarkets Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks to 26/01/19

Showcasing the premium aspect of leeks may assist to drive sales and Chris believes the challenge for leek growers is to improve the way they process, clean and grade leeks to make them more attractive for shoppers to purchase.

3.1%

-3.4%

Major supermarkets

Nearly a third of households claim wastage to be the highest barrier to purchasing leek. Chris Schreurs believes the key to overcoming this barrier may be further development of smaller format options in the form of pre-packaged leeks, which is convenient for shoppers and suits smaller format stores where space is at a premium. Pre-packaged leeks would also enable on-pack messaging such as recipe ideas or health benefits.

Other supermarkets

Greengrocers & specialty stores

Funding statement These data and insights were produced independently by Nielsen and shared through the Harvest to Home platform, supported through the Hort Innovation Vegetable, Sweet potato and Onion Funds. For more insights visit: www.harvesttohome.net.au

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Japan market

profile

This Japan market profile is an extract from the Export Market Mapping Report prepared by McKinna et. al. for AUSVEG as part of the Vegetable Industry Export Strategy 2020. Grower-exporters can use the Export Market Mapping Report to: • Identify vegetable export trends in 17 international markets • Identify market opportunities for 11 vegetable products • Incorporate data and market information into your Export Strategy.

Extract from the Export Market Mapping Report.

Japan market snapshot Population Per capita GDP Degree of urbanisation Ethnic mix

126.8 million US$43,279 94% Japanese 98.1%, Chinese 0.5%, Korean 0.4%, other 1%

Country profile Despite the economic challenges of recent decades, Japan remains the third largest economy in the world and one of the largest fresh food importers. President Abe’s four pillar strategy for economic reform is gaining traction and tourism is booming, up at 33%

leading to the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. A champion of free trade, Japan drove the TPP agreement. Increasingly market access for fresh foods is freeing up, although some seasonal tariffs exist and phytosanitary inspections remain stringent and mandatory.

Food culture Japanese consumers value freshness, food safety and premium quality and will pay on that basis, within limits. Traditional dishes are highly regional, usually consisting of a series of dishes of which vegetables are an important component. Western foods are widely available and now a regular part of the diet. Flavour preferences can be vastly different to Australian tastes, so market research and sometimes sensory research are required.

Business culture Relationship building requires constant market visits and socialising to build trust. Respect for age and status are paramount and etiquette and protocol around this is complex. Communication is often indirect and implied with a reluctance to directly say ‘no’.

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YOUR MARKET 33THE best Japanese market opportunities appear to be asparagus, broccoli, onion, celery and pumpkin.

Market channels

Exports

Overview

Total vegetable exports to Japan have declined by 26% in volume terms in the past 12 months (Table 1 and Figure 1), largely due to declines in the higher volume categories of onions, asparagus and carrots. In 2017, onions were the largest export category to Japan and had previously experienced growth.

Japanese consumers are highly nationalistic about food but the aging of Japanese farmers, poor farm competitiveness and recent natural disasters means imports are growing in order to service demand, even though vegetable consumption is declining. In 2014 China and the US accounted for 69% of Japanese vegetable imports (including frozen).

China and other low cost Asian suppliers are taking more market share from the USA, although there consumer concern exists with cases of Chinese produce being banned due to safety issues. Supply chains typically require an importer, trading house then wholesalers however, increasingly supermarkets are dealing directly with suppliers to fund constant promotions. Retail Retail vegetable sales are shifting to fresh cuts, again a reflection of aging consumers and more single person households buying smaller and more convenient portions. Austrade estimate the value of the cut vegetable market at JPY180 billion and growing. Older consumers tend to buy vegetable fresh cuts daily at local corner stores. QR codes are widely used to provide supply chain information to the provenance conscious consumers. Supermarket chains are highly regionalised and small format corner stores hold market share. Major retail chains include: Aeon, Seven & I, Yamada, Isetan, Uny, J Front and Ito Yokado. Food service Japan’s out-of-home food consumption is growing rapidly and exceeds in-home dining. Competition is intense at the many local independent outlets and elderly diners are funding a home delivery boom. Aged care is also a growth sector. The massive growth in tourism is fuelling much hotel development and competition for menu innovation and new offerings.

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Asparagus is the second-biggest category to Japan which has experienced a 31% downturn over the previous year despite a previous growth trend. This is due to the confluence of factors including reduced total imports by Japan, increased prices of Australian product, quality issues and an extended supply window from Peru. Lettuce and broccoli have experienced strong increases, but both from a very small base and this appears at best, to be opportunistic trade.

Onions 39% Carrots 29% Asparagus 26% Cabbage/kale 4% Broccoli 2% All other 1%

The opportunities afforded by market access for pumpkins have not been realised with a sharp drop occurring in 2017. Australia is not competitive with the established New Zealand supply.

Market

FIGURE 1 Total exports from Australia to Japan by category (volume)

The market potential index (Figure 2) suggests that despite the downturn in 2017 there are quite strong prospects for a range of vegetables in Japan in the future, largely driven by an increasing demand from an ageing population and a slowdown in local production for the same reason. The market is large and

growing; the main issue for Australia is in regard to tailoring the product for local preferences (e.g. broccoli is sold by florets in this market), price competitiveness and market access (Table 2).

Source: ITC Trade Map 2018; Fresh Intelligence analysis

TABLE 1 Australian vegetable exports to Japan Volume traded (tonnes) 2015 Onions

5,071

2016

Trend

2017

5,569

1 yr

4,223

5yr CAGR

-24%

-3%

Carrots

1,084

4,001

3,223

-19%

36%

Asparagus

3,298

4,173

2,861

-31%

6%

Cabbage/Kale

1,602

806

460

-43%

207%

99

56

159

183%

Broccoli

-

1

4

18

367%

-

Pumpkins & squash

13

47

4

-92%

-

Celery

76

68

3

-96%

Lettuce

All other Total

0 11,244

14,723

10,951

-26%

8%


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TABLE 3 Freight SEA

Melbourne

Sydney

Brisbane

Adelaide

Fremantle

26

23

21

30

34

Average days Transit

Singapore

Singapore

Singapore

Singapore

Singapore

Discharge port

Yokohama

Yokohama

Yokohama

Yokohama

Yokohama

Shipping

OOCL, APL, MSC, Maersk

OOCL, APL, MSC, Maersk

OOCL, APL, MSC, Maersk

OOCL, APL, MSC, Maersk

OOCL, APL, MSC, Maersk

Melbourne

Sydney

Brisbane

Adelaide

Perth

YES

YES

YES

AIR Direct Transit

Narita

Narita or Haneda

Narita

Narita

Narita

Airlines

Japan, Qantas

Japan, Qantas, ANA

Qantas

Singapore

Singapore

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

1.00

Access

Tariff

USD to AUD

0.80

TABLE 2 Market access

0.60 0.40

Free

Broccoli

Free

Cabbage/leafy veg

Free

Capsicum

Free

Carrot

Free

Celery

Free

Lettuce

Free

FIGURE 3 Exchange trend

Onion

Free

Potato

Free

Pumpkin/squash

Free

Sweet potato

Free

The best opportunities appear to be for asparagus, broccoli, onion, celery and pumpkin. Australia does not have market access for capsicum, potatoes, beans, and sweet potato.

● No access; ● Conditional access; ● Free access

0.20

AUD : USD AUD : JPY

20 09 /10 20 10 /11 20 11 /12 20 12 /13 20 13 /14 20 14 /15 20 15 /16 20 15 /16 20 17 /18

0

JPY to AUD

1.20

Source: McKinna et. al., 2018

Bean

e Ca

Local currency: Yen

FIGURE 2 Market potential index

Category

ag bb

tuc

ota tp

Let

to

s ee Sw

Be

an

ts rro

kin Pu

e

Competitiveness Propensity to consume Demographics

Ca

Ce

mp

y ler

o tat Po

ion On

To

ma

cco

to

li

m

icu

ps Ca

NO Singapore

Airport

The opportunities for broccoli are strong with a high propensity to consume as well as reasonable competitiveness.

Bro

As pa rag us

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

NO Singapore

MORE INFORMATION Levy-payers that would like a copy of the Export Market Mapping Report, or to talk further about opportunities in the Japan market should contact Manus Stockdale on (08) 9486 7515 or manus.stockdale@ vegetableswa.com.au

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33THE Australian delegation at FOODEX including WA growers Jim Trandos from WA Corn Growers, Renae Adams from Twin Lakes, Pennie Patane from Patane Produce, Patrick Fox from Fox Farms and Richard Hunt from Sumich.

WA growers attend

FOODEX Trade Show Japan

I

BY MANUS STOCKDALE EXPORT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

n March five Western Australian vegetable growers attended the FOODEX trade show in Tokyo, Japan arranged by AUSVEG.

The five West Australian’s were part of the 18 strong Australian group of growers that attended the trade show as part of the AUSVEG Export Development program which is funded by Hort Innovation. Claire McClelland and Manus Stockdale also attended for vegetablesWA to support and assist the WA growers. The program commenced on Monday 4 March with a market insights tour with growers visiting the Japan Air Lines

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freight facility at Narita Airport in Tokyo. The freight facility is right on alongside the airport so cargo can be unloaded from planes and into the warehouse as quickly as possible. The growers gained a better understanding of the import process and how imported vegetable products are handled.

Participants were shown the process of quarantine inspection that all imported vegetables undergo. The visit gave growers a good insight into the import process and the range and volume of produce that is imported into Japan. The Australian group met with one of the major fresh produce importers Wismettac Foods and visited their multistorey warehouse followed by a supermarket that the importer supplied. Growers saw firsthand the variety of produce that is imported from a wide range of countries. It was interesting

to compare the quality of produce, how the produce was packed for export and the condition of the produce on arrival in Japan. At the supermarket the differential in the pricing of local Japanese and imported vegetables was surprising to some growers. In other parts of Asia such as Singapore and Hong Kong Australia produce attracts a price premium, however, in Japan for many vegetables (and fruits) if there is a locally grown supply imported alternatives are priced lower. This was a key lesson for many of the growers as their assumption was that Japan as a country with a high income and a strong food culture would be willing to pay for Australian quality, however, the reality is that the Japanese are quite price sensitive and highly nationalistic when it comes to purchasing vegetables. On Tuesday the FOODEX trade show commenced and ran until Friday. The trade show is the largest food show in Japan and covers all products from fresh fruit, vegetables and meat to


YOUR MARKET

processed food and beverages. Many countries were represented including USA, Canada, Mexico, Thailand, Vietnam, China, Spain, France and Italy. The trade show allowed Australian vegetable growers to display their produce and to meet importers and buyers from major Japanese retailers. AUSVEG provided translators to assist the growers with meetings with the Japanese buyers.

The trade show display included a cooking station with a chef to showcase the Australian product. Sample dishes with WA broccoli and sweet corn were prepared allowing visitors to the stand to test the Australia produce. The trip to Japan, including visits to importers’ warehouses, supermarkets and discussions with buyers gave the growers that attended a great insight into the buying behaviour and preferences of Japanese retail customers.

Japan can be a tough market to break into but once you have established relationships with buyers it can be a very good market to supply. Several of the WA growers that attended received promising business leads and are planning to send samples or trial commercial consignments to new customers following the trade show. Overall it was a very successful trip and all of the growers that attended found it to be worthwhile.

MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in finding out more about export or the opportunities to get involved in the AUSVEG Export Development Program please get in touch with Manus Stockdale at vegetablesWA.

Australian fruit and vegetables on display at FOODEX.

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Export Facilitators Project

update

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YOUR MARKET

T

An Export Workshop will be held on Thursday 17 October 2019.

BY MANUS STOCKDALE EXPORT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

he Export Facilitator Project (VG16085) aims to help vegetable growers to get started exporting their produce to overseas markets. The project provides practical assistance to growers to help them identify opportunities in export markets and understand what is involved in exporting. Manus Stockdale is the Export Facilitator at vegetablesWA and he regularly visits growers to discuss export opportunities and how they can get involved. There is a lot of focus on export in agriculture at the moment and support is available from the industry, WA and Australian governments to encourage growers to export.

Australian government Export Market Development Grants One of the programs available to new exporters or existing exporters looking to get into new markets is the Australian government Export Market Development Grants (EMDG) program. The EMDG program is run by Austrade and assists exporters by reimbursing up to 50% of eligible export promotion expenses annually for eight years. Many activities associated with export development and promotion can be claimed including market visits, attendance at trade shows, samples (including freight) and promotional materials. Using EMDG can really reduce the cost of establishing a new export market. For more information see austrade.gov.au/ export/export-grants.

WA Industry and Export Awards Applications are now open for the WA Industry and Export Awards which are run by the Export Council of Australian on behalf of the WA Department of Jobs, Tourism, Science and Innovation.

The awards recognise the achievements of WA business in export and their contribution to the State’s economy and there are 17 categories including Agribusiness Exporter of the Year. Last year WA Corn Growers were finalists in the awards for both the Agribusiness and Emerging Exporter categories. Application close on 5 July and vegetablesWA is happy to assist interested growers with their applications: www.exportawards. com.au/wa

AUSVEG’s Export Market Development Project Many WA growers have benefited from getting involved in AUSVEG’s Export Market Development Project which is funded through the National Vegetable Levy by Hort Innovation. The Program aims to implement the Vegetable Industry Export Strategy and runs activities such as grower attendance at overseas trade shows (such as the FOODEX Trade Show in March 2019 on page 106), the annual Reverse Trade Mission where overseas buyers visit Australia and export training for growers. The Vegetable Industry Export

Strategy has recently been updated with lots of useful market information for growers. Vegetable growers that would like a copy of the Strategy should get in contact with vegetablesWA.

Export Workshop An Export Workshop will be held in conjunction with the annual vegetablesWA Industry Summit in Perth on Thursday 17 October. The workshop will provide growers with a practical understanding of what’s involved and how to get started in export. The training will cover: • Export planning and resourcing; • Export marketing and pricing; • Export logistics; and • Export documentation. If you interested in attending the workshop, please let us know and we’ll add you to the mailing list for the event. MORE INFORMATION For more information on any of the activities in the article or to discuss export opportunities please contact Manus Stockdale on (08) 9486 7515 or manus. stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au

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YOUR PRODUCTION

PHOSPHATE RESERVES IN VEGETABLE FARMS — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Dựa phân lân trong đất các phương cách khai thác VÕ THẾ TRUYỀN CHUYÊN VIÊN KHUYẾN NÔNG VIỆT NAM, HIỆP HỘI RAU CẢI TÂY ÚC

Chất phốt-pho, trong phân bón họi là “phân lân” và thường tồn tại dưới dạng hợp chất phốt-phát. Đây là chất truyền dẫn năng lượng đặc biệt trong quá trình quang hợp, làm tăng khả năng đề kháng của hoa màu và hương vị của sản phẩm. Tuy nhiên khi được bón vào đất dưới dạng các hợp chất phốt-phát hòa tan trong nước thì lân nhanh chóng kết nối với các chất khác rồi tồn tại dười dạng không hòa tan nên hoa màu không thể hấp thu được. Chỉ trong 6 tuần sau khi bón vào đất thì 75% phân lân bị mất đi do hiện tượng trên. Các nghiên cứu của CSIRO ước tính khoảng 10 tỉ đô la giá trị phân lân hiện đang bị cầm giử trong đất nông nghiệp dưới dạng không hòa tan trong nước. Một điều tra vào năm 2016 trên các trang trại rau cải khu vực phía Bắc Perth đã phát hiện hàm lượng lân rất cao trong các mẩu đất được xét nghiệm1 (Bảng 1).

Làm thế nào hầu hết lượng phân lân bón vào đất trở thành dự trử không thể sử dụng? Về mặt hóa học, khi tan trong nước thì các hợp chất trong phân bón phân ly thành các hạt tích điện chẳng hạn như NH4+, NO3-, K+, PO32-, PO43-, Fe2+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Al3+, Mn2+, Mg2+, SO42+, Cl, CO32. Các hạt tích điện dương (mang dấu +) có thể bị liên kết với các hạt tích điện âm (dấu trừ). Lực liên kết mạnh hay yếu tùy thuộc vào điện tích của các hạt — điện tích càng cao thì mối liên kết càng chặt. Trong phân bón Lân là loại phân khoáng có điện tích âm mạnh nhất (3-). Vì vậy Lân rất dể liên kết và có mối liên kết rất chặt với các hạt có điện tích dương 1 Nghiên cứu do Neil Lantzke, một nhà nông học tham gia dự án của cơ quan quản lý nguồn lợi thiên nhiên khu vực Perth — Perth Region NRM, và Võ Thế Truyền, Chuyên viên khuyến nông — Hiệp hội rau cải Tây Úc thực hiện năm 2016.

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

33NẤM Mycorrhizal – Hẹ thống sợi màu trắng là sợi nấm gắn vào rể cây.

tương đương. Khi hình thành các liên kết như vậy thì các hợp chất mới (chẳng hạn như phốt-phát can xi, phốt phát sắt) trở nên không tan trong nước làm cho hoa màu không thể hấp thụ được. Độ pH (còn gọi là độ chua) của đất cũng có vai trò trong vấn đề này. Trong đất có độ pH cao hơn 6,4 (như hầu hết các mẩu đất trong Bảng 1) thì thiệt hại gần như chắn chắn là sự hình thành liên kết giửa lân và vôi (Phốt phát can xi) làm cho cả hai nguyên tố này trở nên vô dụng —

hoa màu không hấp thụ được. Điều này rất tác hại vì đây là 2 nguyên tố hết sức cần thiết cho tiến trình quan trọng nhất để hoa màu phát triển gọi là tiến trình quang hợp (Quang hợp là tiến trình xảy ra trong lá cây sử dụng ánh sáng, nước và cac-bon để tạo ra thức ăn cho cây). Ngược lại khi đất chua (độ pH đất thấp hơn 6,4) thì hạt khoáng lân có điện tích 3- lại liên kết với khoáng sắt (Fe), mănggan (Mn) và nhôm (Al). Nước giếng một số nơi chứa rất nhiều ôxit sắt. Sắt thường

Bảng 1 Kết quả phân tích dinh dưỡng đất một số trang trại rau cải North Perth Ký hiệu mẩu đất 4 Độ pH

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

6.5

6.3

7.5

5

6.8

6.4

7.2

7.1

dS/m

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.4

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

Cacbon hữu cơ

%

0.7

1

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.5

0.7

0.9

Đạm- Nitrate

mg/kg

68

26

10

105

22

24

32

47

EC (độ dẫn điện)

Lân- Phosphorus

mg/kg

75

109

88

114

50

125

86

134

Kali- Potassium

mg/kg

61

47

37

110

16

72

70

87

n Thấp n Cao


YOUR PRODUCTION

có điện tích 3+ liên kết rất chặt với phốt phát có điện tích 3- và trở nên không tan. Như vậy lân có trong đất cũng trỏ nên vô dụng với hoa màu.

Hạn chế thất thoát phân bón và dành lại phần phân lân bị cầm giử trong đất2 Phân tích dinh dưỡng trong đất và kiểm tra hàm lương lân tổng số Nếu trước nay quí vị thường xuyên bón phân có chứa lân (trong công thức phân bón có ký hiệu P và P2O5) thì phân tích dinh dưỡng trong đất chắc chắn kết quả phân tích sẽ thể hiện “tài khoản dự trử” lân tổng số trong đất rất cao. Tuy nhiên tài khoản lân dự trử này không thể dùng được vì đa phần trong đó là ở dạng không hòa tan trong nước nên hoa màu không thể hấp thu được. Chọn loại phân lân phù hợp và cố đinh lân dưới dạng hòa tan Bước đầu tiên để cải thiện quản lý phân bón lân là lựa chọn loại phân lân phù hợp với từng mục đích trồng trọt. Nếu quí vị trồng hoa màu ngắn ngày như các loại cải, dưa, hành …cần thiết phải có lượng lân có mặt kịp thời khi cây hình thành bộ rể ban đầu và phát triển nhanh thì bón các loại phân DAP và MAP là phù hợp. Mặt khác, nếu quí vị trồng các loại cây lâu năm hoặc trồng nhiều vụ hoa màu liên tiếp trên cùng một lô đất thì các loại đá khoáng thiên nhiên có chứa lân phân được giải từ từ như Soft Rock, Guano lại tốt hơn. Các loại đá khoáng này cần vài tuần để phóng thích lân ra cho cây trồng.Nhưng lượng lân phóng thích cao và lâu bền. Một nghiên cứu của Bộ Nông nghiệp Hoa kỳ so sánh lượng lân phóng thích ra đất của phân super lân (Triple super phosphate) và của đá phốt phát trong suốt thời gian 13 năm. Nghiên cứu này cho thấy trong năm đầu tiên thì phân super lân phóng thích lượng lân ra đất nhiều hơn, nhưng mỗi năm sau đó đá phốt phát lại sản sinh ra đất lượng lân cao hơn gấp 9,5 lần so với phân super lân trong suốt 12 năm còn lại.

Kích thích hệ vi sinh vật trong đất Bón thêm chất hửu cơ và axit humic vào đất là một trong các biện pháp tổng hợp để duy trì lân ở dạng hòa tan và tăng cường các loại nấm có lợi như Mycorrhizal có vai trò rất quan trong trong việc hấp thu phân khoáng của rể cây. Nấm Mycorrhizal là một sự mở rộng hết sực hiệu quả của rể cây do cả mạng lưới sợi nấm gắn cố định vào rể và lan tỏa ra. Mạng lưới sợi nấm này giúp gia tăng bề mặt hấp thụ của rể, chúng lan tỏa đến các vị trí có phân bón và ẩm độ để hấp thu đồng thời sản sinh ra các hợp chất sinh hóa bổ trợ nuôi ngược lại cây. Hệ thống sợi nấm còn sản sinh ra dịch có tính axit nhẹ giúp phả vở các liên kết giửa can xi và lân rồi hấp thụ chúng và chuyển ngược lại cho rể cây. Lợi ích lớn nhất của việc kếp hợp axit humic với phân lân là hình thành humate lân – một phức hợp lân cây trồng hấp thu được. Điều này giúp hạn chế lân liên kết với các khoáng chất khác thành dạng không hòa tan. Trồng hổn hợp hoa màu che phủ đất Biện pháp trồng hổn hợp hoa màu che phủ đất đã được ứng dụng nhiều nơi trên thế giới. Tài liệu nghiên cứu cho thấy lợi ích vượt bật3 của biện pháp này như: 1. Cải thiện cấu trúc đất; 2. Tăng cường thêm đạm (N); 3. Khôi phục và dự trử phân bón dư thừa; 3 www.soilwealth.com.au/resources/fact-sheets/ soil-nutrition-and-compost/summer-cover-crops. Retrieved 16 May 2019.

4. Khống ché sâu bệnh hại trong đất; 5. Khống chế cỏ dại và hạn chế xói mòn lớp đất mặt do nước và gió. Hổn hợp hoa màu che phủ đất bao gồm các loại hoa màu của 5 họ cây phối hợp với nhau. 5 họ hoa màu đó là họ ngủ cốc (lúa mạch, cao lương…), họ hòa bản (các loại cỏ một lá mầm), họ thập tự (các loại cải), họ đậu, và họ chân vịt (rau dền, cỏ chân vịt, dền gai…). Các báo cáo cho thấy rằng khi được phối trộn với nhau trồng che phủ đất thì chúng cùng nhau sản sinh các hợp chất phenol kích thích sự hoạt động bùng nổ của hệ vi sinh vật trong đất, nhanh chóng tạo ra rất nhiều lợi ích. Một trong những lợi ích đó liên quan đến việc tăng cường tiếp cận nguồn lân bị cầm giử trong đất4. Các loại cây thuộc họ đậu trong hổn hợp này phóng thích ra axit phá vở các liên kết khóa can xi và lân với nhau giúp cây nhanh chóng hấp thu các chất này. Lợi ích thứ hai liên quan đến hiện tượng kích thích vi khuẩn có lợi giúp hòa tan lân — Phosphate Solubilising Bacteria (PSB) — do các loại dịch tiết ra của hổn hợp hoa màu trồng che phủ đất này. Vi khuẩn Phosphate Solubilising Bacteria (PSB) này cũng góp phần cung cấp lân dều đặn cho hoa màu. THÊM THÔNG TIN Truyen Vo 0457 457 559 or truyen.vo@ vegetableswa.com.au

4 https://blog.nutri-tech.com.au/phosphatefacts-how-to-stabilise-p-and-free-your-frozenreserves-2/ Retrieved 16 May 2019.

2 Phosphate Facts — How to Stabilise P and Free Your Frozen Reserves (Part 1 and 2). file:///C:/ Users/Truyen/Documents/ARTICLES%20FOR%20 VEGWA%20MAGAZINE/Truyen%20articles/ May%202019/Phosphate%20Facts%20–%20 How%20to%20Stabilise%20P%20and%20 Free%20Your%20Frozen%20Reserves%20 (Part%201).html; Retrieved 15 May 2019.

33HỔN hợp hoa màu che phủ đất.

WA Grower WINTER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Tờ thông tin ghi nhãn xuất xứ hiện có sẵn bằng các ngôn ngữ khác ngoài tiếng Anh Rebecca thân mến, Trong những năm gần đây, ACCC đã thực hiện các chiến dịch giáo dục Ghi nhãn xuất xứ (CoOL) cho các doanh nghiệp và người tiêu dùng, dẫn đến Tiêu chuẩn thông tin ghi nhãn thực phẩm xuất xứ năm 2016 trở thành bắt buộc vào ngày 1 tháng 7 năm 2018. Các chiến dịch này nhằm: • giúp các doanh nghiệp đảm bảo nhãn của họ tuân thủ Tiêu chuẩn, đặc biệt tập trung vào các thương nhân nhỏ và siêu nhỏ liên quan đến việc cung cấp thực phẩm dễ hỏng • giáo dục người tiêu dùng về các nhãn thực phẩm mới.

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WA Grower WINTER 2019

Ngoài các chiến dịch giáo dục, ACCC còn sản xuất một số tài nguyên cho ngành công nghiệp và người tiêu dùng có sẵn trên trang web của ACCC. Điều này bao gồm tờ thông tin CoOL hiện đã được dịch sang các ngôn ngữ khác ngoài tiếng Anh, bao gồm: • Tiếng Trung giản thể (tiếng phổ thông) • Trung Quốc truyền thống (tiếng Quảng Đông) • Tiếng Việt • Hàn Quốc • Tiếng Ả Rập.

Thông tin được dịch này có thể giúp tăng nhận thức về CoOL cho nhiều người tiêu dùng và doanh nghiệp hơn. Xin lưu ý rằng tờ thông tin CoOL dự định được đọc cùng với nhãn Thực phẩm và thực phẩm nhập khẩu và thông tin Câu hỏi thường gặp được cung cấp trên trang web của Bộ Công nghiệp, Đổi mới và Khoa học. Trân trọng, Nhóm doanh nghiệp nhỏ Ủy ban cạnh tranh và người tiêu dùng Úc (ACCC)


Phí dịch vụ là gì và tiền phí này về đâu?

Phí dịch vụ:

Phí nầy có thể được thu tại điểm đầu tiên thu mua sản phẩm rau cải tươi. Thương lái mua rau cải thu phí rồi sẽ trả tiền phí này về Hội Đồng Nông Nghiệp (APC) hoặc là nông gia có thể chọn cách trả phí trực tiếp đến APC. Hội Đồng Rau cải (VPC, là một bộ phận của APC) phân bổ tiền phí này cho các dự án thông qua qui trình phê duyệt dự án hàng năm.

Hội Đồng Nông Nghiệp – Hội Đồng Rau Cải là hội đồng gồm 5 nông gia đại diện.

Hiệp Hội Rau Cải Tây Úc

Giúp đở và tranh đấu cho nông gia trong sản xuất và trên nghị trường. Đảm bảo chất lượng sản phẩm Cung cấp tài liệu và phương cách hổ trợ doanh nghiêp

Chương trình ăn uống dinh dưỡng Ủng hộ sực khỏe và hạnh phúc cho thiếu nhi Các chương trình hổ trợ tăng cường ăn uống có rau cải trong trường tiểu học

Biosecurity Fund Quỹ An ninh sinh học Quĩ dự phòng để sử dụng trong trường hợp có sâu bệnh hại nghiêm trọng hay các trường hợp cần thiết.


FREE WINGMAN SEEDS


YOUR PRODUCTION Permits

Permits

Current Minor Use Permits can also be searched by specific crop or pest types at https://portal.apvma.gov.au/permits Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

PER10677

Propyzamide

Chicory & endive

Grass and broadleef weeds

Expiry date 30-Apr-23

PER10845

Barmac Zineb Fungicide

Brassica leafy vegetables

Cercospora leaf spot & downy mildew

31-May-20

PER10875

Pirimor WG Aphicide (pirimicarb)

Celeriac

Aphids

30-Sep-20

PER10976

Bentazone

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER10988

Bladex 900 WG (cyanazine)

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER11438

Glyphosate (shielded sprayer)

Specified vegetables

Grass and broadleaf weeds

30-Jun-19

PER11440

Sumiclex 500 (procymidone)

Peppers

Sclerotinia rot

31-Jan-20

PER11441

Propachlor

Radish, swede, turnip

Grass and broadleaf weeds

31-Dec-19

PER11747

2,2-Dichloropropionic Acid

Carrot crops (for seed)

Promotion of bolting and grass weed control

30-Nov-19

PER11768

Chlorpyrifos

Pumpkin

African black beetle

31-Mar-21

PER11935

Triadimenol

Parsnips, radish, swede & turnip

Powdery mildew

30-Jun-22

PER11949

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Beetroot & radish

Various insects

31-Mar-20

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, silverbeet, endive, radicchio, chicory & processing peas

Downy mildew

31-Mar-20

PER11991

Legend Fungicide (quinoxyfen)

Silverbeet

Powdery mildew

31-Mar-21

PER12008

Propachlor

Spinach, silverbeet, spring onions, shallots, rocket & brassica leafy veg

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

30-Nov-25

PER12047

Thiabendazole

Sweet potato

Field rots caused by scurf & root rot

30-Sep-21

PER12048

Prometryn

Parsnip & carrot

Weeds

30-Sep-20

PER12351

Confidor Guard Soil

Leafy lettuce, okra

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Jun-20

PER12357

Linuron

Parsnips

Grass and broadleaf weeds

30-Sep-20

PER12378

Acephate

Tomatoes & sweet peppers

Western flower thrips

31-Oct-20

PER12384

S-metolachlor (Dual Gold Herbicide)

Rhubarb

Various weeds

31-Aug-20

PER12447

Teldor 500 SC Fungicide

Peppers (capsicum & chilli), cucumber and lettuce

Botrytis rot

31-May-21

PER12489

Imidacloprid

Celery, cucumber, peppers & Cape gooseberry

Aphids

31-May-20

PER12565

Scala Fungicide

Capsicum and lettuce (protected crops only)

Botrytis rots

30-Sep-22

PER12823

Trifluralin

Chillies, paprika and eggplant

Various broad leaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-21

PER12846

Abamectin

Lettuce (hydroponic), snow peas & sugar snap peas

Two-spotted mite

30-Sep-20

PER13088

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Specified root vegetables, specified alliums & celeriac

Various insect pests

31-Mar-22

PER13114

Prometryn

Celeriac

Grass weeds listed on label

31-Mar-22

PER13116

Propiconazole

Sweet corn

Northern corn leaf blight

31-Mar-21

PER13152

MCPA 250 Selective Herbicide

Rhubarb

Broadleaf weeds

31-Dec-21

PER13154

Dual Gold Herbicide

Brassica leafy vegetables

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

31-Mar-22

PER13170

Dimethoate

Melons including watermelons (postharvest)

Various fruit fly species

30-Sep-20

PER13300

Abamectin

Rhubarb

Broad mite

31-Dec-21

PER13301

Alpha-cypermethrin

Lettuce

Red-legged earth mite & vegetable weevil

31-May-20

PER13305

Glyphosate (shielded sprayer)

Carrots

Certain broadleaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-20

PER13322

Success Neo (spinetoram)

Specified leafy vegetables

Potato moth

31-May-22

PER13323

Score Foliar Fungicide (difenoconazole)

Celeriac

Cercospora leaf spot & septoria leaf blight

31-Oct-20

PER13367

Linuron

Leeks & celeriac

Grass and broadleaf weeds

30-Apr-21

PER13441

Ambush Emulsifiable Concentrate Insecticide

Rhubarb

Green peach aphid, green looper, light brown apple moth and budworms

31-Mar-27

WA Grower WINTER 2019

115


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.) Permit No.

116

Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date 31-May-22

PER13444

Propiconazole

Radishes

Cercospora

PER13496

Linuron

Celery

Range of weeds

30-Apr-22

PER13626

Metolachlor

Spinach, silverbeet, spring onions, shallots, green beans and navy beans

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-22

PER13653

Maldison

Leeks, spring onions and shallots

Onion thrips

28-Feb-23

PER13673

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Celery, silverbeet & spinach

Late blight, septoria leaf blight & downy mildew

30-Sep-21

PER13695

Ecocarb Fungicide

Various vegetables

Powdery mildew

30-Sep-20

PER13696

Trifluralin

Parsnips

Wintergrass

31-Mar-23

PER13698

Phosphorous

Lettuce (leaf+hydro), parsley, coriander, fennel and bulb (allium) vegetables

Downy Mildew

30-Sep-22

PER13716

Abrade Abrasive Barrier Insecticide

Tomatoes (protected)

Various insect pests

31-Jan-20

PER13717

Amistar Top (azoxystrobin + difenoconazole)

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13720

Pristine

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13721

Switch

Tomatoes (protected)

Grey mould (botrytis)

31-May-21

PER13724

Previcur

Tomatoes (protected)

Root rot

31-May-21

PER13726

Trifloxystrobin

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13902

Phorate

Sweet potatoes

Aphids, thrips, jassids and organophosphate susceptible twospotted mite and wireworm

31-Mar-23

PER14008

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Garlic

Downy mildew & purple blotch

31-Mar-23

PER14035

Diflufenican

Peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-23

PER14036

Bupirimate

Eggplant

Powdery mildew

28-Feb-23

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Brassica leafy vegetables, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, chicory, endive, radicchio, rocket, carrots and parsnip

Various fungal diseases

31-Mar-22

PER14046

Mancozeb

Cucumbers

Grey mould

31-Mar-23

PER14048

Pendimethalin

Spring onions, shallots & radish

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

31-Mar-23

PER14049

Permethrin (Ambush )

Celery

Helicoverpa and looper

31-Mar-23

PER14050

Flint 500 WG Fungicide

Cucumbers and capsicums (protected)

Powdery mildew

30-Jun-23

PER14051

Iprodione

Broccoli seed treatment

Rhizoctinia

31-Mar-23

PER14071

Pirmicarb

Sweet corn, spring onion, celery

Aphids

30-Jun-19

PER14077

Eco-Oil (Botanical Oil)

Greenhouse & hydroponic capsicum, cucumber & lettuce

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Sep-23

PER14212

Imidacloprid

Rhubarb

Aphids

31-Dec-22

PER14318

Metalaxyl-M

Lettuce

Damping off

30-Sep-22

PER14326

Captan

Leafy lettuce, cucumber, capsicum & chilli

Grey mould

30-Nov-21

PER14337

Trifluralin

Swedes and turnips

Weeds

30-Jun-20

PER14351

DC-Tron Plus

Lettuce

Various bugs

31-Mar-21

PER14353

Rovral Aquaflo Fungicide (iprodione)

Peppers & celeriac

Sclerotinia rot

31-Mar-22

PER14430

Azoxystrobin (Amistar 250 SC)

Lettuce

Bottom rot

30-Jun-22

PER14431

Rizolex Liquid

Lettuce

Bottom rot

30-Jun-22

PER14432

Pendimethalin

Brussels sprouts

Weeds

30-Jun-19

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Chicory, leeks, spring onions, shallots

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

30-Jun-19

PER14470

Mancozeb & Dimethomorph

Snow peas

Downy mildew

30-Apr-22

PER14479

Propiconazole

Various vegetable crops

Various pests

30-Nov-19

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

Celery, silverbeet, spinach, chicory and endive

DM, cercospora & septoria

31-Aug-22

PER14505

Pyrimethanil

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Grey mould (botrytis)

30-Jun-19

PER14536

Abamectin

Sweet corn, chillies, paprika, spring onions and shallots

Two-spotted mite

31-Dec-23

WA Grower WINTER 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER14626

Copper as tribasic copper sulphate

Garlic

Downy mildew

30-Jun-19

Broad leaf and grass weeds

PER14628

Ioxynil

Garlic

PER14694

VectoBac WG Biological Larvicide

Protected cropping — capsicum, cucumber, eggplant, herbs & lettuce

31-Jul-20

PER14695

Ridomil Gold 25G (metalaxyl-M)

Parsnips

Pythium Spp. and Phytophthora Spp.

30-Jun-19

PER14701

Pyriproxyfen

Beans

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Jun-20

PER14703

Tramat 500 SC Selective Herbicide (ethofumesate)

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea only) & silverbeet

Various weeds

31-Jul-19

PER14722

Abamectin

Capsicum, cucumber, eggplant, zucchini, tomato, sweet corn, chilli, paprika, potato, snow pea and sugar snap pea

Tomato red spider mite

30-Sep-20

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Leeks, spring onions and shallots

Various broadleaf and grass weeds

30-Jun-21

PER14773

Basagran (bentazonesodium)

Onions

Broadleaf weeds

31-Jan-23

PER14816

Azoxystrobin

Carrot

Powdery mildew, sclerotinia rot (white mould), black rot

30-Jun-19

PER14839

Zineb

Eggplant, spinach & silverbeet

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

30-Sep-19

PER14840

Bupirimate

Cucurbits & peppers

Powdery mildew

30-Sep-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Chicory, endive, radicchio, silverbeet and spinach

Botrytis and alternaria

30-Sep-19

PER14842

Copper Oxychloride, Cuprous Oxide or Cupric Hydroxide

Spring onions and shallots

Downy mildew

30-Sep-19

PER14843

Indoxacarb (Avatar Insecticide)

Celery

Heliothis, lightbrown apple moth, lucerne leaf roller and vegetable weevil

30-Sep-19

30-Jun-19

PER14858

Pendimethalin

Parsnip

Grasses and broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Sweet potato, brassica leafy vegetables, chicory radicchio & rocket

Aphids

30-Jun-19

PER14886

Pendimethalin

Garlic

Grass & broadleaf weeds

30-Sep-19

PER14890

Methomyl (Lannate-L)

Spring onions and shallots

Western flower thrips

31-Oct-19

PER14891

Trifloxystrobin

Beetroot

Alternaria leaf spot

30-Sep-19

PER14892

Pymetrozine (Chess Insecticide)

Snow peas and sugar snap peas

Aphid pests

31-May-22

PER14906

Triadimenol

Leek, chives, shallot, spring and Chinese onions

White rot (Sclerotium)

31-Oct-19

PER14907

Emamectin

Brassica leafy vegetables

Various pests

30-Nov-19

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Brassica leafy vegetables, leafy lettuce & other leafy vegetables

Downy mildew & other diseases

31-Dec-22

PER7909

Scala 400 SC Fungicide

Cucumber

Botrytis rot

30-Sep-22

PER80060

Frontier-P Herbicide

Bulb onions

Nutgrass / purple nutsedge

31-Jul-21

PER80099

Alpha-Cypermethrin

Fruiting vegetables, except cucurbits

Mediterranean fruit fly and Queensland fruit fly

31-Mar-20 31-Mar-20

PER80138

Alpha-cypermethrin

Cucurbits

Cucumber fruit fly

PER80210

Pyrimethanil

Protected tomatoes

Botrytis

30-Jun-20

PER80282

Alpha-cypermethrin

Onions

Onion thrips

30-Nov-20

PER80538

Mancozeb

Parsley, chicory and brassica leafy vegetables (Brassica spp.)

Anthracnose and septoria

31-Mar-25

PER80558

Bifenazate

Snow peas & sugarsnap peas

Various mites

31-Aug-20

PER80717

Trichlorfon

Eggplant, Thai eggplant, pepino & Cape gooseberry

Fruit fly

31-Oct-20

PER80891

Pyranica Miticide

Cucumbers

Two-spotted mite & European red mite

30-Sep-20

PER80910

Iprodione

Brussels sprouts & eggplant

Grey mould

31-Jul-20

PER80954

Methoxyfenozide

Snow peas and sugar peas

Native budworm, tomato grub and cluster caterpillar

30-Sep-20

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Cucumber, brassica vegetables, lettuce, beans, peppers, eggplant and peas

Specified whitefly and mite species

31-Mar-21

WA Grower WINTER 2019

117


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.)

118

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Lettuce, chicory, endive, radicchio & spinach

Broadleaf weeds

31-May-20 30-Sep-20

PER81260

Imidacloprid

Beetroot

Aphids & thrips

PER81271

Various Actives

Leeks

Specified grass and broadleaf weeds

31-Oct-21

PER81408

Phosphorous acid

Capsicum

Phytophthora soil fungus

30-Sep-20

PER81702

Dominex Duo EC Insecticide

Cucumbers

Loopers

31-Mar-21

PER81713

Mainman 500WG Insecticide

Tomatoes

Silverleaf whitefly

31-Mar-21

PER81914

Emamectin

Celery & eggplant

Heliothis, light brown apple moth & cluster caterpillar

31-Oct-19

PER82055

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Garlic

Annual grasses and broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-21

PER82063

TEBUCONAZOLE

Garlic

Orange rust

31-Mar-21

PER82136

Difenconazole

Brassica vegetables

Ring spot

30-Sep-20

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Cucumber, peppers (sweet & chilli), zucchini, eggplant, sin qua, bitter melon, tomato & snake bean

Two-spotted mite

31-Mar-21

PER82359

Pirimor (pirimicarb)

Peppers - chilli

Aphids

31-Mar-21

PER82374

Talstar

Various crops

Brown marmorated stink bug & yellow-spotted stink bugs

28-Feb-23

PER82456

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Field grown capsicum, chillies, paprika

Downy mildew

30-Sep-20

PER82459

Clethodiim

Brassica vegetables

Various grass weeds

30-Sep-21

PER82460

Paraamite selective miticide

Cucurbits, Asian cucurbits

Two-spotted mite and red spider mite

31-Jul-22

PER82461

Folicur 430 SC Fungicide

Beetroot, chicory, endive, radish, silverbeet

Scletotinia rot

31-Aug-20 31-Mar-21

PER82551

Diazinon

Leeks & cauliflower

Onion fly & onion seedling maggot

PER82556

Fluazifop

Various vegetables

Grass weeds

31-Jan-23

PER82745

Difenconazole

Silverbeet, spinach, chicory, endive

Fungal diseases

31-Aug-20

PER82811

S-Metolachlor

Beetroot

Blackberry nightshade

1-Feb-20

PER82904

Fenhexamid

Snow peas & sugar snap peas

Grey mould and chocolate spot

30-Jun-22

PER82992

Avatar (indoxacarb)

Asparagus

Garden weevil

31-May-22

PER83203

Fipronil (REGENT 200 SC)

Celery & field lettuce

Western flower thrips, onion thrips

13-Mar-22

PER83277

Iprodione

Garlic

Botrytis

31-Jul-21

PER83765

Maxim XL

Spinach and silverbeet

Damping off

30-Sep-20

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Potato, sweet potato, tomato, capsicum, chilli, peppers, eggplant

Tomato potato psyllid

28-Feb-20

PER84249

Various

Potato

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Jul-20

PER84531

Methoxyfenozide

Sweet corn

Lepidopteran pests

31-Oct-20

PER84555

Vapormate (Ethyl Formate)

Fresh fruit & vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

30-Jun-19 31-Dec-21

PER84734

Verdict (haloxyfop)

Onions

Storksbill

PER84743

Sulfloxaflor

Fruiting vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Oct-22

PER84757

spinetoram

Fruiting vegetables other than cucurbits & root and tuber vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

30-Nov-20

PER84805

cyantraniliprole

Fruiting vegetables, root and tuber vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Dec-22

PER84808

Ethofumesate (Tramat)

Onions

Broadleaf and grass weeds

28-Feb-23

PER84878

Switch Fungicide

Protected and field grown capsicum

Botrytis & sclerotinia

30-Nov-22

PER84955

Iprodione

Green beans, carrots, spinach & silverbeet

Sclerotinia, black rot & grey mould

28-Feb-23

PER85003

Ranman 400 SC Fungicide

Spinach and silverbeet

Pythium damping off

28-Feb-23

PER85011

Transform Insecticide

Nursery stock (non-food)

Aphid, mealybugs, mirids, scale, greenhouse whitefly

28-Feb-23

PER85307

Pirimicarb

Faba bean, broad bean and vetches

Bean aphid

31-Oct-19

PER8930

Phorate

Eggplant, peppers, shallots and spring onions

Aphids, jassids, mites, thrips and onion maggot

31-Jul-19

WA Grower WINTER 2019


Let’s talk about your industry

Sam Turner Relationship Manager Hort Innovation

Meet a vegetable fund Relationship Manager and see how he can support you. Sam is keen to chat with you. He is your link to the latest R&D developments and how these can help your business grow. It’s easy to request a phone call – just go to the ‘Contact Me’ form at horticulture.com.au/contact-me. Alternatively, you can call 02 8295 2300 or email membership@horticulture.com.au and let us know you would like Sam to call you.

horticulture.com.au


What's on

what’s on... Upcoming important events!

2019 Cover cropping: implications for weed management WHEN Thursday 20 June, 10am WHERE Ivankovich Farms, 6684 Forrest Highway, Myalup (opposite the Crooked Carrot Cafe) Hosted by Ivankovich Farms, vegetablesWA, and the University of New England. Please join us for plenty of discussion about this two season cover crop trial, a field walk to view the trial crops, and a great morning tea and lunch! To register for this free event visit bit.ly/2Z2BOjo

Protecting Cropping Australia’s 15th biennial conference, trade show & farm tours Save the Date WHEN 7–10 July WHERE Star Casino, Gold Coast Queensland Connecting growers to valuable information and relevant technology. If you are interested in the Naming Rights for the event, please contact: Saskia PCA Company Secretary admin@protectedcroppingaustralia.com t: 0414 333 996 Jonathan Eccles 2019 Conference Chair jonathan@eccles.com.au t: 0407 242 757

Industry Summit and Grower Tour Save the Date WHEN 17–18 October WHERE Gingin & Crown Towers vegetablesWA will host its 5th Annual Grower Tour and Industry Summit in October 2019. In our 5th year we will continue to hold the Industry Summit and networking event at Crown however will move to the Crown Towers Ballroom. We will also host the HortConnectWA Brunch in the same location. The grower tour and export events will be held on Thursday 17th October. We ask all growers and stakeholders to save the date to allow you to attend our premier event. Rebecca Blackman Operations Manager, vegetablesWA e: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au

WA Grower advertiser contacts Name

Website/Email

Address

Australian Agriculture Marketing Organisation (p25) Bon Electrics (IBC)

Contact name

Contact no.

James Cathcart

0414 255 586

www.bon-electrics.com.au

Lot 4, Bullsbrook Road, Bullsbrook WA 6084

Kaela Bonomi

(08) 9571 1314

edp australia pty ltd (p41)

www.edp.com.au

31-37 OBrien Street, Mooroopna VIC 3269

Mick Schirmer

0437 252 122

HortConnectWA (p37)

www.hortconnectwa.net

702-704 Murray Street, West Perth

Sam Grubiša

(08) 9486 7515

Horticulture Innovation Australia (p119)

www.horticulture.com.au

Level 8, 1 Chifley Square, Sydney NSW 2000

Hort Connections (OBC)

info@hortconnections.com.au

Madec (p98)

www.harvesttrail.gov.au

Organic 2000 (Benara Nurseries) (p35)

www.organic2000.com.au

59 Safari Place, Carabooda, WA 6033

Paliz Agriculture (p21)

www.paliz.com.au

21 / 110 Inspiration Drive Wangara WA 6065

Rivulis (p21)

www.Rivulis.com.au

Seminis (p114)

seminis.com

Signet (IFC)

signet.net.au

TriCal (p17)

www.trical.com.au

WA Crates (p91)

service@wacrates.com.au

Dept of Ag QLD (p7)

120

WA Grower WINTER 2019

(02) 8295 2300 1800 062 332 (08) 9407 5182 Hossein Darvish

(08) 9303 9638 1800 558 009 0411 427 220 (08) 8347 3838

Crate Yard, Market City

(08) 9456 4092


Powering WA growers for more than 30 years_ The WA horticultural landscape is unique. At BON Electrics we’ve been working with all sorts of growers in every corner of the state for more than three decades. WA growers rely on us to provide holistic solutions, covering all their electrical, water and refrigeration needs. We can help bring your vision to life through the design and install of new infrastructure, and we can partner with you for ongoing maintenance to keep things running as they should. As a family owned and run business, we take the time to understand your needs, we develop a solution that helps you get to where you want to go and we deliver it with the level of service you expect.

Pictured in the photo, left to right: Brandon Southern (Project Manager), Frank Bonomi (Company Director), Ben Bonomi (Technical Director).

Electrical Back Up Power Solutions | Packing Lines | Control Growing Technology | General Electrical Maintenance Programmable Logic Control Systems | Energy Efficient Lighting Solutions | Energy Harvesting Solutions Refrigeration Systems and Solutions

Water Comprehensive Irrigation System Solutions | Pump Systems and Associated Controls | Filtration Systems and Solutions | Dosing Systems and Solutions | Maintenance of your entire water supply system

“Over the past 20 years BON Electrics have been our electrical contractor of choice. We have worked with them on numerous projects and they continually support our business with ongoing maintenance. We recommend BON Electrics without hesitation, they’re efficient, knowledgeable and consistently deliver the high quality of work required by WA Corn Growers.” - Jim Trandos, Trandos Farms

If you want a partner that understands the ins and outs of the WA horticultural industry, book your free consultation with BON Electrics today.


P R OG R AM N O W L IV E Program and speaker information now available on the website. Register now to make the most of the significant early bird savings.

HO RTCO NNEC TIONS .COM.AU

Profile for vegetablesWA

WA Grower Magazine Winter 2019  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

WA Grower Magazine Winter 2019  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

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