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VOL. 54 NO 4. SUMMER 2019 $25.00 (inc GST)

wa

grower WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948

Focusing on driving income and profitability from your land

Delving into Freshcare 4.1

What you need to know to control

stable fly

This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by vegetablesWA together with: • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA


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inside Your vegetablesWA magazine

10 YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

84

55 3

WA POTATOES

43

Export Development

75

CEO’s Report

4

President’s Report

44

Our State on a Plate

76

President’s Report

5

Executive Officer’s Report

45

Rainbow Lorikeets

76

YOUR PRODUCTION

7

World Potato Congress

46

Potato export plan

48

BBQ potato and salmon skewers

49

WA Potatoes Magazine

50

Gauging crop water demand

8

Natural predators

10

Farmgate hygiene after harvest

12

Weapon against soil-borne diseases 14

POMEWEST

YOUR BUSINESS

77

Delving into Freshcare 4.1

78

Grower profile: Paul Glavocich

80

Changes to land tax exemption

83

51

How is your business financed?

84

Protecting fruit tree crops from mites 16

Pomewest Executive Manager

52

Grower profile: Bao Duy Nguyen

86

Controlling stable fly

18

2019 Pomewest Quality Program

54

Income and profitability

90

Strip-tilling

20

Keeping up with Kanzi

57

Labour Scheme Update

92

Taking care of your finances

94

Permits 115 TOOL TIME Using chemicals responsibly YOUR INDUSTRY Vegetable Industry Summit

23 24 29 30

Connecting growers with consumers 32 Future-proof pollination

34

Protected cropping

36

VegNET IEO Update

38

Mobile pest surveillance units

40

Hort Connections 2020

42

®

WA Apples at the Perth Royal Show 58 Apples put to the crunch test

60

Take time to get piece rate right

96

Working with Worksafe

62

Farm hygiene

98

WA CITRUS

65

New podcast boosts business YOUR MARKET

100 101

From the Chair

66

Progress on the industry structure

67

Pre-packed salad demand

Experts in WA

68

Export Facilitators Project update 106

The biosecurity binge continues

70

Preparing to attend a trade show

Promoting WA citrus fruit

70

STONEFRUIT WA

71

Season throws a few curve balls

72

Plum and nectarine salad

74

102 108

VIETNAMESE TRANSLATIONS

112

WHAT'S ON

120

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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VOL. 54 NO 4. SUMMER 2019

WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948


YOUR CONTACTS

contacts vegetablesWA

Management Committee

702-704 Murray Street, West Perth WA 6005 t: (08) 9486 7515 e: office@vegetableswa.com.au

President Dan Kuzmicich m: 0408 910 761

Chief Executive Officer John Shannon m: 0488 111 526 e: john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au Office Manager Karen Raybould t: (08) 9486 7515 e: karen.raybould@vegetableswa.com.au COVER IMAGE: Glen Ryan out in the field. Photo © Anton Blume

Published by vegetablesWA This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by: • vegetablesWA • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA

© 2019 All articles and other material published in this magazine is vegetablesWA copyright (unless otherwise stated) and may not be reproduced in part or full without the written permission of the authors and publisher. DISCLAIMER: vegetablesWA make no representations and expressly disclaims all warranties (to the extent permitted by law) about the accuracy, completeness, or currency of information in WA Grower. Reliance on any information provided by vegetablesWA is entirely at your own risk. vegetablesWA is not responsible for, and will not be liable for, any loss, damage, claim, expense, cost (including legal costs) or other liability arising in any way, including from any vegetablesWA or other person’s negligence or otherwise from your use or non-use of WA Grower, or from reliance on information contained in the material or that vegetablesWA provide to you by any other means.

Vietnamese Industry Extension Officer Truyen Vo m: 0457 457 559 e: truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au Industry Extension Officer Sam Grubiša m: 0427 373 037 e: sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au Benchmark Lead Bryn Edwards m: 0417 409 821 e: bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au Quality Assurance Coordinator Joel Dinsdale m: 0417 857 675 e: joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au Finance & Administration Officer Sandie McLeod t: (08) 9486 7515 e: sandie.mcleod@vegetableswa.com.au Export Development Project Lead Manus Stockdale m: 0448 897 652 e: manus.stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au Labour Scheme Facilitator Melissa Denning m: 0477 477 044 e: melissa.denning@vegetableswa.com.au Communications & Policy Officer Amber Atkinson t: (08) 9486 7515 e: amber.atkinson@vegetableswa.com.au

Life Members

A.J. Anderson*, D.J. Arbuckle, J. Arbuckle Snr*, J.H. Arbuckle* (M.B.E.J.P), H.R. Ashby*, S. Calameri, M. Dobra, A. Harris*, A. Ingrilli, G. Kiriros*, R.G. Leach*, F. Natoli, S. Sawle*, R.M. Schultz, C.P. Stevens, W.R. Stevens* (M.B.E.J.P) and J. Turley. * Deceased

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

Carnarvon

Vice President Maurice Grubiša m: 0413 050 182 Metro North Committee Peter Dobra m: 0408 616 515 Gingin Lauren East m: 0419 047 371 Manjimup Paul Glavocich m: 0413 922 287 Gingin Peter Ivankovich m: 0428 919 211 Myalup Anthony Lieu m: 0401 558 886 Metro North Duc Nguyen t: (08) 9941 8376 Carnarvon Paul Shain m: 0419 041 045 Carnarvon

Agricultural Produce Commission APC Manager Ingrid Behr t: (08) 9368 3127 e: APCManager@dpird.wa.gov.au

Advertising For information on WA Grower advertising rates and sizing please go to: www.vegetableswa.com.au/wa-growersmagazine and click on the download media kit link.


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

your

industry association

Your industry associations

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

CEO’s Report

BY JOHN SHANNON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

W

elcome to another WA Grower magazine.

The end of 2019 marks another busy year for vegetablesWA and a long list of milestones reached. Since the last edition I celebrated ten years of employment at vegetablesWA. I’m very humbled to have been able to serve our grower members for this length of time. As I reflect on the last ten years, we have achieved much and yet much remains to be done or maintained. What remains has been the strength of the relationships I’ve had with growers and their families over many years. Our industry has also benefitted from the relationships we’ve maintained with many other stakeholders. vegetablesWA is doing really powerful work across a range of areas, like benchmarking and financial analysis, QA, market development, and agronomic industry development.

I hope the next ten years will be even more productive, although like our industry we’ve got some challenges as always. 2019 has been a great year and one of the greatest highlights was our annual industry programme. This year the vegetablesWA Summit attracted the Hon Alannah MacTiernan MLC, 2018 Rural Woman of the Year Krista Watkins, along with a host of growers and industry stakeholders, to learn more about Freshcare 4.1, area wide management, benchmarking and strip tillage.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

Our two-day agenda, which included a Grower Tour, Industry Brunch and Export Readiness Workshop, were a great success and we look forward to building on the success of 2019, while taking on board your feedback, to make the 2020 events even better. 2019 marked the third year of data collection for Benchmarking. Bryn has spent a lot of time with growers collating the last of the data for the final report due in April 2020. If you would like to know more, please contact Bryn Edwards email bryn.edwards@ vegetbleswa.com.au. Since joining us in September Melissa has conducted a number of workshops across the state to discuss the Pacific Labour Scheme and the Seasonal Worker Programme. The focus has been evenly split between assisting employers to apply for the Programmes and advising current Approved Employers on worker issues and updates.

33THE Hon Alannah MacTiernan MLC with vegetablesWA CEO John Shannon at the 2019 Vegetable Industry Summit.

In January 2020 the new Freshcare 4.1 will roll out so Joel has been very busy putting together information about the changes and working with both Sam and Truyen to support you — our growers. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the office. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all vegetablesWA staff for their hard work over the last year. To staff, growers and our stakeholders, I would like to wish you all a very Merry Christmas and look forward to a great New Year with you all. MORE INFORMATION John Shannon, phone 0488 111 526 or email john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

vegetablesWA

President’s Report H

BY DAN KUZMICICH PRESIDENT, VEGETABLESWA

ere in Carnarvon we are drawing to the end of the season. Harvesting continues for some growers and others like tomato and capsicum growers are winding down. I am worried that some tomato growers have really struggled again this season as price and quality have been well down. In saying that, there are a handful of tomato growers that have done well, growing smaller patches and changing their growing practices, which is encouraging to hear. However, Carnarvon growers should be aware that the market system is looking and has been bringing over Eastern states tomatoes to improve quality into retail outlets as we haven’t been able to provide it from here. This leaves Carnarvon tomato growers in a difficult position to sustain being viable as growers.

Commission next year to help growers overcome the situation that they find themselves in, by consulting with the growers about their growing practices, i.e. variety of tomatoes, fertiliser’s used, watering schedules, spray programs, on farm hygiene and more.

From a vegetablesWA perspective we’ve achieved a lot more since the last edition of WA Grower. If we look at the year 2019, defeating water licensing fees alone would have been a remarkable achievement. That we have won additional support from state government to better facilitate grower access to the Pacific Labour

Scheme and the Seasonal Labour Program has been great. Thank you Minister, and our labour scheme facilitator Melissa Denning. This in addition to the successful ongoing services we provide around industry extension, marketing, quality assurance and business improvement. I hope that growers have also noticed an improvement in our communications now that Amber Atkinson has recently joined the team in this new role. Feedback was also that the Summit, grower tour, export workshop, and HortConnectWA brunch were great events which growers should try to attend into the future.

33PROJECT underway to help improve tomato quality by consulting with growers about tomato varieties, fertiliser’s used, watering schedules, spray programs, onfarm hygiene and more.

Talking to people within the market system they are all saying the same thing. Truyen Vo, our Vietnamese Industry Extension Officer, and Manus Stockdale, our Export Facilitator, went to the wholesale markets with Committee of Management member, Paul Shain, to see for themselves and did confirm to me that there is a concern with some Carnarvon tomato quality. Truyen and Manus are developing a project to be considered by the Agricultural Produce WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION

Tomato potato psyllid has recently been found in Carnarvon.

process. More growers in the Carnarvon area need to be trapping for this pest to keep numbers down. Growers I urge you to get involved in this program as it does help the region as a whole and we as growers do have a responsibility in our on-farm biosecurity. I can see this helping the region greatly and build on this program, for more information on this contact Annie Van Blommestien (research officer plant biosecurity from DPIRD) she does do some great work here, or you can contact CGA for more information.

33MORE growers in the Carnarvon area need to be trapping for Tomato potato psyllid to keep numbers down.

I was fortunate to have a meeting with Kingsley Songer (AUSVEG SA Chairman and General manager of 4ways Fresh) who visited Carnarvon early November. 4ways Fresh are engaging with growers to source produce from Western Australia. Talking with Kingsley I did get the feeling he does understand the challenges the grower face and will work with growers so both parties are sustainable going forward. Building relationships in this industry is vital and I wish Kingsley and the growers all the best in building those relationships. Another marketing option to find homes for your produce is always handy to have. Unfortunately, Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) has been found in Carnarvon, at the time of writing two to be preciseone male and one female. I guess the law of averages says it was going to happen, just a matter of when. Talking to Rohan Prince from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

Development (DPIRD) I mentioned that there was one good thing that came out of this, which was the trapping process put in place about three years ago which gave Carnarvon an early warning system for this type of pest.

DPIRD has been very active with the trapping process, we just need the other states to follow suit so there is more understanding and transparency in handling this problem on a national level. If you have any queries regarding TPP contact vegetablesWA for more information. The Carnarvon Growers Association (CGA) have been distributing fruit fly traps to growers to install on their properties, so far certain growers have been taking part which is encouraging and getting results from this trapping

Another season is almost over and this year coming to the end. Before we know it the planting program will all start again for another season. Before I go, I would like to say I do contact growers from time to time Just to get some feedback, just to stay informed with what is happening around the state. I would like to hear from more growers just to have a chat, grower to grower and discuss issues that arise. So, if you are interested please give vegetablesWA a call and leave your details and I will get back to you ASAP. I would like to wish all growers and industry a very Merry Christmas and a very happy and prosperous New Year. As a grower I appreciate your engagement and support. Stay safe over this period and looking forward to catching up in the new Year. MORE INFORMATION Contact Dan Kuzmicich on 0408 910 761 or damir.kuzmicich@bigpond.com


YOUR PRODUCTION

your

production Your production WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

BY DAVID ROWE DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DPIRD)

T

he goal of irrigation management is to apply water in the optimal way to ensure the best crop performance and business profitability. When matching irrigation to plant water demand, it’s important to know how crop water use changes according to plant and environmental factors.

Factors affecting crop water use Environmental factors Environmental factors are related to climate and weather and include things such as temperature, wind speed, solar radiation and humidity. The effect of these factors on crop water use can be estimated using pan evaporation (Epan) or evapotranspiration (ETo) measured in millimetres per day. This data is sourced from weather stations and is available online from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, the Bureau of Meteorology, or SMS weather services such as the one run by vegetablesWA. Plant factors Plant factors relate to the type of crop and its growth stage. Generally, plants use more water as they: 1 grow more leaf area 2 establish more roots 3 start producing fruit

33A baby leaf spinach crop in the early growth stages uses less water than the rate of evaporation.

The proportion of a crop’s water use to Epan is known as the crop factor (CF), which can be useful to know when developing an evaporation-based irrigation schedule. Crop factors are simplest to use when plant water use is measured in millimetres (mm) like rainfall.

For example, a one week old lettuce crop in sandy soil has a CF of 0.8, which means the lettuce will only transpire 8mm of water for every 10mm of evaporation. At six weeks however, the CF is 1.3 meaning the crop will transpire 13mm for every 10mm of evaporation so irrigation should be adjusted accordingly.

Schedule for success When scheduling day-to-day irrigation, it is important to consider environmental factors and plant factors, especially the actual growth stage and weather conditions.

Daily variation in temperature, wind speeds, cloud cover and rainfall all significantly affect the water use of a crop. The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) Irrigation calculator is an online tool that can be used to approximate the water requirement of commercial crops produced in Western Australia on a crop or annual basis (but not day-to-day).

DPIRD irrigation calculator agric.wa.gov. au/irrigation-calculator.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

33DAILY water use of a mature celery crop is higher than the evaporation rate due to its large leaf area and established root system.

By entering some key information about your crop, the calculator will account for the CFs, growth stages, and average daily evaporation to provide an estimate of how many megalitres of water the crop needs — over its life for annual crops or yearly for perennial crops.

The calculator should be used as a general guide only, because it relies on average weather data from the past 25 years and does not account for seasons that are hotter, drier, colder or wetter than average.

When working out a water budget, remember that the irrigation requirement of a crop will always be greater than the plant water use because additional water is applied for purposes such as ground preparation, crop cooling, sand suppression, and applying nutrients. MORE INFORMATION The DPIRD Irrigation calculator can be accessed at agric.wa.gov.au/irrigationcalculator. For further details about irrigation scheduling using daily weather data, search for ‘irrigation scheduling’ at agric.wa.gov.au.

NEED HARVEST WORKERS? A no cost Australian Government funded service that can find you suitable workers, manage enquiries and provide information on your rights and responsibilities as an employer.

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Natural

predators

are key to beat crop pests

33THE research team found that beneficial insects were more abundant in organically grown crops.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

The number of beneficial insects is heavily influenced by surrounding vegetation.


YOUR PRODUCTION

33RESEARCH results found that ‘beneficial bugs’ such as ladybeetles had the potential to counter damaging pest populations.

A

ustralian vegetable growers have teamed up with researchers under a Hort Innovation funded project to find more natural and sustainable ways to manage damaging pests in their fields. Their aim is to grow cleaner and greener crops; with consumer preferences, changes in maximum residue limits in export markets, the reduced availability of insecticide products (as a result of registration restrictions), and pests becoming chemically resistant — all drivers for the change.

Hort Innovation Research and Development Manager Ashley Zamek said beneficial bugs may play a key role in the solution. “Chemical use in agriculture is unavoidable, but for some time now there has been mounting pressure to reduce reliance on the spraying of insecticides to control vegetable pests,” she said. “This research project looks at how we can support beneficial insect populations in vegetable crops through approaches that will complement traditional farming by developing methods that are simple to implement, compatible with mainstream farming operations and can help drive down costs.”

Ms Zamek said preliminary results found that ‘beneficial bugs’ such as ladybeetles and predatory mites, which fed on many insect types and were commonly found in vegetable crops, had the potential to counter damaging pest populations. “The research team found that beneficial insects were more abundant in organically grown crops than in conventional crops where synthetic insecticides had been used. The research also found that the number of beneficial insects present was heavily influenced by surrounding vegetation,” she said. “Compared with densities in field centres (taken to serve as a ‘baseline’), beneficial insects were more common in the margins of these crops if adjacent to shelterbelts. These results are similar to those found overseas where farmers have now implemented companion planting with profitable results. “Results have indicated that this enhancement of beneficial insects actually helps to control pest populations, demonstrating the potential benefits of promoting biodiversity in crops.

33TOP: Flowering plant trial. 33ABOVE: Trap plant trial

“This project will ensure there are viable options for Australian growers to implement this work for our environment that does not affect the productivity of the crop.” The next phase of this research will trial the best way to integrate companion plant resources to promote beneficial insects for sweet corn and brassica crops as case studies. MORE INFORMATION Growers are being encouraged to get involved. If you are a vegetable grower and you would like to get involved in this project, contact the project lead, Professor Geoff Gurr at ggurr@csu.edu.au or (02) 6365 7551.

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

Farmgate hygiene: The importance of cleaning up after harvest

I

n this article, AUSVEG National Tomato potato psyllid Coordinator Alan Nankivell discusses post-harvest practices that can be undertaken to reduce the lifecycle opportunities for TPP as well as other on-farm pests.

Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) lives on green plant material from solanaceous crops, which includes tomato, capsicum, chilli, eggplant and potato. There are also other hosts that have no economic benefit, such as the night shades and bush tomatoes, which need to be managed around the borders of fields. One of the key findings from the Western Australian incursion in 2017 is that the psyllid appears to have the ability to ‘over winter’ on host plants, and wait for the growing season to commence in earnest during spring.

If the numbers are high at the beginning of the season, then they will rapidly multiply and present as a major management issue early. Additionally, if TPP numbers get out of control, they — like all other sucking insects — will impact on crop yield and produce quality as well as increase the risk of spreading pests. To control the impact of TPP, it is important to minimise the numbers that can over winter.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

On-farm hygiene is an important element to farming best-practice.


YOUR PRODUCTION

33TOMATO-POTATO psyllid lives on green plant material from solanaceous crops, which includes tomato, capsicum, chilli, eggplant and potato.

Minimising risk As with many crops, on-farm hygiene is an important element to farming best-practice. This is particularly so for the effective risk mitigation of TPP. Cleaning up and disposing of green plant material that is past its productive usefulness will reduce the opportunity for over wintering of TPP.

The general practices of farmgate hygiene, which apply to other pests and diseases, also apply to TPP.

The integration of farmgate hygiene practices and routine standard operating procedures will mitigate against the impact of many pests, not just TPP. Key points to note: 1 Understand the lifecycle and behaviour of TPP. 2 Routinely undertake monitoring of fields and their surrounds, either by observation or trapping, to know which insects are present (pest and beneficial).

Photo Š Truyen Vo

3 Once the economic value of the crop is exhausted, remove the unwanted green plants and dispose of promptly using methods such as compositing or burning that kill unwanted pests.

33TPP pictured in a chilli plot. 33TOMATO potato psyllid eggs and adult captured in 2019 winter in an abandoned chilli plot in Western Australia.

Finally, there is value in regularly reviewing the Farm Biosecurity website as it is continually updated with management strategies and information on the management of new pests. This information can be found at farmbiosecurity.com.au. MORE INFORMATION For more information on this program, please contact AUSVEG National TPP Coordinator Alan Nankivell at alan. nankivell@ausveg.com.au. Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) National Program Coordinator has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable, fresh potato and potato processing research and development levies and contributions from the Australian Government. Project Number: MT16018 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This article was originally published in Vegetables Australian magazine, courtesy of AUSVEG.

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A practical guide to identification and control of soil-borne diseases.

33SOIL-BORNE diseases cause an estimated $120 million in losses to the Australian vegetable industry annually.

New weapon

for all growers in ongoing battle against soil-borne diseases

T

he Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection (ICP) project work with growers nationally to put soil management and plant health research into practice.

In this edition we showcase the impressive new resource to assist growers better manage soil-borne diseases — a practical guide that covers your specific crop and addresses your specific disease problem. Soil Wealth ICP Phase 2 (VG16078) is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund. Soil-borne diseases cause an estimated $120 million in losses to the Australian vegetable industry annually. They are an ongoing challenge to all growers

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globally. Knowing how best to manage them is key, and a new practical guide to identification and control of soil-borne diseases will help Australian growers incorporate these skills into their farming practice, regardless of whether they are currently battling disease or not.

Their ability to survive for long periods in the soil makes the control of soil-borne diseases particularly difficult. The diseases are caused by a range of fungi, bacteria, moulds, nematodes and viruses occurring in the soil. They also appear across a wide vegetable host range, making them incredibly difficult to avoid. Management then becomes key. Modern intensive farming operations are under continued pressure from

consumers for perfection. Growers are no longer able to rely on broad spectrum chemical treatments. Pests can be resistant to available chemical treatments, so growers are increasingly embracing integrated pest management (IPM). This environmentally sensitive approach uses a range of techniques to manage pests, rather than growers reaching automatically for a pesticide. Soil-borne diseases in vegetable crops: A practical guide to identification and control fits seamlessly into this way of thinking, providing a valuable tool for the grower. Chapters are based around vegetable crop families, providing information on identification of the major soil-borne diseases for each crop. The guide outlines conditions which favour disease and methods available for control.


YOUR PRODUCTION

According to Applied Horticultural Research lead author Dr Len Tesoriero, “often the most challenging thing for a grower is to correctly identify what soilborne disease they may have”. “Without this it’s really difficult to effectively manage the problem.”

RMCG manager of communications and resource development Carl Larsen said his team had collated the best available science in a practical, one-stop-shop ute guide. “This makes it easy for growers and advisors to get the information they want to solve their problem, regardless of whether that’s identification or available controls,” he said. Complementing the guide in supporting growers, the Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection project operates across the country. Demonstration sites, master classes, field days, regional workshops and interest groups deliver best-practice management of soilborne diseases.

There are also a range of other great resources to assist in the management of soil-borne diseases including fact sheets, case studies, videos and past webinar recordings on the project website www.soilwealth.com.au. MORE INFORMATION You can access all the resources in this article, as well as news and events from around the country at soilwealth.com.au. For more information, please contact project leaders Dr Gordon Rogers on (02) 8627 1040 or gordon@ahr.com.au and Dr Anne-Maree Boland on (03) 9882 2670 or anne-mareeb@rmcg.com.au. This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Project Number: VG16078

Get on top of your irrigation this summer.

IRRIGATION: tips for summer We all know good irrigation management gives you good plant and soil health outcomes. As crop growth and water use increases with the warmer weather it is a good time to be thinking about getting on top of your irrigation. Below are some quick tips and tools to help get you ready for a potentially challenging summer growing season: • Below average rainfall during 2019 may have reduced your water reliability. Check the seasonal rainfall outlook for vegetable growing regions (September – November 2019) to get some indication of potential in-season rainfall • Check your irrigation system is ready for the season • Check your subsoil moisture

• Check your crop monitoring and soil moisture tools are working before it really warms up • Don't get caught out by rapid increases in crop water use in spring-early summer • Be aware of declining water quality as water becomes scarce, which often goes hand-in-hand • Understand irrigation decisions: from enterprise planning to the paddock.

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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Protecting deciduous fruit tree crops from

mites

BY ALISON MATHEWS MANJIMUP OFFICE AND RESEARCH FACILITY, DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DPIRD)

The cumulative leaf infested days method is used to determine mite damage thresholds.

M

ites are a topic that have come up frequently while our project team has been speaking with Western Australian growers as part of the Hort Innovation funded project ‘An integrated pest, disease and weed management program for the Australian apple and pear industry.’

To support WA fruit growers to manage mites in their orchards, DPIRD recently hosted Dave Williams, a leading horticultural entomologist from Victoria, to run an IPDM workshop in Manjimup. During the orchard walk and presentations, Dave demonstrated how to monitor trees for mites and other pests and explained how to use the cumulative leaf infested days (CLID) method to determine mite damage thresholds. The cumulative leaf infested days (CLID) method was developed and is used in eastern Australia but can be used by WA orchardists as well. Unlike other monitoring thresholds that look at the abundance of a pest at a single point in time, this method uses the percentage of leaves infested with mites over time.

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33DAVE Williams demonstrating how to monitor for a range of pests and diseases, including mites.

It is known what percentage of leaf scorch will develop at certain CLID levels, so this method provides damage thresholds that can vary depending on the acceptable level of leaf scorch.

A tutorial on how to calculate CLID is available on extensionAUS’ Apple and Pear IPDM portal. This website contains a wide range of articles related to pest and disease management in apple and pear crops, with new articles and seasonal updates regularly posted. To keep up-to-date, join the OzApplePearIPDM Facebook group. DPIRD has been doing significant work towards allowing importation of the European red mite predatory mite Typhlodromus pyri from eastern Australia.

This species has been shown to be the best predatory mite to use against European red mite. We are keen to get the predatory mite into WA, as European red mite is the primary species damaging apple trees in some southern orchards. We hope that by introducing this new species, we can further reduce the amount of pesticide being used to produce apples. Growers are encouraged to check out the ‘Managing mites in WA deciduous fruit trees’ page on the DPIRD website for more information on mites in Western Australia, including using miticides registered for use in WA. This online resource includes photographs and notes to help growers identify the range of mite species that may be present.


YOUR PRODUCTION

33CORRECT identification of mite species is important to avoid the over-reliance of miticides for control that can lead to pesticide resistance.

33APPLE growers taking part in the recent IPDM field day held in Manjimup.

In some cases, the best method of detection is the symptoms of feeding by mites on the appearance of foliage. This is especially the case for the microscopic ‘eriophyid’ mites such as apple rust mite, plum rust mite and pearleaf blister mite.

33LEAF damage to pears by two-spotted mite.

The DPIRD website also includes an update on miticides registered for use against the pest mites, including a newly registered product with multiple active ingredients. The table of miticides contains information on the particular crop and mite species and in some cases the stage of mite the product is registered for use on as well as the withholding period. As is always the case, consult with your exporter before using any pesticide on your trees.

Photo © DPIRD

Correct identification of mite species, determining their abundance and/or impact and having good knowledge of appropriate pesticide use is important to avoid the over-reliance of miticides for control that can lead to pesticide resistance. The web page provides information on how to monitor for pest mites and suggested action thresholds for two-spotted mite, European red mite and bryobia mite.

MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Alison Mathews at alison.mathews@dpird.wa.gov.au • extensionAUS Australian Apple Pear IPDM portal: extensionaus.com.au/ ozapplepearipdm/ • DPIRD: agric.wa.gov.au

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

What you need to know to control stable fly

S

table fly (Stomoxys calcitrans), sometimes known as biting fly, is an aggravating pest in Western Australia, particularly on the coastal plain, north and south of Perth where it is a declared pest under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.

33STABLE fly is a declared pest under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.

It can bite humans, domestic pets and livestock, seeking to draw blood which is essential to complete its life cycle. Regulations are in place in 14 designated local government areas (LGAs) to manage the pest and reduce fly breeding. LGAs where stable fly is a declared pest are the cities of Armadale, Cockburn, Joondalup, Kwinana, Rockingham, Swan and Wanneroo, and the shires of Capel, Chittering, Gingin, Harvey, Kalamunda, Serpentine–Jarrahdale and of Murray.

An updated management plan to control stable fly was gazetted in September 2019 and incorporates improved management methods to minimise and control breeding of the livestock pest. The Stable Fly Management Plan 2019 is a result of six years of research by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development. Improvements were incorporated into the updated plan as a result of these key research findings.

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About stable fly Stable flies can be difficult to identify. The adult stable fly is slightly smaller than a house fly and slightly larger than a bushfly, but has a checkerboard of dark spots on the back of the abdomen. The peak time for stable fly to breed and be active is from October to April. After ingesting a blood meal, the female fly lays around 90 eggs in four or five suitable locations such as rotting vegetable matter or animal manure. She may lay up to 600 eggs over a lifetime and, in warmer areas, may breed all year-round. Key breeding sites for stable flies include: • ageing manure mixed with organic material such as straw • rotting vegetable crop residues left after harvest, including reject produce • straw bedding mixed with urine and faeces • reject vegetables fed out to livestock in large piles

• rotting hay, straw or sawdust, fermenting feed and piles of grass clippings. Stable fly can be a serious livestock pest around animal enclosures, stables, feedlots and paddocks or pastures Cattle and horses are most affected. Animals will try to avoid the fly by stamping their feet, tail switching, throwing their heads down toward their front legs, and kicking sand up onto their legs and body. Horses are seen to stamp when stable flies bite their legs.

Stable Fly Management Plan 2019 The Stable Fly Management Plan 2019 sets out measures to control stable fly in areas of Western Australia where it is a declared pest — the cities of Armadale, Cockburn, Joondalup, Kwinana, Rockingham, Swan and Wanneroo; shires of Capel, Chittering, Gingin, Harvey, Kalamunda, SerpentineJarrahdale and Murray.


YOUR PRODUCTION

The plan is currently being translated into Vietnamese for increased transparency and uptake in the horticultural community. It is not feasible to eradicate stable fly in Western Australia, however the new control measures under the updated management plan aim to control breeding. Minimising breeding is critical to reducing the impact and spread of stable fly.

Any part of the crop that remains in or on the soil within three days of harvesting can be buried to a depth of 200mm with a stone burier or 300mm with a mouldboard plough, then the soil surface compacted with a roller. Fruit and vegetables not for human consumption, or that is for any reason unsuitable for sale, must be deep buried at least 100cm below ground.

Research by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development suggests that adopting the methods contained within the updated management plan could result in 95 to 99 per cent of stable fly being controlled, up from 85 per cent control as a result of the previous measures in the 2016 plan.

Changes from previous Stable Fly Management Plan 2016 Under the 2019 plan, all areas in declared LGAs are subject to the plan, not just agricultural land. Research found that stable fly can be more effectively controlled in commercial vegetable production on sand by rolling or compacting topsoil than with chemical treatment. 33THE Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development research has shown that burying vegetable waste with a mouldboard plough (background) and then compacting it with a roller (foreground) can greatly reduce stable fly populations.

The plan allows for untreated poultry manure to be used on non-irrigated pasture. There are a number of requirements which include that it is spread evenly at a rate no greater than 10t/ha dry weight and particles must be no greater than 20mm.

A person intending to use untreated manure must advise local government a minimum of three working days beforehand. The Stable Fly Management Plan 2019 includes the control measures from the previous plan as approved measures for two years. This will allow for the transitioning from the old plan to the updated plan measures. The approved measures are available on the department’s website.

Stable fly is a serious pest of livestock and can deliver a painful bite. Waste vegetables fed to stock must be in troughs of boxes or on hardstand; the vegetable waste cannot be placed directly on soil. Fodder (hay and silage) must be spread thinly on paddock or fed on hardstand.

The community can also play a key role in limiting potential stable fly breeding environments by removing waste feedstuffs, poorly made compost, piled lawn clippings and unused vegetable feed. MORE INFORMATION More information about the stable fly management plan and a link to the gazetted 2019 plan is available at www.agric.wa.gov. au/bam/management-plans To report stable fly, or for advice on implementing control measures to reduce stable fly, contact the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS) on (08) 9368 3080 or padis@dpird.wa.gov.au. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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YOUR PRODUCTION

How has your strip-till New Year’s resolution progressed?

33MEMBERS of the project team with a strip-till unit at Hort Connections.

Photo © RMCG

33STRIP-TILLED carrot crop in Tasmania.

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YOUR PRODUCTION

T

he Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection (ICP) projects work with growers nationally to put soil management and plant health research into practice.

control benefits adding up to produce impressive yield and quality results.

In this edition we track progress against implementing strip-till, a system of cultivation that works strips of soil where the crop will be planted or sown and leaves most of the soil covered and undisturbed. Soil Wealth ICP Phase 2 (VG16078) is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund.

For Ed, the standout result was the combination of higher overall yields and higher marketable yields in the ryecorn cover crop areas, where 80% of the crop was marketable, compared to 62% in the fallow area.

Casting your mind back Each year comes around, and we all make a New Year’s resolution. What was yours? How are you tracking? Or, like many, have you forgotten what it was entirely?

In the 7ha operational trial, the ryecorn cover crop area produced an outstanding cucumber yield, well above farm averages. Direct seeded cucumbers established better and produced more marketable fruit per plant and overall marketable yield per hectare.

You can also hear Ed Fagan talk about how his initial reservations about striptill and cover crops were dispelled in a video on our website.

Strip-till resources to get you going

The benefits of trip-till cultivation.

Back in December 2018, we wrote an article — Make 2019 the year you have a serious look at striptill. This outlined the benefits of reducing establishment costs and saving time, improving soil health, as well as some of the challenges in changing to a strip-till system.

Since then the team has been busy around the country talking with growers and implementing some of the innovations on demonstration sites, as well as showcasing the technology at farm walks and conferences, like Hort Connections.

Strip-till lessons from the field Cover crops + roller crimper + strip tillage have proven a winning combination for a partnership between Mulyan Farms’ Ed Fagan and AHR’s Marc Hinderager from the Soil Wealth project. Cucumber yield and gross income more than doubled, with many soil and weed

It’s not too late! There’s still plenty of 2019 left to investigate what striptill means for you, your production system and your area.

The project team have developed a great package of resources to help you make a start. These include: • Lyndon Orpwood discusses the benefits of strip-tillage to Simplot Australia: in this video Lyndon Orpwood from Simplot Australia (Bathurst, NSW) explains how strip-tillage has improved moisture retention and field productivity. The benefits include stubble retention, greater efficiency and reduced diesel usage. • Ed Fagan explains why his initial reservations about strip-till and cover crops were dispelled: in this video Ed Fagan (Cowra, NSW) explains how strip-tillage and cover cropping compliment each other for a successful cucumber crop. • Strip-till for corn production — Reducing erosion, building robust soils: hear Dr Kelvin Montagu demonstrate the erosion control

benefits of strip-tillage in vegetable production in this technical video. • Strip-tillage in the field — Jeff McSpedden, NSW case study: in this video Jeff McSpedden from Bathurst NSW explains how strip tillage has improved the productivity of sweet corn on hist farm. • Strip-till in Tasmania — A reduced till farming system: watch this video to find out more about the benefits and challenges of using strip tillage in vegetable production systems, as well as testimonials from growers. • Strip-till in Tasmanian vegetable crops: read this fact sheet to find out more about the benefits and challenges of strip-till, as well practical considerations out in the paddock. • Strip-tillage for vegetables and potatoes with Steve Peterson (USA) and Ben Pogiolli (AUS): catch-up with this fantastic webinar recording and hear from industry experts on how strip-till will save you fuel and time, increase soil organic matter, reduce erosion and compaction, and how fertilisers can be banded at multiple depths. MORE INFORMATION You can access all the resources in this article, as well as news and events from around the country at soilwealth.com.au. For more information, please contact project leaders Dr Gordon Rogers on (02) 8627 1040 or gordon@ahr.com.au and Dr Anne-Maree Boland on (03) 9882 2670 or anne-mareeb@ rmcg.com.au. This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Project Number: VG16078

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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For more information : Graeme Simmonds – Technical Sales Representative – Tel: 0427 171 401 – graeme.simmonds@hmclause.com The product descriptions, technical data and disease resistance ratings provided are intended for reference only. This information and any other verbal or oral information represent average results from specific trials and are not a prediction or promise of future performance. Seed and crop performance and disease severity will vary depending on the location, climate, soil type, soil conditions, cultural and management practices and other environmental factors. New, unknown, and/or atypical strains of pathogens may exist for which the varieties have not been tested and which may overcome the resistance of the variety. Accordingly, HMCP warrants that a representative sample of seeds sold was tested and labeled at the time of initial packaging, and, at the time of such testing, conformed to the label within recognized tolerances. HMCP makes NO other warranty of any kind. The sale and use of seeds are subject to the terms and conditions of sale appearing on catalogues and price lists - © 2019 HM.CLAUSE

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TOOL TIME

TOOL

TIME

your

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TOOL TIME

Making it easy to use chemicals responsibly BY TRUYEN VO | FIELD EXTENSION OFFICER VIETNAMESE, VEGETABLESWA

TOOL

APVMA’S ONLINE PORTAL

WHAT DOES IT DO

TOOL TO ENSURE YOU ARE USING THE CORRECT, REGISTERED PRODUCT

WHO WOULD USE IT

GROWERS THAT NEED INFORMATION ABOUT CHEMICAL USAGE

WHEN USING PESTICIDES, the importance of producing ‘clean food’ while protecting human health and the environment is of utmost importance. Growers need to be aware of their responsibilities and ensure the pesticides they are applying to crops involve no risk to others. In order to use chemicals responsibly, growers must follow the instructions on the labels of registered product or carefully check over the permit issued by APVMA. This is especially important when growers learn from each other about a potential ‘highly effective chemical product’ without clear information of the product registration and permit.

Luckily, the ability to find this information is easier than ever, thanks to the APVMA’s online portal which can be used on any smart phone, iPad, or computer. The ‘product search’ https://portal. apvma.gov.au/pubcris in APVMA’s online services https://portal.apvma. gov.au/ is an easy and friendly tool that can help you to make sure you are ‘using the correct, registered product’. See the following page for search examples.

THE COST

FREE MORE INFORMATION

https://portal.apvma.gov.au/ pubcris

CAUTION

Key considerations:

▶ GROWERS need to ensure the pesticides they are applying to crops involve no risk to others.

✔✔ use the correct, registered product ✔✔ follow the instructions on the label ✔✔ read the material data safety sheet (MDSS) ✔✔ use the correct equipment to apply the chemicals ✔✔ make sure you have the correct licence and permit, if one is required ✔✔ understand and meet your work health and safety obligations keep accurate records Go to https://portal.apvma.gov.au/pubcris for more information

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019


TOOL TIME

Here is an example of the steps to follow if you were searching for ‘CHLORPYRIFOS’. STEP 1

STEP 3

STEP 5

VISIT THE SEARCH PORTAL

TYPE IN THE CHEMICAL NAME YOU ARE SEARCHING FOR

FILTER BY REGISTERED STATE, WHICH IN THIS EXAMPLE IS WA

STEP 2

STEP 4

STEP 6

START THE SEARCH

ADD ANY RELEVANT FILTERS

VIEW THE RESULTS

You can also search for a list of chemical products registered, in WA for instance, using the ‘PEST ON HOST’ search tool in the same page. Below are the steps if searching for ‘THRIP ON WATERMELON’. STEP 1

STEP 3

STEP 5

START THE SEARCH

SEARCH FOR PRODUCTS TO CONTROL THRIPS ON WATERMELON

VIEW THE RESULTS

STEP 2

STEP 4

CHOOSE PEST ON HOST

FILTER BY REGISTERED STATE, WHICH IN THIS EXAMPLE IS WA

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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TOOL TIME

Sick of getting lost in a pile of paper receipts? BY AMBER ATKINSON | COMMUNICATIONS & POLICY OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

TOOL

SMART PHONE APPS TO TRACK RECEIPTS

WHAT DOES IT DO

CAPTURE AND RECORD RECEIPTS AND EXPENSES

WHO WOULD USE IT

BUSINESS OWNERS AND MANAGERS

THE COST

FREE MORE INFORMATION

WWW.ATO.GOV.AU/GENERAL/ ONLINE-SERVICES/ IN-DETAIL/MYDEDUCTIONS/ MYDEDUCTIONS WWW.MYOB.COM/AU/MYOBAPPS/MYOB-CAPTURE HTTPS://QUICKBOOKS.INTUIT. COM/AU/MOBILE/

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SAY GOODBYE TO overflowing shoeboxes of receipts, lost receipts and those especially annoying receipts whose ink slowly fades to nothing. There is now an abundance of free apps available that make it ridiculously simple to capture, send and store receipts, helping you to stay on top of your expenses and make tax time way less stressful.

We showcase three popular apps that allow you to capture receipts on the go, using your mobile phone. If you, your bookkeeper or accountant is using a popular accounting software package, it’s highly likely they will have a mobile app available, so be sure to check your favourite app store or Google to see what’s available.


TOOL TIME

1. myDeductions

myDeductions is an app from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) which makes it easier and more convenient to keep your expense and income records in one place:

Records you can keep

• If you are an employee, you can use myDeductions to keep records of your work and general expenses and to make lodging your tax return easier.

• photos of your invoices and receipts.

• If you are not an employee, you can still record your general expenses, such as gifts and donations and the cost of managing your tax affairs.

WWW.ATO.GOV.AU/GENERAL/ ONLINE-SERVICES/ IN-DETAIL/MYDEDUCTIONS/ MYDEDUCTIONS

• If you are a sole trader, you can use the myDeductions tool to keep records of your income and deductions.

How it works 1. Download the ATO app to your smart device 2. Select the myDeductions icon 3. Step through and choose whether you'd like to use the tool as an individual (generally or as an employee), as a sole trader (business) or both.

2. MYOB Capture

This app is ideal for MYOB users. In just a few steps, all receipts are stored safely online ready for deductions at tax time. The app scans and reads the relevant information on your receipt. Advanced machine-learning suggests matches to your transactions and bank feeds then populates the bill so you can drastically reduce your manual admin.

WWW.MYOB.COM/AU/ MYOB-APPS/MYOBCAPTURE

A central location for all your documents means less stress for you at tax time. It gives easier access for your accountant and bookkeeper so you can stay compliant for good. You also get a much clearer picture of how much you’re spending.

You can record: • expenses and deductions • vehicle trips • income (if you’re a sole trader)

Using myDeductions at tax time Whether you lodge your own tax return or use a tax agent, myDeductions can help you keep your tax records organised. Throughout the year it’s a fast, easy way to capture information on the go. When you are ready to do your tax return you can: • email your data, including to your tax agent • upload your data to prefill your tax return, then either —— you can lodge it —— your tax agent can access your uploaded data through their practice management software.

How it works 1. Download the MYOB Capture app to your smart device 2. Use your smartphone camera to take the photo 3. Adjust the image to fit within the markers 4. Click to send to the In Tray in AccountRight and it’s done 5. The data on receipts and bills is digitally extracted, leaving you to simply review and approve. When you store receipts digitally on the MYOB servers, not only will the ink never fade but also the days of sorting through dozens to find the right one are gone. Securely stored, easily organised, problem solved.

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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TOOL TIME

3. Intuit Quickbooks

This handy app lets you take your finances with you. Start by creating a profile for your business, then you’re ready to snap, track and sort your expenses to see how you spend your money. It only takes a few seconds and a handful of details to enter an expense. Take photos of your expense receipts, then digital copies will then be saved to the cloud for future reference.

This app also manages mileage tracking and through automatic tracking can reliably and automatically track kilometres with your smartphone’s GPS. You can categorise business and personal trips with a swipe and add trips manually. Best of all, you could get up to $680 in potential tax deductions for every 1000km driven (up to 5000km).

HTTPS://QUICKBOOKS.INTUIT. COM/AU/MOBILE/

Stay on top of your expenses and make tax time way less stressful.

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YOUR INDUSTRY

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Vegetable

Industry Summit

& Grower Tour 17–18 OCTOBER 2019

O

BY AMBER ATKINSON COMMUNICATIONS & POLICY OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

n Thursday October 17 vegetablesWA two-day Industry Summit programme kicked off with a bus ride to Gingin.

Grower Tour The destination of this year’s grower tour was Tony Colotti’s Brookrise Farm and the afternoon attracted a few dozen growers and industry reps with an opportunity to network and gather some new information they could utilise in their business. Tony gave everyone a warm welcome and after a quick run down on his property and crops, we took off to the paddock. Landmark had arranged for Jonathan Smith and Andrew Dedman from Stratus Imaging to provide a demonstration of two Aero Shield survey drones, which represent the very latest in geospatial technology and a viable alternative to ground driven and aerial sprayers. It was great to watch the drones travelling along the fields at various speeds and see the spraying in action to gauge how accurately these machines can deliver their load. The display was followed by a talk from Agile8 Consulting Limited chief

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executive officer Kevin Moore, who travelled all the way from Hong Kong to discuss the delivery of COOLNOMIX cooling systems and related technologies that alleviate the impact of air conditioning and refrigeration systems on the environment — and bottom line.

Kevin was a passionate pioneer in the space, and it was interesting to see and hear about future cooling and food storage options.

HortConnectWA Brunch The Friday commenced with the HortConnectWA champagne brunch at Crown Perth. HortConnectWA aims to bring together like-minded young horticulture professionals to engage in social and professional networking. Between flowing coffee, bacon and eggs, guests heard from three motivated speakers: West Cost Eagles Assistant Coach, Michelle Cowan; Woolworth Ethical Sourcing Manager Laura McManus; and Buy West Eat Best representative, Melissa Worthington. It was a great morning and a wonderful precursor to the main event — the Vegetable Industry Summit.

After a delicious lunch of freshly cooked burgers, AFGRI Moora showcased some on their latest machinery and growers had the opportunity to talk shop before heading back to Perth. Growers ended the night with a cocktail function, along with attendees of the Export Workshop, which was a great way for everyone to get to know each other.

33L–R: Responsible Sourcing Manager at Woolworths Group Laura McManus, Assistant Coach for West Coast Eagles Michelle Cowan and Buy West Eat Best Program Manager Melissa Worthington.


YOUR INDUSTRY

The Grower Tour included a demonstration of two Aero Shield survey drones.

Vegetable Industry Summit The event was MC’d by ABC Rural radio presenter Di Darmody, who has now become a crowd favourite and truly made the event as entertaining as it was interesting.

Our first speaker of the event was banana farmer, Krista Watkins, who travelled through the night from Queensland to share the story about the origins of her business, Natural Evolution Foods.

The Vegetable Industry Summit was MC’d by Di Darmody,

Frustrated with dumping tonnes of bananas because they were the wrong shape or size, Krista and husband Rob repurposed the waste by developing gluten free ‘banana flour’ and now produce approximately eight tonnes each week. Krista was followed by vegetablesWA Quality Assurance Coordinator Joel Dinsdale, who discussed Freshcare 4.1; and then DPIRD Development Officer Craig Webster who discussed area wide management.

33MITCH East speaking at the Vegetable Industry Summit.

The afternoon included an engaging benchmarking presentation, delivered by our very own benchmarking lead, Bryn Edwards, and a fascinating discussion on strip tillage, presented by Kelvin Montague from Colo Consulting. The day concluded with a networking function where growers, stakeholders and speakers got to eat, drink and engage one on one.

33TOP: Julia Easton with Bevan Eatts.

33ABOVE L–R: Ben Coman, Andrew Hughes, Michael Bogdanich, Vince Tana and Andrew Bogdanich. MORE INFORMATION Contact, Amber Atkinson at: amber.atkinson@vegetableswa.com.au

We would like to thank our funders Bankwest and Buy West Eat Best, along with all the growers and stakeholders who attended. WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Connecting food producers with consumers

using digital technology BY AARON NATOLI PROJECT MANAGER, PERTH NRM

A

survey conducted by the Perth Region Natural Resource Management (Perth NRM), showed overwhelmingly that WA consumers want to know more about where their food comes from.

Perth NRM has developed the ‘Sustainable Farmer Community Innovation’.

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Below, Perth NRM Project Manager Aaron Natoli shares his vision of connecting food producers with consumers using technology.

Consumers want to know more First and foremost, consumers want to know that their food is safe, which means they will typically seek out Australian products as a result of its clean, green image. The next thing consumers want to know is: who grows the produce? The person, the identity, the character that delivered this living thing, all the way from paddock to plate. Interestingly, in the digital age consumers are more “connected” than ever, however they are seemingly more disconnected from those that produce its food.

We have lost our link with the land As countries develop, the share of the population working in agriculture declines. While more than two-thirds of the population in developing countries

work in agriculture, less than 5% of the population does in developed countries. It is predominantly the huge productivity increase through mechanisation and automation that makes this reduction in labour possible. In Australia, we have become a nation of urban dwellers, with less and less of our relatives being involved at any level of farming, either agriculture or horticulture.

As farmers leave the land, consumers know less about where and who produces the food they consume daily. In fact, if you asked many children today where food comes from, you might not be surprised to hear the response being Coles or Woolworths.

A new approach To meet the needs of the farmers and the consumers who wants to know more about where their food comes from, who grows it and how it is produced, the Perth NRM has developed the ‘Sustainable Farmer Community Innovation’ (the project).

Perth NRM will use digital technologies including mobile device apps and cloud computing to provide convenient access to traceability data from WA farmers, giving consumers real time access to information important to them in purchasing decisions including: • Who the farmer is; • When the produce was harvested; • What food safety standards the farmer meets; and • How sustainable the farmer is. Trust is paramount in the digital age and with new technologies that give verifiable and convenient access to provenance information, the project will enable WA consumers to be sure that “what you see is what they get” in terms of WA produce. Perth NRM aims to give WA farmers a platform to demonstrate their outstanding work, putting them in focus of WA consumers to direct their purchasing power toward these farmers via the project. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Aaron Natoli at aaron.natoli@perthnrm.com

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Horticulture industry and researchers join forces to

future-proof pollination

33RESEARCH trials in Western Australia form part of a $5.7 million, five-year research effort examining insect pollinators for horticultural crops.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019


YOUR INDUSTRY

“We are looking at ‘fluffy’ fly species that have no trouble attaching pollen to their bodies,” she said. “We also want flies that are energetic, and travel reasonable distances up and down rows of crops, such as hoverflies, rather than staying in one area with limited movement.” Dr Anderson said if certain fly species prove good pollinators, researchers will also determine the most cost-effective ways for growers to get access to these fly species.

R

esearch trials in Western Australia are looking at the potential for native flies to pollinate horticultural crops. The field trials form part of a $5.7 million, five-year research effort focused on pollination of horticultural crops, with major funding support through Hort Innovation and involving some of the nation’s leading researchers. While bees are the most widelyused and well-known pollinators for crops, a range of insects are natural crop pollinators. Assessment of fly pollination is being carried out across Australia on farms in Western Australia (Busselton and Gingin); Queensland (Mareeba, Dimbulah, Walkamin, Bundaberg); Tasmania (north and south); South Australia (Mt Gambier); and the Northern Territory (Darwin). The project is led by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), in collaboration with the University of WA, Western Sydney University, University of New England, Seed Purity Pty Ltd and Biological Services. Two species of native flies were recently released into netted enclosures on an avocado orchard in the State's SouthWest to coincide with their flowering

33DEPARTMENT of Primary Industries and Regional Development research officer David Cook, Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan, Dr Sasha Voss of UWA, agronomist Jacinta Foley and Hort Innovation R&D General Manager Dr Alison Anderson at a pollination trial site in the South-West.

to examine the influence of flies on avocado fruit production. Western Australian Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan said the WA Government is contributing $836,000 towards this important research project.

DPIRD lead researcher David Cook said flies make ideal pollinator candidates because they are present year-round, they need lots of sugar for flying so they visit many flowers for nectar and as a consequence, pollen sticks to their bodies.

“Two local fly species are being trialled in netted enclosures on a commercial avocado property near Busselton, during the short five-week window that avocados are flowering,” Dr Cook said.

$5.7 million, five-year research effort focused on horticultural crop pollination.

“This project is a fantastic national collaboration, with department researchers, the horticulture industry, universities and the private sector sharing their knowledge on innovative ways to benefit our fruit and vegetable industries,” Ms MacTiernan said.

Hort Innovation R&D General Manager Dr Alison Anderson said by exploring different pollination methods, this project is arming Australian growers with more pollination service tools for success. “Bees perform a wonderful service. What this project is aiming to do is support that service by determining which species of native flies can also effectively transfer pollen from plant to plant,” Dr Anderson said. Dr Anderson said many attributes make a fly a good pollinator.

“Four weeks after flowering has ended, a count will be made of the number of avocado fruitlets formed that are more than 5mm in diameter (a measure of pollination success) across different treatments.

“A second count will be made in February and the final harvest of fruit will be assessed in winter 2020.” Pollination is vital to the success of many fruit, nut and vegetable crops, with pollination-dependent crops in Australia worth almost $6 billion per year. Jacinta Foley, agronomist on Jasper Farm trial site in WA, said the prospect of purposefully introducing alternative pollinators to service our avocado trees was an exciting one. MORE INFORMATION Contact Dr David Cook, Researcher Officer, DPIRD South Perth on (08) 9368 3084. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY

33A protected environment enables producers to grow high-value products for longer, potentially opening up new domestic and international market opportunities.

Protected cropping to boost north’s high-value produce

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YOUR INDUSTRY

33 A protected environment gives producers more control over temperature, water, pest and disease management.

Two-year $443,000 research and development project on protective cropping.

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new Cooperative Research Centre for is set to supercharge the horticultural industry by encouraging more producers to invest in protected cropping systems. The two-year $443,000 project is a research and development (R&D) partnership between producers in North Queensland, Carnarvon (WA) and Lake Bennett (NT), the Carnarvon Growers’ Association, Northern Territory Farmers’ Association, Cravo Australia, Port of Townsville, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) and Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (WA DPIRD). The project team will examine the various protected cropping systems, technologies and practices and work with producers to develop a roadmap of how they can implement the right system for them.

According to DAF project leader, Dr Elio Jovicich (DAF), having more information will support growers in their business and investment planning and help them tap into highvalue, premium markets and secure higher returns.

“Depending on the crop species and protected cropping technology, yields per square meter have shown to be four to 10 times or even greater than in field-grown crops,” he said. “However, it’s essential to understand crops harvested in most protected cropping scenarios will be different from those grown outdoors, even if we are talking about the same vegetable crop species. Under structures, the fruit type and visual and eating quality will be different and target specific markets where they can attract higher prices,” he said. WA DPIRD’s assistant director of Horticulture, Rohan Prince, said growing in a protected environment gives producers more control over temperature, water, pest and disease management.

“It also means they can grow high-value products for longer, potentially opening up new domestic and international market opportunities,” he said. “We hope our work will bust some of the myths around protected cropping in northern Australia and give growers and their financiers' confidence to invest in PC structures for horticultural production.” Cooperative Research Centre for Developing Northern Australia (CRCNA) chief executive officer Jed Matz said protected cropping industry is one of the fastest-growing food-producing sectors in Australia, with an estimated value of around $1.8 billion per annum. “With the increasing consumer demand for access to fresh, high quality produce year-round, it makes sense for northern Australian producers to learn more about what they need to do to capture their share of this opportunity,” he said. MORE INFORMATION The project team expect to deliver a suite of information materials and guidelines for adopting protected cropping in tropical environments to the industry when their final report is delivered in 2021.

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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VegNET IEO Update

Summer 2019 BY SAM GRUBIŠA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

D

ark mornings, short days and my personal nemesis the wind chill factor, here are six words to usher you serenely on your way; so long, farewell auf Wiedersehen goodbye … because the sun has come to stay with us a while!

Like raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, summer’s golden sky orb is one of my favourite things. However, even the eldest von Trapp child couldn’t deny the complexity of life on the land during an Aussie summer.

The end of August saw Team Veg head down to Donnybrook, for the years final HortConnectWA BBQ and Beer session. Moving forward with Industry and Ambassadors pooling our resources and coming together to discuss next years direction, a strategic blueprint of support and wisdom is steadily taking shape. Keep an eye out for info and updates on social media and our e-news. Early September was a blur. Team Veg bid a sad farewell to Ops Manager

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Rebecca Blackman, an eight-year veteran of the industry and asset to her future employer. It took very little convincing for Labour Scheme Facilitator Melissa Denning and Communications and Policy Officer Amber Atkinson to make Veg House their home, which is a bonus as the knowledge and experience they bring to the team is a win for WA horticulture. Contributing to the national industry consultation, that focussed on the core objectives of the VegNET extension project and the practical approach to its future incarnation, was a productive endeavour. Hearing key requirements and industry objectives straight from growers and industry reps mouths, are always going to be welcome additions to the Team Veg information compendium.


YOUR INDUSTRY

As was the morning spent out at the markets with Manus Stockdale, talking to market agents and service providers. The guys we spoke with were very generous with their time and open with their comments. We gained a few insights on quality, supply, economics and even touched on food safety QA. Our little grey cells were firing as we walked away with questions answered and new thoughts forming. Gathering information from an array of sources provides a broad knowledge base to draw on; while fostering relationships across all industry sectors enables access to a far wider variety of opinions and experiences. The cultivating of new networks can unlock resources that previously were deemed out of the realm of possibility. As talking is one of my notable talents and facilitating the transfer of information is a hefty slice of the extension pie; establishing collaborative intent across industry is a recipe I’m willing to try.

While we are meticulously focused on our crop’s health during the summer season, as we head towards Christmas, New Years and the year 2020, I urge you to be just as mindful of the wellbeing of those you call mate. Recent news reports have again brought to light the hard times faced by those on the farm. Vision of our “extended” Ag family in the east as they gleefully danced in the rain, allows consumers a poignant glimpse at the perpetual optimism that binds a grower to the land. The fact is, while Mother Nature persists in flaunting her unmatched power, those on the land remain staunchly defiant of any threat to their livelihoods. That level of willpower is both a blessing and a curse. It brings to mind a decidedly ‘loud, ethnic and sweary’ conversation about succession I had with my father. The ‘clean’ version of what he said was, “you can’t tell the bloody rhubarb to stop growing! So… if I’m not here you either hoe it in and walk away or get out there and bloody grow it! Make a decision and get on with your life! I’ll be gone … I won’t care!”.

The Grower Group Tour hit the mark with machinery and drones.

I missed the end of September and the start of October due to the appealing prospect of cute babies, cowboy boots and Margaritas. Although returning from leave the week of the Grower Group Tour and Industry Summit had me questioning my ability to do maths, I would have hated to miss it. The Grower Group Tour hit the mark with machinery and drones and the Industry Summit nailed it with food waste innovation and strip tillage! Throw a HortConnectWA brunch in the middle and that’s a wrap for another year.

It’s a black and white, farm-centric example of life’s harsh lessons and your ability to choose the outcome. It’s a lesson that continues to guide me when I’m faced with circumstances that are out of my control. I wish you all a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year … and remember … some days it’s ok to just sit back and let the bloody rhubarb grow. MORE INFORMATION Contact Sam on 0427 373 037 or email sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au.

33BROOKRISE farm Grower Group Tour.

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Mobile pest surveillance units to give plant industries vital pest and disease information 40

WA Grower SUMMER 2019


YOUR INDUSTRY

33THE iMapPESTS project aims to rapidly monitor and report the presence of priority pests and diseases.

he first mobile pest surveillance unit known as a ‘sentinel’ has been unveiled, forming part of a nationwide research and development (R&D) initiative to provide Australia’s plant industries with vital information about the presence of pests and diseases in different growing region.

T

A total of eight sentinels will be constructed and deployed in different growing as part of a $21 million program called iMapPESTS: Sentinel Surveillance for Agriculture. This project is led by Hort Innovation, through funding from the Australian Government Department of Agriculture as part of its Rural R&D for Profit program, as well with support from 17 partner organisations. The sentinel includes a suite of smart surveillance traps that capture airborne fungal spores and insects and reference them against information including GPS, temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction to provide real-time data on pests and diseases in a particular region.

About the project: iMapPESTS is a national program of research, development and extension designed to put actionable information into the hands of Australia’s primary producers to enhance on-farm pest management decision-making. The project aims to lay the foundations for a national cross-industry surveillance system that can rapidly monitor and report the presence of airborne pests and diseases affecting major agricultural sectors across the country, including grains, cotton, sugar, horticulture, wine and forestry. This will be achieved through a range of surveillance, diagnostics, modelling and engagement and adoption activities.

The iMapPESTS project aims to rapidly monitor and report the presence of priority pests and diseases to aid on-farm decision making across all plant industries of Australia, including grains, cotton, sugar, horticulture, wine and forestry.

The sentinel includes a suite of smart surveillance traps that capture airborne fungal spores and insects.

That data will then be fed in real-time into a cloud-based system for storage and downstream analysis, and will be distributed to producers, governments and industry groups in the form of immediate alerts, general reports and an iMapPESTS user dashboard to support fast, informed and collaborative decision-making.

The sentinel is being launched by South Australian Research and Development Institute researcher Dr Rohan Kimber.

“Keeping Australia’s agricultural produce free from pests and diseases is an ongoing job that is vital to protecting the future viability of our primary production industries,” Dr Kimber said. “The sentinels will help enhance plant industries’ pest management, biosecurity and claims of area freedom by rapidly monitoring and reporting the presence or absence of high-priority pests and diseases in a region.

According to grains grower Richard Konzag, the sentinel will be a vital tool to help inform future business decisions. “Good information leads to better decision making, better decisionmaking leads to better profitability and sustainability,” Mr Konzag said. MORE INFORMATION iMapPESTS is a five-year, $21 million program led by Hort Innovation, with funding from the Australian Government Department of Agriculture as part of its Rural R&D for Profit program, as well as 17 partner organisations from across the plant industry research and development corporations, and leading research organisations in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. Visit: www.imappests.com.au

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YOUR INDUSTRY

Janine Allis to headline

Hort Connections 2020

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elegate registrations are now open for Hort Connections 2020, the biggest business and networking destination for the Australian horticulture industry, which will be held at the Brisbane Convention Centre from 15–17 June 2020.

1

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The event will explore the theme of ‘Sustaining the Future of Fresh’, bringing together thousands of attendees from the local and international horticulture supply chain to discuss on-farm and supply chain practices, review consumer behaviour and consumption trends, and focus on the future of sustainable fresh food production.

As part of the registration launch, AUSVEG and PMA A-NZ are excited to announce businesswoman and bestselling author Janine Allis as the first confirmed speaker. Janine is the Founder of Boost Juice, Executive Director of Retail Zoo and has appeared on Channel Ten’s Shark Tank and Australian Survivor 2019.

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

“Next year’s Hort Connections conference in Brisbane is being designed to deliver as much value as possible for growers and everyone else in the horticulture supply chain, from presenting worldleading research to offering a huge range of business opportunities on the trade show floor.

Hort Connections 2020

5–17 June 2020

“We’re proud that Hort Connections has become such a huge event for the horticulture industry, thanks to support from growers and other delegates who are returning year after year to take advantage of the opportunities on offer,” said AUSVEG National Marketing Manager Nathan McIntyre.

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“We’ve already seen around a third of the trade show floor snapped up by exhibitors and we’re more than seven months out from the event, so we’re excited to offer what’s turning into a massive business and networking space.

33HORT Connections 2019 Trade Show. 1. Opening of the Hort Connections 2019 Trade Show. 2. Agriculture Minister Bridget McKenzie at the Gala Dinner. 3. Hort Connections 2019 Gala Dinner.

“Anyone thinking about attending Hort Connections 2020 should take advantage of the early bird rates on offer and register for what’s shaping up to be an industry-leading event.” MORE INFORMATION Delegates can find out more information about the event and register online at hortconnections.com.au.


WA POTATOES

potato

update WA Potatoes

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WA POTATOES

contacts Horticulture House 103 Outram Street, WEST PERTH WA 6005 p: (08) 9481 0834 e: admin@wapotatoes.com.au w: todatoes.com.au Simon Moltoni, Chief Executive Officer m: 0447 141 752 e: simon@wapotatoes.com.au Morena Perdec, Finance & Admin Manager e: morena@wapotatoes.com.au Georgia Thomas, Project Manager e: georgia@wapotatoes.com.au

Committee 2019–20 Vaughan Carter Chairperson

Busselton

Albany Colin Ayres Deputy Chairperson

m: 0417 092 505 m: 0428 451 014

Glen Ryan Secretary

Pemberton

m: 0428 827 126

Gary Bendotti Treasurer

Pemberton

m: 0427 569 903

Patrick Fox

Scott River

m: 0499 887 202

Bronwyn Fox

Dandaragan

m: 0427 447 412

Christian deHaan

Manjimup

m: 0429 436 361

Elected Members Representing the Ware Fresh sector: Vaughan Carter, Christian de Haan, Glen Ryan and Bronwyn Fox Representing the Seed sector: Colin Aryes Representing the Export sector: Patrick Fox Representing the Processing sector: Gary Bendotti

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Chairperson’s Report

I

BY VAUGHAN CARTER CHAIRPERSON, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

t seems like only a short time has passed since having to pen a report for the grower magazine yet when I look at what has transpired, months have gone by.

Our industry held its annual general meeting on September 27. As you are now aware the PGA has welcomed to the board Bronwyn Fox, Patrick Fox, and Glen Ryan. It sometimes is difficult to get people involved in joining a representative body due to time constraints but it is extremely pleasing to have individuals wanting to be part, so welcome and we look forward to our new members’ input.

A big thank you to outgoing members Mia Rose, Danny Omodei and Roy Humphrey for their dedicated time as members of the PGA and I wish them both the very best. On the industry front, our time is spent mostly on the continuation of export development. Growers have recently been involved with local meetings in Albany, Manjimup, Bunbury, and Dandaragan. From all reports, growers represented themselves well and are showing interest in the developing project. Unfortunately the Bunbury meeting was poorly attended due to the timing with hay season and pending rain. Apologies were given. The consultant group AgWA Consulting is pressing on with the export space having been to Victoria and Canberra for investigative proposes. Glen Ryan and Simon Moltoni also attended.

By the time my report hits the press, AgWA Consulting will have been to Egypt visiting with growers and extolling the virtues of how good WA seed is. As we progress quickly with the export development, PGA has formed a subcommittee chaired by Glen Ryan. The purpose of the subcommittee is to be flexible enough to meet regularly and deal with the charter of responsibilities with forming a new entity. The subcommittee reports to the PGA on developments as they arise. Thank you to those individuals who nominated to be involved with the subcommittee. On the domestic front things are ticking along fairly smoothly. Price per kilo seems to have stabilised a little and the produce that is hitting the shelves looks good. Having said that the season has been extremely soft so expected yields will be high as we roll through spring into summer and we might see a surplus. Export opportunities into the east may arise with their difficult dry season continuing. Best wishes to all growers as we lead into the Christmas space! MORE INFORMATION To contact Vaughan call 0417 092 505 or email marybrook438@gmail.com


WA POTATOES

Executive Officer’s Report SIMON MOLTONI EXECUTIVE OFFICER, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

At the AGM the new constitution was formally implemented, including the change from Zone representatives to industry sector representatives. We now have committee members from the fresh, export, seed, and processing sectors. Regionality has not been compromised as we have members from Albany in the south, to Dandaragan in the north. On that note I would like to welcome three new members to the Committee. Patrick Fox, Glen Ryan, and Bronwyn Fox. Congratulations, I’m sure you will represent our industry with great enthusiasm.

$6.00/t

Seed potatoes — local and export

$150/ha

Ware (fresh) potatoes — local

$8.00/t

Ware (fresh) potatoes — export

$6.00/t

Ware (fresh) potatoes — marketing

$2.50/t

Part funding for PGA

H

I recently attended the National Potato Industry Biosecurity Surveillance Strategy Workshop (#2). While it can seem like a talk fest at times (and many of the participants don’t seem to understand each other) it is of course essential to our businesses. Biosecurity is critical to both the protection of our current low disease status and the development of new export opportunities. We must be able to demonstrate our capacity to prove area freedom, detection, management etc to agreed international standards in order to achieve these goals. This project is ongoing and will become a key part of the Potato Industry Strategic Plan.

Processing potatoes — local and export

Projects approved 2019–20

ard to believe another year has nearly passed by. Growers have been busy trying to keep up with spring plantings as well as dealing with shearing, hay season, sales of new season vealers, and setting up semi-permanent irrigation systems.

Throw in end of school year commitments and it becomes a challenge to squeeze in the festive season celebrations! Make sure you find time to take a breath and share a refreshment with your mates.

Fee-for-service charge 2019–20

A big thank you has been earned by our outgoing members Danny Omodei, Roy Humpfrey, and Mia Rose. As members of the last committee of the old constitution, they have managed all issues on behalf of our growers during the period of greatest upheaval in the Association’s history. Well done and good luck in your next endeavours. The industry has unfortunately lost two long time contributors with the retirements of Dale Spencer and Steve Milroy. Dale has been a vital part of the landscape with his role as the Manager of the Certified Seed Scheme and AQUIS inspection officer. Steve has diligently worked at becoming the most significant researcher in potatoes in WA. We acknowledge their significant dedication and contribution and wish them all the best in retirement. The Export Development Project continues at rapid pace. The Commitment from growers to the proposed entity demonstrated by the PPC funding is extremely positive. Grower turnout to our eight regional meetings has also been extremely positive. We will continue to keep members up to date via meetings and email as we go. The PGA has formed a sub committee to act as an Interim Board of the new export entity. This board is represented by Colin Ayers, Patrick Fox, Danny Omodei, Steve Bendotti, and is Chaired by Glen Ryan. The role of this committee is to give the new entity a presence practically,

Delivery of Registered Seed Potato Certification Schemes & Virus Testing

$310,500 $96,000

Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid (PSTVd) surveillance of the Seed Scheme Part Funding for Export Development Project

$100,000

politically and commercially. It can make recommendations to the PGA but cannot act on its own. Once the entity is incorporated, elections will be held and it will stand in its own right. Recent activities in the export project include the eight regional meetings, two workshops, two meetings of the Interim Board, a trip to Canberra and Sydney to meet with the Federal Department of Agriculture, HIA, AUSVEG and PepsiCo, and our second mission to Egypt. A report on the Egypt mission will be in the next issue of WA Grower.

The immediate priority now is to name the Export Entity and develop the logo and branding. Thanks to all for the many suggestions. A shortlist has been developed and we look forward to making the announcement shortly. I would like to thank Morena and Georgia for their ongoing exceptional commitment to our members. Our office can seem a long way from the spud paddock, but that is where our commitment lies. We wish you all a Merry Christmas and a profitable New Year! MORE INFORMATION Contact Simon Moltoni on 0447 141 752 or email simon@wapotatoes.com.au

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WA POTATOES

World Potato Congress coming to South Australia in 2023 Initiative and innovation wins the ... potato

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WA POTATOES

A

delaide South Australia has been named as the host city for the 2023 World Potato Congress (WPC), the first time this globally significant biennial business event has been held in Australia.

In addition to highlighting the destination’s business events offering — including accessibility, world-class venues, hotels and connectivity — the successful bid, led by the Adelaide Convention Bureau and Potatoes South Australia, ultimately focussed on an ‘Old World Meets New’ theme given the historical status of the potato as a food staple. It also concentrated on the innovation and technology applied to its production today and the investment in research and development being undertaken locally and internationally, with consideration given to global changes in sustainability, climate, culture and population. Furthermore, Potatoes South Australia presented the WPC board with an all-new initiative which also featured strongly in South Australia’s successful bid to host the event. As of the 2023 congress, a ‘WPC Trust for Developing Nations’ will be established, the purpose of which will be to help fund Potato Industry Research, Development and Education in developing nations.

Photos © Thomas Foods International Fresh Produce

The potato industry’s philanthropy in the developed world will aim to meet the following objectives including: ·· Assisting in eradicating extreme poverty and hunger ·· Developing global partnerships and encouraging information sharing ·· Improving water use efficiency

·· Increasing yields from a diminishing arable/useable area ·· Increasing educational and nutritional standards ·· Reducing food loss and waste in the value chain The WPC ‘Old World meets New’ theme will truly focus on the importance and position the potato will play in the future with topics for discussion and discovery at the congress to include Sustainability, Consumer Behaviour, Value-Adding, Technology in Production and Pests/Diseases and Biosecurity.

The 2023 World Potato Congress is expected to attract over 1000 delegates to Adelaide for the week, generating in excess of $4.5 million to the State’s economy and almost forty direct jobs. Potato South Australia CEO Robbie Davis said that she is honoured and thrilled that Potatoes South Australia will lead the hosting of the 2023 World Potato Congress in Adelaide, South Australia.

The World Potato Congress will be held for the first time in Australia during 2023.

The Bureau, in its bid to attract their interest in South Australia as a host destination, initially hosted the event owners at their 2017 Agricultural Industry showcase — an annual educational event designed to highlight the state’s business events assets as well as its innovation and technological advances within the agricultural sector. The Bureau has been working alongside and supporting Potatoes South Australia ever since, in its efforts to bring this important world congress to South Australia.

“A first for Australia, this unique event will provide the opportunity for whole-of-industry unification in the celebration of the world’s third largest food crop,” she said. “Our innovative, creative, food-savvy city which is a hub for entrepreneurship and world-class R&D, will be the perfect backdrop for this significant global event. We will be proud to demonstrate clever technology from the Australian paddock to the global plate. Reciprocally, the networking and investment opportunities, the learnings and experiences the local industry will access will be invaluable.”

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Potato export plan

developing through industry consultation New export entity on track for 2020 launch

B

acked overwhelmingly by industry, the Potato Growers Association of Western Australia (PGAWA) is moving forward to establish an export entity in the first half of 2020.

The PGAWA has recently completed the second round of consultation with grower members over five regional forums. Industry members have been able to review a range of business cases before selecting a not for profit service provider model for the new export entity. Meetings have also opened up discussions about membership, funding, and branding for the new entity. 33PGAWA sub-committee Spokesperson Glen Ryan.

Photo © Anton Blume

PGAWA is narrowing down a list of priority markets for future exports.

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The funding for the project has been allocated from existing projects and an additional contribution from growers through the APC-PPC.

“I am very happy to be the spokesperson for this important sub-committee and be a part of the development of a new export entity for our industry,” said Glen.

As part of the due diligence for the initiative, a delegation of industry representatives recently travelled to Canberra and Sydney to meet with government officials and other potential partners. The trip opening up discussions about market access issues and market opportunities.

“Moving forward, it is crucial for the PGAWA and industry to maintain a high level of communication about all aspects of the entity, which the subcommittee can support,” Glen added.

“It is critical to the long-term success of the new entity that we have working relationships with a range of key partners in government and industry. Through this planning phase, the PGAWA is narrowing down a list of priority markets for future exports,” said PGAWA CEO, Simon Moltoni. The PGAWA has now established a sub-committee to oversee the ongoing development of the export entity, appointing grower Glen Ryan as Spokesperson.

As part of a separately funded project, an industry delegation has traveled to Egypt in November, to investigate market opportunities and further develop key relationships in-market. MORE INFORMATION Contact Simon Moltoni on 0447 141 752 or email simon@wapotatoes.com.au


WA POTATOES

Perfect with:

White potatoes Also great with:

Red potatoes

BBQ potato and salmon skewers

Tip

FOR EVEN COOKING, CUT POTATOES INTO SIMILAR SIZED PIECES

Makes 8 skewers Ingredients 12 baby potatoes, cut into similar size pieces (halves) or left whole if small 500g salmon fillet, cut into 8 similar sized chunks

Method 1. Par boil the baby potatoes in a large pot of salted boiling water for about 8 minutes or until they are fork tender. Drain and allow to dry in the colander.

2 tbsp fresh or dried dill

2. Using a long metal or wooden skewer first pop on a potato, then a piece of lemon, then salmon, repeat and then finish with another potato. Finish all skewers.

4 tbsp olive oil

3. Drizzle with oil and dust with dried dill.

Store bought dressing

4. BBQ or pan fry until the potatoes and salmon have some nice crispy edges on each side. Season well.

1 lemon, sliced into thin rounds

Salt and pepper

5. Serve with a lemon dill sauce and fresh salad. WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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WA POTATOES

s e o t a t Po OUT AND A BOUT

Local

e n i z a g Ma

OUT AND A BOUT

Share with us

Love

PHOTOS BY PHILO LOVES

W

hen potatoes are life there is only one thing do, find the resta you can urants servin g the best potat in town and tell everyone o dishes these mouth-wa about them! Just look at tering plates of goodness and try to resist .

Must Wineba

Chef Charlie

r

CHEF: Russe ll Blaikie ADDRESS: 519 Beaufort Street , Highgate, Weste rn Australia 6003 PHONE: 9328 8255 DISH NAME : Grilled Abrolh os octopus, roast potato whip, muhummara, BRAVO™ apple AVAILABILIT Y: A regular menu addition

Vargas.

The Flour Fac

tory

CHEF: Charlie Vargas ADDRESS: 16 Queen Street , Perth PHONE: (08) 9485 1711 : New potato es, saltbush, potato cream AVAILABILIT Y: Available exclus ively on our Chefs Feed Me Menu

DISH NAME

@mustwinebar @MUSTWinebar www.must.com.a

u

@theflourfactor y @theflourfactor yperth theflourfactory. com

Varnish on Kin

CHEF: Daire

POTATOES SOURC ED FROM PEMBE RTON, SALT BUSH SOURC ED FROM KATANNING, SOUTH WEST WA.

g

Fox

ADDRESS: 75 King Street, Perth PHONE: (08) 9324 2237 DISH NAME : Smoked potato es with salsa verde

Local

BY GEORGIA THOMAS PROJECT MANAGER, WA POTATOES

Know of a great potato dish in Western Austra your area of lia? Send us an email at georgia@wa com.au and potatoes. we will it on social media check it out and featur e or the next edition Potatoes magaz of WA ine.

Chef Russel l Blaikie. Grilled Abrolh os octopus, roast whip, muhum potato mara, BRAVO™ apple

AVAILABILIT Y: Any time for lunch/dinner @varnishonking

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WA Potatoe

s Magazine

New potato es, saltbush, potato cream Spring-Summer 2019–2

0

@VarnishOnKing varnishonking.co

m

Chef Daire Fox.

Smoked potatoes with salsa verde

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WA Potatoe

s Magazine

A Potatoes have recently launched a new magazine for consumers. Full of delicious recipes, potato facts and health information, the magazine is aiming to inspire consumers to keep potatoes on their plate all year round. Three thousand copies of the SpringSummer edition were printed in September and have been distributed to retailers, wash packers, farmers markets and also directly to consumers at the Perth Royal Show.

The magazine was able to gather support from a number of advertisers, including Beta Spuds, Supa Spuds, Karri Country Gourmet Potatoes and Buy West Eat Best.

Keep an eye out for our Autumn/Winter edition. Out in March!

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Contributors to the magazine included top chef Russell Blaikie from Must Winebar and Clinical Nutritionist Carmen Hudson. Feedback so far has been very positive, with the next edition being planned for Autumn/Winter, ready for the Warren Districts Agriculture Show in March. In the meantime, Project Manager Georgia Thomas will be meeting with retailers and looking at how many copies can be distributed.

If you are keen to take a look inside, please email georgia@wapotatoes.com.au with your name and address and we can send you a copy. Please also get in touch if you are keen to have some copies available at your farm stall or shop for consumers to pick up. MORE INFORMATION We are also gathering feedback from as many people as possible, so if you want to send us your ideas or comments please email to georgia@wapotatoes.com.au too.

Share with us Know of a great potato dish in your area of Western Australia? Send us an email at georgia@ wapotatoes.com.au and we will check it out and feature it on social media or the next edition of WA Potatoes magazine.

Spring-Summer 2019–2

0

7


POMEWEST

pome

update Pomewest

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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POMEWEST

From the Pomewest

contacts Pomewest Committee and Officers

Mark Scott, Chair e: markpscott@bigpond.com Mario Casotti e: mario@casottigroup.com Wayne Ghilarducci e: strathspey@modnet.com.au Jason Jarvis e: twinpack@bigpond.com Harvey Giblett e: newtonbros@wn.com.au Sam Licciardello e: sam@orchard1sixty.com.au Susie Murphy White, Project Manager e: susan.murphy-white@dpird.wa.gov.au Nardia Stacy, Executive Manager e: nardia@fruitwest.org.au

Executive Manager Season update

APC–Pomewest FFS Income 2019–20 Project General Account Budget including FFS, Project Grant Funding APAL, HIA and DPIRD and Fruit West Co-operative Biosecurity Account Budget (FFS)

33THE overall impact of recent hail may be fairly minimal as netting appears to have protected most orchards.

$ 588,710 60,000

APC-Pomewest expenditure general account 2019–20

Project $ New technology project (Susie Murphy White) 90,000 Maturity standards legislation & compliance 40,000 Medfly surveillance trapping network (Ashmere 61,557 Consulting) Systems approach to market access 40,000 Disinfestation & quality management of BRAVO 229,280 apples in the cold chain for market access (DPIRD & Fruit West Co-operative are co-funders) Other projects 15,000 Annual meetings and communications 15,000 Industry sponsorships & association 4,800 memberships Promotion & publicity local project (Fresh Finesse) 37,500 Administration including salary and office costs 165,567 APC charge @10% of FFS income 45,000 Total 743,704

APC - Pomewest expenditure biosecurity account 2019–20 Project Codling moth (DPIRD) Biosecurity Liaison Officer APC charge @10% of FFS income Total

$ 35,000 15,000 6,000 56,000

APC fee-for-service charge POME FRUIT EFFECTIVE FROM 1 JANUARY 2015 Type of fruit Fresh fruit — apples, pears, Nashi, other Processing fruit Biosecurity FFS for fresh fruit Biosecurity FFS for processing fruit

52

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

$/kg 0.015 0.005 0.002 0.001

H

BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

ail has hit the South West corner of WA between 31 October and November, a product of a sudden cold front. Susie Murphy White and I have been busy investigating the damage and measuring the impact to our crops for the 2020 season.

At the time of writing this report, it appears that this bout has affected mainly two orchards west of Manjimup. The overall impact to next year’s crop, we believe, will be fairly minimal as netting (both permanent and drape) appears to have protected most orchards.

It was heartening for us to receive such empathy from our counterparts in the east on the news of our ‘hit’. We are particularly grateful for the support we have received, especially from the APAL staff and chief executive officer of the Apple and Pear Growers Association of SA, Susie Green, who know only too well the devastation caused by hail. It’s also good to know that learnings are there for us to source if need be.


POMEWEST

All we can hope is this is all nature has to throw at us, spring weather can be so unpredictable.

Protective cropping This type of incident also proves that protective cropping can make a major impact, and has certainly made the difference in this case, which strengthens the National Netting Program initiative. APAL is committed to push the program with the Federal Government. Still a work in progress, securing our food production is critical and assistance accessing netting is the answer to protecting crops against multiple conditions including hail, high temperatures and birds. Pomewest will continue to talk to government representatives to push this initiative from a state perspective.

Live Lighter Perth Hills Festival 12 October Pomewest again supported the Hills Orchard Improvement Group to continue the tradition of this truly unique community event located in the Perth Hills, which showcased the local fruit industry. This year the focus was on healthy eating and a fun-filled day that is affordable for families. Our donation provided children under 12 years with the opportunity to make their own fruit kebabs, go on rides and visit the petting zoo, all for free!

33ARRON Rodwell of Aero Vines using the Green Atlas cartographer to map blossoms at an ANABP 01A block at Lady Croft Orchards in Manjimup.

At the cooking demonstrations the celebrity chef Adrian Tobin created tasty treats for visitors, highlighting pome, stonefruit and citrus in his dishes. Local bus tours took visitors to nearby orchards to see where their fruit came from and local growers demonstrated pruning demonstrations for the budding horticulturist.

APAL events 13–14 November

The last Pomewest Committee Meeting for the year was held on Friday November 22. Minutes of the meeting are available and can be circulated on request.

This edition We report on our promotions work, an update on our involvement with Worksafe’s Orchard Inspection Project, our 2019 quality project outcomes, and Kanzi® apple update.

Pomewest Committee Meeting minutes are available and can be circulated on request.

Susie Murphy White attended the APAL Grower R&D and future business update on 13-14 November at the Melbourne Cricket Ground to represent WA Pome industry. We will report any interesting learnings in the autumn edition of WA Grower.

We were pleased that our State based project for Cold Chain Disinfestation and Quality Management of BRAVO™ branded apples for market was chosen to be presented nationally.

33EVEN superheros love apples — 2019 Perth Hills Festival.

November Committee Meeting

Seasons greetings

Lastly, I would like to take the opportunity on behalf of our committee and staff, to wish all our WA pome growers and stakeholders the very best for a safe and glorious Xmas and holiday season. We say goodbye to 2019 but we look forward to doing this all again in 2020.

MORE INFORMATION In closing this report, I again welcome you to contact myself, Susie or Committee members at any time to discuss any industry matters. Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@pomewest.net.au.

The project, managed by Dr Francis Delima, is due for completion in mid2020. The results of the data collected, we hope, will assist us with the data required to gain access to currently quarantined premium markets. WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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POMEWEST

2019 Pomewest Quality Program

A

BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

s WA pome growers are fully aware, Pomewest is determined to lift the quality standards of apples in WA. To achieve the goal, the whole industry needs to continue the work together.

Pomewest will continue to promote ‘the great WA apple’ message to customers to build demand for our product.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019


POMEWEST

In 2019 steps were implemented to progress this outcome including:

How did we fair in 2019?

• Setting minimum maturity standards for Royal Gala, Granny Smith and Pink Lady

Testing program results

• Provide to growers a step-by-step guide to test maturity

BY CHRIS HALL TOTAL QUALITY ASSURANCE SYSTEMS PTY LTD

• Implement testing programs including a nil cost offer to preharvest test • Provide workshops in each growing region to assist growers to test their own fruit • Promotion — utilising media and promotional activities to endorse the message ‘when you buy a WA apple it will be a great apple’ The Pomewest Committee recently met in November to discuss the next steps forward. It is our intention to reward and acknowledge the growers doing the right thing, and to look at ways to deter those who are intentionally rushing immature fruit to market in order to jumpstart the season.

With declining demand in the apple category in general, it is imperative that we protect and not damage our market. The committee will look to better involve the supply chain (retailers and marketers) in the program and look into stronger consequences to address consistent failures. We will communicate these strategies in the New Year.

Process Pomewest engaged authorised Biosecurity and Agricultural Management Act (BAMA) inspectors from TQAS to perform monitoring on behalf of the industry. Random samples were collected from central markets, wholesalers and retail outlets throughout the year. Monitoring commenced on 24th January 2019 as new season fruit harvesting commenced and pre-season workshops were conducted by Pomewest in the Perth Hills, Donnybrook and Manjimup districts to demonstrate the sampling techniques and equipment being used.

Grower lines of any of the three varieties were sampled as they were first encountered at wholesale and market level. Retail samples were collected under a mystery shopper program.

Some grower lines were identifiable at retail level by their unique stickers. Brix (TSS) levels were measured using refractometers and starch levels were assessed against the relevant index using an iodine solution. Penetrometers were used in checking whether fruit pressures were at or above the minimum firmness standards.

Outcomes Early harvesting of new season fruit appears to be driven by many factors. Advances in extended apple storage technologies have reduced the consumer anticipation factor and reliance on new season fruit. The perceived benefits from harvesting apples early have greatly diminished. Wholesale The good news is that only three grower lines samples at wholesale failed to meet minimum brix levels. However, 14 samples were found to be below the minimum starch level.

33STARCH testing with iodine.

It is timely, that we now remind and encourage you to continue the great work of 2019. Please contact and engage with Susie Murphy White for any assistance with testing fruit and continue using your free testing guides and pre-harvest testing offer with TQAS. Pomewest has budgeted for the sampling to continue in 2020 and we will continue to promote ‘the great WA apple’ message to customers to build demand for our product. Following is a report by Chris Hall of TQAS with a review of last year’s results.  WA Grower SUMMER 2019

55


POMEWEST

General observations Observations made during the sampling and testing process include the following: • Brix and starch levels of ‘new season’ fruit at all steps of the supply chain continues to remain an issue for fruit marketers and retailers. • Extended carry over stock at wholesale level affects the general quality further down the marketing route. • Apples which are over-mature or soft are more prevalent at retail than at wholesale.

3320 samples from retail outlets failed minimum pressures. Of these, 17 samples were Royal Gala and three were Granny Smith.

It appears that some apple producers may not be testing starch levels at the commencement of harvesting as recommended by Pomewest. A total of six samples failed minimum pressure readings — four Royal Gala, one Pink Lady and one Granny Smith. TABLE 1 WHOLESALE RESULTS — 120 SAMPLES Test type Brix Starch Pressure

Passed

% passed

117

97.5

92

76.7

114

95.0

A total of 99 wholesale samples passed all tests — 82.5%

Retail Only three samples (all Royal Gala) which were collected from retail outlets under the mystery shopper program were found to be below the minimum Brix standard. There were five lines found at retail level which did not meet the starch index. 20 samples from retail outlets failed minimum pressures. Of these, 17 samples were Royal Gala and three were Granny Smith. TABLE 2 RETAIL RESULTS — 191 SAMPLES Test type

Passed

% passed

Brix

188

98.4

Starch

186

97.4

Pressure

171

89.5

A total of 165 retail samples passed all tests — 86.4%

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

The storage factor Post-harvest management of fruit was identified as the most significant factor in maintaining apple quality for consumers. Apples which are no longer stored in controlled atmosphere environments continue maturing which eventually leads to quality deterioration. Loss of pressure from over-maturity results in soft and mealy textures which are unpalatable to consumers.

Over-mature fruit being sold by retailers may not have been held at ideal temperatures during packing and marketing. Wholesaler activities involving moving apples from chiller to ambient temperatures and back again prior to the fruit being sold have been observed and this can result in dramatically reduced shelf life quality of fruit when offered for sale at retail level. These activities may require further investigation with a view to educating everyone involved in packing, handling, transporting and marketing apples about maintaining cool chain integrity. Retailers who handle large volumes of fruit are not known to store apples for extended periods at Distribution Centres or in stores and there is little delay in their usual handling processes. All avoidable delays within the apple marketing process should be eliminated wherever possible.

• Mixed maturity was evident within many samples of early presented varieties. • High starch levels often related to low brix results. • Brix levels were generally found to be lower at wholesale than at retail. • Pressure fails were greater at retail level. • Nearly all Pink Lady samples passed all maturity testing at wholesale and retail.

Take home message Overall, the 2019 Apple Maturity Monitoring Program was successful in identifying issues which can affect consumer acceptability. Additional numbers of pre-harvest testing, continued monitoring and improvements to supply chain handling, storage and transport procedures will enhance consumer confidence in WA apples.

33POST-HARVEST management was identified as the most significant factor in maintaining apple quality for consumers.


POMEWEST

Keeping up with

i z n a K

®

T

he Kanzi® branded apple has positioned itself as one of the major players in the ‘club variety’ section of the apple aisle at Australian retail outlets. Consumer demand across the nation is increasing dramatically and production is swiftly following suit. There are now over 80 growers across Australia growing the apple. Developed in Belgium, the Kanzi apple, whose name is supposedly (loosely) derived from the Swahili phrase "hidden treasure", ticks all the boxes of a thoroughly modern apple. A cross between the Gala and Braeburn varieties, the fruit has a bi-coloured appearance. ®

There are now over 80 growers across Australia growing Kanzi® apples. • Harsh opposing weather events in New South Wales causing some damage • Extremely hot and dry weather in Southern Victoria • Lenticel spot and pitting issues in Western Australia, which has been managed

Kanzi® is a firm crispy apple, giving its eater an excellent taste experience — slightly tangy, rather than sweet and very, very juicy.

Despite all this, Des reports that Kanzi® has outperformed expected sale expectations and marketed approximately 3.5 million kilograms of Class 1 Kanzi® apples across all states.

Des Muir, licensed manager for the Kanzi® apple in Australia, reported that overall the 2019 harvest was a mixed bag due to many growers having to deal with adverse conditions including:

Supermarket chains and independent retailers have been particularly delighted with the offering this year, with the majority of the crop being sold within 26 weeks of marketing.

• Severe hail damage in South Australia

80% of the volume was sold in the major chains, with Aldi and Costco making significant sales this season.

33KANZI® at Bunbury Far mers Markets.

Consumer feedback continues to be very encouraging with many ‘hits’ on the website commenting on about how impressive Kanzi® is as a top-class eating apple. Des also reported that next season’s crop forecast looks very promising and is expected to out-perform 2019 and reach 5 million kilograms of Class 1 apples; mindful, of course, of reported hail damage already in Western Australia. Looking onwards and upwards to 2020, Kanzi® apples continue to be a real success story with approximately 90,000 trees planted in 2019 and another 60,000 planned for 2020, which will complete Kanzi® apple program for Australia. Keep it up Kanzi®!

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

57


POMEWEST

WA Apples

Showcasing beautiful WA apples.

at the Perth Royal Show

33APPLE with Nutella was a hit with the younger visitors.

58

33CONSTABLE Care made an appearance.


POMEWEST

A

BY NOELENE SWAIN POMEWEST PROMOTIONS CO-ORDINATOR

gain, we were able to showcase beautiful West Australian apples at the 2019 Perth Royal Show. 33APPLE Slinkies were a huge hit.

Our stand, amongst other regional displays in the Discover WA exhibition, was situated in the Centenary Pavilion. As a rule, the Perth Royal Show attracts more than 350,000 visitors each year and is well established as a popular tradition for West Australians to celebrate the production and knowledge of agriculture in the state. As such, Pomewest’s promotional efforts are focused on this annual occasion as our major event.

Being part of the Centenary pavilion is still an excellent opportunity to engage an audience on a family food discovery — tasting the very best on offer from regional WA. Armed with Apple Slinky machines, our apple team managed to swirl and twirl their way through over 2395 BRAVO™ apples and over 2,675 Pink Lady and Granny Smith apples. This year’s figures represented a 28% increase on the previous year and the best year since 2013. Utilising the Aussie Apple background signage of apple varieties, supply maps and general orchard lifestyle images, proved ideal for engagement with individuals, families and children interested in discovering more about local food. From an educational aspect, the various Aussie Apple variety resources, provided by Horticulture Innovation, were very popular to reference against their own knowledge and preferences — some apple varieties they hadn’t heard about. We were able to chat about the importance of eating locally produced fruit, the health

No matter wh favourite — m at’s your your go-to dail ake an apple y snack. benefits and supporting local growers and the apple industry. It was pleasing to note that people are still loyal to the WA varieties, yet there continues to be a significant portion of consumers who still did not know the origins. However, those who were introduced to WA apples at previous shows, were very quick to espouse their love of the Pink Lady and the new BRAVO™ apple. Most apple enthusiasts had their own ideas about their apple choices. Most people tend to refer to their preference by colour rather than varietal name — e.g. “I like green apples” however many are quite precise on the red apple variety they prefer and show little inclination to vary their purchase if it’s well liked by the family. It appears people use apples as a solid staple for lunch boxes and the family fruit bowl and top up with more exotic fruit options as the season and availability of other fruit changes. There was very limited reflection on the quality of apples — most people seem very content with the fruit year round.

apples were strongly represented as one of the few healthy food choices during the festivities. Many people commented about the popular ‘tradition’ of enjoying apple slinkies as part of their annual Royal Show experience. Sale of a small stock of Apple Slinky machines appealed to those keen to continue the apple ‘magic’ at home. Thanks to Eric Altinier from the Perth Hills and Kate Baker from Manjimup who assisted during the promotion. It’s so important for growers to gain direct feedback from the public and both of these people were generous to share their expertise and passion. Notably, of extreme interest was the display of innovation in value adding to create sparkling juices and vinegars by New Leaf Juices. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Further thanks to Hort Innovation for their support to underwrite and support with resources, and WA Farm Direct for their assistance in the supply and delivery of apples.

Support of the Constable Care and Junior Farmer activities in other pavilions on the Show grounds ensured WA Grower SUMMER 2019

59


. . . s e Appl

POMEWEST

...put to the crunch test in schools

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019


POMEWEST

BY NOELENE SWAIN POMEWEST PROMOTIONS CO-ORDINATOR

T

WA primary school students celebrate Crunch and Sip Week.

here’s no doubt kids LOVE apples and yet consumption is constantly under threat by highly marketed processed snack products.

With an estimated 28% of Aussie kids now considered overweight or obese, it is important to teach kids to enjoy fresh health fruit. The current healthy eating focus within schools continues to present opportunities to work with kids through primary and high schools. WA primary schools celebrate Crunch and Sip Week in September each year with a focus on the Great Aussie Crunch held on 9-13th September when schools across the state focused on activities to highlight the need to eat more vegetables and fruit. This created an excellent opportunity to engage with schools by providing a carton of BRAVO™ apples to implement activities within the classroom. During September the Apples in Schools program supplied 20 WA primary, metropolitan schools, and

involved over 2250 students across approximately 90 classes. Evaluation forms, photos and work samples returned by participating classes, demonstrate the apples provided an extremely positive experience within schools. The apples were actively used within classroom programs as well as sports carnivals, breakfast club activities and playground initiatives.

Fresh apples were an excellent trigger for discussions on healthy eating, sustainability, seasons and importance of supporting local producers. They were also integrated across the curriculum into lessons on maths, English, sport, art, drama, music, health and cooking.

Some schools made the apples the focus of school wide programs and included extensive coverage through their newsletters and parent communications. Many primary schools make active use of Apple Slinky machines — either in the canteen, the classroom, or use as a recess treat and opportunity to connect with the students. These fun gadgets put some fun into eating apples which is well received by students. It was pleasing to note that many schools are still actively using apple slinky machines that have previously been provided as part of the apples in schools project. Support was also provided at two Health Expos held in senior high schools. These full day expos attract a variety of health agencies and involve the whole school to visit the displays staggered through the day. Apple slinkies were made and shared with some of the 1500 students in attendance. The attitude of the teenage students was extremely positive to apples being a great healthy and delicious snack. It was also provided excellent feedback that teenagers have limited knowledge of apple varieties and the local apple industry. This is an excellent positive program which has achieved strong response from teachers and active integration into the classroom programs. Continued support in the future is expected to build positive eating habits and awareness with children.

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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POMEWEST

Working with Working with

Worksafe Worksafe T

his year, Pomewest has been facilitating and encouraging pome growers to engage with Worksafe with their Orchard Inspection Project. Worksafe representatives were invited to present at our recent industry engagement dinners in Donnybrook, Manjimup and the Perth Hills.

• Forklifts operators not having high risk licences • Emergency evacuation processes light on

• Non-compliant ladders to fuel tanks • Risk assessment for use of portable ladders • Risk assessment of MEWP’s on slopes, in relation to manufactures limitations. At the start of this collaboration the Pomewest Committee asked Worksafe to provide it with some data on lost time for injuries and diseases for the Apple & Pear, Stone and Citrus Fruit industries. Essentially the data was collected by information provided on workers’ compensation claims collected by WorkCover WA in 2019 and has been

Ladders accounted for 17% of total LTI/Ds.

The driver behind the project is to enable orchardists to protect themselves and their workers with high class, safe work practices and environments. The other benefits of being involved in the project is that growers and farm managers will be able to meet with inspectors at a time that is convenient and suitable to prepare for routine visits and any possible surprise situations that could interrupt production activities.

Senior Inspector Gary Delamotte reported to us that many orchardists had volunteered for a visit, and most have been very receptive and in compliance with the checklist. Some of the feedback suggests that there are still some issues around: • Maintenance of and guarding of machinery including PTO’s and plant • Testing of RCD’s

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

33WORKSAFE have presented in Donnybrook, Manjimup and the Perth Hills.


POMEWEST

TABLE 1 WORKPLACE INJURY AND DISEASE CLAIMS Total injury/ disease claims

LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost

2009–10

37

28

2010–11

23

16

2011–12

31

22

2012–13

26

14

2013–14

24

15

2014–15

26

20

2015–16

18

13

2016–17

26

16

Financial year

23

19

234

163

26

18

2017–18p Total Average

The mechanism of incident subgroup of Falls from a height account for the largest proportion (23%) of LTI/Ds (1+ days/shifts lost) during the period from 2009–10 to 2017–18p (see Table 2). • The number of Falls from a height LTI/Ds reduced from 10 incidents in 2009–10 to seven in 2017–18p. • Less than five LTI/Ds (1+ days/shifts lost) was recorded per year between 2010–11 and 2016–17. • The breakdown agency of injury classifications associated with multiple Falls from a height LTI/Ds (1+ days/shifts lost) during the reporting period were (in order of magnitude) Ladders (24 LTI/Ds), Tractors, agricultural or otherwise, Power hoists and Vegetation.

p = preliminary data

• Of the 163 LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost, 74% were classified as serious (LTI/ Ds 5+ days/shifts lost) and 23% were classified at severe cases (LTI/Ds 60+ days/shifts lost). • A 38% reduction was recorded in total injury/disease claims and a 32% reduction in LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost.

The breakdown agency is intended to identify the object, substance or circumstance that was principally involved in, or most closely associated with, the point at which things started to go wrong and which ultimately led to the most serious injury/disease (see Table 3).

• There have been no work-related traumatic injury fatalities recorded in these industries. TABLE 2 PREVALENT MECHANISMS OF INCIDENT SUBGROUPS, TOTAL NINE YEAR PERIOD FROM 2009–10 TO 2017–18P

Mechanism of incident subgroup

LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost

% of total LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost (%)

Falls from a height

38

23

revised back to 2000–01. It is important to be aware of the issues when interpreting claims statistics taking into account inconsistencies and omissions — caution needs to be exercised when using workers’ compensation payments as data as it will not reflect injured workers who are not reimbursed by the workers compensation authority.

Muscular stress while handling objects other than lifting, carrying or putting down

25

15

Being hit by moving objects

19

12

Muscular stress while lifting carrying putting down objects

14

9

Falls on the same level

13

8

Hitting stationary objects

11

7

During the combined nine year period from 2009–10 to 2017–18p:

Hitting moving objects

9

6

Vehicle accident

8

5

Muscular stress with no objects being handled

7

4

Being trapped between stationary and moving objects

5

3

149

91

• LTI/Ds where one or more days/shifts was lost from work as a result of a workplace incident (LTI/Ds 1+ days/ shifts lost) accounted for 70% of total injury and disease claims lodged (see Table 1).

Total p = preliminary data * Only the most prevalent subgroups are listed

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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POMEWEST

TABLE 3 PREVALENT BREAKDOWN AGENCY OF INJURY SUBGROUPS, TOTAL NINE YEAR PERIOD FROM 2009–10 TO 2017–18P LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost

% of total LTI/Ds 1+ days /shifts lost (%)

Ladders

26

17

Tractors, agricultural or otherwise

12

8

Vegetation

11

7

Breakdown agency of injury subgroup

Power hoists

9

6

Crates, cartons, boxes, cases, drums, kegs, barrels

8

5

Scissors

8

5

74

50

Total p = preliminary data * Only the most prevalent subgroups are listed

• Ladders accounted for 17% of total LTI/Ds (1+ days/ shifts lost) between 2009–10 and 2017–18p. • 92% (or 24 LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost) were a result of Falls from a height. • The most common natures of injury arising from such workplace incidents was soft tissue injuries due to trauma or unknown mechanisms accounting for 46% (or 11 LTI/Ds 1+ days/shifts lost). Other nature of injury classifications included Other fractures, not elsewhere classified and Dislocation. Preliminary data for 2017–18 recorded six LTI/Ds (1+ days/ shifts lost) involving Ladders; this is the highest number of such LTI/Ds recorded during the nine-year period. Historically, less than five LTI/Ds have been recorded annually. MORE INFORMATION A full report is available to you on application to Pomewest which provides explanatory notes the above reported data. Worksafe will continue to give us feedback on the outcomes over the life of the project.

Enabling orchardists to protect themselves and their workers.

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019


WA CITRUS

citrus

update WA Citrus

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

65


WA CITRUS

contacts WA Citrus Committee Producer Committee Members Mary Ann O’Connor, Chair m: 0429 012 503 e: chair@wacitrus.com.au Richard Eckersley Shane Kay Andrew Sorgiovanni Cliff Winfield Daniel Ying

Affiliate Committee Members Damien Guthrey Brett Heather

WA Citrus Office Building 16, 3 Baron-Hay Court, SOUTH PERTH WA 6151 Bronwyn Walsh, Industry Development Manager m: 0400 873 875 e: industrymanager@wacitrus.com.au

From the Chair

Kate Cox, Administrative Services m: 0439 899 600 e: admin@wacitrus.com.au Helen Newman, Biosecurity Representative e: biosecurity@wacitrus.com.au

what’s on... 2020 WA Technical workshop: pests, spray application, lemons WHEN TBC

WHERE TBC WA

Citrus Australia National Market Outlook Forum WHEN March 3–4

WHERE Melbourne

International Society of Citrus Nurseryman Congress WHEN August

WHERE South Africa

Citrus Research International Congress WHEN August

WHERE South Africa

International Citrus Congress WHEN November 8–13 WHERE Turkey * Dates and location of industry events are subject to confirmation based on availability of speakers, venues and attendance.

A

BY RICHARD ECKERSLEY CHAIR, WA CITRUS

s the 2019 citrus season is ending for most of us, the work for the three citrus committees in WA continues. Thanks to Bron, Kate and Helen, and Committee members, we are in the best position to achieve our targets set in the WA citrus industry strategic plan. Filled with both the highs and lows of most seasons, the 2019 season was no different. Challenges experienced by most were albedo in oranges and high acid levels in fruit affecting decisions on when to start harvesting.

Export volumes out of WA are up on previous years and exporters are having positive feedback on fruit. Our growers in the north have continued to have to comply with movement of fruit protocols as the process for declaring area freedom for citrus canker unfolds. I hope this will be resolved before the end of the year. Changes faced by businesses this season include the federal horticulture award, proposed

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WA Grower SUMMER 2019

increase in export fees and market floors going out of business. These changes have created extra administration for citrus businesses and increased the risk of not being compliant. In addition, the difficulty in passing extra costs through the supply chain during a time of significant cost increases is of concern. On issues such as these, we continue to voice their impact on our businesses, industry and regional economies to the relevant bodies. Recently WA Citrus reviewed a recommendation to achieve less committees in WA, which is a move in the right direction for WA, and to research potential modelling around industry capability for response to incursions and biosecurity preparedness.


WA CITRUS

Progress on the industry structure Welcome

to new Producer Members • Koru Fruit Co • Far End Plantation

The WA citrus industry-working group recommended to the WA citrus industry committees that:

“the WA citrus industry transition to having only one industry committee to undertake the industry roles required by July 2021”.

• John Ronzio • Chinnery, Chapman & Sunga • John Lesiter • Weemala Orchard • Sandgroper Citrus

The long-term goal of the agreed structure should:

• Use financial years as the timeframe for full transition.

• reflect the size of the WA industry

• A transition period of at least 12 months will allow the APC producers committee to be potentially ‘fully active from July 2021

• perform the roles that meet the needs of WA citrus growers • meet legislated requirements. • not be onerous on only a few people

Stepping away from the traditional talks, the initiative to include a Wellbeing presentation at the Industry Day in November was taken, recognising that our businesses are more than 50% about the people and therefore understanding how to look after others and ourselves.

Lastly, congratulations to Mary Ann O’Connor who was voted as the new Chair for WA Citrus at the committee meeting in November. Mary Ann and John O’Connor have a sevenyear-old mandarin and navel orchard in West Gingin. Relatively new to the industry, Mary Ann has been on the WA Citrus Committee and has been the MC for many of the industry days over the last few years as well as hosting events. She is never short of a question and a keen contributor to all matters relating to our industry. I have no doubt Mary Ann will continue to be an asset to the Committee in her new role and looking forward to working with her. MORE INFORMATION Contact Richard on 0417 911 534 or email chair@wacitrus.com.au

• not require excessive process or governance, • have prompt decision-making, implementation • good governance capability and • represent an agreed recommendation by the majority of existing industry Committee members. The justification for the proposal of one committee, an APC Committee • Legal advice that WA must have APC producers committee as required under the APC Act. • There is the opportunity to expand membership of the APC committee in 2020 up to eight producer members, with APC Commission approval, to undertake the current roles of existing three committees. Non producers would be as guests • Use good governance practice for transparent decision-making on allocation of citrus fee for service • Incorporates link to National industry body

• Legal advice that services of Citrus Australia regional advisory group can be provided by a third party. • There has previously been an MOU with Citrus Australia to perform the role of regional advisory group. • Allows transfer of roles and dissolution of other Committees • Addresses concerns of three industry committee structure: over-governance process, availability of industry members to fill positions The three industry committees discussed the recommendation from the industry structureworking group in November. The WA Citrus committee accepted the resolution and will call a meeting with members for a vote. The WA Regional Advisory Committee (WARAC) of Citrus Australia also supported the proposal and will get feedback from the Citrus Australia Board. The decision from the APC citrus producers committee (CSC) was not available at the time of writing the article.

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WA CITRUS

Experts in WA W

A citrus growers were able to take advantage of some opportunistic expert visits to WA over the last few months.

Integrated Pest Management Workshop In October growers were invited to attend an Integrated pest management (IPM) workshop in Bunbury. This workshop was organised by WA Horticulture Area Business Manager from FMC Australasia, Jim Brussen, with assistance from Brad Giles from EE Muir & Sons.

The event included presentations by entomologists, Dr Paul Horne and Jessica Page from IPM Technologies. Paul presented an overview of IPM, emphasizing that IPM is integrating pesticide, biological and cultural management options to keep pests below levels that impact on marketable yield. Jessica then lead a discussion

33INTEGRATED pest management workshop

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of WA citrus pest issues and reviewed management options. Participants had the chance to use the lenses provided to look at some vegetable pests. The threehour workshop was attended by orchard staff from three orchards, DPIRD citrus staff and Bronwyn. They all agreed it was a good introduction to IPM. FMC produce Exirel®, a pesticide used in citrus for thrips, light brown apple moth (LBAM) and weevil management. Paul and Jessica were in WA to run a series of these workshops for FMC covering a number of different crops. WA is part of a proposal submitted to Horticulture Innovation Australia (HIA) for use of the national citrus levy to do some research in WA to build capacity in citrus pest and beneficial identification amongst commercial services. The proposal is under review with HIA in November.

Innovation impresses at vegetablesWA Industry Summit The same week, Krista Watkins, of Natural Evolution, outlined their innovative products from green bananas. Their products make use of about 500 tonnes of bananas that were unsuitable for the traditional banana market. Accompanied by second generation farmer and inventor, husband Rob, they have diversified from banana growing to the nutraceutical market with their banana flour product. You can read more about Krista and Rob’s journey on the Growcom website. There was also an inspiring chat from Michelle Cowan, West Coast Eagles assistant coach, who spoke about taking the opportunities when they arise to have a positive influence on others and following your passion.


WA CITRUS

33WATER sensitive paper shows similar coverage with half the volume of the other.

coverage, effectiveness and whether there were any adjustments that may improve coverage or efficiencies.

Alison also collected feedback on the MRL document that is being developed to assist growers quickly find out MRL information related to particular markets. The current version is available on the Citrus Australia website. Alison and David were in WA for a wine industry roadshow.

Michelle and Krista spoke at the HortConnect Brunch & VegeSummit in October in Perth, which were both attended by vegetable growers and industry representatives and stakeholders.

The Future Of Packaging A Packaging Forum hosted by Food Industry Innovation from DPIRD was attended by Bronwyn and other industry growers, teachers and food and beverage owners. Participants heard about packaging trends, innovations in packaging from WA locals Jim Trandos from WA Corn Growers and Sue Daubney from Bannister Down Dairy — trayless prepack corn and environmentally sustainable milk packaging, as well as John Day from Shopability, Ralph Moylr from the Australian institute of Packaging and Dr Min Teah from Curtin University on packaging and label design. Part of the trade display included the Keymac group, with sleeving for fruit. Presentations are available from DPIRD Food Industry Innovation ‘past event and seminar resources page’. Also included in the discussion was the trade-off in shelf life of fresh produce and impact of packaging, limitations of recycling system, training courses and sustainability goals.

Stand out in the crowd Guests at the Partnering For Customer Value launch in November heard from Mark Hayward co-founder of Dingley Dell Pork, and Professor Andrew Fearne, Value chain management, University of East Anglia. They emphasised having a point of difference, tenacity, passion, failure and stepping away from traditional customers such as supermarkets. Case studies are available on the DPIRD website, including presentations.

Optimised spraying Later in November Citrus Australia agrichemical project officer Alison MacGregor visited WA. She was accompanied by David Manktelow from Applied Research, New Zealand, and they did a teleconference with WA citrus growers and visited some northern orchards. Topics covered included things they had seen while travelling around Australian horticulture and wine districts such as checking the volume being used to ‘spray to runoff’. One site halved their volume and achieved the same coverage with less time, due to saving trips to refill tanks etc. Another site had a significant machinery maintenance issue which meant the machinery was underperforming. The take home message was the need to look at your own situation and check

Key takeaways from Committee for Economic Development of Australia Bronwyn heard about the value of diversity in the workplace at a Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) event in November. Attended by 200 people, some actions that can improve inclusion and diversity: • Focus on facts, demonstrate the business improvement • Lead and cascade, leaders • Prioritise caregiver support, flex and sponsorship and • Mitigate bias systematically, e.g. unconscious bias during recruiting Benefits that research has shown to come from diversity are the employee is: • Four times more likely to stay with employer • Nine times more likely to be innovative, avoiding groupthink and • 10 times more likely to be highly effective, with improved financial performance Speakers recommended having the difficult conversations, challenging the norms, and listening to everyone to understand the ‘why’ there’s a problem so that the corrective actions are on the right track. The West Australian newspaper had a follow up article on the event the following day.

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WA CITRUS

The biosecurity binge continues

I

n September Bronwyn travelled to Mildura to attend two biosecurity events related to the WA citrus industry.

First up was attending the Citrus Triage Workshop hosted by Plant Health Australia. A group of seven people attended from WA, Bronwyn, four from Plant Health DPIRD and one each from Moora Citrus and Northern Valley Packers. Growers and state and federal government staff participated in the twoday event. Presentations on exotic citrus pests and diseases and practical work on field surveillance, diagnosis and biosecurity practices, as well as the networking, left participants with a better understanding of the broader biosecurity system.

33AUTOMATIC vehicle washdown pad at a citrus orchard visited as part of Citrus Triage Workshop.

Next was the second meeting of the newly formed Citrus Australia Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Committee. The current surveillance and research priorities were discussed, and the next meeting is scheduled for January.

The postponement of the Horticulture Liaison project meant WA Citrus biosecurity officer Helen Newman could do some surveillance on the emergence time of citrus gall wasp, as a preliminary activity for some potential national research. We used the opportunity to engage with the community by asking them to participate in the research and volunteer the trees to monitor for the wasps and their natural enemies. Weekly check-ins with the Citrus Canker project leader in WA by Bronwyn kept us up to date with what was going on with the Citrus canker response, and the potential lifting of the quarantine notice and related movement of fruit protocols and inspections before the end of the year.

Promoting

t i u r f s u r t i c A W

Fresh Finesse provided a citrusbased display at the Creative Cookery stall at the Royal Show in September this year and there was a contribution from the fee for service for the Live Lighter Perth Hills Festival in October.

Activities included cooking demonstrations, decorated trees by local schools, make your own fruit kebabs, bike to blend your own smoothie and fruit giveaways. The update from Fresh Finesse showed a conversion to sales of between 20 and 30% from in-store fruit tastings that are part of the annual promotions program.

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Sales of between 20–30% resulted from in-store fruit tastings.

Please ‘Like’ or share posts to spread the word about our fruit to family, friends and consumers: @WACITRUS #WACITRUS WACITRUS


STONEFRUIT

stonefruit

update Stonefruit WA

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STONEFRUIT

Stonefruit Sub-Committee Danny Di Marco, Chair e: dimarconson@gmail.com Anthony Fullam

e: afullam@wn.com.au

Bruno Delsimone

e: bdelsimone@mercermooney.com.au

Anthony Caccetta

e: antc83@hotmail.com

Mark Scott

e: markpscott@bigpond.com

Sebastian Fiolo

e: karragullen@bigpond.com

Mick Padula

e: mickpadula@yahoo.com.au

Shay Crouch, Value Chain Facilitator

e: shay.crouch@perthnrm.com e: (08) 9374 3306

APC fee for service charge

l curve bal

s...

contacts

Season throws a few

Stone fruit effective from 1 November 2009 Type of fruit

$/kg

All fresh stone fruit (apricots, cherries, loquats, nectarines, peaches and plums)

0.015

Processing fruit

0.006

what’s on... 2020 Indonesia Buyer Incursion WHEN January/February 2020 A follow on from the Jakarta trip to build buyer relationships and export capacity for the industry.

In-store tastings WHEN January and February 2020 WHERE Held throughout retailers across the metro area

Hort Connections 2020 WHEN 15-17 June WHERE Brisbane Convention Centre The most influential opportunity for networking, education and business for the entire fresh produce industry.

I

BY SHAY CROUCH VALUE CHAIN FACILITATOR, STONEFRUIT

n what has been the hottest October on record across the planet, our growing regions have received belowaverage rainfall and been warmer than usual. It has resulted in some varieties being picked a week or two early and contributed to heavily set crops. Stormy weather at the end of October brought with it strong winds, a cold snap with frost and hail causing damage both in the Hills and the South West. Then a week later, the temperatures soared into the high 30’s with a strong easterly, and Western Australia was not alone. The Riverland in South Australia has been rocked by severe hail and prolonged drought, and Victoria has had extreme heat followed by cold snaps.

All these factors have together set the scene for an interesting season ahead and we have only just got to December. Maintaining fruit quality and consistency of our fruits is going to play a vital role in the season ahead. Pairing this with the promotion and marketing efforts that are lined up will be of the greatest benefit for growers and the entire industry.

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Season Launch The season has begun and to celebrate we held a season launch in the CBD to showcase our wonderful fruit. There were fruit tastings, competitions to win a tray of fresh stonefruit, opportunities to chat with growers and free recipe cards to take home and try. The launch again gained attention off the back of the inaugural event last year.

Lots of people were excited to have some of their favourite fruit back in season with others interested in the range of ways they can utilise stonefruit in the kitchen. With the learnings of the previous year’s launch, we were able to create greater leverage through the use of Yagan Square, Buy West Eat Best and all our associated networks. Having the launch over the lunch period also proved beneficial as people didn’t seem to be in as much of a rush.


STONEFRUIT

Celebrating the stonefruit season launch in the CBD.

Passers-by were able to hover and ask questions, enjoy a few samples of fruit and then even head to the shops to buy some over their lunch break or while visiting the city. We would like to thank all those who were able to attend and support the event. The event complements the continual work in promoting of our Western Australian stonefruit and leads into a huge series of in-store tastings over the summer. â—? MORE INFORMATION

For more information contact Shay via email or phone (08) 9374 3306.

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STONEFRUIT

d n a m u l P d a l a s e n i r a nect

Local stonefruit in season from

November till April.

Ingredients

Method

Salad

1. Preheat oven to 180ºC. Roast walnuts for about 5 minutes.

2 nectarines, sliced 2 plums, sliced 1 head butter lettuce 1 handful of rocket 1 handful roasted walnuts 1/4 red onion, sliced thinly Dressing 1 tbsp red wine vinegar 1 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp evoo 1 tsp honey Salt and pepper

2. Whisk together dressing ingredients in a small bowl, season to taste. 3. Wash leafy greens. Layer lettuce and rocket on platter. Scatter nectarines, plums and onion over lettuce mix. 4. Sprinkle with walnuts and finish with the dressing.

Perfect for the festive season WELOVEWASTONEFRUIT WASTONEFRUIT

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STONEFRUIT

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

Export

Development

U

pon returning from Jakarta, it was discussed that to continue building on these exporting relationships we should invite a delegation of buyers to WA.

Plans are in the works for a buyer delegation in late January – early February, which is primetime to demonstrate fruit being picked and packed in the orchards before it gets sent into the Indonesian market. There is also going to be some dedicated in-store promotion in Jakarta, facilitated through MoreLink, to bring awareness and understanding about Western Australian plums to the Indonesian public. Last year Australian plum volumes into Indonesia increased by 18% on the previous year, to 548 tonnes, and are the preferred source of plums in many of the premium supermarkets. The promotions will target A+ and A-B socio-economic consumers with sales promotors in stores from February till

April over the busy weekend periods. They will be offering fruit tastings which will complement the point of sale material which includes flagged bunting, banners and shelf wobblers.

This work, having evolved from the grower mission in July, is expected to increase demand and sales of our product in the highly affluent Indonesian market. Indonesia is a nation which imports over US$1.2 billion worth of fresh fruit each year with an increasing demand for exotic fruits such as stone fruits. These figures emphasis how important it is for the WA stone fruit industry to work with our closest neighbour, Indonesia, to encourage further growth into a market who is seeking out a premium product. ●

33EXAMPLES of how Australian produce has been marketed in Indonesia.

Pathology testing Upon the request of some growers who have been seeing tree, shoot and/or twig death and general poor health of some trees, the committee is working with DPIRD’s Pathology team to carry out a range of testing to establish what pathogen, fungi or disease may be affecting the trees. We hope to be able to report back to the growers with the findings from the tests and then find ways to help manage the damage they cause. ● MORE INFORMATION

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This project was made possible by WA State Government through funding from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, WA.

For further information please contact Shay on (08) 9374 3306.

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STONEFRUIT

Our State on a Plate

T

he Channel 9 series Our State on a Plate travels around Western Australia showcasing the wonderful range of produce on offer, highlighting seasonality and great simple recipe ideas. This summer, make sure you look out for West Australian stonefruit as the TV crew visits a local Perth Hills orchard to learn about what makes a great piece of stonefruit and how you can get creative with stonefruit in the kitchen. This journey into the orchard

Do you know where Rainbow Lorikeets congregate at sunset?

will delve into growing the trees, how to know when to pick and how to select that perfect piece of fruit for your liking.

The story will be followed up with a well-known chef doing an upcoming demonstration on how you can include stonefruit into your everyday summer lifestyle. See the latest episode of Our State on a Plate on Saturday evenings at 5:30pm on Channel 9. ● MORE INFORMATION

For more information contact Shay via email or phone (08) 9374 3306.

33CONSUMERS will get a peak into the orchard in an up-coming Our State on a Plate story in a local stonefruit orchard.

The rainbow lorikeet is a declared pest in Western Australia.

B

irdLife will be coordinating Rainbow Lorikeet roost counts in February 2020 and need your help to ensure we can get volunteers to as many roost sites across Perth Region as possible. Rainbow Lorikeets roost communally in tall trees each night with the number of lorikeets at roost sites peaking in summer after the main breeding season. Lorikeets arrive at the roost sites around sunset in noisy groups.

They leave their roosts in the pre-dawn (prior to 5am during the summer months) and this means that early morning sightings are often distant to the roost site. Roost sites are often many kilometres from feeding sites that the lorikeets use during the day, so it is important to only report sites where you see lorikeets at sunset. ● MORE INFORMATION Please report to BirdLife WA any night time roosts by emailing rainbowroost@birdlife. org.au or by phoning the WA office on (08) 9383 7749.

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YOUR BUSINESS

your

business Your business WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR BUSINESS

Delving into Freshcare 4.1 BY JOEL DINSDALE QUALITY ASSURANCE COORDINATOR, VEGETABLESWA

F

reshcare FSQ4 is undergoing an upgrade with all businesses expected to take up the latest iteration at their next audit commencing from 1 January 2020.

This means that businesses that are in the January audit cycle will need to start thinking about the changes required to maintain or attain certification. So what can businesses expect from 4.1? Who better to ask than secondgeneration, vegetable/strawberry farmer, Anthony Lieu, who helped his business become the first in WA to attain Freshcare FSQ4.1 certification.

Landsdale Strawberry Farm was the tenth business nationally to attain the certification. This is an important statistic as Freshcare required ten completed audits to meet GFSI certification requirements that will align it more closely to the other GFSI base schemes (Global G.A.P., SQF and BRC).

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LANDSDALE PERTH

Farmer Anthony Lieu Location Landsdale Enterprises Strawberries, capsicums, tomatoes and egg fruits

33 FRESH strawberries from Anthony Lieu’s farm.


YOUR BUSINESS

So what can businesses expect from 4.1? JD: Congratulations Anthony on becoming the first business in the state to meet the new Code of Practice 4.1 (COP4.1) requirements. Can you tell us about you and the scope of your audit (scope and crops)? AL: My family grows strawberries, capsicums, tomatoes and egg fruits and we are currently certified to Freshcare and HARPS. JD: How did you find the whole process? Was it different to previous audits?

JD: What (if any) were the training requirements? AL: None because I have previously completed FSQ training — but I found it really useful going through the changes and new documents with you (Joel) as it helped to discuss how the changes are going to impact on our production activities. JD: Have any of the changes in the rules and COP4.1 affected your business and the growing/ packing activities?

Anthony Lieu’s business became one of the first in WA to attain Freshcare FSQ4.1 certification.

AL: Not too different but it’s a bit more involved. There are a number of drivers that you have to keep on top of across the growing season to ensure that you remain compliant to the new Code of Practice. Having HARPS greatly helped us to bridge the gaps between 4 and 4.1. Many of the changes were in the rules and they didn’t all affect our business, so it wasn’t too daunting.

AL: Yes — we are conducting more training and refresher training events to ensure that all of our staff members are handling our produce with food safety in mind. We are also ensuring that our staff are understanding and meeting the requirements of our food safety procedures. JD: What prompted you to shift to the new COP4.1? AL: Our business is striving to provide the best possible produce, to the highest standards, so we thought it would be great to upgrade — it also

edges us closer to the global standards (GFSI) which aligns us more closely to the producers in the northern hemisphere. It was also a great opportunity to improve food safety in our business. JD: What advice would you give a grower who is preparing to implement the changes? AL: I’d say to get in nice and early to make the changes. Don’t leave it until the last minute as you will find it hard to meet all of the requirements. I’d advise growers to get informed on the changes to get a good understanding of what to do. It’s a great opportunity for the horticulture industry to improve our food safety practices so growers should embrace the new changes as they will likely provide improved market access. MORE INFORMATION Go to www.freshcare.com.au/ announcement/fsq-4-1-release, phone (02) 8039 9999 or email admin@freshcare. com.au

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YOUR BUSINESS

Vegetable growing:

V

egetable growing is more than throwing seeds into the soil and expecting them to grow. It is a livelihood for many, including Western Australian grower Paul Glavocich. In this edition, Paul opens up about his growing operation and its challenges, his role at vegetablesWA and how a benchmarking project has assisted him in recent business decisions.

PERTH WATTLEUP

Farmer Paul & Crystal Glavocich Location Wattleup Size 10 acres Enterprises All year-round: parsnips, kale and silverbeet Seasonal: garlic and sweetpotatoes

Paul Glavocich understands that making tough decisions is vital to maintaining a profitable and sustainable vegetable growing operation. The secondgeneration grower currently oversees a 10-acre property in Wattleup in Perth’s southern suburbs, but until recently Paul owned another farm at Gingin in the city’s north. However, after reflecting on the Gingin growing operation and its viability, Paul decided to concentrate on the Wattleup property that was started by his parents, Paul and Katy, over 30 years ago. Paul and Katy still work on the farm, along with a couple of permanent staff. Currently, Paul grows parsnips, kale and silverbeet all year-round, with garlic and sweetpotatoes grown as seasonal crops.

Weather can be an issue particularly with leaf lines.

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Combating challenges Like all growers, weather is a big issue for Paul, particularly with leaf lines. However, he has looked at ways to minimise the risk to those crops. “I have cut back production a bit in the times when the weather can be an issue, and then grow the other crops that can handle those conditions. I grow a bit more of my root crops during wintertime, when you have damaging winds and potential hail. You can’t always predict the weather, but you try to, to the best of your knowledge,” Paul says. Water is another challenge and so are the rising costs of operating a farm.

“These are issues that people have got to learn to work with,” Paul says. Furthermore, there is the challenge of urbanisation in the inner-city suburbs where growers have been operating for generations. This is causing them to look further afield which Paul says is understandable, but there are roadblocks. “People are buying land but are being told they can’t clear it for horticulture. The Government’s putting agriculture in the same category as developers. How are we meant to grow the industry if the land that the farmers used to have that was closer to Perth is getting taken away for residential areas? People are moving further out of Perth and then they’re buying this land and the Government’s saying no (you can’t clear it), that’s native vegetation,” Paul says.


YOUR BUSINESS

Paul has been involved in Vegetable business benchmarking over the past two years.

33PAUL Glavocich with his wife Crystal and son Benjamin.

“How is the Government expecting industry to get ahead? I think there should be a bit of forgiveness for people who are feeding the country. We’re using the land for productivity and these are only areas that we have, because people are being pushed further out from the CBD. “It’s really hard to find farms close to Perth. You’ve got to start moving up to Gingin or down to Myalup, which has been the case for years.”

Advocacy activity To ensure his voice is heard on issues affecting the Western Australian vegetable industry, Paul joined the vegetablesWA Committee of Management just over a year ago.

Meetings are held every three months, where these and other topics are discussed between growers and industry members.

Paul joined the Committee so he can have an input in order to benefit the vegetable industry, and he encourages other growers to do the same. “If growers want to better the industry, then the best way is to get involved with the body that supports it. Instead of sitting on the fence, put your voice out there. That’s what vegetablesWA is there for. Everyone’s welcome to speak up.” Paul also encourages vegetable

growers to attend networking events. “I know being a grower can mean you are time-poor, but even if you just go to one of the networking events once every three months or six months, you can be involved,” he says.

Getting down to business Over the past two years, Paul has been involved in Vegetable business benchmarking (VG17000), a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund. Led by vegetablesWA, this project is engaging with Western Australian vegetable growers like Paul to identify production and financial benchmarks and to uncover the drivers of best practice performance. WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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YOUR BUSINESS

Paul is an ardent supporter of the benchmarking project. “I’d encourage Western Australian growers to get on-board with benchmarking because it’s helping people figure out what it’s really costing them to run their business and getting average costs for growers who produce the same lines as you,” he says. “Being involved has given me a view on where my costs are in my business and the crops I was growing, and the money I was really making. Look at the crops that you’re growing and why are you growing them. Are they profitable or are you over suppyling, which is not making them profitable? “Just because you need to make a hard decision on your business, it doesn’t mean that it’s actually bad. Selling my Gingin farm was a hard decision that I had to make, because it was going to better my business. The crops that I was doing weren’t suitable. I think benchmarking can help people make the right decisions and know where their business is heading.”

ROADBASE

Additionally, to maintain disease resistance and ongoing sustainability of the farm, Paul engages in crop rotation practices and has implemented an irrigation and fertilising program that can be used remotely from his phone. He has installed biosecurity measures for anyone entering the farm, and is also a pilot member of the current EnviroVeg program, an industryled initiative that promotes best management techniques by providing resources, support, engagement and a pathway to certification recognition for vegetable producers.

“I’m quite happy at the moment with the way my operation is running. It’s only a small operation, but I’m happy with the customers who I deal with and the lines that I’m growing,” he says. “I like watching the plants grow and their progress. Every day you know you’re doing something productive, and I lead a good lifestyle. You are your own boss. I can see that I’ve planted something, spent an amount of time growing it and then I’ve sold it. To me, that is rewarding.” ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This article was originally published in Vegetables Australian magazine, courtesy of AUSVEG.

A growing passion Despite the challenges and the tough decisions that have accompanied him over the years, Paul is still enjoying being on the farm. As the business owner, Paul runs the day-to-day operation and he still gets his hands dirty out in the field.

RECYCLED AND QUARRY FILL SAND

DRAINAGE MATERIALS

Unprocessed gyprock

WA RECYCLING believes that there is a need to recycle civil, construction and demolition waste into reusable products so the wider community benefits. Call or email for a price to help you out with a cost effect product for soil management. HAZELMERE AND SOUTH * NEW SITE COMING SOON *

Lot 501 Adelaide Street, Hazelmere WA 6055 P (08) 9250 1122 M 0408 952 200 E tony@warecycling.com.au

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TOP SOIL

Processed gyprock

Bring your soil to life.

Now recycling clean gyprock into Grade 1 gypsum (96.8%) Total sulphur (S) 18% Total calcium (Ca) 23.1% Gypsum is approx. 15mm minus so you have slow release and immediate release with fines.

www.warecycling.com.au


Photo © Craig Kinder

YOUR BUSINESS

Changes to land tax exemption for land used for primary production business

O

n 1 July 2014, the Land Tax Assessment Act 2002 was amended to extend the exemption for land used for a primary production business to situations where certain related family entities of the owner use the land for primary production.

However, the exemption was unintentionally extended to include use by trusts with beneficiaries such as charitable institutions or companies provided the individual beneficiaries were family members. This was inconsistent with the intent of the provisions and on 13 June 2019, amendments came into effect to ensure that where the land is used by a related entity that is a trust, every beneficiary of the trust is an individual who is either the nominated beneficiary or a family member of the nominated beneficiary.

However, taxpayers have until 30 June 2020 to make changes to trust deeds to ensure the trust owner or user comply with the new changes.

Primary production land tax exemption changes.

This change means that land used by a trust with a trust deed that still includes other entities such as charitable institutions or companies will no longer be eligible for the primary production exemption.

This change impacts only the owners and users of land, whose land is situated within the Perth metropolitan region or is land not zoned for rural purposes within a town planning scheme. It does not impact rural farming land.

MORE INFORMATION For more information leave your contact details on the web enquiry form at: www.ors.wa.gov.au/landtaxenquiry and a Senior Revenue Officer will contact you.

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Do you need to look at how your business is financed?

33WHAT might have once been a relatively straightforward business structure, may now involve two, three, or even more families.

I

BY CHRIS PUCKRIDGE RURAL FINANCIAL COUNSELLOR RFCS WA

t’s an exciting time to be part of the horticultural industry and with many businesses growing in size and complexity over the years, now is a good time to ask the question — has my financial management evolved with the business or does it need a makeover?

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Like many of WA’s agricultural enterprises, horticultural producers have tended to expand and grow their businesses over time.

where production has had to grow to support more people in the business.

So what started as small family businesses that were relatively simple and relied on the hard work of the owners have become larger operations.

What might have once been a relatively straightforward business structure, may now involve two, three, or even more families and be reliant on bank or other financial services providing annual capital to fund the new season’s crop.

To keep pace with the economics of food production, more land has been purchased or leased.

Many family businesses have embraced these changes, harnessing modern farming systems and adopting new technology.

In many cases, this has often also coincided with the introduction of more family members into the business and created a further cycle of expansion

But the question is, have they also transformed their financial management system?


YOUR BUSINESS

BUSINESS CHECKLIST

Looking at your own operation can you answer these questions:

my business established a  Has plan to manage financial stress if there was a significant event that impacted income?

my business looked at  Has alternatives for funding to ensure we have the best facilities in place?

my business have  Does access to the right people

with suitable skills to advise and support me if there is a significant event that impacts the business?

my financial skills  Are sufficient for me to make my

own decisions with confidence, rather than relying on third parties?

I have the best possible  Do relationship with my bank or other finance provider?

These are good questions to ask yourself and to discuss with your business partners. WA’s horticulture industry is seeing year-on-year growth and increased opportunities to cash in on lucrative export and domestic markets.

This is good news for the industry and presents opportunities for some growers to expand or consolidate their operations, depending on their place in the growth cycle. Getting the groundwork right can make all the difference when it comes to making your business successful.

MORE INFORMATION The Rural Financial Counselling Service of WA (RFCSWA) can discuss these issues with you and explore potential plans and strategies that you can investigate to strengthen your business. Our role is not to tell you what to do or how to do it, but to provide you with information that will allow you to make the best possible decision. The RFCSWA is an independent, not-forprofit organisation and our services are free to registered primary producers and associated small businesses. Call 1800 612 004 to discuss your financial future with an independent, confidential and experienced financial counsellor who is focused on assisting you to strengthen your business.

So while a business needs be sustainable in the face of a natural disaster such as flood, fire or crop loss, you also need to consider “is my finance fit for purpose?”

WA’s horticulture industry is seeing yearon-year growth.

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Bao Duy Nguyen:

N

uffield Scholar and Sun City Produce Managing Director Bao Duy Nguyen has released his report on the findings from his scholarship, which was undertaken in 2017. Vegetables Australia spoke to Bao about his Nuffield experience and the opportunities that it has presented within the industry as well as his own professional development. A desire to improve his greenhouse growing operation, as well as a search for further mentoring, drove Western Australian greenhouse vegetable grower Bao Duy Nguyen to apply for a Nuffield Scholarship in 2017.

Bao is Managing Director of Sun City Produce, a family-owned business in Walkaway, which is located about 30 kilometres south of Geraldton. It produces tomatoes, cucumbers and capsicum in a low-tech greenhouse operation. The vegetable grower was successful in his application, and as a result travelled to Singapore, Indonesia, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States as part of his Global Focus Program. He also travelled specifically to Brazil, Israel, Italy, Canada, Spain and the Netherlands to investigate how low-tech greenhouse operators can become more efficient within their existing systems.

Bao released his comprehensive report Efficient Practices in Low Technology Greenhouses: Surviving as a small family farm in July this year. The Nuffield Scholarship is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund.

Seeking knowledge WALKAWAY PERTH

Farmer Bao Duy Nguyen Location Walkaway Enterprises Tomatoes, cucumbers and capsicum

Six years ago, Bao took a break from engineering and returned to the family farm to work alongside his brother Bao La. Upon his return, Bao observed that the operation’s efficiency needed to improve. While Sun City Produce was able to expand by purchasing additional land, Bao and his family soon realised that the business’ production levels had plateaued. They were working long hours each day and not seeing the return on investment. This prompted Bao to search further afield for ways to improve their growing practices, so they didn’t get left behind.

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“I could see in the long run that we could not sustain a living if we were to continue the way we were. I was sure there were people around the world in similar operations who would have been able to increase their efficiency with restricted low-tech greenhouses,” he said.

Global insights The opportunity to travel to several continents strengthened Bao’s professional and personal networks, increased his confidence in introducing new technology into Sun City Produce, as well as enriching his understanding of how greenhouse vegetables are produced and how Australia can improve its protected cropping practices. “I learnt that applying simple technology will save you time and effort, and inform your decision making. Temperature, humidity and soil moisture sensors can be recorded in real-time on your phone, which really helps in informing you whether to irrigate or open vents,” he says. “As a result, I have implemented some temperature and humidity sensors that allow me to make observations on what the crop is doing so I can change my fertiliser applications. I have put some fans and vents in that reduce heat and humidity; however, the cost to install them on the rest of the farm is too large.”

Key recommendations Bao’s report also defines factors that affect low technical greenhouse management and provides recommendations to vegetable growers operating in these systems, as well as key decision-makers in Australian horticulture.


YOUR BUSINESS

The opportunity to travel to several continents strengthened Bao’s professional and personal networks.

33BAO visited Roquetas De Mar in Spain.

33BAO Duy Nguyen visiting a greenhouse tomato growing operation in Israel.

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“There is production where there are competitive prices for water. Any regional areas that want to continue producing need cheap or competitive price and access to water to sustain their business. In areas of Israel, the Government has helped in accessing bores, recycled wastewater and desalinated water (the overflow from cities using desalinated water),” Bao said. “In Australia, the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources needs to prioritise water allocation for vegetable producers to keep us sustainable.

“There must also be a market for your produce. Europe has a huge market — that’s why their greenhouse industry in Spain’s Almeria region can have 30,000 hectares of greenhouse. “We need to focus on growing things that have a market access and export can be an option. However, there must be quality and collaboration between growers to get the consistency and supply all year round.”

Bao acknowledged that those recommendations could be out of vegetable growers’ control. Therefore, he has focused on practical steps growers can take on-farm that do not require too much capital. The report also provides advice around where businesses can direct their efforts to make sure they are not losing profit because of mismanagement of their technical growing practices.

Opening doors Bao strongly recommends that other members of the vegetable industry apply for the Nuffield Scholarship, as it opens the communication lines with other growers and provides the opportunity to adopt practices and exchange knowledge with leaders in their own field. Over the past 12 months, Bao has joined vegetablesWA as a committee member and is the Chairman of the newly established Mid-West Horticulture Grower Group Inc. that he helped to establish with other growers in the Geraldton area. Bao is also considering undertaking an entrepreneur course following his Nuffield studies.

“I now realise that farming is a business and we need to add value to what we produce. However, at this stage, I would like to stay on the farm and continue putting what I’ve learnt into practice. I really enjoy growing and it’s great when you are improving each season.” MORE INFORMATION To read Bao Duy Nguyen’s report Efficient Practices in Low Technology Greenhouses: Surviving as a small family farm, please visit nuffieldinternational.org/live/Report/ AU/2017/bao-duy-nguyen. For more information, please visit nuffield. com.au. The Nuffield Scholarship has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Project Number: VG14065 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This article was originally published in Vegetables Australian magazine, courtesy of AUSVEG.

PREMIUM PROPERTY NEW LISTING

Cowalla / Gingin Shire 2373 Cowalla Road, Cowalla

Asking price is a very competitive $290,000

(exclusive of GST)

48.8ha / 120.5ac

For Sale by private negotiation for $1,500,000. All offers considered. Quality Horticulture Property • • • • •

North western periphery of the sought-after Gingin shire Huge water licence of 504,150kL 22ha plus of irrigation from five production bores providing good water Ideal for market garden, lucerne, fruit, hot houses etc Two storey 4x2 manor with modern complements

• Managers office, staff rooms with 276m2 GP shed • Machinery/packing shed 560m2 + (29m2) cool room with three phase power • Major arterial routes to Perth via Indian Ocean Drive or Brand Highway

Listing details and photos available at landmarkwa.harcourts.com.au/LEP29646 Adam Shields 0429 104 760

5553603

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WA crates The professional packaging service for WA’s finest fresh fruit and vegetables

0 email: service@wacrates.com.au


YOUR BUSINESS

Focusing on driving income and profitability

from your land Photos © Craig Kinder

BY BRYN EDWARDS BENCHMARK LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

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Greater profit by focusing on improving quality or yield of product.


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B

uilding on the achievements of the first two years of the Financial Review and Benchmarking service, we’re at the start of the third year of working with growers to help you keep more money in your pocket. During this time many of the growers that have participated have been able to easily identify areas to either reduce costs or increase income — some even quickly found six figure savings. Interestingly, the service has been able to show that growers who spend wisely and deliberately on specific costs that have a clear view towards maximising income are the ones who end up with a

greater profit and more money to show for their efforts — this is either focusing on improving quality or yield of product. In 2017–18 we found that on average the top 25% most profitable growers achieved a gross income of $111,028 per hectare, with average operating costs of $78,236 per hectare, resulting in an average of $32,792 operating profit per hectare (see Figure 1). This is compared to the average across the industry, which is a gross income of $46,272 per hectare, and operating costs of $35,484 per hectare, providing a return of $10,788 operating profit per hectare. Yes, bigger risk in terms of input costs carried by the business up front, but much bigger returns and profitability. [Note: The top 25% of profitable growers covers a variety of farm sizes big and small, a range of vegetable lines and differing locations]

120,000

In fact, on average, the top 25% spent 63c to make a dollar before tax, finance, depreciation and drawings, compared to the average across the industry who spent 75c to make a dollar. In terms of wages, often a significant proportion of costs (31% of costs on average across the industry and 32% for the top 25%), the top 25% were able to generate on average $303,846 per full time employee compared to $244,786 across the industry average — again using the spend wisely in a focused manner to generate the income. Many of these figures you can quickly and easily work out for your own business by diving into your management accounts, or tax returns, and then dividing your results by the total number of hectares that you grow on.

This will give you a quick idea of where you stand against the wider industry and top performers — valuable reference points and food for thought. If you want to discuss this further, or get involved in the Financial Review and Benchmarking service so you can have someone else do the maths for you, and go into a greater detail to understand exactly why you have the results you have, feel free to get in touch.

100,000 80,000

$

60,000 40,000

I’m always up for coming on farm for a cup of tea and discussion about how we can keep more money in your pocket!

20,000 0 TOP 25% -20,000

AVERAGE

BOTTOM 25% MORE INFORMATION

Gross income Operating costs Operating profit

Bryn Edwards, phone 0417 409 821 or email bryn.edwards@vegetables.com.au

FIGURE 1 2017–18 VEGETABLE INCOME, COSTS AND PROFIT WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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Labour Scheme Update

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L

BY MELISSA DENNING LABOUR SCHEME FACILITATOR

abour ensures that the vegetables are picked before they rot in the ground. It is a critical component in getting the produce packed and into the truck for an on-time delivery to the customer.

The Seasonal Worker Programme has been running since 2007.

It is also one of the largest elements leading to sleepless nights and stress amongst growers. While water and rain are at the mercy of mother nature, labour can be managed. Similarly, while the price of produce is decided by the market and customers — these are external stresses that growers cannot ultimately control. For many years Australia has been very attractive to backpackers from the world over.

Young people have been coming to holiday here and in the process, pick up a bit of work to have some money to move on to the next destination. In the past few years the number of backpackers has been declining, leaving a shortage of workers in the horticultural sector. The Seasonal Worker Programme (SWP) has been running since 2007 and has steadily grown in numbers since its inception. Growers are able manage their labour needs through this programme to erase labour concerns. Growers can decide how many workers are required and when the workers arrive and depart.

33TIMORESE workers in the packing shed at Handasyde Strawberries. 33RETURNING Timorese workers in Albany at Handasyde Strawberries.

Several employers have described the workers as “more consistent and reliable” than backpackers. More importantly workers can return year after year, so not only does the farm get the workers required, in Year 2 the workers are already trained and raring to go straight off the plane. The participating Pacific countries are Timor-Leste, Tonga, Samoa, Fiji, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Nauru, Kiribati, Tuvalu and Papua New Guinea.

The SWP is a federally run programme through the Department of Employment, Skills, Family and Small Business. There are eligibility requirements in order to join the programme but vegetablesWA have resources that can assist with this process. Last year there were approximately 13,000 Seasonal Workers in Australia, with about 400 in WA. MORE INFORMATION Contact Melissa Denning, vegetablesWA Labour Scheme Facilitator, 0477 477 044 or go to https://pacificlabourmobility.com.au/ Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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Taking care of your finances

from payroll and wages to your own super

33PAYROLL tax threshold will increase to $950,000 on January 1, 2020 and again on January 1, 2021 to $1 million.

I

ts good news for small business owners, the State Government recently announced a change in the payroll tax threshold. Payroll tax — the ins and outs WA businesses with an annual payroll of up to $850,000 are currently exempt from payroll tax, however from January 1, 2020 this threshold will increase to $950,000, increasing again on January 1, 2021 to $1 million.

It’s estimated that around 12,000 businesses will benefit from this change. Eleven thousand enjoying a reduced tax bill, and a further 1,000 no longer reaching the payroll tax threshold.

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This will lower the costs associated with hiring additional staff and, if you’re a small business owner, it could be the perfect time to reassess your business operations. Perhaps this is the time to explore more opportunities to expand your business and to employ more staff. The Chamber of Commerce and Industry WA estimates that the first change to the tax threshold could create almost 900 jobs.

including gaining a good understanding of relevant pay awards and which industrial relations systems will apply to your business.

It pays to get complex wage calculations right Much has been written recently about wage theft, with prominent national businesses facing legal challenges over employee payment shortfalls.

Around 12,000 businesses will benefit from the changes in payroll tax thresholds.

It is of course important to note that many small businesses are sole traders. But if these enterprises employed just one person it would create an additional 143,000 new jobs for Western Australians.

Before jumping in to start employing staff it’s important to do your homework

The Commonwealth government announced in July that it would bring in new criminal laws against wage theft. However, this has been delayed and consultations are underway to develop measures to criminalise wage theft and to look at whether existing penalties are sufficient.


YOUR BUSINESS

33A standard contribution of 9.5% of before-tax income will allow you to plan for life after work.

A standard contribution of 9.5% of before-tax income will allow you to plan for life after work.

While all wage theft involves the underpaying of employees, not all underpayment of employees is wage theft.

Research by the Australian Payroll Association recently revealed that 90% of organisations say their payroll managers find the current laws confusing and contradictory. Those surveyed reported being unsure of how to interpret the wording of pay awards and associated legislation. With the Fair Work Ombudsman tackling some of Australia’s largest and most prominent companies for underpaying staff, sometimes due to administrative oversights, it is understandable that small businesses with far less administrative firepower can be susceptible to mistakes.

Businesses need to work to their strengths and, almost inevitably, pay for advice and service in other areas. The complexities of payroll regulations may, for some businesses, warrant paying for the services of an independent human resources professional or accountant who can set up or manage payroll.

A super chance to prepare for the future Many small business owners put their own superannuation at the bottom of their priority list, but it is a vital part of running your own business — and by taking action now, you can ensure you have a strong financial foundation for your retirement years. Superannuation is one of the best routes to saving for retirement, and if you’re self-employed or work as a contractor, paying yourself super falls into your list of responsibilities.

Understandably, many small business owners prioritise other financial responsibilities over paying themselves super. If you have been an irregular payer and have a lowbalance account, since 1 July 2019 new laws (known as the Protecting Your Superannuation Package) require superannuation providers to report and transfer these accounts to the Australian Taxation Office. The ATO website has information about superannuation, including how to set up your account. See ato.gov. au/super The Small Business Development Corporation website also provides information about superannuation, payroll and other tax and finance matters. MORE INFORMATION The Small Business Development Corporation is here to help. Contact one of our business advisers for a free one-to-one session on 133 140 or visit smallbusiness.wa.gov.au for more information.

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Take time

to get piece rate right BY ROBERT HAYES STATE MANAGER – MADEC, NATIONAL HARVEST LABOUR INFORMATION SERVICE

M

any growers see the use of piece rates as an attractive option to avoid paying overtime to casual workers employed under the Horticulture Award. While piece rate workers are not subject to the overtime provisions of the Horticulture Award, changing to piece rate payment is not a simple or easy process. What is a piece rate? Using piece rates to pay workers is a good way to encourage productivity and incentivise workers. A piece rate payment is one where payment is made according to each ‘piece’ processed. An example would be how much weight or volume of product is picked, packed, pruned or made. Prior to picking or packing, a rate is agreed and payment is made that depends, for example, on how many kilos, buckets or bins are picked or packed.

33A piece rate payment is one where payment is made according to each ‘piece’ processed.

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Once a rate is agreed, payment is solely based on how fast the worker is, with the fastest worker earning the most and the slowest the least.

When can a piece rate be used?

The employees’ earnings will depend entirely on their productivity. A piece rate agreement does not guarantee that the employee will earn at least the minimum weekly or hourly wage in the award.

• The award or registered agreement must allow for piece rate payments. Most horticulture workers are paid under the Horticulture Award 2010 which allows for piece rate payments.

Piece rate payments don’t include overtime Following a decision of the FairWork Commission on April 2, a number of changes were made to the Horticulture Award including the requirement to pay overtime to casual workers from the 15th April 2019. Nothing in the decision changes the payment of a casual employee on a piecework agreement. This means that the pieceworker does not get overtime or the night loading, and neither the overtime rate nor the night loading are factored into the calculation of the piece rate, but additional payments for working on public holidays still apply. While the use of piece rates would seem to be an easy, legal way to avoid having to pay overtime, it’s not as simple as it sounds, and as with most things, the devil lies in the detail.

A number of criteria must be followed before workers can be paid on a piece rate as follows:

• A piece rate can only be used when the weight, volume, or unit picked or packed by individual workers can be measured. So there is no opportunity for a group piece rate where for example two workers share picking into a bin, or a group of workers share how much is picked using a mango picking aid. • If an employee is doing an hourly paid task and achieves 304 hours before the eight week overtime period is finished (which would trigger overtime payment), they cannot then be switched to piece rates (that don’t attract overtime) for the same task. If they have been doing an hourly paid shed job and then switched to a different piecework paid job such as picking, that will not attract overtime.


YOUR BUSINESS

How to implement piece rate payment A number of criteria MUST be met before making piece rate payments: • Check the FairWork Ombudsman website for information on piece rate payments — www.fairwork.gov.au/ pay/minimum-wages/piece-ratesand-commission-payments • There must be a written and signed piecework agreement setting out the pay rate per piece and how it is measured, before any work commences. An employer has to keep the agreement as part of their records and give a copy to the employee. If the agreement is varied, it must be agreed to in writing by the employee and employer. • Piecework rates must enable the average competent employee to earn at least 15% more per hour than the minimum hourly rate in the Award for their type of employment and classification level. Competence is not to be confused with motivation, attitude, behaviour or proficiency. These are attributes or levels of skills that may determine how much a worker picks and is ultimately paid, but they are not indicators of competence.

33PIECE rates are an important productivity tool allowed for in the Horticulture Award.

• Piece rates may change several times a day if workers move to different paddocks/fields where crops might be heavier or lighter, or fruit smaller or larger etc. In this case workers must be aware, and agree to the new piece rate. • A timesheet must be used for each worker that records the number of hours worked for each piece rate, including breaks.

Calculating the piece rate Determining what an average competent worker is can be difficult, and may need adjustment if it doesn’t allow for an average competent worker to earn at least 15% above the minimum hourly rate in the Award. Where historical data exists, use this to assist in calculating the piece rate.

Where historical data exists, use this to assist in calculating the piece rate.

Where data does not exist, use a best estimate derived from neighbouring farms or similar crops in other areas.

Workers can also be initially paid on an hourly rate to help determine realistic targets for piece rates. It is preferable that the piece rate is calculated using sample data from as many workers as possible to ensure it is representative of the workforce. Piecework is not intended to be mechanism to reduce wages costs. Piecework provides a 15% loading for workers as they are being placed on a productivity form of payment. If all workers on a property were considered to be competent, it follows that the total wages cost could actually be higher than if workers were paid on an hourly basis. Remember, piece rates are an important productivity tool allowed for in the Horticulture Award. When calculated and implemented correctly piece rates can be a win-win for both growers and workers. But moving to piece rates is not quick or easy. Take your time, do some homework and seek advice before making the switch. MORE INFORMATION The National Harvest Labour Information Service connects growers with workers and is provided as a no-cost service through a call centre and website. It is funded through the Australian Government and managed by MADEC, a not-for-profit organisation

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DESIGN

Everything you need to know about

toilets and handwashing on your farm

I

f you are an employer, main contractor, or self-employed, you are required to provide a safe workplace for all workers, including yourself. The Safe Work Australia Code of Practice provides practical guidance for businesses to meet obligations about amenities required for the welfare of workers. Toilets and hand washing facilities on the farm are important to consider. Below is a breakdown of your obligations in the workplace:

Toilets Access to clean toilets must be provided for all workers while they are at work. Where reasonably practicable, toilet facilities should be provided for workers, rather than relying on access to external public toilets. Number of toilets For workplaces within buildings, the National Construction Code of Australia sets out the ratio of toilets to the number of workers, and the specifications for toilets. Generally, separate toilets should be provided in workplaces where there are both male and female workers. However, one unisex toilet may be provided in

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workplaces with both male and female workers where: • the total number of people who normally work at the workplace is 10 or less • there are two or less workers of one gender For example, a workplace with two male and eight female workers or with one female and three male workers could have a unisex toilet because there are 10 or fewer workers in total and two or fewer workers of one gender.

A unisex toilet should include one closet pan, one washbasin and means for disposing of sanitary items. For all other workplaces, separate toilets should be provided in the following ratios: Workers

Closet pan(s)

Urinals

Males

1 per 20 males

1 per 25 males

Females

1 per 15 females

N/A

These ratios are the minimum standard that should be provided. However, in some workplaces, the scheduling of workers’ breaks will affect the number of toilets required. There should be enough toilets available for the number of workers who may need to use them at the same time.

Design of toilets Toilets should be: • fitted with a hinged seat and lid • provided with adequate lighting and ventilation • clearly signposted • fitted with a hinged door capable of locking from the inside on each cubicle • designed to allow emergency access • positioned to ensure privacy for users • separated from any other room by an airlock, a sound-proof wall and a separate entrance that is clearly marked. Toilets should be supplied with: • an adequate supply of toilet paper for each toilet • hand washing facilities • rubbish bins • for female workers, hygienic means to dispose of sanitary items.


YOUR BUSINESS

Access to toilets Toilets must be accessible, preferably located inside a building or as close as possible to the workplace. In multistorey buildings, toilets should be located on at least every second floor. Mobile, temporary or remote workplaces If work is undertaken away from base locations or at outdoor sites (for example, gardeners, bus drivers, couriers), workers must have access to other toilets, for example public toilets or toilets at clients' premises. In such cases, information should be provided to workers on where the toilets are located. Where it is not reasonably practicable to provide access to permanent toilets (for example, short-term temporary workplaces and workplaces in remote areas), portable toilets should be provided. Portable toilets should be located in a secure place with safe access. They should be installed so they do not fall over or become unstable and should be serviced regularly to keep them clean.

DESIGN Design of hand washing facilities Hand washing facilities should:

RATIO: One wash basin for every 30 males and one for every 30 female workers.

• be accessible at all times to work areas, eating areas and the toilets • be separate from troughs or sinks used in connection with the work process • contain both hot and cold water taps or temperature mixers • be protected from the weather

Hand washing Hand washing facilities must be provided to enable workers to maintain good standards of personal hygiene. Workers may need to wash their hands at different times (for example, after visiting the toilet, before and after eating meals, after handling chemicals or handling greasy machinery). Number of hand washing basins In most cases, for both males and females, hand washing basins should be provided in at least the ratio of one wash basin for every 30 males and one for every 30 female workers, or part thereof. The number of hand washing basins may need to be increased depending on the nature of the work carried out at the workplace. For example, where the work involves exposure to infectious substances or other contaminants, separate hand washing basins should be provided in addition to those provided with toilets.

• be supplied with non-irritating soap (preferably from a soap dispenser) • contain hygienic hand drying facilities, for example automatic air dryers or paper towels. • where a business engages in activities such as food preparation or health care, there are also duties under health legislation in relation to hand washing facilities. Mobile, temporary or remote workplaces

If work is carried out in locations where there are no hand washing facilities, workers should have access to alternative hand hygiene facilities, for example a water container with soap and paper towels, hand wipes or alcohol-based hand wash. MORE INFORMATION For more information visit https://ablis. business.gov.au/service/wa/code-ofpractice-workplace-amenities-andfacilities/17285

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New podcast bust myths and boosts business

33PODCAST preparation underway with Hort Innovation staff.

A new podcast series titled Growing Matters is now freely available to download or stream through Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Stitcher.

The series was developed after consultation from industry stakeholders highlighted the need for a greater variety of easy to access resources across multiple platforms. Hort Innovation CEO Matt Brand said the Rural Development Corporation spent considerable time consulting with stakeholders during the company’s national roadshow earlier this year and used that feedback to formulate an engagement strategy. “Investing in and creating resources that our growers could engage in while out in the field, tending to crops and riding the tractor was vital to reaching a greater amount of growers and spread the outcomes of the research that their levies help to support,” he said.

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“The podcast is one such way that we are doing that, but we will continue to address new and innovative ways to reach our growers and keep them informed of developments in their industry.” Hort Innovation Research and Development Manager Ashley Zamek, who manages the pollination fund, said the podcast gave her a platform to speak candidly about the risks, the developments and the future of what the Australian pollination industry will look like. “Having the opportunity to provide that level of detail about some of our projects, busting myths and providing tangible outcomes to our growers is something I’m really excited about,” she said. “This podcast series boasts great talent, all experts in their field and also provides a great deal of insight into the type of research we’re doing, why we’re doing it and what the benefits are for industry.” MORE INFORMATION For more information or to access the podcast, visit: www.horticulture.com.au/ podcasts 

ended lis t m en com

ing

The four-part series explores common misconceptions around pollination and how threats to the current honeybee population will impact on growers bottom lines; it also details how growers can use data and analytics to maximise their profits, addresses access to international markets through trade initiatives and even debunks the myths around high fat horticultural produce and provides tools on how to market these crops to consumers.

“In this last year, Hort Innovation managed more than 600 active R&D projects. Each of those projects deliver milestones, and it’s fair to say that most of those projects will deliver applicable outcomes that we want to communicate back to industry.

Re

A

new resource designed to arm horticultural growers with everything they need to grow their business has been released by Hort Innovation.

If you are a grower looking to expand your business into the export market, or if you are a grower wanting to know how international trade helps to support your domestic operation, then the episode Breaking barriers through trade and Taste Australia will not disappoint. Two of Hort Innovation’s finest reveal all their secrets to help you grow your business, understand the trade and export market and give you the tools you need to succeed in getting your premium quality fruit into the international market.


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your

market Your market WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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e c n e i n e v n o c Healthy Demand for pre-packed salads continues to grow

I

BY GI LEE SENIOR CLIENT SERVICE EXECUTIVE

n recent years, Nielsen identified two key consumer trends — convenience and increased health-consciousness. Just recently, as reported in Food&Drink Business, major supermarkets have adjusted their strategic plans to broaden their range of ready-to-eat and semi-prepared meals, such as fruit salads and pre-cut vegetables for snacking. This is to cater to shifting consumer needs and to deliver added value for time-poor shoppers who are willing to pay a price premium to save time. These trends are also being reflected in the demand for fresh salad. While loose fresh salad leaves, such as baby spinach or mesclun salad, declined in terms of dollar sales by -8.0% in major supermarkets compared to last year, consumption of bagged salads (bagged salad leaves and shredded/slaw) continued to rise. This has resulted in a 6.4% increase in dollar sales and a 6.6% lift in volume sales (see Figure 1).

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33READY-TO-EAT salads recorded the strongest growth, with dollar sales up by 14.3%.


YOUR MARKET

14.3%

3.6%

Households consume fresh salad 10.3 times a month.

8.3%

6.4% 6.6%

-1.8%

TOTAL VEGETABLE

-5.7% -8.0% LOOSE LEAF SALAD

BAGGED SALAD

READY-TO-EAT SALAD

Dollar sales change in % vs a year ago Volume sales change in % vs a year ago

FIGURE 1 DOLLAR AND VOLUME SALES CHANGE VS PRIOR YEAR IN MAJOR SUPERMARKETS Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks ending 13/07/2019 Copyright © 2019 The Nielsen Company (US), LLC. All Rights Reserve

6.4%

Ready-to-eat salads (salad bowls and salad kits) recorded the strongest growth, with dollar sales up by 14.3%. This is considerably higher than total vegetables (+3.6%) and ranks just behind the vegetable with the highest dollar sales growth — cucumber (+16.5%). Looking at dollar sales contribution to fresh salad in major supermarkets, the importance of convenient pack types and formats becomes apparent, with bagged salads making up almost 70% of all fresh salad dollar sales, while value-added ready-to-eat salads contribute almost a quarter (24.3%) (see Figure 2).

24.3%

69.4% Loose leaf salad Bagged salad Ready-to-eat salad

FIGURE 2 FRESH SALAD DOLLAR SALES CONTRIBUTION IN MAJOR SUPERMARKETS Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks ending 13/07/2019 Copyright © 2019 The Nielsen Company (US), LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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Belinda Adams, from Coastal Hydroponics and AUSVEG Grower of the Year 2014, believes that convenience is the biggest driver of purchase for consumers of fresh salad. “Not having to prepare a salad or purchase all required ingredients to make a salad from scratch” is an indispensable valueadd in consumers’ eyes.”

33SALAD bowls targeting younger children could entice time-poor parents to replace fast-food and frozen ready-to-eat meals with a healthy alternative.

Bagged salads can be classified into three sizes: small (1–2 serves, ≤100g), medium (3–4 serves, 101–250g) and large (more than 4 serves, >250g). A deeper look at pack size sales reveals two key growth trends (see Figures 3 and 4).

Trading up to big bags Although the majority of bagged salad sales stems from medium-sized bags, shoppers are trading up to bigger pack sizes from medium-sized to largesized bags. This is also affecting sales performance, as medium-sized bags are in decline in volume sales (-2.9%), whereas large-sized bags grew faster (+18.3%).

One potential reason for consumers trading up could be the overall increased consumption.

31% of households state short shelf-life is the main reason for not buying fresh salad. 7.9%

17.4%

6.3%

- 1.0%

10.5% 37.6%

18.3%

SMALL (1–2 SERVES, ≤100G)

- 2.9%

MEDIUM (3–4 SERVES, 101G–250G)

LARGE (MORE THAN 4 SERVES, >250G)

Dollar sales change in % vs a year ago Volume sales change in % vs a year ago

FIGURE 4 DOLLAR SALES CHANGE COMPARED TO YEAR AGO IN MAJOR SUPERMARKETS

51.7%

Small (1–2 serves, ≤100g) Medium (3–4 serves, 101g–250g) Large (more than 4 serves, >250g)

FIGURE 3 DOLLAR CONTRIBUTION TO BAGGED SALADS IN MAJOR SUPERMARKETS Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks ending 13/07/2019 Copyright © 2019 The Nielsen Company (US), LLC. All Rights Reserve

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Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks ending 13/07/2019 Copyright © 2019 The Nielsen Company (US), LLC. All Rights Reserved.

While a year ago, households claimed to consume fresh salad 9.6 times a month, this number has increased to 10.3 times, which is just below the most frequently consumed vegetables — onions (11.7 times) and carrots (11.4 times). Additionally, while fresh salad is predominantly eaten for dinner, more consumers seem to have integrated fresh salad into lunch occasions: while only 37% of fresh salad

shoppers claimed to have consumed the vegetable for lunch on weekends last year, this number has risen to 47%.

Waste not, want not However, not all shoppers are trading up and small-sized salad bags are seeing dollar sales up by 7.9% compared to last year. This growth can be attributed to one of consumers’ key purchase barriers being concerns


YOUR MARKET

20.2%

24.7%

24.9%

22.8% 13.9%

17.0%

5.4%

6.7%

15.3%

16.0%

12.5% 5.3%

11.1% 4.1%

TOTAL VEGETABLE

FRESH SALAD

Start-up families Independent singles

Small-scale families Established couples

Bustling families Senior couples

Young transitional

FIGURE 5 DOLLAR SALES CONTRIBUTION BY LIFESTAGE Source: Nielsen Homescan 52 weeks ending 13/07/2019 Copyright © 2019 The Nielsen Company (US), LLC. All Rights Reserved.

around food wastage. Consumer research shows that wastage is a key concern for vegetable-purchasing households, inhibiting them from purchasing vegetables more often. For vegetables such as fresh salad, potential wastage is also a purchase barrier for non-buying households, with 31% of households stating that short shelf-life is the main reason for not buying fresh salad. Belinda Adams agrees that the growth of smaller-sized bags, especially singleserve 60g salad bags, is a result of catering to those households concerned about wastage.

Getting children to choose salads

Opportunities for further growth

Apart from wastage, household size of fresh salad shoppers might also be driving the sales growth of smallsized bags.

In order to drive sustainable growth of fresh salad, growers could explore different methods and packaging to extend the shelf-life of the product, which would attract new buying households concerned with wastage and entice existing buyers to purchase more fresh salad. According to Belinda Adams, there have been trials in the sanitation methods with the aim of reducing spoilage.

Almost half (47%) of respondents claimed to have consumed fresh salad at least once alone, while 49% have eaten fresh salad with their partner, suggesting that consumption of fresh salad is skewed towards smaller households. Looking at the dollar sales contribution by lifestage confirms that non-family households’ (young transitionals, independent singles and established couples) share of fresh salad spend is proportionally higher than for total vegetables; while the share of purchasing of salad by families with the eldest child under 11 years is lower.

To grow dollar sales among families, larger pack-sizes specifically marked or branded for families could prompt these households to purchase more fresh salad. Salad bowls targeting younger children with customised packaging design and ingredients could also entice time-poor parents to replace fast-food and frozen ready-to-eat meals with a healthy alternative for their children (see Figure 5).

Additionally, families with young children are proportionally spending less on fresh salad than on total vegetable. Apart from larger pack-sizes, new product developments especially targeted at young children could increase family’s shopping occasions for fresh salad. If families with the eldest child under 11 years purchased a fresh salad product one additional time over a year, it would add an incremental $5.6M to fresh salad dollar sales. MORE INFORMATION These data and insights were produced independently by Nielsen and shared through the Harvest to Home platform, supported through the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund. For more insights visit www.harvesttohome.net.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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Export Facilitators Project

update

The Export Workshop gave growers a great overview of the export process.

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BY MANUS STOCKDALE EXPORT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

T

1

he Export Facilitator Project is all about helping vegetable growers understand what is involved in export and assisting them to start selling their produce to overseas buyers. Over the last few months vegetablesWA has been working with an increasing number of growers across a wide range of export related activities.

Asia Fruit Logistica In September four WA growers attended the Asia Fruit Logistica trade show in Hong Kong with AUSVEG. The WA growers had the opportunity to display their produce and meet with fresh produce buyers from across Asia. While visitor numbers were lower than previous years due to the unrest in Hong Kong, the trade show was a great success with a lot of interest in Australia vegetables and good business leads generated for all the WA growers that attended. AUSVEG supports vegetable growers to attend several international trade shows each year and growers should keep an eye out for nomination opportunities.

Export Cost Recovery Review Implementation The Federal Department of Agriculture is seeking feedback on their proposed increase in fees and charges for export certification services. The proposed increases to phytosanitary certificates, tonnage and establishment registration levies are being set to recover the cost of the Department providing the service. The Department is seeking feedback on the proposed increases with submissions open until January 10, 2020 on their website https://haveyoursay.agriculture.gov. au/cost-recovery-implementationstatements

2

3

VEGETABLESWA Export Readiness Workshop 2019: 1. Growers were given a tour of the Tiger International Solutions air freight facility by David Wilkins. 2. Frank Frappa from La Mana Premier Group presenting to growers about his export experience and tips. 3. JENNY Van de Meeberg presenting to growers on the basics of export.

Export Readiness Workshop On October 17 vegetablesWA, in collaboration with AUSVEG, held an Export Workshop before the annual Industry Summit at Aloft Perth. Funding from the Agricultural Produce Commission allowed growers from Gingin, Myalup, Donnybrook and Manjimup to attend and it was great to have 10 growers present. The growers that attended had a variety of export experience — some had never exported before and were considering their options, while others currently export some of their produce through an agent and want to be more involved in the process and make export a bigger part of their business. Whatever the level of experience, each grower said that they learned something that they could apply to their business. Workshop attendees were educated on the current state of Australian vegetable exports and the AUSVEG Export Development Program from Michael Coote, followed by an overview of export processes and requirements from Jenny Van de Meeberg of VDM Partners. Bankwest’s Manager of International Trade Finance, Wayne Harper, explained the payment options for export sales and provided an overview of the banks export related products.

Attendees heard from Frank Frappa (GM International Sales) about La Mana Premier’s export business, including some tips for grower about selling and promoting their products overseas. After lunch the group travelled out to Perth Airport to visit Tiger International Solution’s air freight facility to better understand what a freight forwarder does and how produce is prepared for export.

The tour of the facility was a highlight for many of the growers and really helped to provide a practical understanding of what is involved in export. The Export Workshop gave growers a great overview of the export process and highlighted the support and assistance that is available at both a local and national level. MORE INFORMATION vegetablesWA plans to host another export workshop next year, contact Manus Stockdale manus.stockdale@vegetablewa.com.au or via phone (08) 9486 7515 if you would like to attend or get involved in any of the other export activities.

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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Preparing to attend a trade show BY MANUS STOCKDALE EXPORT DEVELOPMENT PROJECT LEAD, VEGETABLESWA

A

ttending international trade shows are a great opportunity to meet potential buyers, understand what customers are looking for and learn about your competitors. Trade shows can seem a bit daunting at first but with some preparation they can be very beneficial for your business and export development. The first thing you need to understand before attending a trade show is whether there is market access for your vegetable product for the country that the trade show is being held. The quickest way to determine this is to check the AUSVEG Market Access Matrix (visit: https://ausveg.com. au/app/uploads/2018/02/Market_ Access_Matrix.pdf), followed by a more

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detailed search of the Department of Agriculture’s MICoR database (visit: https://micor.agriculture.gov.au). It’s also worth checking the market access requirements for your products for neighbouring countries, as buyers from smaller countries within a region will also attend major trade shows. Knowing the market access requirements is important not only to know which products you can supply, but also the cost of getting your product to the market. If a phytosanitary certificate is required, pre-export treatment or direct freight route, these will all influence the cost of getting your product to market which needs to be reflected in the price you quote.

Pricing Customers go to trade shows wanting to do business, so be prepared to provide pricing to them. Knowing your costs is essential preparation before attending a trade show and you should be able to quote a potential customer the price of each of your products, including freight. It is also important to know the tariffs and quotas (if any), or opportunities to use Australian Free Trade Agreements for the market to gain an advantage over other international competitors.

Your sales pitch At the trade show there may be many companies selling the same vegetable

lines as you, including other Australian growers. It’s important to have a sales pitch prepared outlining why customers should buy from you. Firstly, you need to be able to explain what your business does, the scale of the business and what the history of the company is (emphasising multi-generational family farming can be important in some markets). Knowing the volume of product that you can supply and when it will be available in market, as well as pricing, is essential. You should also have a pricing negotiation strategy.

One of the most important things is to be able to answer the question ‘Why is your product better than a competitor or other countries product and why should a customer buy from you’. The answer needs to be honest and succinctly explains why your product is the best. This can be a quality attribute, for example your ability to supply is better than your competitors, or the freight times are shorter and therefore freshness of your product is better. Whatever your unique selling point (USP) is, you need to be prepared and confident to explain it to your potential customers in order to give yourself the best chance of making the sale.


YOUR MARKET

Promotional materials Having good promotional material can create a lasting impression with visitors to your trade show stand and increase the chances of gaining new customers. Business cards and a company brochure are essential promotional materials to take with you when you attend a trade show. A well designed and thought out brochure should include a brief family business history/story, why customers should buy from you (unique selling proposition), what products are grown, what formats are available and which months they are available, details of any quality assurance (QA) or other certifications, freight options and delivery times to key ports, as well as contact details including contact name. Brochures can be expensive to print and heavy to transport overseas so it may be worth considering having two brochure formats — one that provides a brief overview of the company and then a more comprehensive multipage brochure for more serious customers. If you are targeting a specific market for your produce than it may be worth considering translating your brochure into the local language. Having some small give-aways or company merchandise can be a nice touch for interested customers, but it can get expensive if you are not targeted in how you give it away at the trade show stand.

33IDENTIFYING potential customers and arranging meetings before travelling to a trade show can increase the likelihood of gaining new customers.

Display samples

Meeting customers

Samples of produce on display provide an opportunity for you to showcase the quality of your vegetables. Customers like to see what you can supply and how your produce compares to local or other imported options and what formats you can supply in. The logistics of getting samples into overseas markets can be straight forward or complicated depending on the country and their requirements. A good freight forwarder will be able to assist you, but it is worth doing your own homework and being aware of any issues that could arise.

Identifying potential customers and arranging meetings before travelling to a trade show can increase the likelihood of gaining new customers. Many companies may visit the tradeshow, but if you want to ensure that you meet with them it is worth trying to schedule a specific time to meet with them. Trade show organisers often make meeting rooms available that can be booked by attendees, or there are usually tables available in the Australian trade display area. Arranging meetings with customers in advance signals that you are seriously looking for export business and can increase the chances of securing new customers.

Â

Attending an overseas trade show provides a great opportunity to learn about the market and the consumers of your product.

Having small give-aways or company merchandise can be a nice touch.

Market insights visits

Plan to visit as much of the supply chain as possible to learn about how your product will arrive in the country, how wholesale distribution works, who the major retailers are and how consumers will prepare and eat your product.

33DISPLAY samples of your produce. Customers like to see what you can supply and how your produce compares to local or other imported options.

Arrange visits to retailers, wholesalers and logistics providers to build your knowledge on how the supply chain works. It is also recommended to contact AUSTRADE, as well as your state government trade office in the market, as they may be able to provide useful information and contacts to help you get the most out of your visit. WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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to remind them of who you are months down the track when you are looking for customers again.

Knowing your costs (including freight) is essential before attending a trade show.

Preparing a standard email about your company and sending it to each customer, with a few personal or specific details, can be an easy way to save time but keep in contact.

Checklist ✔✔ Check the market access for each of your vegetable lines ✔✔ Calculate your pricing, including freight ✔✔ Prepare your sales pitch and know your Unique Selling Proposition (USP)

Follow-up

✔✔ Print business cards and promotional materials ✔✔ Arrange freight for your sample products ✔✔ Arrange meetings with existing customers or identified potential customers ✔✔ Prepare for follow up after the trade show and schedule the time to do this when you return home

One of the most important things to do to secure new export business is to follow up with buyers that you meet at trade shows. When you return from a week or more away from your business it can be hard to find the time to contact people that you met overseas, however this is essential to building your relationship with potential customers. It’s better to send a brief email that simply reminds them of you and your company, rather than not making contact at all and then trying

These follow up emails can even be written before you attend the trade show so that they are ready to go when you get back home. WhatsApp or other message service are also a common and less formal way of keeping in contact with buyers and can be a great way to build a relationship with potential customers. Relationships are key to building export business and simply following up and keeping in contact is a great place to start. MORE INFORMATION Contact Manus Stockdale on (08) 9486 7515 or manus.stockdale@vegetablewa.com.au.

Custom designed and manufactured vegetable grading and packaging solutions. Complete turnkey installations and after sales support.

electric bin tipper & moving floor hopper

potato / onion grading line

carrot / vegetable hydrocooler

stainless steel 5 drop lift roller sizer with electronic size adjustment

vegetable polisher

www.edp.com.au phone: (03) 5820 5337

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email: sales@edp.com.au


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YOUR PRODUCTION

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TO CONTROL STABLE FLY — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Những điều cần biết để khống chế ruồi trâu (stable fly) Ruồi trâu (Stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans), đôi khi còn được gọi là biting fly) là loại côn trùng gây nhiều phiền toái ở Tây Úc, đặc biệt là vùng đồng bằng duyên hải phía Bắc và Nam thành phố Perth, nơi mà loài này đã được công bố là sinh vật gây hại trong luật An ninh sinh học và quản lý nông nghiệp 2007.

33RUỒI trâu (stable fly) là loài sinh vật gây hại được công bố trong luật An ninh sinh học và quản lý nông nghiệp — Biosecurity and Agricultural Management Act 2007.

Loài này cần phải chích vật nuôi và con người hút máu để hoàn thành vòng đời của chúng. Qui định về quản lý loài ruồi này đã được thiết lập trên 14 hạt quản lý (LGAs) để quản lý và giảm thiểu loài này sinh sản. LGAs bao gồm các quận lỵ như Armadale, Cockburn, Joondalup, Kwinana, Rockingham, Swan and Wanneroo và các địa phương như Capel, Chittering, Gingin, Harvey, Kalamunda, Serpentine–Jarrahdale và Murray. Bản cập nhật kế hoạch quản lý ruồi trâu vuuwaf được phát hành vào 9/2019 và được kết hợp với các phương pháp quản lý tăng cường để giảm thiểu và khống chế sinh vật gây hại trên gia súc. Kế hoạch phòng trừ ruồi trâu mới phát hành là kết quả của 6 năm nghiên cứu của Bộ Nông nghiệp. Các biện pháp tăng cường đã được cập nhật như là các kết quả chính của chương trình nghiên cứu này.

Ruồi trâu Ruồi trâu tương đối khó phân biệt. Con trưởng thành hơi nhỏ hơn ruồi nhà nhưng lại lớn hơn ruồi trong rừng, tuy nhiên chúng có yếu tố khác biệt là các chấm đen trên lưng và dưới bụng. Thời điểm ruồi trân sinh sản mạnh là từ tháng 10 đến tháng 4. Sau khi hút máu ruồi cái đẻ khảng 90 trứng trong 4-5 vị trí thích hợp cho chúng như rau cải thối và phân động vật.

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Trong suốt vòng đời một con ruồi cái có thể để 600 trứng và ở nhũng vùng nóng ấm thì chúng sinh sản quanh năm. Cá vị trí ruồi hay đẻ trứng là: • Phân gia súc củ lẩn với rơm rạ • Phần xác bẻ rau cải thối ngoài đồng • Vật liệu rơm rạ lót chuồng lẩn với phân và nước tiểu gia súc • Rau củ thức ăn gia súc dư thừa • Rơn rạ mục, các loại thức ăn gia súc lên men và các bành cỏ mục. Ruồi trâu là loại gây hại trên gia súc tập trung xung quanh các nơi như máng ăn, bãi cỏ, chuồng trại… Trâu bò và ngựa bị ảnh hưởng nặng nhất. Gia súc thường xua đuổi ruồi trâu bằng cách giậm chân liên tục, quẩy đuôi, dúi đầu xuống hai chân trước, đá cát phủ lên chân, than mình. Ngựa thì tìm cách dẩm chết ruồi.

Kế hoạch khống chế ruồi trâu 2019 Kế hoạch khống chế ruồi trâu 2019 thiết lập các biện pháp khống chế ruồi

trâu tại các khu vực công bố dịch hại ruồi trâu ở Tây Úc bao gồm các quận lỵ như Armadale, Cockburn, Joondalup, Kwinana, Rockingham, Swan and Wanneroo và các địa phương như Capel, Chittering, Gingin, Harvey, Kalamunda, Serpentine–Jarrahdale và Murray. Kế hoạch này đang được dịch sang tiếng Việt để gia tăng sự minh bạch và tăng cường sự tiếp thu trong cộng đồng nông gia. Không thể tiêu diệt hoàn toàn ruồi trâu. Tuy nhiên kế hoạch mới này dưới sự nâng cấp các biện pháp quản lý đặt ra mục tiêu khống chế sự sinh sản của chúng. Giảm thiêu chúng sinh sản là biệt pháp thiết yếu để giảm thiểu tác hại và sự lây lan của chúng. Các nghiên cứu của Bộ Nông nghiệp cho thấy rằng ứng dụng các biện pháp được nâng cấp trong kế hoạch mới có thể giúp giảm thiểu đến 95%-99% ruồi so với kết quả 85% của kế hoạch năm 2016 đang được áp dụng.


YOUR PRODUCTION

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TO CONTROL STABLE FLY — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Các thay đổi so với kế hoạch 2016 Theo kế hoạch mới 2019 tất cả diện tích trên các địa phương trong danh sách công bố LGAs đều phải tuân thủ chứ không chỉ riêng diện tích đất nông nghiệp. Nghiên của cũng chỉ ra rằng ruồi trâu cũng được khống chế hiệu quả hơn ở các trang trại trồng rau cải trên đất cát bằng cách lăn nén làm dẽ chặt mặt đất hơn là biện pháp phun thuốc. Bất kỳ phần xác bả rau cải bỏ lại ngoài đồng trong vòng 3 ngày có thể được chôn sâu 200mm bằng máy gạn chôn sỏi (stone burier) hay chôn sâu 300mm bằng máy cày sau đó nén dẽ mặt đất bang ống lăn. Rau quả không sử dụng hay không bán được phải được chôn sâu tối thiểu 100cm.

33NGHIÊN cứu của Bộ Nông nghiejp và phát triển nông thôn - Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development – đã cho thấy rằng chôn vùi xác bả rau cải bằng máy cày sau đó nén dẽ mặt đất bằng ống lăn như trong hình có thể giảm thiểu ruồi đáng kể.

Thức ăn gia súc dư thừa phải được gôm lại trong máng ăn hoặc trên bề mặt cứng, không được bò trực tiếp trên mặt đất. Cỏ, rơm rạ cho gia súc ăn phải được rãi mỏng trên đồng hay phải chứa trong máng ăn. Kế hoạch mới cho phép sử dụng phân chuồng trên đồng cỏ không có tưới với yêu cầu phải rãi đều với khối lượng khô tối đa 10 tấn/ha và cục phân chuồng nhỏ hơn 20mm. Ai có ý định rãi phân chuồng chưa qua xử lý buộc phải thông báo cho chính quyền địa phương thối thiểu 3 ngày làm việc trước khi rãi. Kế hoạch khống chế ruồi trâu mới 2019 bao gồm các biện pháp khòng trừ từ kế hoạch trước đây như là các phương pháp được chấp nhận trong 2 năm. Điều này cho thời gian để chuyển đổi từ biện pháp củ sang biện pháp mới. Dach mục các biện pháp được chấp nhận có trong trang thông tin của bộ Nông nghiệp. Cộng đồng có đóng vai trò trong việc hạn chế môi trường cho ruồi trâu sinh sản bằng cách loại bỏ thức ăn gia súc dư thừa, các loại phân chưa ủ hoai mục kỹ, các đóng rơm rạ và rau cải cho gia súc ăn không còn dùng được nữa.

33RUỒI trâu là sinh vật gây hại nghiêm trọng cho vật nuôi, đặc biệt là trâu bò và ngựa, chúng chích rất đau.

THÊM THÔNG TIN Thoonng tin chi tiết về kế hoạch phòng trừ ruồi trâu mới 2019 có trên trang thông tin www.agric.wa.gov.au/bam/managementplans Nếu muốn thông báo hay góp ý việc thực hiện các biện pháp phòng trừ ruồi trâu xin vui lòng liên hệ Dịch vụ thông tin sâu bệnh hại của Bộ Nông nghiejp và phát triển nông thôn — Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS), (08) 9368 3080 or padis@dpird.wa.gov.au.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

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DELVING INTO FRESHCARE 4.1 — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Trao đổi về tiêu chuẩn Freshcare 4.1 BY JOEL DINSDALE QUALITY ASSURANCE COORDINATOR, VEGETABLESWA

Tiêu chuẩn Frshcare FSQ4 đang trong quá trình nâng cấp yêu cầu tất cả các doanh nghiệp phải theo kịp phiên bản mới trong kỳ kiểm tra đánh giá trang trại bắt đầu kể từ ngày 1/1/2020. Điều này có nghĩa là các doanh nghiệp nào tới hạn kiểm tra đánh giá trang trại vào tháng giêng tới cần phải bắt đầu suy nghĩ về những thay đổi bắt buộc để được duy trì giấy chứng nhận Freshcare. Vậy thì các doanh nghiệp chờ đợi điều gì từ phiên bản Freshcare 4.1? Chắc là không ai thích hợp để quí vị liên hệ tìm hiểu bằng anh Anthony Liêu, nông dân Việt Nam thế hệ thứ hai đang canh tác dây và hoa màu, người đã trực tiếp làm cho doanh nghiệp gia đình anh trở thành doanh nghiệp đầu tiên ở WA đạt được chứng chỉ Freshcare FSQ4.1. Landsdale Strawberry Farm là một trong số mười doanh nghiệp trên toàn quốc đạt được chứng nhận này – đây là con số chỉ tiêu quan trọng khi mà Freshcare yêu cầu phải có được 10 doanh nghiệp hoàn thành đánh giá để đáp ứng yêu cầu của chứng chỉ GFIS – loại chứng chỉ tương đương với các chứng chỉ dựa trên nền tảng GFSI toàn cầu như Global G.A.P, SQF và BRC. Dưới đây là cuộc trao đổi giứ Joel Dinsdale và Anthony Liêu. JD: Xin chúc mừng Anthony đã trở thành doanh nghiệp đầu tiên của tiểu bang đáp ứng được yêu cầu của bộ qui tắt Freshcare 4.1. Xin anh vui lòng cho biết về bản thân và về phạm vi đánh giá (lảnh vực đánh giá và phần cây trồng)? AL: Gia đình tôi đang canh tác dâu, ớt chuông, cà chua và cà tím và chúng tôi đang có chứng chỉ Freshcare và chứng chỉ HARPS.

114

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

JD: Anh nhận xét tiến trành kiểm tra đánh giá thế nào? Nó có khác biệt với cách kiểm tra đánh giá trước đây không?

cũng phải luôn đảm bảo rằng đội ngủ nhân viên hiểu và đáp ứng các yêu cầu về qui trình an toàn thực phẩm của chúng tôi.

AL: Thật ra cũng không khác biệt lắm, ngoại trừ mình phải thật sự quan tâm sâu vào chi tiết. Có một số nguyên tắt căn bản mà mình phải luôn lưu tâm trong suốt mùa vụ để đảm bảo rằng mình luôn tuân thủ với bộ qui tắt mới. Có chứng chỉ HARPS song hành rất là hửu ích để làm cầu nối liên thông từ Freshcare 4.0 và Freshcare 4.1. Nhiều thay đổi trong phiên bản mới đã có trong qui định và không phải thay đổi nào cũng ảnh hưởng đến doanh nghiệp. Vì vậy nó cũng không phải là quá tầm của mình.

JD: Điều gì đã thúc đẩy anh tiến đến COP4.1?

JD: Nó yêu cầu các loại tập huấn nào? AL: không gì cả, bởi vì tôi đã có chứng chỉ tập huấn FSQ trước rồi, tuy nhiên tôi thấy thật hữu ích khi ra cứu kỹ các thay đổi và các tài liệu mới với anh Joel. Điều này giúp thảo luận kỹ các thay đổi tác động thế nào đến hoạt động sản xuất của doanh nghiệp. JD: Thế thì các thay đổi trong bộ qui tắt 4.1 ảnh hưởng thế nào đến hoạt động trồng trọt, đóng thùng và buôn bán sản phẩm? AL: có ảnh hưởng chứ - chúng tôi phải tiến hành huấn luyện và ôn luyện nhiều hơn để đảm bảo đội ngủ nhân công luôn chú trọng đến vấn đề an toàn thực phẩm khi xử lý sản phẩm. Chhusng tôi 33NÔNG gia trồng dâu và hoa màu Anthony Liêu ngoài đồng.

AL: Doanh nghiệp gia đình chúng tôi luôn phấn đấu cung cấp sản phẩm tốt nhất có thể cho thị trường, với tiêu chuẩn chất lượng cao nhất. Chính vì vậy chúng tôi cho rằng sẽ rất tốt khi nâng cấp tiêu chuẩn. Điều nầy cũng giúp chúng tôi nhích gần hơn với tiêu chuẩn chất lượng toàn cầu (GFSI) làm cho chúng tôi tiêm cận với các nhà sản xuất ở Bắc bán cầu. Nâng cấp tiêu chuẩn cũng là cơ hội lớn để tăng cường khâu an toàn thực phẩm cho doanh nghiệp chúng tôi. JD: Có có lời khuyên nào cho nông dân khác đang chuẩn bị thực hiện các thay đổi? AL: Tôi muốn khuyên rằng hảy thực sự quan tâm và thực hiện sớm những thay đổi. Đừng để cho đến khi quá muộn như vậu quí vị sẽ thấy rất khó khan để đáp ứng tất cả các yêu cầu. Tôi khuyên các nông dân nên được phổ biến kỹ về những thay đổi để thật suwh thông hiểu mình cần phải làm gì. Đây là cơ hội rất tốt cho ngành rau cải để tăng cường các thực hành an toàn thực phẩm, vì vậy nông dân nên nhiệt tình tiếp nhận các thay đổi vì chúng sẽ giúp tăng cường khả năng tiếp cận thị trường.


YOUR PRODUCTION Permits

Permits

Current Minor Use Permits can also be searched by specific crop or pest types at https://portal.apvma.gov.au/permits Permit No. Product

Crop

Reason for use

PER88567

Outlook

Bulb Onions

Amaranthus

Expiry date 30-Nov-20

PER11764

Spiroxamine

Snow Peas & Sugar Snap Peas

Powdery Mildew

31-Dec-21

PER11441

Propachlor

Radish, Swede, Turnip

Grass & Broadleaf Weeds

31-Oct-24

PER13147

Lontrel

Cauliflower

Capeweed & Clover

30-Sep-24

PER88171

Biopest Paraffinic Oil

Rockmelon, Honeydew Melon & Zucchini

Aphids & Thrips

31-Jul-20

PER87005

Abamectin

Garlic

Bulb Mite

30-Sep-24

PER81870

Pyganic Organic Insecticide

Olives

Olive Lace Bug

31-Oct-24

PER88066

Emamectin

Celery

Helicoverpa, Lightbrown Apple Moth & Cluster Caterpillar.

31-Aug-24

PER14891

Trifloxystrobin

Beetroot

Alternaria Leaf Spot

30-Sep-29

PER14843

Indoxacarb (Avatar Insecticide)

Celery

Heliothis, Lightbrown Apple Moth, Lucerne Leaf Roller & Vegetable Weevil

30-Sep-29

PER87929

Transform

Tomato

Greenhouse Whitefly

30-Jun-20

PER87918

Pestech Py-Bo

Zucchini

Ants, Aphids, Caterpillars, Earwigs, Leafhoppers, Thrips & Whitefly

30-Apr-22

PER87914

Nufarm Maya Herbicide

Onions

Broadleaf Weeds

31-May-21

PER14142

Ioxynil

Spring Onions, Shallots & Welsh Onions

Broadleaf & Grass Weeds

31-Mar-21

PER87865

Stomp Xtra Herbicide

Sugar Snap Pea

Annual Grasses & Broadleaf Weeds

30-Sep-22

PER14936

Haloxyfop

Adzuki Bean

Grass Weeds

30-Jun-24

PER82104

Custodia

Various Beans

Powdery Mildew

30-Nov-22

PER87773

Devrinol-C 500Wg Herbicide

Brassica Vegetables

Broadleaf & Grass Control

31-Aug-22

PER87754

Folicur

Garlic

Orange Rust

31-Jul-22

PER14703

Tramat 500 Sc Selective Herbicide (Ethofumesate)

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea Only) & Silverbeet

Various Weeds

31-Jul-24

PER84734

Verdict (Haloxyfop)

Onions

Storksbill

31-Dec-24

PER87670

Xentari Wg Bta Biological Insecticide

Brassica Leafy Vegetables

Diamond Back Moth, Cabbage White Butterfly, Helicoverpa & Vegetable Looper

31-Jul-24

PER87631

Coragen Insecticide

Spinach & Silverbeet

Cabbage Leaf Miner

30-Jun-24

PER14479

Propiconazole

Various Vegetable Crops

Various Pests

30-Nov-24

PER87630

Serenade Opti Biofungicide

Brassica Leafy Vegetables

Bacterial Spot

30-Jun-22

PER87619

Entrust Sc Naturalyte

Tomato

Various Thrips

31-Aug-24

PER14505

Pyrimethanil

Snow Peas & Sugar Snap Peas

Grey Mould (Botrytis)

30-Jun-24

PER14432

Pendimethalin

Brussels Sprouts

Grasses & Broadleaf Weeds

30-Jun-24

PER14695

Ridomil Gold 25G (Metalaxyl-M)

Parsnips

Pythium spp. & Phytophthora spp.

30-Jun-24

PER13901

Glyphosate (Shielded Sprayer)

Capsicums, Snow Peas, Sugar Snap Peas

Annual & Perennial Grass & Broadleaf Weeds

30-Jun-24

PER81244

Fluazifop-P-Butyl

Specified Vegetables & Herbs

Annual Grass Weeds

30-Jun-22

PER14457

Alpha-Cypermethrin

Chicory, Leeks, Spring Onions, Shallots

Red-legged Earth Mite, Onion Thrips

30-Jun-24

PER87553

Dupont Fontelis

Hydroponic Cucumbers

Gummy Stem Blight

30-Nov-22

PER87552

Various Herbicides

Garlic

Various Weeds

30-Apr-24

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

115


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.)

116

Permit No. Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER87376

Switch

Garlic

Black Mould

30-Nov-21

PER87276

Applaud

Tomatoes

Bemisia tabaci & Trialeurodes vaporariorum

31-Dec-19

PER87208

Torque

Tomatoes

Two-Spotted Mite

30-Apr-22

PER87200

Starane Advanced Herbicide

Bulb Onion

Weeds

31-Aug-24

PER80219

Apollo Miticide (Clofentezine) Tomatoes (Protected)

Two-Spotted Mite

30-Apr-24

PER14471

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Shallots & Spring Onions

Various Pests

31-May-24

PER14584

Imidacloprid

Brassica Leafy Vegetables

Aphids, Whitefly & Thrips

31-Jan-24

PER81876

Abamectin

Brassica Vegetables, Bulb Vegetables, Fruiting Vegetables

Leaf Miner

30-Apr-24

PER14696

Abamectin

Head Lettuce

Two-Spotted Mite

31-Dec-23

PER87185

Benevia Insecticide

Tomato

Suckling Pests

31-Jul-24

PER87114

Axiom Plus

Garlic

Downy Mildew, Purple Blotch

30-Jun-22

PER87113

Chateau

Garlic

Various Weeds

31-Oct-22

PER14949

Carbendazim

Mushrooms

Dry Bubble, Wet Bubble & Green Mould

28-Feb-21

PER87065

Dimethoate

Melons Including Watermelons (PostHarvest)

Various Fruit Fly Species

28-Feb-24

PER87051

Durivo Insecticide

Various Vegetables

Various Pests

28-Feb-24

PER87015

Lambda- Cyhalothrin

Garlic

Various Pests

31-Aug-22

PER87014

Various Products

Garlic

Annual Grasses & Broadleaf Weeds

28-Feb-24

PER87013

Various Products

Garlic

Various Diseases

28-Feb-24

PER87012

Ioxynil

Garlic (Allium Sativum) (Fresh Market & Seed)

Broadleaf Weeds

30-Sep-21

PER86959

Hydrogen Peroxide (49.5%),

Tomato

Agrobacterium

30-Sep-20

PER86865

Ioxynil

Onions

Annual Broadleaf Weeds

31-Aug-21

PER80210

Pyrimethanil

Protected Tomatoes

Botrytis

30-Jun-23

PER86849

Imazamox, Imazapyr

Faba Beans

Annual Broadleaf & Grass Weeds

30-Apr-22

PER86815

Versys

Tomato

Silverleaf Whitefly

31-Dec-21

PER14352

Metalaxyl-M (Apron Xl 350) & Fludioxonil (Maxim 100)

Broccoli (Seed Treatment)

Damping-Off & Rhizoctonia

31-Jan-24

PER86805

Phosphorous Acid

Rhubarb

Downy Mildew

31-Jan-24

PER86800

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Garlic

Insects

30-Sep-23

PER86799

Tebuconazole, Mancozeb, Metalaxyl, Metalaxyl-M

Garlic

Fungal Diseases

30-Sep-23

PER81131

Prochloraz Present As The Manganese Chloride Complex

Leafy

Open-Head Lettuce

31-Dec-23

PER86751

Various Fungicide

Garlic

Various Disease

30-Sep-23

PER86750

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Garlic

Insects

30-Sep-23

PER86732

Various Herbicides

Garlic

Various Weeds

30-Aug-21

PER86723

Various Herbicides

Garlic

Broadleaf & Grass Weeds

30-Sep-21

PER86665

Fipronil

Carrots

White Fringed Weevil & Symphylids

31-Jan-22

PER80169

Metribuzin

Carrots

Grass & Broadleaf Weeds

30-Apr-24

PER12506

Dimethoate

Eggplant

Queensland Fruit Fly & Mediterranean Fruit Fly

31-Aug-23

PER82039

Bifenthrin

Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage & Cauliflower

Symphyla

30-Sep-23

WA Grower SUMMER 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit No. Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER10918

Imidacloprid

Carrot, Leafy Lettuce, Silverbeet & Spinach

Greenhouse Whitefly & Aphids

31-Dec-23

PER86599

Bifenthrin

Celery

Red-Legged Earthmite

31-Dec-23

PER86551

Pyrethrins

Organic Green Beans

Bean Podborer

30-Apr-24

PER86530

Status Herbicide

Beans

Annual Rye Grass & Winter Grass

31-Aug-21

PER14210

Acramite Miticide

Lettuce

Two-Spotted (Red Spider) Mite

30-Sep-21

Melon Thrips

PER14186

Success Neo (Spinetoram)

Eggplant

PER86449

Paclobutrazol

Potato

30-Sep-21

PER81136

Switch Fungicide

Lettuce

Anthracnose

30-Sep-21

PER80101

Sumitomo Samurai Systemic Insecticide

Fruiting Vegetables, Cucurbits

Cucumber Fruit Fly

30-Sep-23

PER80100

Sumitomo Samurai Systematic Insecticide

Fruiting Vegetables, Excluding Cucurbits

Mediterranean Fruit Fly & Queensland Fruit Fly

30-Sep-23

PER86443

Pirimicarb

Sweet Potato, Spring Onion

Various Aphids

30-Jun-23

PER86428

Serenade Opti

Cucumber

Bacterial Spot

30-Jun-21

PER13607

Spinnaker Herbicide

Adzuki Bean

Weeds

30-Sep-23

PER14959

Haloxyfop

Leafy (Salad) Vegetables, Mizuina, Green Elk

Storksbill

30-Nov-24

PER81609

Imidacloprid

Navy Beans

Silverleaf Whitefly

31-Jan-24

PER14496

Metolachlor

Adzuki Beans & Mung Beans

Certain Annual Grasses & Broadleaf Weeds

31-Mar-24

PER14127

Pendimethalin

Brassica Leafy Vegetables & Rocket

Weeds

31-Aug-23

PER14602

Boscalid, Iprodione & Chlorothalonil

Onion (Bulb & Seed)

Botrytis Neck-Rot

30-Sep-23

PER86245

Veritas Fungicide

Sweet Corn

Maize Rust

31-Dec-23

PER13752

Tebuconazole

Faba Beans & Broad Beans

Cercospora Leaf Spot & Rust

30-Jun-24

PER86221

Clothianidin

Mung Beans, Navy Beans & Soya Beans

Redbanded Shield Bug & Green Vegetable Bug

31-Aug-21

PER81452

Methomyl

Mung Beans

Bean Pod Borer

30-Jun-23

PER10938

Imidacloprid

Snow Peas & Sugar Snap Peas

Greenhouse Whitefly

31-Jan-20

PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 Ec Miticide)

Cucurbit Vegetables, Fruiting Vegetables, Potatoes, Snow & Sugar Snap Peas

Tomato Spider Mite, Two-spotted Mite, Broad Mite, Tomato Russet Mite

30-Sep-23

PER13778

Various Herbicides, Insecticides & Fungicides

Carrot, Onion & Brassica Seed Crops

PER13119

Diazinon

Onions

Onion Thrips

31-Jul-20

PER14473

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb

Leeks, Spring Onions & Shallots

Downy Mildew, Purple Blotch & Botrytis Rots

30-Jun-23

PER10312

Glufosinate (Basta)

Capsicums & Peas

Broadleaf Weeds & Grasses

31-Dec-19

PER14047

Methidathion

Peppers & Eggplant

Rutherglen Bug

31-May-23

PER11127

Nufarm Filan Fungicide

Peppers Celery

Sclerotinia Rot

30-Jun-23

PER13795

Agpro Propazine 500

Carrot Crops

Nightshade, Fat Hen & Wireweed

31-Mar-23

PER85733

Phosphorous Acid

Potato (Solanum tuberosum)

Pink Rot

20-Nov-23

PER14033

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Snow Peas & Sugar Snap Peas

Pasture Webworm, Cutworm, Rutherglen Bug & Thrips

31-May-23

PER82460

Paramite Selective Miticide

Cucurbits, Asian Cucurbits

Two Spotted Mites & Red Spider Mite

31-Jul-23

PER14650

Paramite (Etoxazole)

Melons

Two-Spotted Mite

28-Feb-23

PER10677

Propyzamide

Chicory & Endive

Grass & Broadleef Weeds

30-Apr-23

31-May-22

30-Jun-23

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

117


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.)

118

Permit No. Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER13902

Phorate

Sweet Potatoes

Aphids, Thrips, Jassids & Organophosphate Susceptible TwoSpotted Mite & Wireworm.

31-Mar-23

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Brassica Leafy Vegetables, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cauliflower, Chicory, Endive, Radicchio, Rocket, Carrots & Parsnip

Various Fungal Diseases

31-Mar-22

PER14046

Mancozeb

Cucumbers

Grey Mould

31-Mar-23

PER14051

Iprodione

Broccoli Seed Treatment

Rhizoctinia

31-Mar-23

PER14036

Bupirimate

Eggplant

Powdery Mildew

28-Feb-23

PER85402

Flumioxazin

Carrot For Seed Production Only

Cleavers

30-Jun-23

PER85363

Fulfill Insecticide

Faba Beans

Green Peach Aphid & Faba Bean Aphid

31-Aug-21

PER85352

Pendimethalin

Peas

Grass & Broad-Leaved Weeds

30-Jun-20

PER85291

Prosulfocarb

Carrot For Seed Production Only

Annual Ryegrass

31-Mar-23

PER85232

Tau-Fluvalinate

Carrot For Seed Production Only

Rutherglen Bug

30-Sep-23

PER85163

Pyriproxyfen

Cropping Areas: Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts, Herbs & Spices

Red Imported Fire Ant

30-Apr-21

PER85152

Pirimicarb

Adzuki Bean, Mung Bean & Soybean

Cowpea Aphid & Soyabean Aphid

31-Jul-23

PER85127

Phosphorous Acid

Processing Tomatoes

Phytophthora Root Rot

31-Mar-23

PER85076

Peratec Plus Fungicide

Tomatoes

Fusarium Wilt

28-Feb-21

PER85003

Ranman 400 Sc Fungicide

Spinach & Silverbeet

Pythium Damping Off

28-Feb-23

PER13653

Maldison

Leeks, Spring Onions & Shallots

Onion Thrips

28-Feb-23

PER84955

Iprodione

Green Beans, Carrots, Spinach & Silverbeet

Sclerotinia, Black Rot & Grey Mould

28-Feb-23

PER14212

Imidacloprid

Rhubarb

Aphids

31-Dec-22

PER14773

Basagran (BentazoneSodium)

Onions

Broadleaf Weeds

31-Jan-23

PER13696

Trifluralin

Parsnips

Wintergrass

31-Mar-23

PER84890

Pyriproxfen

Beans

Silverleaf Whitefly

31-May-21

PER84878

Switch Fungicide

Protected & Field Grown Capsicum

Botrytis & Sclerotinia

30-Nov-22

PER12221

Petroleum Oil

Specified Vegetable Crops

Specified Insect Pests

30-Nov-22

PER84808

Ethofumesate (Tramat)

Onions

Broadleaf & Grass Weeds

28-Feb-23

PER84805

Cyantraniliprole

Fruiting Vegetables, Root & Tuber Vegetables

Tomato Potato Psyllid

31-Dec-22

PER84757

Spinetoram

Fruiting Vegetables Other Than Cucurbits & Root & Tuber Vegetables

Tomato Potato Psyllid

30-Nov-20

PER84743

Sulfloxaflor

Fruiting Vegetables

Tomato Potato Psyllid

31-Oct-22

PER80282

Alpha-Cypermethrin

Onions

Onion Thrips

30-Nov-20

PER84708

Agri-Fos 600 Systemic Fungicide

Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas)

Pythium Root Rots & Phytophthora Root Rots (Suppression Only)

31-Aug-22

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Brassica Leafy Vegetables, Leafy Lettuce & Other Leafy Vegetables

Downy Mildew & Other Diseases

31-Dec-22

PER84531

Methoxyfenozide

Sweet Corn

Lepidopteran Pests

31-Oct-20

PER7909

Pyrimethanil Fungicide

Cucumber

Botrytis Rot

30-Sep-22

PER12565

Scala Fungicide

Capsicum & Lettuce (Protected Crops Only)

Botrytis Rots

30-Sep-22

PER13695

Ecocarb Fungicide

Various Vegetables

Powdery Mildew

30-Sep-20

WA Grower SUMMER 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit No. Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER13698

Phosphorous

Lettuce (Leaf+Hydro), Parsley, Coriander Fennel & Bulb (Allium) Vegetables

Downy Mildew

30-Sep-22

PER84261

Admiral Insect Growth Regulator (Pyriproxyfen)

Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage & Cauliflower

Silverleaf Whitefly

31-Oct-20

PER14536

Abamectin

Sweet Corn, Chillies, Paprika, Spring Onions & Shallots

Two-Spotted Mite

31-Dec-23

PER84249

Various

Potato

Tomato Potato Psyllid

31-Jul-20

PER84245

Movento 240 Sc

Potato, Sweet Potato, Tomato, Capsicum, Chilli, Peppers, Eggplant

Tomato Potato Psyllid

28-Feb-20

PER12172

Pestigas

Mushrooms

Mushroom Flies

30-Sep-22

PER84142

Fontelis Fungicide

Protected Hydroponic Tomatoes

Powdery Mildew

31-Aug-22

PER14604

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Garlic

Selected Insect Pests

31-Mar-22

PER11935

Triadimenol

Parsnips, Radish, Swede & Turnip

Powdery Mildew

30-Jun-22

PER14431

Rizolex Liquid

Lettuce

Bottom Rot

30-Jun-22

PER14184

Phosphorous (Phosphonic) Acid

Beetroot, Carrot, Parsnip & Brassica Leafy Vegetables

Damping Off & Downy Mildew

30-Jun-22

PER13626

Metolachlor

Spinach, Silverbeet, Spring Onions, Shallots, Green Beans & Navy Beans

Various Broadleaf & Grass Weeds.

30-Jun-22

PER14430

Azoxystrobin (Amistar 250 Sc)

Lettuce

Bottom Rot

30-Jun-22

PER14318

Metalaxyl-M

Lettuce

Damping Off

30-Sep-22

PER13322

Success Neo (Spinetoram)

Specified Leafy Vegetables

Potato Moth

31-May-22

PER83765

Maxim Xl

Spinach & Silverbeet

Damping Off

30-Sep-20

PER13496

Linuron

Celery

Range Of Weeds

30-Apr-22

PER14470

Mancozeb & Dimethomorph

Snow Peas

Downy Mildew

30-Apr-22

PER13088

Success Neo Insecticide (Spinetoram)

Specified Root Vegetables, Specified Alliums & Celeriac

Various Insect Pests

31-Mar-22

PER13154

Dual Gold Herbicide

Brassica Leafy Vegetables

Various Broadleaf & Grass Weeds

31-Mar-22

PER13114

Prometryn

Celeriac

Grass Weeds Listed On Label

31-Mar-22

PER14351

Dc-Tron Plus

Lettuce

Various Bugs

31-Mar-21

PER13441

Ambush Emulsifiable Concentrate Insecticide

Rhubarb

Green Peach Aphid, Green Looper, Light Brown Apple Moth & Budworms

31-Mar-27

PER13444

Propiconazole

Radishes

Cercospora

31-May-22

PER83277

Iprodione

Garlic

Botrytis

31-Jul-21

PER83203

Fipronil (Regent 200 Sc)

Celery & Feild Lettuce

Western Flower Thrips, Onion Thrips

13-Mar-22

PER13153

Regent 200 Sc

Sweet Potato

White Fringed Weevil & Wireworm

31-Dec-21

PER13300

Abamectin

Rhubarb

Broad Mite

31-Dec-21

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

119


What's on

what’s on... Upcoming important events!

2020 Freshcare training

FoodEX Japan

Food and Hotel Asia Singapore

WHEN Every month WHERE West Perth Office Run every month in the West Perth office, this training commences at 9am and goes through the entire Freshcare certification.

WHEN March 10 to 13, 2020 WHERE Makuhari Messe, Japan FOODEX JAPAN is the Asia's largest exhibition dedicated on food and drink across Japan and the whole world.

WHEN March 31 to April 3 2020 WHERE Singapore FHA-Food & Beverage is Asia’s largest food & drinks trade event that brings together the global food and hospitality community.

For more details contact Joel Dinsdale (joel. dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au) or see the Events page on the website www.vegetableswa. com.au/events

Seasonal Worker Soccer Competition WHEN Sunday January 26, 2020 WHERE Manjimup Help the South West seasonal workers celebrate Australia Day with a round robin soccer tournament. Teams will be comprised of workers from farms in the region. For more details contact Melissa Denning at melissa.denning@vegetableswa.com.au

For more details visit www.jma.or.jp/foodex/en

Syngenta 2020 Australian Melon Conference & Field Day WHEN Monday, March 30, 2020 WHERE Pan Pacific Perth, 207 Adelaide Terrace, Perth, WA 6000 The event will feature field trials of the latest melon varieties. This is a wonderful opportunity to learn and socialise with growers and industry people. Don't miss it! For more details visit www.eventbrite. com.au/e/syngenta-2020-australian-melonconference-field-day-tickets-69389316313

For more details visit www.fhafnb.com

Hort Connections 2020 WHEN June 15-17, 2020 WHERE Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre AUSVEG and PMA Australia-New Zealand Limited (PMA A-NZ) have again united to deliver the joint industry conference and Trade Show, Hort Connections 2020. Hort Connections 2020 will be held at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre 15-17 June 2020. For more details: t: (03) 9882 0277 e: info@hortconnections.com.au

WA Grower advertiser contacts Name

Website/Email

Address

Contact name

Bon Electrics

www.bon-electrics.com.au

Lot 4, Bullsbrook Road, Bullsbrook WA 6084

Kaela Bonomi

BOYA Equipment

www.boyaequip.com.au

2 Prestige Parade, Wangara WA 6065 Australia

Contact no. (08) 9571 1314 (08) 9302 2006

Corteva edp australia pty ltd www.edp.com.au

120

31-37 OBrien Street, Mooroopna VIC 3269

Mick Schirmer

0437 252 122

HM Clause

www.hmclause.com

177 Templestowe Road, Lower Templestowe 3107 Victoria

Carol Hitchins

(03) 8850 5400

Landmark

www.landmarkharcourts.com.au

1a Lily King Place, Gingin WA 6503

Madec

www.harvesttrail.gov.au

MMJ

www.mmj.com.au

Rivulis

www.Rivulis.com.au

Signet

www.signet.net.au

WA Crates

service@wacrates.com.au

Crate Yard, Market City

(08) 9456 4092

WA Recycling

www.warecycling.com.au

1/219 Midland Rd, Hazelmere WA 6055

(08) 9250 1122

WA Grower SUMMER 2019

0429104760 1800 062 332

Level 6, 12 St Georges Terrace, Perth WA 6000 1800 558 009 Fiona

0411 427 220


Unlocking the true power of water and electrical technology for WA growers. At BON, we’ve been working across the unique WA horticultural landscape for over 30 years with growers in every corner of the state. As a family owned and run business, we take a proactive approach to identify and solve your electrical, water and refrigeration needs. We can bring your vision to life through the design and install of new infrastructure, partnering with you along the way to keep things running as they should. We pride ourselves on doing the right thing by our customers, providing you with end-to-end solutions through dependable service.

Pictured in the photo, left to right: Brandon Southern (Project Manager), Frank Bonomi (Company Director), Ben Bonomi (Technical Director).

Electrical Back Up Power Solutions | Packing Floor Custom Design Automation | Horticultural Climate Control General Electrical Maintenance | Programmable Logic Control Systems | Energy Efficient Lighting Solutions Energy Harvesting Solutions | Refrigeration Systems and Solutions

Water Comprehensive Irrigation System Solutions | Pump Systems and Associated Controls | Filtration Systems and Solutions | Automated Fertigation and Water Control | Maintenance of your entire water supply system Water Measurement Technologies

“Over the past 20 years BON Electrics have been our electrical contractor of choice. We have worked with them on numerous projects and they continually support our business with ongoing maintenance. We recommend BON Electrics without hesitation, they’re efficient, knowledgeable and consistently deliver the high quality of work required by WA Corn Growers.” - Jim Trandos, Trandos Farms

If you’re looking for a partner with knowledge and experience in the WA horticulture industry, book your free consultation with BON today.

www.bon.com.au


“All I’ve known is growing veggies and onions. Our customers know they can depend on our quality. We’ve been using Zorvec® Enicade® and we’ve had no disease pressure at all. It’s part of a crop protection strategy that ensures we can deliver, year after year.” Darren Rathjen 5th Generation Farmer and Onion Grower

Watch the video at ZorvecOnions.corteva.com.au

GROWING REPUTATIONS. Zorvec® Enicade® provides unmatched consistency and control of Downy Mildew to achieve a better crop, even under challenging environmental conditions. Watch Darren’s story, find useful resources and hear from Australian onion growers about how Zorvec Enicade’s unique mode of action is providing proven results that help grow their reputations for consistent, quality produce. Visit ZorvecOnions.corteva.com.au

20

35 grams

Rainfast in 20mins

Systemic Protection

Unique Mode Of Action

Long-lasting Optimal Control Active Ingredient Per Hectare

Contact your Corteva Agriscience™ representative or call 1800 700 096. ®

, ™ Trademarks of DuPont, Dow AgroSciences and Pioneer and affiliated companies or their respective owners. FR8283j

Profile for vegetablesWA

WA Grower Magazine Summer 2019/2020  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

WA Grower Magazine Summer 2019/2020  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

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