Page 1

VOL. 52 NO 4. SUMMER 2017 $25.00 (inc GST)

wa

grower WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948

Hort Code of Conduct & HARPS

Understanding your co$ts can lead to better business

Act now!

TPP update: Quarantine zone

This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by vegetablesWA together with: • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest

APC-VPC APC-PPC


UNLOCK FARM POTENTIAL A unique technology that puts 5 select species of beneficial bacteria back into depleted soil to‌

Ameliorate disease-affected soil Improve yields and crop grades Unlock nutrients for plant use Reduce impacts of soil-borne pests

Available in granule and liquid blend

GROWISE.COM.AU

Peter 0481 573 653 John 0411 086 292


VOL. 52 NO 4. SUMMER 2017

45

WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948

inside Your vegetablesWA magazine

14 YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

3

46

22 YOUR INDUSTRY

41

YOUR BUSINESS

81

vegetablesWA CEO’s Report

4

Tomato potato psyllid surveillance

42

Horticulture benchmarking

New staff at vegetablesWA

5

Precision systems technology

44

Benchmarking 84

vegetablesWA President’s Report

6

Seed potato market opportunities

46

New ACCC online tool

85

Potato Growers President’s Report

7

Tomato potato psyllid management

48

Silica dust cancer risk

86

Grower Group Tour and Summit

8

Mental health

50

Horticulture Code of Conduct

88

WA Potatoes Marketing Update

10

Taste of the Gascoyne

52

A guide for business

90

Leadership Program 2018

54

Information for traders

93

Wanneroo Agricultural Show

56

Syngenta Growth Award

57

Euro Trip

58

Water efficiency & productivity

62

Industry Extension Officer update

64

Seed Potato Mission to Egypt

66

Agrimaster case study

68

Working with fertilisers

70

YOUR PRODUCTION

13

Tomato potato psyllid

14

TPP Quarantine Area Notice FAQs

18

US stable fly expert in WA

22

Dickeya dianthicola management

24

Soilborne disease

26

Cucurbit virus disease research

28

Machinery spreading metham sodium 32 Responsible chemical disposal

34

Permits 113 TOOL TIME Using the Agrilaser

37 38

Refractometer 40

POMEWEST

73

Executive Manager’s Report

74

National systems approach project

76

Aussie Apples in schools

78

Aussie Apples at Perth Royal Show

80

YOUR MARKET

82

95

Aussies are making friends with salad 96 Export success: Odeum Farms

98

Asia Fruit Logistica 2017

99

Shoppers seek fresh, local produce 100 HARPS

102

Country of origin food labelling

104

Potential markets for WA fruits

106

VIETNAMESE TRANSLATIONS

109

WHAT'S ON...

120

WA WAGrower GrowerSUMMER SPRING 2017

1


contacts vegetablesWA

Management Committees

702-704 Murray Street, West Perth WA 6005 t: (08) 9486 7515 e: office@vegetableswa.com.au

Vegetable Growers Association

Chief Executive Officer John Shannon m: 0488 111 526 e: john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au Operations Manager Rebecca Blackman t: (08) 9486 7515 e: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au Main cover image: Paul, Crystal and Benjamin Glavocich, Glavocich Produce

Vietnamese Industry Extension Officer Truyen Vo m: 0457 457 559 e: truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au

Published by vegetablesWA

Industry Extension Officer Sam Grubisa m: 0427 373 037 e: sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au

This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by: • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • vegetablesWA • Pomewest

© 2017 All articles and other material published in this magazine is vegetablesWA copyright (unless otherwise stated) and may not be reproduced in part or full without the written permission of the authors and publisher. DISCLAIMER: vegetablesWA make no representations and expressly disclaims all warranties (to the extent permitted by law) about the accuracy, completeness, or currency of information in WA Grower. Reliance on any information provided by vegetablesWA is entirely at your own risk. vegetablesWA is not responsible for, and will not be liable for, any loss, damage, claim, expense, cost (including legal costs) or other liability arising in any way, including from any vegetablesWA or other person’s negligence or otherwise from your use or non-use of WA Grower, or from reliance on information contained in the material or that vegetablesWA provide to you by any other means.

2

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Benchmark Lead Bryn Edwards m: 0417 409 821 e: bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au Market Development Manager Claire McClelland m: 0477 477 044 e: claire.mcclelland@vegetableswa.com.au Quality Assurance Coordinator Joel Dinsdale m: 0417 857 675 e: joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au Finance & Administration Officer Christina Ford t: (08) 9486 7515 e: christina.ford@vegetableswa.com.au Life Members A.J. Anderson*, D.J. Arbuckle, J. Arbuckle Snr*, J.H. Arbuckle* (M.B.E.J.P), H.R. Ashby*, S. Calameri, A. Harris*, A. Ingrilli, G. Kiriros*, R.G. Leach*, F. Natoli, S. Sawle*, R.M. Schultz, C.P. Stevens, W.R. Stevens* (M.B.E.J.P) and J. Turley. * Deceased

President

Dan Kuzmicich m: 0408 910 761

Vice President

Maurice Grubisa m: 0413 050 182

Committee

M. Dobra L. East P. Ivankovich A. Natoli B. Nguyen D. Nguyen P. Shain

m: 0417 174 110 m: 0419 047 371 m: 0428 919 211 t: (08) 9405 4817 m: 0418 939 982 t: (08) 9941 8376 m: 0419 041 045

Carnarvon

Metro North

Gingin Manjimup Myalup Metro North Geraldton Carnarvon Carnarvon

Potato Growers Association President

Vaughan Carter m: 0417 092 505

Vice President

Daniel Omodei m: 0427 761 121

Treasurer

Mia Rose m: 0409 112 245

Committee

C. Ayres G. Bendotti R. Humfrey D. Terrigno

Busselton

Pemberton

Myalup

m: 0428 451 014 Albany m: 0427 569 903 Pemberton m: 0427 148 832 Gingin/Dandaragan m: 0417 771 333 Manjimup

Advertising For information on WA Grower advertising rates and sizing please go to: www.vegetableswa.com.au/wa-growersmagazine and click on the download media kit link.


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

your

industry associations WA Grower SUMMER 2017

3


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

CEO’s Report

A

Grower tours

Sativa Farms and Loose Leaf Lettuce Company I’d encourage growers to read up on the articles about our new benchmarking program with Bryn Edwards and Planfarm. The growers who have participated are already saying that in analysing the data it’s given them some new ideas on how to improve their business.

BY JOHN SHANNON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

bout 90 vegetable growers and other stakeholders recently joined us for the third vegetablesWA Industry Summit funded by Hort Innovation and the APC-VPC.

Topics included precision agriculture technologies being implemented for the first time in vegetable production; opportunities for value adding; benchmarking; and biosecurity. It was particularly good to get Jenny Franceschi’s insights on value adding in the week that she was awarded the Telstra WA Businesswoman of the Year award — it’s great to have someone in horticulture be recognised in this kind of way. This event was also supported by a successful grower tour which saw 35 people seeing varying parts of the Dobra family’s Sativa Farms and Loose Leaf Lettuce Company; and an export fundamentals workshop held in association with AUSVEG attended by seven growers the previous day.

4

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Many growers are being approached by wholesalers to sign a new Horticulture Produce Agreement due to the new Horticulture Code of Conduct.

Growers should be very careful to understand the terms being proposed and seek independent legal advice before signing.

33THE successful grower tour saw 35 people seeing varying parts of the Dobra family’s Sativa Farms and Loose Leaf Lettuce Company.

These special events have been really useful to help growers to connect and learn new things in addition to the Hort Code workshops and vegetablesWA roadshows we’ve held across all the regions. We’re already planning a number of new activities for 2018 for growers to get involved in. I’m really pleased with our recent recruitment of Joel Dinsdale in our new QA Coordinator role. As we move towards a HARPS world and increased demands from retailers for ethical audits, QA will become ever more important.

vegetablesWA has provided the contact details of two law firms on page 89 with previous experience with the Code if required. Despite successes, certainly 2017 will be a year that most growers will remember for all the wrong reasons given our Tomato Potato Psyllid experience. I hope growers can take time with family over Christmas to focus on our blessings and plan for a much more prosperous 2018. Best wishes from the vegetablesWA team this Christmas season. MORE INFORMATION John Shannon, phone 0488 111 526 or email john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

New staff

W

e have the pleasure of welcoming Joel Dinsdale and Christina Ford to vegetablesWA.

Joel Dinsdale vegetablesWA has secured Joel Dinsdale in the role of Quality Assurance Coordinator. This role will enable growers to access assistance with implementing their on-farm QA programs.

This is a free service provided through funding from the APCVPC (your fee for service). This role will enable growers to access assistance with implementing their on-farm QA programs.

He has supported growers in the Quality Assurance domain since 2013 while working for the Potato Marketing Corporation (PMC) of Western Australia. Joel completed training in Freshcare Food Safety and Quality Edition 4 (FSQ4) along with Freshcare Environmental Edition 3 and is an approved FSQ4 trainer. Joel is excited to assist growers to ensure that they are implementing a Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) approved food safety program that ensures that growers are ready to meet supplier/retailer requirements.

Christina Ford vegetablesWA has hired Christina Ford as a Finance & Administration Officer.

• Assist with Corrective Action Request (CAR) & Maximum Residue Limits (MRL)

This role will enable Rebecca to undertake the Operations Manager role and focus on the business. Christina comes from the oil and gas industry and is organised and motivated and we look forward to having her on the team.

• Provide pre-audit checks for vegetable growers

MORE INFORMATION

The Quality Assurance services on offer are:

• Deliver extension activities/workshops in all growing regions Joel has had a range of roles in the agriculture sector since graduating from Curtin University with a BSc (Applied Science) Viticulture and Oenology.

Joel can be contacted on 0417 857 675 or joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au Christina can be contacted on (08) 9486 7515 or christina.ford@vegetableswa.com.au

PLEASE NOTE: WE HAVE MOVED... JUST AROUND THE CORNER 702-704 Murray Street West Perth WA 6005 t: (08) 9486 7515 e: office@vegetableswa.com.au

rful akeholders a wonwdeyear. st nd a s er ow gr r We wish all ofndoulook forward to a prosperous ne festive season a The office will be closed from 22nd December and re-open on 2nd January 2018.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

5


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

President’s Report BY DAN KUZMICICH PRESIDENT, VEGETABLESWA

T

he harvest season up North is drawing to a close, it has been a disappointing one for most growers up here. Prices have been down on previous years. Across the board for most product lines, about 30% more vegetables produced were grown in the Gascoyne Region due to the roll on effect from the situation we all have had with Tomato Potato Psyllid

(TPP) early on this year in February. This created uncertainty with growers on their planting programs all over the state, which created diverse product planting programs and created an over supply on the local market and trade to the eastern states was put on hold. This has had a big impact on the grower’s bottom line, growers to their credit were prompt in adapting the new process to manage this situation and eventually open trade to the eastern states. All growers should be aware of the Horticulture Code of Conduct which will be in full effect by April 2018. John Shannon and the vegetablesWA team have been doing roadshows to the major growing regions in WA to bring awareness to the importance of understanding growers obligations. vegetablesWA has done a

lot of research in identifying potential pit falls for growers entering into terms of trade agreements with wholesalers, I urge all growers that have any concerns in this matter to contact vegetablesWA on (08) 9486 7515. As the harvest season draws to a close up North and it begins in the south of the state I would like to wish all growers and their families a very merry Christmas and a safe and prosperous New Year. As growers we have had a challenging year and a well-deserved break is needed.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank vegetablesWA Committee of Management for their ongoing support this year, their efforts, forward thinking and good direction to building skilled base staff in these past 12 months. Thanks to John, Rebecca and the rest of the vegetablesWA staff who have worked very well as a team this year in assisting growers in this challenging past 12 months. MORE INFORMATION Contact Dan Kuzmicich on 0408 910 761 or damir.kuzmicich@bigpond.com

AgVet Chemical Accreditation Training ONLINE at your pace and place Support your QA program and WHS requirements with Nationally recognised Units of Competence: AHCCHM303 – Prepare and apply chemicals / AHCCHM304 – Transport and store chemicals

ation ical accredit ed a chem ts of requiremen Has complet t meets the program tha Units of Competence. l na tio na these chemicals e and apply 303 – Prepar re chemicals AHCCHM ort and sto 304 – Transp AHCCHM

Convenient & flexible – do it wherever you have internet access, at times that suit you, and in chunks that suit you. Relevant – Tailor your learning experience by choosing topics that relate to your work. Do it now – no need to wait for a course near you and no need to travel. We support & understand you – we are a rural business & will support you through your course. Online & practical assessments – they relate to what you do.

Find out more, enrol or make an enquiry at: www.smithandgeorg.com.au or simply ring us on 1800 991 985 RTO 40075

6

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Potato Growers

President’s Report

A

BY VAUGHAN CARTER PRESIDENT, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

year has passed quickly and plenty has happened in that time. Same time last year we had negotiated and delivered the Grower Adjustment Payments (GAP) which was a long drawn out process.

Growers have since diversified and are doing different forms of agriculture from avocados to livestock to limes or further invested in our potato industry. Potato production still goes on and we are currently seeing the effects of deregulation and biosecurity issues. There has definitely been a heavy impact on our bottom line. It’s no secret that we were going to see a depressed market some degree but not to the extent currently. Potato Growers Association (PGA) has had its AGM on 13th October and nominations were required for Albany, Busselton/ Marybrook and Dandaragan Zones. I would like to congratulate Colin Ayres (Albany) and Roy Humphries (Dandaragan) for the re-election I appreciate the commitment from these individuals as well as our other Committee of Management members. I understand how busy they are with their own businesses, yet they still find time to lead the industry. The Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) outbreak is still creating a severe headache for WA growers with export trade to the eastern seaboard being restricted. I realise that I’m sounding like a broken record in saying that the industry is working tirelessly to create a reversal but it is very evident that it is happening. I look forward to the moment when we can say that the trade can resume with our other states.

33HORT Innovation is currently investigating market access with South Korea.

The Committee of Management have engaged with Mike Davies from Department of Primary Industries & Regional Development (DPIRD) in relation to our industry seed scheme. The discussion is in relation to Potato Deed of Distribution (PDD), TPP and CLso and the testing protocols that are to be put in place for potato seed certification. This has not been finalised but it is very close and growers will be informed as soon as it is documented.

Having spoken to a few merchants, potato sales seems to be steady. Myalup is currently supplying the market and Bussselton is close to coming on line. What is on the shop shelf is variable and consumers are seeing some sprouting which indicates that deliveries have been slow and stock is showing its age. This reflects the market space.

To finish I would like to congratulate growers for their patience in relation to the PDD saga. What I have witnessed from this is a very tight knit industry that support PGA to try and get the best outcome for all. Everyone will now Constitution for have signed and received the Potatoes WA distribution from Government and this now closes the door on all previous Potato Marketing Corporation (PMC) related issues for the final time.

PGA are in the process of finishing a new constitution for Potatoes WA. We are currently working with Strickland Park who specialise in Constitutional documents and it is close to finalisation.

On the overseas export front there is continued progress. Meetings were held in Manjimup on 28th October and a representative group will travel to Egypt to continue with this exciting prospect. Hort Innovation is currently investigating market access with South Korea so watch this space, hopefully a good outcome can come from these preliminary investigations.

NEW

Wishing everyone a safe and festive season and a Merry Christmas. MORE INFORMATION To contact Vaughan call 0417 092 505 or email marybrook438@gmail.com

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

7


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

Grower Group Tour and Summit

T

The group set off from Crown at 7:30am and made their way to Sativa Farm in Cullalla. The host Kevan Dobra met the group at the gate and the field tour began with the necessary boot bleach bath for biosecurity and a demonstration of Kevan’s crew harvesting baby leaf. Next there was a short walk, with a greeting from Farm Manager Jase Dobra, where Kevan showed off the farms overhead irrigation system. Lastly, the group got to get up close and personal with the 3-in-1 smudger, an impressive innovation in farm machinery. With just a single pass this machine forms three “ready for planting” beds; with tyre tracks and tops so flat they look like tables…job one. It seals the top of the beds so there is no need for rolling…job two. Its third and final job is the most impressive of all…it Methams. Yes, one of the most unpleasant

8

The Industry Summit was held at the Crown Perth attended by over 90 people (it was standing room only for vegetablesWA staff!).

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

he Grower Development Program was a success again this year with the tour being held at Sativa Farm and Loose Leaf Lettuce Company in Gingin with 24 growers and 12 industry personnel attending.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Sativa Farm and Loose Leaf Lettuce Company tours

The presentations kicked off with Allan McKay and Rachel Lancaster talking about the Hort Innovation Precision Ag project VG16009 and the sites at Centrewest and Capel Farms. jobs on a Western Australian farm is made almost easy with this innovation. Then the group headed off to Loose Leaf Lettuce Company in Lennard Brooke where the group went for a processing plant tour. The history of the company and business advice was handed out by Maureen Dobra, with an introduction to some of the people who keep the baby leaf wheels turning. There was a tour of the facility followed by a Q&A session.

Rachel was able to fill in the audience on the use of Electromagnetic (EM) data to map drainage. You can read further about the project on page 44 of this issue. Then 2017 Telstra WA Business Woman of the Year, Jennie Franceschi provided the group with the details on Value Adding and using High Pressure Processing (HPP) technology. Jennie and her team have launched a range of products such as Born Pure, Truu & Avovita. There was a short break and


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Dr Jessica Lye from AUSVEG, finalised the day with a presentation on Biosecurity. A TPP update from Rohan Prince, DPIRD discussed the upcoming surveillance which kicks into gear over Summer.

then Bryn Edwards, vegetablesWA and Planfarm’s Paul Omodei Jnr spoke of the business advantages of Benchmarking and officially announced the launch of the initiative with funding from the Department of Primary Industries & Regional Development (DPIRD). You can read more about benchmarking on page 84 of this issue.

The Industry Summit ended with networking, drinks and canapes. This was then followed by the Grower Group being able to network further to cement the new relationships they had made during the day which was sponsored by Rural Bank and Bendigo Bank at The Waiting Room (TWR). We will be running a similar program next year and we hope you can join us on the 26th October 2018. MORE INFORMATION For more information or to make a suggestion on next years topic contact Rebecca Blackman, (08) 9486 7515 or Rebecca.blackman@ vegetableswa.com.au

Flow Rate: 0.7, 1.1, 1.4, 1.8, 2.5 L/Hr at 1bar Emitter Spacing: 10cm, 15cm, 20cm, 25cm, 30cm, 40cm, etc. Thickness: 200 micron(8mil), 250 micron(10mil), etc.

2 1 / 1 1 0 I N S P I R AT I O N D R I V E , W ANGARA, 6 0 6 5 WA , A USTRALIA +61 8 9303 9638 I N F O @ PA L I Z . C O M . A U PA L I Z . C O M . A U P A L I Z A G R I C U LT U R E

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

9


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

WA POTATOES U g n i p t e d k a r te a M

7

W aln ut

Br ea d

new recipe videos

33SEVEN new recipe videos are targeting those looking for healthier options with whole food ingredients.

33P

d an il ve O O, AT OT

The push to put WA grown, fresh potatoes on peoples plates every day is continuing at full pace with the Todatoes campaign being delivered by Breadbox Marketing & PR. 10

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Perth Royal Show stand

33TODATOES Recipe Handbook.

Todatoes Recipe Handbook

The campaign has so far delivered excellent visibility through TV and social media channels. Additionally, the WA Potatoes organisation has continued to achieve strong media presence through targeted PR around the new campaign launch, Seed for Schools and the Perth Royal Show. Breadbox Marketing & PR Director Emma Potter says the team are pleased that the reach of the Todatoes’ campaign has far exceeded any initial campaign expectations at a rate of more than 70–80% on TV and beyond.

“The campaign has hit its audience at a frequency of at least seven times through the various touchpoints — TV, social, digital and outdoor,” says Emma. “Anecdotally, the campaign has caused a stir, proving to be positively received and the message retained. We can’t wait to hear if our long-term objective of inspiring our audience to increase the frequency that they eat potatoes will be reached, but we know we are well on our way”.

Modern Recipe Content In response to consumers insatiable appetite for recipe and video content on social media, Breadbox has created a suite of seven new recipe videos (or GIFS). The delicious and simple recipes are tuned into the modern consumer — targeting those looking for healthier options with whole food ingredients. The social media GIFS went live on October 6, 2017 and were published across Facebook and Instagram. The recipes were also shared on the Todatoes website.

Following on from the successful Todatoes TV campaign, a recipe booklet has been created with a delicious potato recipe for each day of the week. The cookbooks will be used at events to give consumers more encouragement to eat potatoes every day. The goal is to eventually be able to provide these booklets to retailers to inspire consumers at the point of purchase.

Perth Royal Show WA Potatoes were pleased to be able to work with the Royal Agricultural Society to once again engage with consumers at the Perth Royal Show this September. The WA Potatoes stand promoted the Todatoes campaign with a video playing the TV commercials and presenting the new recipe GIFS, the stand also included a fun potato digging area for kids, stickers and recipe booklet giveaway as well as a WA Potatoes branded reusable shopping bag giveaway. Additionally, to attract more families to visit, the stand did a daily competition offering the chance to win a family pass to Adventure World. In the lead up to the show and during the show, Breadbox supported the activity with extensive promotion across social media platforms, including a “flat lay” competition that engaged 20,482 people.

More numbers: • 2,500 competition entries over the week (around 300 per day) • 1,500 reusable bags were given away (all of them) • 1,800 recipe booklets were handed out • 2,070 stickers were given to the kids doing the potato dig

Seed for Schools

The popular Seed for Schools Program relaunched during the Perth Royal Show to target parents of school children and encourage them to register their school. The state-wide initiative, run by WA Potatoes, encourages kids to get their hands dirty and into the garden — highlighting the importance of healthy food, and supporting local farms. The program provides schools with seed potatoes, educational resources for teachers to use in classrooms, as well as a monthly e-newsletter with gardening tips and stories of progress from participating schools. Registrations are expected to reach over 400 schools by the time they close in January 2018.

Register NOW

You can register on our website www.todatoes.com.au or contact Morena Perdec, Finance and Administration Manager P: (08) 9481 0834 E: Morena@wapotatoes.com.au

MORE INFORMATION For more information about any WA Potatoes activities head to www.todatoes.com.au or contact the office on (08) 9481 0834.

Follow us

for more great potato information on Facebook and Instagram

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

11


TOTAL EDEN YOUR AGRICULTURAL IRRIGATION SPECIALISTS Total Eden are your local irrigation specialists that can help you design, install and maintain an efficient, waterwise irrigation system, whatever your crop. Our certified irrigation designers can design a custom system, specifically for your individual requirements saving you valuable time, water and money.

PREMIUM DRIP TAPE • AUSTRALIAN MADE • EFFICIENT WATER DISTRIBUTION • SEAMLESS CONSTRUCTION • TURBULENT FLOW PATH

With over 20 years servicing agricultural, commercial and domestic systems throughout Western Australia, Total Eden have the complete solution. Trusting Total Eden with your irrigation requirements allows you to be free to concentrate on what you do best. Call Jon today on 0417 911 158

CUSTOMISED FILTRATION TECHNOLOGIES

SMART MICRO IRRIGATION • CLASSIC & PRESSURE COMPENSATED

• AUTOMATIC FILTRATION

• 29-304 LPH

• MANUAL FILTRATION

• SEMI-AUTOMATIC FILTRATION

• ANTI-INSECT & DUST PROOF

• MEDIA FILTRATION

• DESIGNED, ENGINEERED & MANUFACTURED IN AUSTRALIA

STORE LOCATIONS

TOTALEDEN.COM.AU

BALCATTA

BIBRA LAKE

BUNBURY

BUSSELTON

BYFORD

CANNING VALE

GREENWOOD

JOONDALUP

MALAGA

MANDURAH

MIDLAND

MYAREE

OSBORNE PARK

ROCKINGHAM

Unit 8, 39 Erindale Rd, Balcatta WA 6021 P (08) 9244 7532

Unit 6, 157 Winton Rd, Joondalup WA 6027 P (08) 9300 3833

6 Port Kembla Dr, Bibra Lake WA 6163 P (08) 9434 7575

Unit 4, 2 Carson Rd, Malaga WA 6062 P (08) 9249 2373

Unit 2, 4 Mervyn St, Bunbury WA 6230 P (08) 9791 6888

Cnr Gordon Rd & Kulin Way, Mandurah WA 6210 P (08) 9582 0522

Did you know?... All WA metro stores are waterwise irrigation design shops!

118 Strelly St, Busselton WA 6280 P (08 9754 2999

Unit A, 175 Great Eastern Hwy, Midland WA 6056 P (08) 9274 6545

2/821 Sth Western Hwy, Byford WA 6122 P (08) 9525 4800

89 Norma Rd, Myaree WA 6154 P (08) 9317 1836

Cnr Bannister & South St, 128 Cockman Rd, Greenwood WA 6024 Canning Vale WA 6155 P (08) 9342 1188 P (08) 9455 3338

Unit 1, 3 King Edward Rd, Unit 1, 8A Leach Cres, Rockingham WA 6168 Osborne Park WA 6017 P (08) 9528 3044 P (08) 9244 7477


YOUR PRODUCTION

your

production WA Grower SUMMER 2017

13


YOUR PRODUCTION

Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) Transition to management plan

T

he insect pest, the Tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), was detected in Western Australia for the first time in February 2017. This prompted a comprehensive biosecurity response by Western Australia, to minimise the impact of TPP on WA businesses. In collaboration with industry, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is currently implementing an eight-month plan to develop the science, biosecurity and business systems to support growers and industry manage TPP.

What is the TPP Transition to management plan? The Transition to management plan aims to improve the capacity of growers and industry to manage TPP. A vital part of the plan is to determine the status of the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) associated with TPP, and known to cause Zebra Chip disease in potatoes in other parts other world.

At the time of printing, CLso has not been detected in WA. The presence of CLso would change the risk profile and management strategies for TPP in WA. Transitioning to management follows national agreement TPP cannot be eradicated and efforts should focus on management. DPIRD is responsible for reporting to the national Consultative Committee on Emergency Plant Pests (CCEPP) on the implementation of the plan.

14

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

What’s included in the plan? The Transition to management plan runs from September 2017 to May 2018, and includes: scientific research and development to improve our understanding of TPP, its biology and options for control national and enterprise management plans to help manage TPP on properties and throughout the supply chain targeted surveillance for TPP/CLso complex during Spring 2017 and Autumn 2018

market access and trade.

TPP research and development Scientific research and development is critical to improving our understanding of TPP and increasing control options available to growers. TPP literature review A literature review will be completed to identify the best-available research on TPP/CLso from Australia and overseas. Topics such as glasshouse and field Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices, different crop types, climates and alternative hosts will be covered. Any knowledge gaps identified during the review will help guide future research investment.


YOUR PRODUCTION

Pre-harvest trials

Post-harvest disinfestation trials

Pre-harvest treatments help maximise the quality of the product intended for market and are an important part of managing TPP along the entire supply chain.

Disinfestation of capsicum, chilli and tomato is required for interstate and international market access.

Chemical trials • Insecticide trials at the department’s glasshouse facilities aim to establish effective chemicals for use in tomato, potato and capsicum crops. Several insecticides will be assessed. • The effectiveness of insecticides already registered for use in tomato, potato and capsicum — but not currently registered for use on TPP — will also be assessed.

Biological Control Agent trials • A Biological Control Agent (BCA) is an organism, such as an insect or plant disease, that is used to control a pest species such as TPP. • Department researchers have commenced a joint trial with Biological Services, to evaluate potential BCAs which are commercially available to determine their effectiveness against TPP. • The trials will evaluate the effectiveness of three different insect species, including brown lacewings, ladybirds and a predatory mirid bug in tomato, capsicum and chilli crops. • The trials are housed in the department’s glasshouse facilities and involve inoculating host crops with TPP and then releasing the BCA’s to determine their effectiveness on TPP. • Preliminary results on the effectiveness of ladybirds as control agents for TPP are currently being collated.

The department is undertaking a small-scale chemical effectiveness trial for post-harvest disinfestation of these crops. Research by the department will feed into the national TPP research and development agenda.

These plans will clearly outline measures to effectively control TPP and demonstrate industry commitment to minimising its spread and impact. This will be critical in supporting ongoing efforts to renew and maintain market access, and underpin certification and assurance schemes. As such, a systematic approach to enterprise management planning will be undertaken. Assisted by the Enterprise management plan coordinator, each industry will have a complete enterprise management plan addressing their entire supply chain. Completed plans will include:

National management plan A National Management Plan will be developed to give the community and trading partners confidence TPP is being actively managed in Australian production areas. AUSVEG through the national TPP Program Coordinator will lead the development of the National management plan, in collaboration with state and federal governments, and industry partners.

Enterprise management plans for growers An essential component of Transition to management is the development and implementation of Enterprise management plans for affected industries.

• understanding pest and pathogen biology and their identification • identification of risk pathways • application of control and management options • biosecurity awareness and implementation, e.g. signage, surveillance and sanitation • post-farm gate management. Much of the information is readily available from local, interstate or international sources. Working with industry bodies, information will be put into a familiar format, using existing good practice, biosecurity, Quality Assurance and certification documents as appropriate. The aim is to build on current practices to incorporate TPP, without creating additional work. The department looks forward to working with growers to provide the tools needed for a smooth transition to management.

trials

will evaluate the effectiveness of BCAs, such as brown lacewings & ladybird.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

15


YOUR PRODUCTION

Other states are required to develop surveillance plans for the pest in accordance with national and international standards.

Surveillance The department recently completed its spring 2017 TPP surveillance program. ‘Sticky traps’ were installed on commercial and non-commercial properties in and around the Perth metropolitan area with known populations of TPP. The department had great support from the WA community with more than 1000 properties registering to host a ‘sticky trap’ during the surveillance period. Each trap was inspected by department entomologists and any TPP collected were tested for CLso. About 4000 traps were processed through the department’s diagnostic laboratories. At the time of printing, there have been no detections of CLso in Western Australia. A second round of surveillance will be undertaken in early 2018.

Market access and trade The department’s TPP market access working group continues to work with other states and territories to minimise the impact of TPP on trade. This includes developing movement conditions to allow the export of host and non-host produce and nursery stock while providing an Appropriate Level of Protection (ALOP) from WA to other jurisdictions. MORE INFORMATION Ian Wilkinson TPP Project Coordinator Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development t: (08) 9780 6278 e: ianstewart.wilkinson@dpird.wa.gov.au

NEED HARVEST WORKERS? A no cost Australian Government suitable workers, manage enquiries and provide information on your rights and responsibilities as an employer.

16

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

A Quarantine Area is currently in place which includes the Perth metropolitan area and surrounding local government areas. The Quarantine Area conditions were developed in consultation with WA’s horticultural industry and apply to commercially-produced and home-grown host plants or nursery stock grown within the Quarantine Area. For more details go to page 18 or visit www.agric.wa.gov.au/tpp Gavin Foord Enterprise Management Plan Coordinator Foord Systems t: 0435 018 189 e: gfoord@westnet.com.au agric.wa.gov.au/tpp

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development


WA crates

The professional packaging service for WA’s ďŹ nest fresh fruit and vegetables

0 email: service@wacrates.com.au


YOUR PRODUCTION

Tomato potato psyllid (TPP)

THE Quarantine Area Notice

APPLIES to the movement of all plants in the Solanaceae and Convolvulaceae families.

Quarantine Area Notice FAQs

T

he Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) has been found in Australia for the first time, in the Perth metropolitan area and some regional areas. A Quarantine Area Notice is in place which applies restrictions to the movement of some commercial and home grown plants produced in these areas, in order to limit the spread of this pest.

Here are Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the Quarantine Area Notice to assist commercial producers and industry. Please note, these FAQs will continue to be updated as required. Visit agric.wa.gov.au/tpp for updates.

1

What is a Quarantine Area Notice (QAN)?

From 1 November 2017, host plants in the Quarantine Area cannot be moved into Specified regional locations in Western Australia without specified treatment.

A QAN is a notice under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 that declares a quarantined area due to the presence of a harmful pest or disease.

The Quarantine Area Notice applies to the movement of all plants in the Solanaceae and Convolvulaceae families, including but not limited to:

In this case, the Quarantine Area Notice has been declared because the Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) has been found in the metropolitan area and in some regional areas.

Scientific name

Example (common name)

Solanum tuberosum

Potato

Lycopersicon spp.

Tomato

Capsicum spp.

Pepper, paprika, capsicum, chilli

Solanum melongena

Eggplant

Solanum betaceum

Tamarillo

Ornamental & weed Solanum spp.

Nightshades, potato vine

Physalis spp.

Groundcherry

Lycium spp.

Matrimony vine, goji berry, African boxthorn

Convolvulus spp.

Field bindweed

Ipomoea batatas

Sweet potato

View the published Quarantine Area Notice on the department’s website: agric.wa.gov.au/tpp

18

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Visit agric.wa.gov.au/tpp to view the QAN and more information on treatment requirements.

2

What is the aim of declaring a Quarantine Area?

The aim of the Quarantine Area is to restrict the movement of host plants which could spread TPP from the Quarantine Area to other parts of Western Australia. The Quarantine Area is part of a national response plan which includes containment measures for TPP and increased testing for Candidatus liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), a bacteria associated with TPP in other parts of the world. CLso has not been detected in Western Australia to date.

3

What areas are in the Quarantine Area?

• Perth metropolitan area • AugustaMargaret River • Beverley • Boddington • Boyup Brook • BridgetownGreenbushes

• Gingin • Harvey • Kojonup • Mandurah • Manjimup • Moora • Murray • Nannup • Narrogin

• Brookton

• Northam

• Bunbury

• Pingelly

• Busselton

• Plantagenet

• Capel

• Toodyay

• Carnamah

• Victoria Plains

• Chittering

• Wagin

• Collie

• Wandering

• Coorow

• Waroona

• Cranbrook

• West Arthur

• Cuballing

• Wickepin

• Dandaragan

• Williams

• Dardanup

• Woodanilling

• Denmark

• York.

• DonnybrookBalingup


YOUR PRODUCTION

Kununurra

Broome

7

What are the approved treatments for non-fruiting plants (seedlings)?

Host plants produced within the Quarantine Area should be: • prepared as required by (a) or (b) below with the treatment being completed no more than 36 hours prior to movement; and

Carnarvon

• records kept of the treatment, together with details of transporters and consignees kept. a) For tomato, capsicum, chilli and eggplant plants:

Geraldton

• Sprayed with 300mL/ha of the 18g/L active of abamectin (Permit # 14722) or 20mL/100L of the 250g/L active of bifenthrin (Permit # 9795); Northam

• Sprayed with 40mL/100L of the 240g/L active of spirotetramat (Movento 240 SC label)* and

Perth

Bunbury

• 24 hours later, sprayed with 200mL/100L of the 225g/L active of methomyl.

Esperance

Albany

TPP Quarantine Area Effective as of 1 November 2017 0

75

150

225

300

375

Legend

Kilometres

REFERENCE: Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia 1994 Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994 Zone 50 Vertical Datum: Australian Height Datum 1971 Date: 30/10/2017 Job Number: 2017037 File name: TPP_T2M_Quarantine_Area

Quarantine Area Specified Local Government Areas Local Government Areas in above

4

What are Specified local government areas?

Host plants cannot be moved from the Quarantine Area into the Specified local government areas without prescribed treatment. Specified local government areas are important horticulture areas in which TPP has not been detected, and include: • Albany

• Jerramungup

• Broome

• Mingenew

• BroomehillTambellup

• Morawa

• Carnarvon

• Ravensthorpe

• Chapman Valley

• Shark Bay

• Esperance

• Three Springs

• Gnowangerup

• Wyndham-East Kimberley

• Greater Geraldton • Irwin

• Northampton

5

DISCLAIMER While all reasonable care has been taken in the preparation of the material in this document, the Western Australian Government and its officers accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions it may contain whether caused by negligence or otherwise or for any loss, however caused, sustained by any person who relies on it.

Why is this notice coming into effect now?

This current notice replaces a pre-existing notice and offers refined control measures.

6

Are there still restrictions on the movement of host produce (i.e. host fruit and vegetables)?

There are no movement restrictions on host fruit and vegetables under this QAN. Treatment is required for host plants, such as seedlings or nursery stock, where they are moving from the Quarantine Area to the Specified local government areas in Western Australia. It is important to note that interstate measures apply to a range of plants and produce. More information on requirements for moving plants or produce from Western Australia to other states is available from the department website under the TPP market access section.

Note: DO NOT use methomyl in protected cropping situations, such as glasshouses, greenhouses, plastic houses, plastic tunnels or shadehouses

b) For host plant ornamentals and host plant nursery stock: • Sprayed with 25mL product per 100L of the 80g/L active of bifenthrin (APMVA Permit # 10043) or 50mL/100L to a maximum of 1.5L for 18g/L abamectin (the registered rate for two spotted mite on ornamentals); or • Sprayed with 40mL/100L of the 240g/L active of spirotetramat (APVMA permit #81707); and • 24 hours later, sprayed with 200mL/100L of the 225g/L active of methomyl (Permit # 82428). Note: DO NOT use methomyl in protected cropping situations, such as glasshouses, greenhouses, plastic houses, plastic tunnels or shade-houses.

If not prepared in accordance with the treatments above, host plants may be moved from the Quarantine Area if: • prepared in an approved manner published on the department’s website; or • certified by an inspector as having been prepared in accordance with the directions of an inspector. WA Grower SUMMER 2017

19


YOUR PRODUCTION

8

I f a consignment requires certification by an inspector, at whose cost is this? Who pays for the inspector to certify the host plant?

If certification is required, standard certification and inspection fees will apply to the producer/consignor who has requested the service.

9

Who is responsible for ensuring the fumigation or other effective treatment is done?

The consignor is responsible for treatment if moving host material, or causing it to be moved, to a restricted destination outside the Quarantine Area. Records must be kept as per the QAN, including details of treatment.

10

What happens if I don’t comply with the QAN?

Failure to comply with a QAN can result in a fine or remedial action being taken under section 133 of the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007, or both. People moving host material, and potential carriers outside the Quarantine Area into restricted areas, should consider the impact of the introduction of TPP into WA’s key production areas.

11

What are my reporting obligations?

Consignors of host plants to a destination outside the Quarantine Area must keep a record of treatments, together with details of transporters and consignees.

12

Who can I contact for more information?

• D  r Ian Wilkinson, DPIRD t: (08) 9780 6278 For enquiries regarding chemical use, contact: • D  r Darryl Hardie, DPIRD m: 0404 819 600 For enquiries regarding legislative requirements around chemical use, contact: • Chris Sharpe, DPIRD t: (08) 9368 3815 MORE INFORMATION Further information and general enquiries: • More information, including how to look for and report the pest, is available from the department website at agric.wa.gov.au/tpp • Pest and Disease Information Service Phone: (08) 9368 3080 or email: padis@dpird.wa.gov.au

For enquiries regarding the Quarantine Area Notice and the TPP transition to management response, contact:

TOTALLY INTEGRATED PREPARATION AND PACKAGING SOLUTIONS FOR AUSTRALIA’S FRESH PRODUCE MARKET.

From packaging shed to the retail outlet, edp australia can supply everything you need. 33–37 O’Brien Street Mooroopna VIC 3629 Phone: (03) 5820 5337 Email: sales@edp.com.au

20

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

www.edp.com.au

KEEPING AUSTRALIA MANUFACTURING


YOUR PRODUCTION

Summer Safety Checklist

Are you ready for fire and storm season? Use our safety checklist to keep your family, workers and property safe this summer.

Time to lock up

Summertime means more youngsters on rural properties during the long school break. Remember to secure all chemical lids and ALWAYS lock storage sheds.

Ute it ... don’t boot it!

Picking up supplies? Use a trailer or ute tray to stow chemicals in transit. It’s the safest way to avoid any spills or fumes inside your vehicle.

Got drums?

It’s easy to triple-rinse your agvet containers and run them in to one of drumMUSTER’s 800+ collection sites. Check our interactive map to locate your local depot.

What’s in your shed?

ChemClear will dispose of your unwanted chemicals during its regular state collections, all you need to do is register them online. Meanwhile, keep all chemicals high and dry.

Update your store manifest

It’s the first thing responders need in an emergency. Ensure your site map and chemical list are current and easy to access.

agsafe.org.au

drummuster.org.au

chemclear.org.au WA Grower SUMMER 2017

21


YOUR PRODUCTION

US stable fly expert visits Western Australia

D

r Taylor is an entomologist in the Agroecosystems Management Research Unit of United States of America, Department of Agriculture (USDA), based at Lincoln, Nebraska and is known around the world for his work in population dynamics and area wide management of stable flies.

He visited Western Australia at the invitation of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) for two weeks to exchange knowledge with local researchers and producers. Dr Taylor estimates US producers lose several billion dollars per annum in beef production due to stable fly feeding on cattle blood. He said “in a typical outbreak in the USA there are often less than 15 stable flies per animal feed from large numbers of cattle in free range and intensive production systems.” He went on to say, “This contrasts with the Western Australian scene where less numbers of free range and feedlot cattle may experience vastly larger numbers of flies per animal at certain times of the year.” He believes the difference is that in the USA, the problem is typically isolated to a broad area and intensive beef production systems, whereas in Western Australia outbreaks are more likely to occur where irrigated horticulture and cattle production coexist on the light sands typical of the Perth coastal sandplain. The availability of large amounts of vegetative waste in these production systems drives the problem.

22

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

BY DON TELFER DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES & REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

“Western Australian research into controlling stable fly is some the most innovative on-ground work in the world,” said international Stable Fly Expert Dr David Taylor.

“In all of these environments,” Dr Taylor said, “managing the breeding sites is critical to control of stable flies. Whether this is rolls of rotting hay, cattle feed waste, wet cattle manure from poorly drained and cleaned intensive production systems or organic waste from horticulture.” 33L–R: Dave Taylor and David Cook in Gingin checking out stable fly.

In a typical celery crop that has been harvested, the large amount of trash and unmarketable plant material left on the soil is an ideal place for eggs to be laid. If the waste is in contact with the soil, and the sand is kept wet, up to 1,000 stable flies per square metre may emerge from this waste in approximately one months’ time. From one hectare of production, 10 million stable flies may emerge. He says “there are three things every person can do to reduce fly breeding, Sanitation, Sanitation, Sanitation.” Dr Taylor applauds the world leading research being carried out locally by Dr David Cook from DPIRD into reducing stable fly breeding in horticulture refuse. Dr Cook’s research in WA suggests that producers should deep bury vegetable waste using a mouldboard plough, stone burier or multiple passes of a rotary hoe, followed importantly by a heavy roller that compacts the topsoil temporarily. Using the combination of plough or rotary hoe plus the roller gives 99% control of stable fly.


YOUR PRODUCTION

33PRODUCERS should deep bury vegetable waste using a mouldboard plough, stone burier or multiple passes of a rotary hoe, followed importantly by a heavy roller that compacts the topsoil temporarily.

This is to be reflected in the new Stable Fly Management Plan to be issued in coming months. The American researcher says the WA work is of relevance in Costa Rica and Brazil where traditional beef enterprises share land with pineapple and sugar cane production respectively, and large numbers of stable flies have resulted. However by contrast to Western Australian horticulture that may produce 50 to 100 tonnes of waste vegetable matter per hectare, Costa Rican pineapple plantations typically produce greater than two hundred and forty tonnes per hectare at the end of the cropping cycle every two years. The stable fly issue in Costa Rica and Brazil has become so great that it is causing social unrest as protesters demonstrate about the growing numbers of stable flies.

Dr Taylor also said “we tend to concentrate on small areas that produce large numbers of stable flies.” He went on to say, “It seems just as important to concentrate on the large areas that only produce very small numbers of this pest, as one stable fly per square metre equals 100 000 flies over ten hectares.” Whilst in Western Australia Dr Taylor was in demand as a keynote speaker at the Stable Fly Symposium in Gingin on Thursday 2 November, the DPIRD Visiting Specialist lecture 3 November, and a beef producers field day in Jarrahdale on 12 November. He also met with beef producers and feed lotters in Gingin, Capel, Chittering and Serpentine to discuss mitigation of the fly.

MORE INFORMATION Dr Taylor was brought to Western Australia by the Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development as a visiting specialist, in conjunction with the Shire of Gingin and the WA Broiler Growers Association. For further information contact Department of Primary Industries & Regional Development on www.agric. wa.gov.au/vegetables/stable-flywestern-australia or contact Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS) (08) 9368 3080.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

23


YOUR PRODUCTION

Management approach for

Dickeya dianthicola T

he Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), in conjunction with the WA potato industry, will implement a management strategy for the plant pest Dickeya dianthicola following a national decision that it cannot be eradicated. The National Management Group agreed it was not technically feasible to eradicate the bacteria, and supported a management approach to minimise the impact on production and market access. DPIRD Irrigated Agriculture Executive Director John Ruprecht said extensive sampling and surveillance undertaken by department staff led to the discovery that Dickeya dianthicola most likely made its way into Western Australia via infected dahlia tubers from eastern Australia. “Grower assistance and extensive tracing by DPIRD led to the discovery that infected dahlia tubers had been grown on a WA potato growing property, prior to the planting of potatoes. Potatoes from this property were linked to the infected potato crops in WA,” he said. “Further tracing led to the detection of the bacteria on dahlia tubers grown on a commercial property in Victoria, and also in freesia bulbs imported from Victoria. “Discovery of the likely source has been a great outcome, in that it will help to minimise further spread of the bacteria.” Mr Ruprecht said DPIRD was grateful for the positive working relationships established with industry representatives and growers from day one of the response. This cooperation enabled staff to collect samples from 27 properties, and through tracing link the infected properties to some 64 properties, which was essential to determining the extent of the outbreak.

24

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

“Cooperation also enabled us to work closely with quarantined property growers to determine how they could continue their business operations without risking spread of the disease to other properties,” Mr Ruprecht said.

“Another important outcome was modification of an existing PCR testing process to allow for rapid, high-throughput testing of potato tubers — the first of its kind to be used in Australia.” Mr Ruprecht said quarantine restrictions on the five WA properties have been lifted. Going forward, the Potato Growers Association of WA (PGAWA) will lead management efforts to minimise industry impacts. “This will include raising grower awareness of buyer responsibility to understand the risks of spreading the disease.

33DICKEYA dianthicola most likely made its way into Western Australia via infected dahlia tubers from eastern Australia.

“DPIRD will provide technical advice, fee for service laboratory testing and will work with PGAWA to modify the Certified Seed Scheme and Registration Rules to manage the disease.” Mr Ruprecht said due to the fact that Dickeya dianthicola is likely to be widespread in other jurisdictions, there were currently no additional interstate trade restrictions being considered for WA potatoes, apart from those restrictions in place for the Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) outbreak. The international market access for WA potatoes remains unaffected. MORE INFORMATION For further information see the DPIRD website www.agric.wa.gov.au/plant-biosecurity/ biosecurity-alert-dickeya-dianthicola


High cation exchange capacity Retains nutrients in the root zone

Calcium Bentonite Clay Increases soil moisture retention Locally sourced, stable, inorganic product

0418 140 929

BentoniteWA

info@bentonitewa.com.au www.bentonitewa.com.au


YOUR PRODUCTION

Marshalling troops T S N I A G A D N TO DEFE SE A E S I D E N R O SOILB 33DR Graham Stirling helping Balingup orchardist David Giumelli assess his soil health.

26

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR PRODUCTION

BY PETER CLIFTON SOUTH WEST CATCHMENTS COUNCIL

F

armers hear a lot about the bad things that live in our soils. But there are plenty of good things too. These beneficial organisms are battling against pests for supremacy of our soils. Have you ever heard of nematode-trapping fungi? Or big predatory nematodes that feed on smaller pest nematodes? Or megastigmatid mites that can eat more than 20 nematodes a day? We usually only hear about the bad nematodes and fungi, but there is a whole army of bugs in the soil, including good nematodes and fungi, that are beneficial to plants. Beneficial soil organisms compete with pests for space around our plant roots, so it’s a battle you want the good guys to win. Somebody who perhaps understands this battle more than most is Queensland nematologist Dr Graham Stirling. Dr Stirling has studied this fascinating microscopic world for the past 46 years and was recently invited by South West Catchments Council (SWCC) to speak with orchardists and potato and vegetable growers about soil biology.

“It’s a matter of having a picture of the whole system, not just the pests,” Dr Stirling said. “So even though you’ve got pathogens that try to destroy roots, you’ve also got organisms that will help you keep them under control.” One beneficial organism is mycorrhizal fungi. These fungi grow in plant roots and help plants access water and phosphorus when soil levels are below excessive levels. Another critical role is keeping pests away from plant roots.

“There’s certainly scientific evidence which suggests that you’ll get less of those pathogens invading plant tissue when the mycorrhizae are there first,” he said. Unfortunately, some agricultural practices are harmful to mycorrhizae.

beneficial organisms are battling against pests for supremacy of our soils

“Plants exude carbon out of their root system to feeds soil organisms,” he said. What they are trying to get in return is a good strong biology around their roots to protect against the pathogens. “It’s something that has evolved over millions of years. So a lot of the battle to get a healthy biology is to have plants in the system all the time.” Dr Stirling said a strong soil biological community can also improve water infiltration and soil drainage. And while most farmers know that some bacteria can fix nitrogen, soil organisms are also crucial to holding and mineralizing nutrients.

“One of the problems is that we tend to over-use phosphorus in our systems, and the mycorrhizae tends to drop away. Tillage also knocks fungi around.”

MORE INFORMATION

Soil biology is dependent on soil carbon. Dr Stirling said organisms can be sustained by carbon inputs from plant residues and root exudates. These inputs fuel the growth of bacteria and fungi, which then become a food source for beneficial nematodes, mites and other soil organisms.

For more information contact Peter Clifton on (08) 9724 2469, mobile 0409 680 900 or email peter.clifton@swccnrm.org.au or check the SWCC website swccnrm.org.au

South West Catchments Council is producing videos from Graham’s presentation which can be found at www.youtube.com/user/SWCCNRM

ORGANIC

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

27


YOUR PRODUCTION

Ord River Irrigation Area

Cucurbit virus disease research Mosaic and deformation symptoms caused by ZYMV infection.

28

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

A

chieving effective management of severe aphid-borne virus diseases is a key R&D priority for cucurbit growers in the Ord River Irrigation Area (ORIA). The project Resolving the critical disease threats to the WA cucurbit industry from new and previous incursions of damaging cucurbit viruses is addressing this threat.


YOUR PRODUCTION

This project is funded through the Boosting Biosecurity Defences Project's Research and Development (R&D) Fund made possible by Royalties for Regions (RfR). The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), Ord River District Co-operative (ORDCO), Ceres Farm, Barradale Farm and Bothkamp Australia Farm are also providing financial and in-kind support. The project’s aims are to identify: i) management measures that assist in controlling virus spread, and ii) critical vulnerabilities in the disease cycle to target.

Close collaboration between ORIA cucurbit growers, ORDCO, the Kununurra-based company Raitech Ltd, and DPIRD Kununurra and Perth staff is helping achieve these objectives. Here, we discuss progress over the last six month period. Project manager Dr Roger Jones said, in both the 2015 and 2016 ORIA growing seasons, Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) infection was minimal in earlysown melon and pumpkin crops. Its spread was first observed in later-sown crops in June, which was half way through the growing season, after which infection was widespread and caused major losses. In contrast, in the 2017 current growing season, a small part of the valley suffered severe (ZYMV) disease and losses

throughout the growing season, but in the rest of the valley, aphids and ZYMV infection only appeared at the end of the growing season so losses were minimal there, he said The main activities during this period were: i) field trials with aphids and ZYMV at DPIRD’s Kununurra Research Station, and ii) studies on Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) disinfection, survival and spread under WA conditions.

Field trials DPIRD project researcher Dr Craig Webster said, the 2017 field trials focused mostly on combating ZYMV-induced losses in melon and pumpkin production in the ORIA by: i) revealing the differing intrinsic levels of aphid infestation and virus infection that occur within each of a selection of varieties of rockmelon, honeydew, watermelon and pumpkin varieties being evaluated at the request of the local industry; ii) delaying the entry of aphids and associated virus to watermelon directly seeded into millet stubble following the results of last year’s preliminary trial on this subject; iii) Collection of seasonal data on aphid and ZYMV arrival and numbers in watermelon data collection blocks planted at different times.

33TOP: ZYMV infection in zucchini leaves.

33ABOVE: Project researcher Dr Craig Webster demonstrating a field trial involving melon and pumpkin varieties to ORIA growers (Daryl Smith, Jason Lerch, Chelsea McNeil and Christian Bloecker).

Varietal comparisons Dr Webster said, as seen in our previous greenhouses studies, all melon varieties became infected by ZYMV, so, as expected, there was no complete resistance to the virus. However, several varieties demonstrated significantly delayed virus infection (up to one month). Aphid colonisation occurred on all varieties, although their numbers were lower in several of them. Such reductions in aphid numbers and delays in virus infection may provide sufficient time for normal fruit development to occur, significantly reducing losses from the virus, he said. WA Grower SUMMER 2017

29


YOUR PRODUCTION

Pa

aps n tr

Sowing into millet stubble deters viruscarrying aphids from landing & introducing ZYMV.

Data collection blocks Dr Webster said, two blocks were planted with watermelon, each block at a different time — early May and late July.

To assess aphid flights, yellow sticky traps mounted on star pickets, and pan traps located at canopy level were included at each corner of the assessment area and changed every fortnight.

33WATERMELON seedlings (above) and plants growing in millet trash (inset).

Aphid arrival and virus incidence were greatly delayed compared to the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons. This situation was reflected across most of the northern side of the valley, he said.

Millet stubble

30

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

12 Virus incidence (%)

Dr Webster said, in both the early and late sown trials, the number of colonising aphids found on watermelon growing in millet stubble was reduced (in time of sowing 2) or delayed (time of sowing 1), as seen in the 2016 trial. Virus levels were too low to measure in the early sown trial, but with the late sown trial there were lower ZYMV levels in all millet treatments, as observed in 2016. This finding provides evidence of the likely effectiveness of this method as an alternative means of controlling ZYMV spread. Thus, sowing into millet stubble offers a way of deterring virus-carrying aphids from landing and introducing the virus (see Figure 1). Some additional work is needed on optimising the agronomy of sowing watermelon into millet trash before widespread adoption can occur, he said.

Bare Millet

10 8 6 4 2 0 6/9/17

19/9/17 Sampling date

FIGURE 1 ZYMV spread in watermelon plots with and without millet trash Source: Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

4/10/17


raps

Sticky t

YOUR PRODUCTION

Summary In the 2017 ORIA growing season, a small part of the valley suffered severe ZYMV disease and fruit losses throughout the growing season, but in the rest of the valley aphids and ZYMV infection only appeared near the end of the growing season so losses were minimal. In field trials, several melon varieties demonstrated significantly delayed infection with the virus. Although aphid colonisation occurred on all varieties, their numbers were lower in several of them. Such reductions in aphid numbers and delays in virus infection may provide sufficient time for normal fruit development to occur, significantly reducing losses.

33CALIBRATION block of watermelon showing a yellow sticky trap mounted on a star picket, and a pan trap mounted on a large plastic container.

CGMMV Studies Dr Webster said, following the report in the Winter 2017 WA Grower edition on preliminary findings about CGMMV disinfection, survival and spread under WA conditions, more information had been obtained on this subject. The extent of CGMMV contamination is an important issue with highly contaminated surfaces requiring longer, and more stringent, methods for disinfection. Mixing fresh sap from infected leaves with dilute bleach solutions (5-25%) or resuspended 20% dried skim milk powder and leaving the mixture for up to an hour, eliminated CGMMV infection of cucurbit plants. Other disinfectants, such as Virkon, were less effective and are more likely to become swamped when high levels of virus are present. When complete, these experiments should lead to effective ways to reduce contamination on highly contaminated surfaces (e.g. vehicle tyres) and lightly contaminated surfaces (e.g. floors and other large surfaces) where the use of caustic solutions like bleach is impractical, he said. Disinfection of CGMMV in irrigation water was investigated with water samples collected from a contaminated greenhouse. When these water samples were rubbed

33MOSAIC symptoms caused by CGMMV infection in cucumber leaves.

onto cucumber plants, a few became infected, but water samples taken following UV light treatment (a common method used in greenhouses where irrigation water is recycled) did not cause any infection. This demonstrated the potential for CGMMV spread in irrigation water, and the role that treatment with UV light can have in preventing this, he said. Persistence of CGMMV in soil is being evaluated with soil spiked with roots from CGMMV-infected plants. After the soil was spiked, a few transplants became infected. Similarly, when using soil spiked with infected sap, a few transplants also were infected. Infection of even a small number of plants, as shown here, highlights the dangers of this mode of transmission since rapid spread of the virus to neighbouring plants will occur subsequently. Additional experiments demonstrated that some damage to the roots is required for CGMMV infection as this was achieved by transplanting young seedlings into infested soil whereas experiments with freshly contaminated soil directly planted with seeds (not transplants) showed no plant infection.

Sowing watermelons into millet stubble again resulted in reduced aphid landings and ZYMV levels, as observed in the projects 2016 trials. Thus, the sowing into millet stubble offers a way of deterring virus-carrying aphids from landing and introducing the virus. The extent of CGMMV contamination was important with highly contaminated surfaces requiring longer, and more stringent disinfection methods. Mixing fresh sap from infected leaves with dilute bleach solutions (5–25%) or resuspended 20% dried skim milk powder and leaving the mixture for up to an hour proved effective at eliminating infection, but other disinfectants were less effective. The potential for CGMMV spread in irrigation water was demonstrated along with the effectiveness of UV light treatment in preventing this. The finding that a small number of plants became CGMMV-infected when seedlings, but not seeds, were transplanted into contaminated soil highlights the dangers of such transplanting in initiating CGMMV epidemics. MORE INFORMATION For more information, go to the DPIRD website www.agric.wa.gov.au/biosecurity-quarantine/ biosecurity/plant-biosecurity. Or contact Dr Roger Jones at DPIRD (08) 3968 3269.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

31


YOUR PRODUCTION

Using machinery to spread metham sodium Sativa Farm

BY SAM GRUBISA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

I

t was a hot Monday afternoon when I made my journey up to Sativa Farm in Cullalla. Turning onto the red gravel access road, I realised Google maps doesn’t really do this 800 acre property justice. Sativa Farms is one of the production farms for Loose Leaf Lettuce Company, owned by Maureen, Barry and their son Kevan Dobra. Kevan has been working the property for 12 years with his Farm Manager son Jase, the fifth-generation in the Dobra Dynasty. While livestock and broadacre farming cover a majority of the land, the “loose leaf” operation is what I came to see. Kevan and Jase have their work cut out for them, cropping 110 acres of cos, spinach, rocket, tatsoi, mizuna, kale and baby leaf lettuce in rotation here.

32

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Being on a property that’s out of reach of the sea breeze with temperatures reaching a scorching 50°C, two of the growing sites have a specially adapted overhead irrigation system that can help combat the searing heat of summer.

Seeing a huge open ground cropping area that appears to have its own rain clouds hovering above is as innovative as it is big. Unsurprisingly, the irrigation system is not the only forward thinking these two hard working men are doing. The ‘made to spec’ machinery is a trio of innovation. First off, the remote-controlled harvester, that can cut whole head cos as well as the baby leaf, is an impressive piece of machinery. Then you have the massive dual job bed former/rotary hoe hybrid. But it was the 3-in-1 smudger that really made the grower in me say “WOW”. Long hours, inclement weather conditions and the physical nature of the farm inspire all growers to design pieces of machinery that will make their day just that bit easier; and this is exactly what Kevan and Jase have done.


YOUR PRODUCTION

This method injects the metham deep enough for the chemical to be effective, without the fumes being released to the immediate atmosphere. As the tractor moves along at around 9km/h, a hectare can be fumigated in under 10 minutes. With the beds formed, fumigated and sealed with one machine in under 10 minutes, irrigation can be applied to activate the chemical reaction with little to no leaching. During application, spray drift by atmospheric and temperature inversion is virtually eliminated, keeping the chemical within the target area.

The ‘made to spec’ machinery is a trio of innovation.

By keeping the chemical within the target area its effectiveness as a soil fumigant, with the added benefit of a preemergence herbicide, is significant; 8–10 weeks in Winter and 5+ weeks in Summer.

Seeing the machine in action (without the metham being hooked up… because… WH&S) had me applauding with a smile on my face like a split watermelon. Farm machinery has always been a big interest of mine, so seeing something that is not only innovative but ticks all the boxes for on farm best practice has kicked some serious goals. Driving back down that red gravel access road a bit sweaty, dusty and a whole heap more informed, my respect for the West Aussie growers and their inspired ideas was definitely cranked up a notch. MORE INFORMATION If you would like further information contact Sam at sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au To see the tractor in action head to our website www.vegetableswa.com.au

33A remote-controlled harvester, that can cut whole head cos as well as the baby leaf, a massive dual job bed former/rotary hoe and 3-in-1 smudger.

What started as a self-welded, single run smudger has become a three job behemoth. With just a single pass this machine forms three ‘ready for planting’ beds; with tire tracks and tops so flat they look like tables… job one. It seals the top of the beds so there is no need for rolling… job two. Its third and final job is the most impressive of all… it methams. Yes, one of the most unpleasant jobs on a Western Australian farm is made almost easy with this innovation. Ensuring the tractor has the appropriate door/window seals and air filters, a 1,000L metham sodium tank is securely mounted on top of the smudger, eliminating the need for decanting the product which may result in possible hazardous exposure. There is a separate metered pump for each bed former, so each bed receives the correct rate of chemical application. PVC pipes (non-corrosive, easily replaced and relatively inexpensive) with evenly spaced, pre-drilled holes are connected to the pumps and mounted behind a cutting blade that slices 60mm beneath the top of the formed bed. WA Grower SUMMER 2017

33


YOUR PRODUCTION

e l b i s n o p Res

Safe disposal of chemicals is imperative to the safety of farm owners, workers, animals and the environment.

34

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR PRODUCTION

Registration Form

chemclear.org.au

A

re unwanted, unused, Step by step to disposal leaking and deregistered agricultural chemicals taking up space in your spray Take an inventory of your unwanted Step 1 agvet chemicals. shed? Are you looking for an effective and environmentally sustainable method of chemical Register @ www.chemclear.org.au Step 2 Free-call 1800 008 182 disposal? Have you ‘inherited’ Fax form back to 03 9371 8501 chemicals from a previous 33FOR a ChemClear Inventory of Unwanted Chemicals property owner? If you answered Registration Form go to www.chemclear.org.au/resources/ forms/ yes to any of these questions, Ensure that your registered chemicals Step 3 are stored securely and safely. then ChemClear is for you. CounCil

FAX FORM BACK TO 03 9371 8501

Farmer

Safe disposal of chemicals is imperative to the safety of farm owners, workers, animals and the environment.

Funded by a 4 cent per L/kg levy that is included in the purchase price of chemicals, ChemClear is an environmentally safe, no repercussions, no questions asked path of disposal. Chemicals are placed into two clear groups, see Table 1.

Step 4

Step 5

ChemClear will remain in contact with you and will advise of the next collection in your area.

When advised of the collection date prepare your registered chemicals for delivery to the nominated site.

Step 6

Deliver your registered chemicals to the ChemClear retrieval vehicle at the advised location in your area.

TABLE 1 Chemical disposal charges

Group 1 — FREE of charge

Group 2 — per L/kg fee

In their original container

No longer registered for use (exceeding two years from de-registration)

Label intact and readable

Unknown chemical

Manufactured or supplied by companies participating in Ag Stewardship Programs

Unlabelled chemical

Registered, suspended or withdrawn chemicals whose registration has ceased within the last two years

Out of date (exceeding two years from expiration date)

Within two years of expiration date

Mixed chemicals

Not held by distributors as unwanted inventory

Chemicals from non-participating manufacturers

government

Business

The ChemClear program has collected and disposed of more than 350 tonnes of obsolete, inherited and unknown agricultural chemicals since its inception. By using ChemClear you can also meet your responsibilities and obligations under Quality Assurance and Farm or Environmental Management plans.

MORE INFORMATION For further information please call: • Joel Dinsdale Quality Assurance Coordinator m: 0417 857 675 e: joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au • Sam Grubisa Industry Extension Officer (English) m: 0427 373 037 e: sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au •  Truyen Vo Industry Extension Officer (Vietnamese) m: 0457 457 559 e: truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au •  Graeme Passmore WA ChemClear Consultant m: 0429 933 307 e: jaderan@bigpond.net.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

35


YOUR PRODUCTION

Spill kit should be kept inside the storage area suitable for the chemicals housed

GHS Hazard class

GHS Hazard category

ADG Class/ Packing Group

Placard quantity

Acute toxicity

1

6.1 PG 1

50 kg/L

2

6.1 PG 11

250 Kg/L

3

6.1 PG 111

1,000 kg/L

Placard to display

Manifest Quantity 500 kg or L

TOXIC

2,500 Kg or L 10,000 Kg or L

As a general rule GHS flammable liquids, Skin corrosion and Oxidising liquids and solids require the same placard and manifest quantities as above but display their own respective placards.

36

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


TOOL TIME

TOOL

TIME

your

production WA Grower SUMMER 2017

37


TOOL TIME

Using the Agrilaser

through the eyes of an academic

Business case: Blueberry farm Australia Location: Cherokee, Victoria, Australia Application context: Blueberry farm (Food production > Vineyard & Orchard) Problem definition: Blueberries damaged and eaten by birds Pest bird species: Rosella (Psittaculidae) Time of year with bird problem: Summer (December to February) Time of the day with bird problems: From sunrise to sunset Number of systems: 1 x Agrilaser Autonomic 100 Laser projection area: 2–3ha In use since: December 2016 Reduction in crop loss: 65% Bird reduction after Agrilaser Autonomic installation: 95%

38

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

J

ohn Benson owns a small blueberry farm in Cherokee, Victoria. Consisting of half forest and half cleared land. On the six to seven acres cleared land he grows berries that he sells on a small scale, farmers markets and such.


TOOL TIME

“The Agrilaser is a terrific machine. It works even during the super bright Australian summer days.” 65% is just the beginning The first season with the laser was very successful. According to Benson, there is much more potential. The first year was only a starting point. “It’s a learning curve. Looking back at it, I could have done a few things better. Instead of starting when the fruit is starting to show, I would activate the laser four to six weeks before.

The birds then are still making their nests for spring and summer and breeding. The point is to create an atmosphere that is uncomfortable or even threatening for them.

During the summer of 2016 he started using the Agrilaser Autonomic to stand up against the beautiful, but voracious, Rosella parrots. The first season was successful, but the academic turned farmer has enough tricks up his sleeve to make the laser even more effective. During the Australian summer of 2016 John Benson started using the Agrilaser Autonomic. His first impression being positive: “The laser works off a computer and power source and was not complicated to set up at all. It took about an hour to get everything ready to go. “Blueberries grow significantly over the summer, something to keep in mind according to Benson. “The growth of the fruit could mean you have to reposition the laser or that you have to adjust the parameters.”

Wipe-out The birds ravaging the blueberry farm are the colourful Rosella parrots. Sometimes attacking with thousands at once. Benson used all kinds of tools to disperse the aggressive birds on his farm: scarecrows, noisemakers, light reflecting shiny tapes. But nothing seemed effective enough. “Some tools only work during the day or need too much monitoring, it just didn’t do the trick. I’ve seen them destroy an entire harvest within a week or two. The situation before the laser was quite horrifying: without incredible expensive netting the birds would wipe you out. With the laser this scenario is off the table. And even better, the old tools work quite good in combination with the laser,” John said.

And I would also mount the machine even higher. It was now set up on an old truck. Next year I would set it up two meters higher directing towards nesting spots and the fruit.”

An ideal world with two lasers “The Agrilaser is a terrific machine. It works even during the super bright Australian summer days. But, as an academic, I’m always thinking of how things would work even better. In my ideal world, I would have two lasers. The first laser focusing on its regular projection pattern. The other one focusing on irregular bird attacks.” MORE INFORMATION https://birdcontrolgroup.com/less-crop-losswith-autonomic-at-blueberry-farm/

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

39


TOOL TIME

Refractometer A friendly tool for plant crop therapy

Inexpensive tool @

Under $100

BY VO THE TRUYEN INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

C

hemical analysis of soil and leaf samples give an objective guide to help growers, usually with assistance from an agronomist, to make the most of an appropriate fertiliser application program. This is a worldwide recommended practice, however it is usually expensive and it takes several days for the soil and leaf tests results to be returned. In some cases too late to carry out a correction action in terms of making adjustment of plant nutrition status.

It has been suggested for a while1 that a refractometer, which essentially monitors nutrient density within the plant, can offer a good guideline of photosynthesis efficiency and associated pest resistance.

Here are some reasons2 why the use of this tool is recommended.

1.

 his tool offers an inexpensive T insight into yield potential and crop quality.

the likelihood of 2. Itpestalsoandindicates disease pressure. i.e.

levels must always be lower in the morning than in the late afternoon. If morning and afternoon readings are similar then you are lacking the boron required to facilitate sugar transfer and a boron foliar spray will be very productive.

brix crops will have greater 3. High specific gravity, higher nutritional

value and will contain low levels of toxic nitrates. High nitrates always mean low brix levels and increased pest pressure.

levels should be the same 7. Brix throughout the plant. If there is

as the higher the plant sugars the lower the freezing point.

should always have a lower 8. Weeds brix level than your crop or they

with a good brix level are 4. Crops less likely to suffer frost damage refractometer can be used to 5. Amonitor calcium levels in your

significant variation then you have uncovered a nutrient imbalance that requires further investigation.

will be problematical in that crop. If weeds have a higher brix than your crop there is a problem with mineral balance in your soil.

crop. A fuzzy line when looking into the viewfinder is indicative of good calcium levels while a sharp,

As far as farm aids go this one is relatively inexpensive (under $100), can be found for sale on numerous agricultural websites and can give you real-time brix readings to discuss with your chosen consultant. WA Grower SUMMER 2017

levels can also be monitored 6. Boron with this invaluable tool. Brix

the lower the brix level the higher the likelihood of insect attack or fungal disease.

A refractometer is an instrument that measures dissolved solids — brix levels. These solids reflect sugar levels in the plant, but they are also an indication of mineral levels and general plant health.

40

distinct line means a lack of this important mineral.

MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in seeing this friendly tool in action, please contact vegetablesWA for a demonstration as the Industry Extension Officers have one on hand.

1 2

http://blog.nutri-tech.com.au/monitoring-myths/ http://blog.nutri-tech.com.au/ten-reasons-to-owna-refractometer/


YOUR INDUSTRY

your

industry WA Grower SUMMER 2017

41


YOUR INDUSTRY

Tomato potato psyllid surveillance continues in WA S

urveillance efforts against the tomato potato psyllid will gain further momentum over the next couple of months as summer approaches. The Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides an update.

surveillance has been carried out across more than

1,600 properties

Trapping for the tomato potato psyllid (TPP) has ramped up during spring with the warmer weather conducive to increased insect activity. Trapping and surveillance led by the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is part of a national Transition to Management Plan supported by industry and government to help industry effectively manage the destructive pest.

Photo: DPIRD

TPP feeds on tomato, potato, capsicum, chilli, goji berry, tamarillo, eggplant and sweetpotato, leading to loss of plant vigour and yield. Uncontrolled weeds such as nightshade and tree tobacco can also harbour the pest.

42

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR INDUSTRY

Mr Ruprecht said surveillance for the pest in Western Australia will resume in late spring. “The department will work closely with landholders in metropolitan and regional areas to trap psyllids,” Mr Ruprecht said.

33KATE Newman and Darryl Hardie. Residents across the Perth metropolitan area have been encouraged to host a ‘sticky trap’ in their backyard to help combat TPP.

“We have had great support from landholders in supporting surveillance activities since the pest was first detected. “As part of the response to date, surveillance has been carried out across more than 1,600 properties, involving the deployment of more than 10,000 traps.” Other states will also implement surveillance plans for the pest. The department will lead new research including examining chemical control options, post-harvest disinfestation trials and assessing biological control options using predator species. Residents across the Perth metropolitan area have been encouraged to host a ‘sticky trap’ in their backyard to help combat TPP.

“We are calling on the Perth community to support our surveillance efforts by ‘adoptinga-trap’ in their garden during spring,” DPIRD Senior Research Officer Darryl Hardie said. “We are looking for home gardeners from across the Perth metropolitan area, as well Wanneroo, SerpentineJarrahdale, Mundaring, Mandurah, Gingin, Chittering and Murray, who grow potatoes, capsicums, tomatoes or chillies in their gardens.

Strengthening surveillance DPIRD Irrigated Agriculture Executive Director John Ruprecht said the psyllid had significantly impacted Western Australian growers since its detection in February, limiting interstate trade for a range of plants and produce. “This national plan will support improved management of TPP and build confidence around the status of the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), which can be associated with the psyllid but has not been detected in Australia,” Mr Ruprecht said. “The eight-month plan will involve national surveillance, ongoing market access work, increased research on pest management and development of on-farm management plans.”

“This dedicated trapping program will build our knowledge about this insect and its presence in Western Australia, to support our valuable horticulture industry in managing this new pest.” MORE INFORMATION Growers who suspect that tomato potato psyllid may be present in their crop need to report this to their state or territory department of agriculture or primary industries by phoning the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline on 1800 084 881. In Western Australia, growers can also use the DPIRD reporting app. Details about how to access and use the app are available at agric.wa.gov.au/apps/mypestguide-reporter. Article originally appeared in Potatoes Australia. With content provided by DPIRD

Western Australia’s TPP coordinator appointed Dr Ian Wilkinson has been appointed to coordinate the tomato potato psyllid (TPP) Transition to Management phase in Western Australia. Ian will be working with the state’s horticultural industry as well as the National TPP Coordinator to implement the nationally-agreed Transition to Management plan over the next eight months. Ian is a Senior Research Officer with the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, based in Bunbury. Ian has broad experience in research and project management in irrigated agriculture and biosecurity. He successfully managed the 2016 green snail incident, working with Western Australian strawberry growers and industry to limit the impact of the declared pest. He has contributed in a number of other areas of horticulture including apple management and the management of stable fly. Ian is supported by a dedicated team from the department including surveillance, entomology and laboratory staff, to put the plan into action.

This communication has been funded by Hort Innovation using the fresh potato research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Project Number: PT15007

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

43


YOUR INDUSTRY

Adoption of precision systems technology in vegetable production

Capel Farms trial location BY RACHEL LANCASTER ENVIRONMENTAL AND AGRICULTURAL TESTING SERVICES

T

he project VG16009 Adoption of precision systems technology in vegetable production aims to demonstrate the potential for using precision agriculture to increase crop productivity. Field work is continuing on precision agriculture techniques at the demonstration site located at Capel Farms, in the south west of WA. Electromagnetic (EM) and radiometric mapping were completed on fallow areas of cropped land and also on land that is being developed for cropping. Processing of the images from the mapping has been completed.

The mapping provided a range of information such as slope, elevation and depressions in the land as well as an outline of areas where the soil type is significantly different. The initial aim of using the EM and radiometric mapping was to identify areas of clay across the new development area, which were remnants from sand mining operations. Radiometric mapping identified areas where the soil type was different, indicating the clay locations (Figure 1). Ground truthing of the mapping is currently occurring, with soil cores being taken from 31 locations across the mapped areas (Figure 2).

44

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

FIGURE 1 Radiometric map of a new development area at Capel Farms. The dark blue areas indicate potential areas of clay soils, while the red areas indicate areas of sandier soils. Soil cores have been taken to assess the accuracy of the mapping data. The vertical red strip through the middle of the map is an old dirt airstrip, which is known sandy soil


YOUR INDUSTRY

mapping

provided a range of information including slope, elevation and depressions.

A

B FIGURE 2 Ground truthing of the EM and radiometric data from soil cores. Soil core ‘A’ shows the soil profile from the surface (left of photo) to 60cm depth (right of photo). A clay layer is from 0–10cm in depth, followed by the natural grey sand top soil to about 30cm deep and then the yellow sand subsoil. Soil core ‘B’ shows a clay layer through to 60cm deep

The EM mapping provided an additional benefit which was not initially anticipated. The depressions and elevations of the mapped area have been used to determine potential areas of water flow (Figure 3), which will assist with decisions around the installation of drainage lines in the new development areas. The biomass of broccolini crops has also been assessed using a drone to capture images of the growing crop. This precision agriculture technique requires refinement in a brassica crop as the initial data identified that weeds in the crop interrow reduce the accuracy of the biomass estimation.

The soil cores will be analysed for texture, electrical conductivity, pH and nutrients, to determine the soil characteristics from the surface to 60cm deep and a comparison made with the mapping data. If the soil characteristics identified from the soil cores match those predicted using the EM and radiometric mapping data, this suggests the mapping is a useful method for determining soil types across a large area. Compared to traditional soil mapping, which requires multiple soil samples to be collected across an area of interest, EM and radiometric mapping is less time consuming, less labour intensive and may be a more cost effective method to determine potential soil types.

MORE INFORMATION The trialling of precision agriculture techniques on broccolini crops at Capel Farms will continue for another two years. FIGURE 3 Accumulated water flows in the new development area at Capel Farms. Accumulated flow is the direction the water could potentially flow if the soil profile is at field capacity. The accumulated flow is projected from the elevation and depression data gained during EM mapping

The project is funded by Horticulture Innovation Australia, using grower levy funds matched by the Australian Government. The Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland are the leading the project throughout Australia and vegetablesWA is managing the project in Western Australia.

EM and radiometric mapping provides a large mapped area, while traditional soil sampling methods provide only an indication of the soil type in the immediate areas close to the soil sample. WA Grower SUMMER 2017

45


YOUR INDUSTRY

SEED CERTIFICATION

New export market opportunities for WA seed potatoes

In this seed certification program update, Peter Dawson from the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development discusses potential new markets for Australian seed potato growers who are looking to export.

Over the previous 17 years there has been a steady decline in fresh potato production in Australia as well as many other developed countries, while fresh potato production in developing countries is growing faster than population growth.

One growth opportunity available to the Australian potato industry is seed for export markets. Several Western Australian seed potato entities have been pursuing seed potato exports over the last decade. Western Australia now leads Australian seed potato exports with a share of 79%, however the maximum exported was around 4,500 tonnes in 2011. Western Australian exports received a price premium of 73% in the global front. The major markets are Indonesia, Mauritius and Thailand. These markets have grown over the last decade but are now reaching capacity, so there is a need to look for new seed potato markets.

46

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR INDUSTRY

Market Attractiveness Index

68 67.4

67 66

66.0

65

65.7 64.8

64

64.5

63

63.1

62 61 60

Pakistan

Brazil

Egypt Sri Lanka Country

Niger

Bangladesh

FIGURE 1 Market Attractiveness Index (MAI) of potential seed potato markets Source: Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

growth opportunity — seed for export markets

Global outlook According to World Potato Markets Issue 311, global trade in seed potatoes amounted to 1.5 million tonnes in 2016. This trade is dominated by the Netherlands with 60% of the market (around 900,000 tonnes), followed by France, United Kingdom (Scotland), Canada, Germany, Denmark and Belgium — all of which export more than 50,000 tonnes of seed. The main season for these seed potato exports is from October to May, with a peak between November and December. June to September could be a seasonal window for Australian exports where other major suppliers are not very active in the trade market. Australian seed potatoes will have suitable physiological age for vigorous growth at times of the year when the European seed is dormant or senile.

New markets

Future potential

The Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has produced a report entitled Markets for Western Australian seed potatoes, which investigates potential new export market opportunities for the state’s seed potatoes. A market attractiveness index was developed and calculated for 77 countries which import more than USD$1 million worth of seed potatoes annually. These countries were ranked according to indicators of market access and market demand.

As there are only minor differences between the MAI of the six selected countries, it would be more appropriate to consider this as a group of countries with good potential, rather than ranking within them. However, some observations on differences will be discussed.

The Market Access Index used three sub-indices including the indicators of difference in average and bilateral tariffs (tariff for Australia); difference in average distance of all importing countries and distance between Australia and the importing country; and total Australian trade with that importing country.

The Market Demand Index was based on seven sub-indices, using the indicators of import value growth, market size, unit value of import, trade balance, change in trade balance and future growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Different indicators in their raw form can’t be used for comparison purposes, so the indicators were normalised; combining the normalised market access and market demand indices gave a Market Attractiveness Index (MAI). A final noneconomic evaluation of countries was then done to exclude obvious problems, such as war zones. Pakistan, Brazil, Egypt, Sri Lanka, Niger and Bangladesh were selected as potential markets for Western Australian seed potatoes. Their MAI can be compared in Figure 1.

Market demand was highest for Egypt among the top rated countries. Egypt is the major market in terms of market size but in terms of market growth, it ranks second from the bottom. However, market size is very large for Egypt compared to the other markets, hence a small portion of the Egyptian market may create a big opportunity for exports. Market growth is highest for Niger, however the size of the market is very small. Egypt and Brazil have a value of 100 in market size and market premium respectively. This means that among all the importers of seed potato (203 countries), Egypt ranks first in market size and Brazil ranks first in market premium. Details on each country were compiled and are available in the full report which can be found at: agric.wa.gov.au/exportmarkets-wa-seed-potato. MORE INFORMATION For more information, please visit agric.wa.gov.au. Articles originally appeared in Potatoes Australia, content was provided by DPIRD.

This communication has been funded by Hort Innovation using the fresh potato research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Project Number: PT15007

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

47


YOUR INDUSTRY

Coordinating tomato potato psyllid management on a national scale

T

he newly-launched strategic levy investment MT16018 — Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) National Program Coordinator will enable the potato industry, as well as other affected industries, to take a proactive and strategic approach to TPP management in Australia. Alan Nankivell, formerly of the Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre (PB CRC), began the role of National TPP Coordinator on 16 October.

Photo: Plant and Food Research NZ

33SYMPTOMS of CLso in potato.

48

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Early in February, the tomato potato psyllid (TPP) was found in Australia in a Perth vegetable garden. Continued surveillance by the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has found the psyllid in agricultural areas surrounding Perth, and also in vegetable and potato growing regions south of Perth. So far, the associated bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum; CLso) has not been detected. Surveillance for the bacterium will continue under a recently approved Transition to Management (T2M) plan, which will continue until May 2018. On completion of the T2M phase: • W  e will know if CLso is carried by our TPP population. • W  e will have guidance material to manage TPP at a farm level. • W  e will have a national plan to guide management of TPP now, and into the future. • W  e will have interstate compliance protocols for produce grown in affected regions. • W  e will have begun Australian research on the biology and management of our endemic population. DPIRD staff who work on the T2M plan will be supported from the industry side by Alan Nankivell, as National TPP Program Coordinator, who will lead development of the National Management Plan and contribute to farm management guidance material. The project, Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) National Program Coordinator (MT16018) is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable, Fresh Potato and Potato Processing Funds. Importantly, this role is funded for three years, ensuring that initiatives that are begun during the T2M phase can be continued by the coordinator throughout the life of the project.


YOUR INDUSTRY

What will happen if tomato potato psyllid is found in a currently unaffected state or territory?

About Alan Nankivell During his career, Alan has gained extensive experience in leading and developing national programs across several sectors. While leading biosecurity initiatives in viticulture, he developed innovative, easy-to-use communication tools to aid farm gate hygiene and risk assessment, as well as developing online spatial information to provide stakeholders with up-to-date knowledge of where pests are and where they are not. “I am looking forward to meeting with growers who have been impacted by the incursion of TPP,” Alan said. “I will seek to learn from them and apply this knowledge to develop tools to maximise the efforts of stakeholders who are affected by TPP. For those regions where it is not known if TPP is present, I will work with stakeholders to ‘prepare’ as though TPP could arrive.”

Project overview The primary function of the role will be ensuring that R&D and management efforts across the various industries and jurisdictions affected by TPP are coordinated, prioritised and strategic. Efforts to effectively manage TPP at the moment are largely directed at Western Australia (uninfected ‘at risk’ regions and infected regions). However, this is intended to be a national project, with coordination activities seeking to benefit both Western Australia and states that are not yet managing the pest. This role will reduce double handling and wastage of resources as it will ensure that important initiatives are not repeated by several organisations and aid in directing investments to where R&D is most needed for effective management of TPP. The primary output of the program will be the development of a national TPP management strategy, which will include a national TPP R&D agenda, to be updated annually.

Australia's Chief Plant Health Officers, as part of national Plant Health Committee (PHC) are very aware of industry concerns about the possible impacts of a tomato potato psyllid (TPP) detection beyond Western Australia. PHC is currently working towards an agreed regulator position, in consultation with industry. Such a case would be reviewed once again by the national committee charged with recommending action during an Emergency Plant Pest incursion. If the decision is made to not undertake eradication, TPP will become a ‘managed’ pest in the region, state or territory. At that point it is up to the government of that state or territory to let the pest be unregulated and managed by industry best practice, contain the pest to a defined area through regulation, or eradicate the pest without support from the Federal Government. This decision is often influenced by several factors, including: • the value of the affected industry in that state;

The first workshop for the project was held on 26 September at the PlantSci17 Conference in Brisbane. This workshop targeted government and researchers in order to assess future R&D needs and priorities for management of TPP and CLso, and was the first major output of the project. It will be followed with further industry consultation at various forums in order to develop the TPP R&D agenda that will underpin the national management plan.

The steering committee A steering committee for the project has also been finalised, and includes individuals with experience covering potato processing, fresh potato production, vegetable production, government biosecurity policy, entomology and plant pathology.

• geography of the region; • resourcing available within the particular government department; and • the view of members from the affected industry.

Proactive approach The action that will follow such a detection is as yet uncertain. During 2017, interstate compliance agreements for certifying produce from TPP-affected areas have been developed and accepted by several states. This work provides a platform for managing any trade issues as quickly as possible. Additionally, our industry has been pre-emptive in employing a National TPP Coordinator to lead preparations for the spread and long-term management of the psyllid. Regardless of the determination by state or territory governments, AUSVEG will work with the Department of Primary Industry of the affected state with the aim of facilitating communication between government and industry, as well as activities that will support the long-term health of our sector. agenda, which will guide future R&D investments on TPP. The steering committee will review and endorse the TPP national plan, and provide independent advice to the coordinator. The committee will be made up of Nigel Crump (ViCSPA), Callum Fletcher (AUSVEG), Geoff Raven (Primary Industries and Regions South Australia), Michael Hicks (Snack Brands Australia), Simon Moltoni (WA Potatoes) and Troy Cukrov (SupaFresh). MORE INFORMATION For more information please contact AUSVEG on (03) 9882 0277 or alan.nankivell@ausveg.com.au. AUSVEG article originally appeared in Potatoes Australia. This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the fresh potato, potato processing and vegetable research and development levies and contributions from the Australian Government. Project number: MT16018

R&D priorities identified will be reviewed by the project steering committee and integrated into the national TPP R&D

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

49


YOUR INDUSTRY

RAISING THE AWARENESS OF

BY SHAUN LINDHE NATIONAL MANAGER — COMMUNICATIONS AUSVEG

Looking after our mental health is vitally important, not just for our personal health and wellbeing, but also to maximise productivity in the workplace and create a strong community.

Knowing where to go for information on mental health and how to make your workplace more mentally healthy can be a hurdle for many people, so AUSVEG has compiled this list of resources that may help to navigate this sensitive space. The statistics speak for themselves: • There are at least three million Australians living with anxiety or depression. • On average, one in four people — one in three women and one in five men — will experience anxiety at some stage in their life. • Suicide is the leading cause of death for Australians aged between 15 and 44, with around 3,000 people dying by suicide every year. That's an average of eight people every day. • Australian businesses lose $10.9 billion every year in absenteeism, reduced work productivity, increased turnover rates and compensation claims due to mental health conditions. • 50% of managers think no one in their workplace is affected.

50

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

It is vital that we start talking more openly about the importance of discussing mental health and seeking help if you or someone you know is experiencing difficulties. There are organisations available for people who are looking for more information about mental health and they can give advice on how to deal with personal mental health issues or those that arise in your workplace, communities, friends or families.


YOUR INDUSTRY

50% of managers think no one in their workplace is affected.

Black Dog Institute

MindSpot

Black Dog Institute is a world leader in mental health research and specialises in rapidly turning research outcomes into mental health resources, online self-help tools, and education for individuals and businesses. Its website holds a wealth of information including:

The MindSpot Clinic is a national and online mental health service that caters for Australian adults aged 18 years and over who have symptoms of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), chronic pain, low mood or depression. The MindSpot team includes psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, indigenous mental health workers, and counsellors and is committed to reducing barriers to effective care such as stigma, severity of symptoms or lack of local services.

• mental health and wellbeing; • self-tests for depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder; • e-mental health tools; • getting help and helping others; • webinars and community presentations; • how to obtain a referral for our assessment clinic; and

For more information please call 1800 61 44 34 or visit mindspot.org.au.

• telehealth services for adolescents and adults. On average, one in four people — one in three women and one in five men — will experience anxiety at some stage in their life.

For more information visit blackdoginstitute.org.au.

Sane Australia Lifeline Lifeline is a national charity providing all Australians experiencing a personal crisis with access to highly-skilled, compassionate and non-judgemental help. For 24/7 crisis support and suicide prevention services call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

beyondblue beyondblue is a not-for-profit organisation that aims to help everyone in Australia achieve their best possible mental health, whatever their age and wherever they live. Since beyondblue was founded in 2000 it has formed strong partnerships with academics, governments, corporates, service providers and the community, promoting good mental health across a range of population groups and places in which people live, learn, work and play. beyondblue offers a 24/7 Support Service staffed by trained mental health professionals. For further information on anxiety, depression or suicide visit beyondblue.org.au or call 1300 22 46 36 (24 hours/7 days a week). To chat to a trained mental health professional, please visit beyondblue.org. au/get-support/get-immediate-support.

SANE Australia is a national mental health charity working to support four million Australians affected by complex mental illness including schizophrenia, bipolar, borderline personality disorder, eating disorders, OCD, PTSD and severe depression and anxiety. For more information, please call the SANE Helpline on 1800 18 SANE (7263) or visit sane.org.

The online Crisis Support Chat service is also available every night at lifeline.org.au/crisischat.

Suicide Call Back Service MensLine Australia MensLine Australia National 24/7 telephone, online-chat and video counselling service supports men with family and relationship issues. MensLine forum and MensLine social media accounts are moderated 24/7.

Suicide Call Back Service National 24/7 telephone, online-chat and video counselling service supports people at risk of suicide, or bereaved by suicide. Call 1300 659 467 or visit suicidecallbackservice.org.au.

For more information visit mensline.org.au or call 1300 78 99 78.

These are just some examples of the mental health services available in Australia. If you require emergency assistance, please contact 000.

MORE INFORMATION For more information or resources go to https://ausveg.com.au/mental-healthindustry/resources-2/ or speak with your GP.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

51


YOUR INDUSTRY

e t s a T e e n h t y of o c s Ga AT THE PERTH ROYAL SHOW

52

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR INDUSTRY

T

Noelene Swain from Fresh Finesse also showed visitors how to make a delicious banana salsa and ratatouille during the week.

BY GEORGIA THOMAS GASCOYNE FOOD COUNCIL

The stand provided around 25,000 samples for the week, plus sold around 400 showbags. The team went through around 660 loaves of banana bread, 360 bags of bananas, 288 kilos of sampling bananas!

he Gascoyne Food Council once again brought a taste of the farm to the city at the annual Perth Royal Show at Claremont Showgrounds.

Additionally the stand used up 47 cartons of fresh produce including capsicums, tomatoes, corn, onions, turmeric, herbs, paw paw, black sapote, beans, pumpkins, zucchini and paprika.

Gascoyne Food featured in the Walk Through WA displays in the Centenary Pavilion offering visitors free food samples, Chef demonstrations, a healthy showbag, products to purchase and fact sheets, activity books and other free information. Despite some inclement weather, the Gascoyne Food stand had a great week, with the busy days making up for any of the quiet periods. The team were able to engage a wide audience and share a great deal of information about the food produced in the region. It was also a great advantage to be located across from the Carnarvon visitor centre stand to share the regional story. This year the stand has some new elements including free samples of mouthwatering Harvey Beef steaks and slow cooked brisket. Visitors were also able to try some award winning Gelatino Premium Banana Gelato, made with Carnarvons’ Sweeter Banana’s.

The event also provided an excellent opportunity to keep the Gascoyne in the media spotlight, with a visit from Channel Seven news shown on live TV and a range of print articles featuring the region. In addition, the social media push during the event reached over 22,000 people. MORE INFORMATION For more information and stay up to date with Gascoyne Food Council activities please go to www.gascoynefood.com.au or email Doriana on admin@gascoynefood.com.au.

Another new addition to the pavilion was the Demonstration Stage where Chef Stuart Laws of Don Tapa joined the line up to cook up some tasty Gascoyne produce over the first weekend. Visitors were able to enjoy a sample of Stuart’s creations, including 36 hour sous vide Harvey Beef brisket and freshly made eggplant caponata.

Fresh from Carnarvon

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

53


YOUR INDUSTRY

Growing Leaders 2018

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 15 JANUARY 2018

National Vegetable Industry Leadership Program 2018

Growing Leaders 2018 — National Vegetable Industry Leadership Program 2018 (Growing Leaders 2018) is the leadership platform being delivered through funding from the Hort Innovation and developed, managed and delivered by Rural Training Initiatives P/L. Lauren East and Natalie Borschoff have attended this course in past years and have both found it of great benefit. The course is funded through the national levy, with levy payers partially reimbursed their costs at the end of the course. Growing Leaders 2018 is the only national industry specific leadership program for the Australian vegetable industry and was designed in consultation with vegetable industry people and with their specific needs in mind. In its eleventh year, the program now has a graduate population of 100 people of all ages and from all sectors of the industry including growing, processing, wholesale and extension have now successfully completed the program.

54

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

The program will run for six months as follows: Program First Residential Second Residential (in conjunction with PMA — A-NZ AUSVEG Convention 2018) Third Residential

To view detailed information on the program and the application process, go to the Rural Training Initiatives website.

Who should apply? • The people who are going to succeed you within the business • Anyone who is sitting on your board of directors • Anyone who features in your succession plan • Those keen people who have demonstrated skills and capacity within your organisation • Those individuals who have interest and passion but require some increased knowledge and ability.

Date

Location

13–15 March 2018

Melbourne

18–20 June 2018

Brisbane

11–13 September 2018

Canberra

We also ask you to consider the underrepresented cohorts who need to have a voice within the industry and encourage them to apply. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Jill Briggs, Project Manager — Growing Leaders, Rural Training Initiatives P/L admin@ ruraltraininginitiatives.com.au


Two centuries of innovation. A lifetime of success. Astuto

F1

Quality Fruit, Firm with Improved Colour & Gloss

+ + + + + + +

Brother variety to the well-known Genio adding even more disease resistance & quality! Cherry tomato with excellent field holding ability & shelf life Premium fruit size (15-20g), ideal for punnet packing Well balanced, clean plant, strong resistance to leaf disease Great resistance package including F3, TYLCV, TSWV & Ss HR: ToMV / Va:1 / Vd:1 / Fol:1,2,3 / Ff (A,B,C,D,E) IR: TSWV:T0 / TYLCV / Ma / Mi / Mj / Ss

Chevello + + + + + +

Large, uniform fruit size, very firm & well-shaped lobes Strong plant, ideal for trellising Even colour transition from green to bright yellow Early maturity & continuous fruit setting ability resulting in higher yields HR: TMV / PMMov:1,2,3 IR: TSWV:P0

Battalon + + + + + + +

F1 - Glasshouse Quality!

F1

-

Vigour for the Cool!

Long Dutch suited to cool season production cool & shoulder slot Vigorous, dark green & healthy plant Shiny, dark green, medium ribbed fruit with uniform shape/length High yield potential Excellent shelf life Strong virus resistance IR: CYSDV / CVYV

For more information, contact: Kevin Swan – Technical Sales Representative – Tel: 0400 622 314 – kevin.swan@hmclause.com Important: The descriptions, illustrations, photographs, advice, suggestions and vegetation cycles that may be presented herein are aimed at experienced professionals and are derived from observations made in defined conditions on various trials. They are offered in all good faith, for purely informational purposes, and shall not therefore, under any circumstances, be held to be exhaustive, be taken as any form of guarantee of harvest or performance, prejudge specific factors or circumstances (either current or future), and more generally, form any kind of contractual undertaking whatsoever. The user must first and foremost ensure that his exploitation conditions, local geographical conditions, his planned growing period, his soil, the means at his disposal (such as technical knowledge and experience and cultural techniques and operations), his resources (such as tests and control methods) and his equipment, and more generally his agronomical, climatic, sanitary, environmental and economic context are suitable for the crops, techniques and varieties that are presented herein. All the varieties illustrated in this publication were photographed in favourable conditions and no guarantee can be provided that results will be identical under different conditions. All reproductions, whether in part or in whole, of this publication (of the medium and/or the contents), in any form whatsoever, are strictly forbidden, unless specific prior permission is granted. Non contractual photographs - All rights reserved - © 2017 HM.CLAUSE

Clause Pacific - P.O. Box 475 - Bulleen - VIC 3105 - AUSTRALIA Tel: +61 (0)3 8850 5400 - Fax: +61 (0)3 8850 5444


YOUR INDUSTRY

r Ag i c o u o l r t e u n r n al a W Show BY SAM GRUBISA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

T

he first Wanneroo Agricultural Show was officially opened by Sir John Forrest on 21st August 1909. Every year since then agricultural, horticultural and other associated industries within the Wanneroo regions have been showcased with the show growing to become the states largest Regional Agricultural Show. This year saw 1,200 competitive classes in agriculture, livestock, hobbies, arts and crafts, horticulture and there was a large contingent of Wanneroo and Carabooda growers, with some excellent performances from schools and ‘Junior Growers’ in the competitions.

1ST PRIZE

1ST PRIZE

1ST PRIZE

2ND PRIZE

56

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

1ST PRIZE

To all of the growers who participated and to those who won, congratulations and we hope to see you supporting this ‘Wanneroo institution’ for years to come.


YOUR INDUSTRY

Carnarvon grower

Michael Nixon nominated for Syngenta Growth Award

C

arnarvon grower and AUSVEG Director Michael Nixon has been recognised as a regional winner in the Syngenta Growth Awards, and has been nominated as a finalist for a Syngenta Growth Award in the Community & People category. Each year, Syngenta profiles growers and farm advisers from different regions across Australia and New Zealand, showcasing their contribution in one of the following categories: • Productivity: Recognises growers and advisers who use best practice in achieving consistent productivity gains. • Sustainability: Recognises growers and advisers who are committed to addressing industry issues to create a sustainable and profitable future. • Community & People: Recognises growers and advisers who make a leading contribution to their community, workers and fellow growers.

Michael sees the Australian agriculture industry as a livelihood for thousands of Australian families and a means to a secure future for his local community. He believes the key to industry success is communication and he is passionate about connecting the agriculture industry.

As part of this enterprise, Michael works to ensure safe and fair treatment of seasonal workers, including taking the time to implement a comprehensive induction program.

Michael started his career as a mixed broadacre farmer. Twelve years ago, he and his wife Catriona decided to move to Carnarvon to become banana growers. While he could not have foreseen the large learning curve that came with this change, Michael and Catriona worked hard to overcome the many challenges they faced. As such, Michael has found that the only way to succeed is to keep learning, and he achieves that for himself through collaboration with a wide variety of farmers and industry stakeholders.

He is active in a number of industry groups including Carnarvon Growers’ Association and he is an AUSVEG board member. Michael was also a past committee member of the Fruit Fly Committee, which helped establish Carnarvon’s Fruit Fly Free status. Through these groups, Michael represents his local growing community while working to navigate regulatory red tape. Importantly, Michael’s efforts have resulted in expedited and increased government support for cyclone victims in the Carnarvon area.

Michael and Catriona have since moved into growing other crops including onions, beetroots and melons alongside their bananas. In fact, they have become the largest basil and onion grower in Carnarvon.

For more information on the Syngenta awards go to their website www.syngenta.com.au/ growthawards

largest basil and onion grower in Carnarvon.

Nominations for the Growth Awards are invite-only and 25 regional winners were chosen from the pool of nominees and announced in October. The regional winners are invited to attend The Growth Awards dinner in November, where the overall Growth Awards winners are announced. The winners are chosen by an independent panel comprised of industry representatives and stakeholders and have the opportunity to participate in a Syngenta overseas study tour.

MORE INFORMATION

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

57


YOUR INDUSTRY

Euro Trip

1st Stop

The worlds biggest orange pepper greenhouse

e th f o e v ti c e p Pers n i r e w o r g e l a m e lone f the group

T

BY LAUREN EAST WILARRA GOLD

he 2017 Young Grower Leadership and Development Mission provided 10 growers from the vegetable industry with the opportunity to gain insight into a range of growing operations throughout Europe. With AUSVEG leading the tour around the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. It’s always interesting at the beginning of any grower group or tour for me, asking myself, ‘I wonder if there will be any other women at this event?’ however, I’m never really surprised when the answer is no. After a few minutes of meeting the group you realise how much we all have in common. We all speak the same language, not the English language, but farming… vegetable farming. That’s right it is what we are all about.

58

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Our tour schedule was fully packed with all things farming, making it my kind of holiday… I mean work trip. Our tour was planned so we could see every aspect of the vegetable production process, from seed company’s start to finish of producing new varieties. Stopping at Syngenta seeds and then onto Rijk Zwaan, we had just missed their field days from a few days before, but there was still plenty to see. First question from me usually starts with “have these been sprayed with anything recently? No! Good!” Just what I felt like, the stem of a cauliflower leaf.

The seedling company use latest technology to combat the cooler temperatures in their region to optimise growing potential. As a broccoli grower, the next step of the process from planting a seedling to harvesting a vegetable was what I was looking forward to. My question for the mission, ‘Surely there’s just got to be a better way of picking broccoli… other than just getting someone else to do it.’ First stop for the harvesting process was visiting the worlds biggest orange pepper greenhouse (known as capsicums in our part of the world), with over 30 hectares of their property under glass. With robotics and renewable energy they have an extremely efficient process of

harvesting. There was the automated indoor farming system that uses LED lighting to grow produce in a controlled environment. This process increases production time and offers a fresh product that can be positioned close to or even in supermarket stores. Moving on to something a bit closer to home and something we all related to was the open field farm. With tractors, trucks, harvesters and plenty of international workers, this was a place we all recognised. Everything was much the same in regards to how they plant, harvest and process their produce. The major difference was the proximity to large populated areas, sending produce to different countries throughout Europe. The highlight of the tour for me was visiting the John Deere factory in Mannheim. It was a great way to get my 10,000 steps in by following the production line of building a brand new tractor. It was a truly remarkable experience seeing a new tractor coming off the line every few minutes.


YOUR INDUSTRY

33THE tour group checking out the green house and field production areas.

The whole time we were there I only saw one tractor heading for Australia, but I guess it was the wrong time of year not being close enough to the end of the financial year. Anyone planning on stopping in for a tour just so you know, you still have to buy a tractor to get a free John Deere hat.

High point on the way to Munich was getting on the Autobahn, 10 seconds later low point, driving on the Autobahn on a bus with maximum speed of 100km/h. On our last leg of the tour, we experienced the final processes of production, visiting the Munich city markets with the main question for wholesalers was ‘what kind of price do you get for that.’ On to play tourist with a local in tow, visiting the local farmers market including culinary samples of German cuisine along the way.

With the end of our tour in sight only meant one thing, your feedback form to be handed in. With a jammed packed tour behind us it took me two weeks just to process all that we had seen. Probably why mine arrived after I got back to Australia. It really was such an amazing experience that I would recommend for any young grower to be part of. The innovation, networking and information to be gained are all things that can be used in your own business. Truly a once in a lifetime opportunity. Unfortunately I didn’t discover the answer to an easier way of picking broccoli (other than my original thought), but I did find out at home we know what we’re doing when it comes to growing quality produce. MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in taking part of AUSVEG’s part funded study tours you can contact them https://ausveg.com.au/ or (03) 9882 0277.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

59


TRUST THE EXPERTS

Poly-Feed

TM

Soluble NPK fertilisers for complete plant nutrition World-renowned Poly-Feed fertilisers feed your crops according to their developing needs by Nutrigation or as foliar sprays, providing plants with optimal, balanced nutrition throughout the growth season. •

Fully water soluble and safe for use with all irrigation and spraying systems, including with water of variable quality.

•

Comprise pure plant nutrients, are enriched with high levels of micronutrients and are free of chloride, sodium and other detrimental elements.

QUALITY HAIFA FERTILISERS AVAILABLE FROM Henderson 800 Rockingham Road Ph 9410 2233 E: mirco@mirco.com.au

neerabuP 2048 Wanneroo Road Ph 9407 4522 E: mirco@mirco.com.au

Rob Illiano 0447 030 367

Johny Mirco 0419 909 648


Years of Growth

Haifa australia

YOUR CROPS WILL LOVE YOU Multi-K

TM

Potassium nitrate fertilisers for healthy crops Treat your crops with Multi-K cutting-edge products to improve your production potential. MulTi-K potassium nitrate fertilisers help you to enhance quality, boost yields and reduce labour costs. Our range includes: • Multi-K GG for greenhouse application • Multi-K Prills for direct soil application

ManjiMuP tradinG 9-11 Pritchard Street Ph 9771 1044 E: trading@manjimup.mirco.com.au Marty Collins 0429 372 607

www.mircobros.com.au www.haifa-group.com


YOUR INDUSTRY

Leading the way to water efficiency & agricultural productivity

Professional certification

F

armers and Primary producers are concerned with the best use of their irrigation systems to maximise production and reduce cost. With over 70% of the water used is in the agriculture sector, any savings will have a significant impact on the economy. As such, state and local governments are putting pressures on and providing incentives for primary producers to maximise water savings. On the other hand, poorly designed, installed or operating systems will have a dramatic effect on yields and will affect the bottom line of primary producers given the tight margins they are already working within. Utilising the services of, or becoming a Certified Irrigation Designer/Professional guarantees that the person has the knowledge, skills, and expertise of the latest and most advanced irrigation systems, ensuring minimum industry standards are applied which ultimately minimises the chances of poorly designed, installed or maintained irrigation systems.

62

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Irrigation Australia Limited (IAL) is the nation's peak organisation representing water users, consultants, designers and installers, manufacturers and resellers, educational institutions and government agencies in Australia.

It is the national body certifying irrigation professionals and providing them with this competitive edge and point of difference in the market. One of Irrigation Australia’s most important missions is to help Australian farmers to upgrade water management efficiency and increase the productivity of every drop of water in the system. IAL is working towards a future where irrigation systems are: designed by Certified Irrigation Designers, Installed


YOUR INDUSTRY

Irrigation Australia administers seven disciplines within the certification framework, covering a wide array of fields such as: Certified Irrigation Designer (CID) uses their knowledge of plants, soils, and hydraulics to develop best practice, cost-effective irrigation systems that improve water efficiency and reduce waste. CID is an internationally recognised program developed by Irrigation Association in the US. Marking and grading of papers for the Certified Designer course is done in the US. It is a well-regarded and acknowledged program that has helped many irrigation designers in Australia win international contracts. Certified Irrigation Agronomist provides advice on the relationship between soil, crop and irrigation together with knowledge of water scheduling to improve yield and water efficiency. Certified Irrigation Installer uses best practice to install, upgrade, troubleshoot or repair irrigation systems minimizing the environmental impacts of irrigation. Certified Irrigation Operator is responsible for the efficient and sustainable use of water when operating an irrigation system to reduce water usage and maximise productivity. Certified Irrigation Contractor manage the installation process of irrigation systems post design they also have responsibility for how irrigation systems are installed and maintained. Certified Irrigation Manager responsible for managing irrigation systems for farms or landscape projects while implementing best practice in irrigation and water use minimise the environmental impacts of irrigation.

water management efficiency and increased productivity

Certified Irrigation Retailer use their substantial knowledge of irrigation hydraulics, pumps and components to understand and meet the needs of the customers in the irrigation retail business.

MORE INFORMATION To read more and/or apply for a certification disciplines, visit our website www.irrigationaustralia.com.au Applicants require previous experience in their chosen field, and requires evidence to be deemed competent for some nationally accredited units of competency. This is accomplished by completing qualifications such as Cert III, Cert IV or Diploma in Irrigation or through the Recognition or Prior Learning Program (RPL). If you need to engage the services of a Certified Professional in your area, then visit the online search directory on the website homepage, select the appropriate tile and complete the search parameters.

33ONE of Irrigation Australia’s most important missions is to help Australian farmers to upgrade water management efficiency and increase the productivity of every drop of water in the system.

underpins its reputation for sustainability and productivity through optimum water resource management.

by Certified Irrigation Contractors or Installers, Run by Certified Irrigation Operators and Managers as well as the provision of product advice by Certified Irrigation Agronomists.

Certification is a voluntary, national program of industry recognition. It is a designation earned by a person to certify that he or she is qualified to perform a job. Certification indicates that the individual has a minimum set of knowledge, skills, or abilities in the view of the certifying body to perform their job to the satisfaction of water managers and customers.

There has been a surge of irrigation stakeholder interest in signing up for professional certification this year as the industry builds its performance and

Alternatively, you can telephone the office toll free 1300 949 891 if you have any questions on how to find, or become a Certified Irrigation Designer/Professional.

Watch our Certification Video here WA Grower SUMMER 2017

63


YOUR INDUSTRY

Kevan Dobra (Sativa Farm, Cullalla) discussing the farm’s overhead irrigation system.

Industry Extension OfficeR

update

I

BY SAM GRUBISA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

t’s been a busy few months in The Land of Veg with the Hort Code of Conduct and the Summit and grower visits… Oh My! Travelling from Albany to Carnarvon and everywhere in-between has been hectic but fun. September saw the coming together of the VegNET National Extension Network for our AGM in Townsville. The gathering started with a ‘Getting to Know You’ session, which was a fantastic way to find out the backgrounds, strengths and motivations of my fellow Extension Officers, Sam and Bianca from Horticulture Innovation and the Applied Horticulture Research Team. The next two days were full of Biosecurity, Precision Ag, Media training and Industry Extension and AHR presentations. The wealth of knowledge and experiences in one room was a great learning experience. The most important take away was

64

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR INDUSTRY

stronger relationships and a feeling of understanding and support from all involved with the VegNET Project, something which I think will be invaluable to my role. The Horticulture Code of Conduct has become like a crusade for me, with the betterment of the growers as my inspiration. With meetings down south and up north, the sharing of information has been one of my main focuses. The Horticulture Produce Agreement is something all growers must have, by April 2018, and we at vegetablesWA have been working our tails off to ensure they are as fair and transparent as they can be. This… is not an easy task! Constant reviews of legislation and legal documents, endless conversations with our CEO and Market Development Manager, as well as working with legal advisors has been extensive and exhausting. Please keep an eye on both the e-news for updates and your emails for further meeting notices. This really is an important issue that affects you all. October was a flurry of activity with the planning of the Grower Group Tour and Industry Summit hitting its peak. Weekly meetings, emails flying back and forth and even a last-minute trip to buy umbrellas as the weather threatened to turn nasty, were all in preparation for this one day and finally, that day arrived.

We set off from Crown at 7:30am and made our way to Sativa Farm in Cullalla. With a wrong turn and a few gear crunches we reached our destination, where our host Kevan Dobra met us at the gate. A demonstration of Kevan’s work crew harvesting baby leaf was an impressive sight to behold. Next there was a short walk, with a greeting from Farm Manager Jase Dobra and Loki the dog, where Kevan showed off the farms overhead irrigation system. Lastly, we got to get up close and personal with the 3-in1 smudger, an impressive innovation in farm machinery, read more about this in Your Production page 32.

Paul Omodei Jnr spoke of the business advantages of Benchmarking and officially announced the launch of the initiative.

Then off to the Loose Leaf Lettuce Company we went for a processing plant tour. The history of the company and some rather sage business advice was handed out by matriarch Maureen Dobra, with an introduction to some of the people who keep the baby leaf wheels turning (the cupcakes and brownies were pretty good too).

Dr Jessica Lye brought the presentations home with a Biosecurity update and some rather terrifying Giant African Snails, along with a TPP update from Rohan Prince as the surveillance kicks into the next gear over Summer.

It was then time to return to the Crown for a bit of a rest before the Industry Summit. The presentations kicked off with Allan McKay and Rachel Lancaster talking about all things Precision Ag. Then 2017 Telstra WA Business Woman of the Year, Jennie Franceschi gave us the low down on the Value Adding and using HPP technology. Our very own Bryn Edwards and Planfarm’s

The night ended on a high with networking, drinks and delicious canapes. I would like to say a big Thank you to everyone who attended and made this one of our biggest events yet. With this year’s Grower Tour and Summit done and dusted, we can now start planning for next years which will take place in October. If you are interested in attending or have any ideas on subjects get in touch and we can look at including them in the planning. As the end of 2017 looms large, I would like to thank you all for an amazing first seven months as your Industry Extension Officer, I look forward to meeting and working with more of you in 2018. I wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year in The Land of Veg. MORE INFORMATION To contact Sam please call 0427 373 037 or email sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

65


YOUR INDUSTRY

Western Australian first Seed Potato Industry Mission to Egypt WA has ideal conditions for seed potato production.

BY PETER DAWSON & ANDREW TAYLOR DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT, AGRICULTURE AND FOOD, WA

33L–R: Andrew Taylor, Kon Peos, Simon Moltoni, Patrick Fox and Aaron Chapman.

T

he members of the mission are Mr Simon Moltoni the Chief Executive Officer of the Potato Growers’ Association of Western Australia (PGAWA), plus three experienced seed potato growers and exporters — Mr Aaron Chapman of WA Elite Seed, Mr Patrick Fox of FoxFarming, and Mr Kon Peos of Southern Packers. They are accompanied by Mr Andrew Taylor, a Research Officer in Horticulture Plant Pathology from the Government of Western Australia’s Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development (DPIRD).

66

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

The purpose of the mission is to explore opportunities to supply WA seed potatoes to Egypt taking advantage of the fact that we can supply seed when it is not readily available from the United Kingdom or Europe. The initial objective is to understand the potential and requirements of the Egyptian seed potato market.

Why seed potatoes from WA? WA’s main seed potato crop is grown during the southern hemisphere summer between latitudes -33° to -35°. October to December plantings are harvested from February to April. Therefore, WA’s seed potatoes can be planted counterseasonally to European potato seed. WA has ideal conditions for seed potato production. Dr Peter Schmiediche of the International Potato Center said, “In the south of WA, potatoes are produced under the most ideal climatic and phytosanitary conditions imaginable.

There is no bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum), potato cyst nematode, or late blight. There is no other potato growing area in the world, known to the International Potato Center, where such conditions are found.”

WA is also free from bacterial ring rot (Clavibacter michiganensis pv. Sepedonicus) and potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum), tobacco rattle virus and potato mop-top virus, plus many other important potato pests. The movement of potatoes into WA is strictly controlled through Australian and WA’s quarantine regulations. WA’s potato production areas are isolated from other Australian potato regions by over 1,800km of desert. This means the risk of introduction of exotic seed-borne disease in WA’s seed potatoes is very low.


YOUR INDUSTRY

In the last three years WA’s seed potatoes have been exported to Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mauritius, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam.

In summary, WA can supply high quality seed potatoes for those potato growing regions having times of planting that are too early or late for northern hemisphere seed. This timing adds value to the quality of the seed used for those plantings.

Customer support

How seed is produced Seed potatoes are produced using pathogen tested tissue cultured nucleus material with minitubers (generation zero (G0)) produced by accredited laboratories. Five field generations are multiplied; G5 harvested seed is the final multiplication allowed. WA’s G5 is the equivalent field generation to Dutch Class E basic seed and Scottish Basic S seed. The WA seed scheme is managed by the Government with advice from industry. Seed potato crops are inspected twice in the field by Government inspectors. Field inspection allows each seed lot to be rated according to observed pest and disease tolerances. Rating 1 has the lowest tolerance of disease while any crop assigned a Rating 3 cannot be grown again within the scheme, regardless of generation. To ensure against infections of asymptomatic virus, leaves of G2 planted crops are tested for tomato spotted wilt virus, potato leafroll virus, potato virus S, potato virus X, and potato virus Y by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The summer growing period discourages aphids. Seed growing areas are also protected by onshore prevailing winds. WA’s soils are light textured and seed can be supplied virtually free from soil.

Inspectors are supported by the Government Plant Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Post-harvest tuber inspections are done by Government inspectors who issue seed labels to seed lots passing inspection.

WA’s seed producers have many years’ experience in producing high quality seed and are able to maximise production towards the requirements of specific markets. Seed exporters have supported their customers through industry development activities. Niche varieties have been imported through quarantine and multiplied. In partnership with the state government agriculture department, seed handling techniques suited to individual markets have been developed, as has Good Agricultural Practices for Indonesian, Sri Lankan and Vietnamese potato production.

The label provides information specific to the seed and is assigned a unique number to allow trace-back of the seed through the multiplications to the tissue culture nucleus material from the accredited laboratory. Australian Government Inspectors issue phytosanitary certificates for export seed.

MORE INFORMATION

WA seed potato markets

WA Certified Seed Scheme Rules:

WA’s potato industry’s total production is around 70,000 tonnes. 9,000t of seed is produced of which 2,000t is exported, 2,000t sold interstate and the remainder used for local production. The industry is keen to increase seed production.

WA Certified Seed Potato Scheme comparison with other schemes:

• www.agric.wa.gov.au/plant-biosecurity/ potatoseed-certification

• www.agric.wa.gov.au/plant-biosecurity/ western-australian-certified-seedpotato-scheme-internationalcomparison Laboratory support: • www.agric.wa.gov.au/bacteria/ddlsplantpathology-services Quarantine, Australian and interstate: • www.agriculture.gov.au/biosecurity/ australia • www.interstatequarantine.org.au/ travellers/interstate-quarantine/

33WA’S soils are light textured and seed can be supplied virtually free from soil.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

67


YOUR INDUSTRY

Agrimaster case study Glavocich Produce

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

P

aul and Crystal have been in Gingin growing vegetables for the past three years however have only been out on their own since July 2017. When they went out on their own it came with its own set of challenges, they had previously grown vegetables South of Perth and knew the challenges they would face with new soil conditions were only the start.

case study

33PAUL and Crystal Glavocich with their son Benjamin.

68

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

PERTH

GINGIN

Farmer Paul & Crystal Glavocich Location Gingin Size 70 acres Enterprises Garlic, parsnips, sweet potatoes, zucchini, eggplant, silverbeet and kale


YOUR INDUSTRY

As they were starting from scratch they looked at setting up new systems, one of which was their finance system with Agrimaster. They were using a consultant BJW Agribusiness who was helping to keep them focused so every three months they were looking at their finances. David uses Agrimaster with his clients as it provides the right level of reporting and is well known by all banks.

By setting up Agrimaster it has allowed Crystal to be able to stop manually working out the profit on each of their lines which was taking up way too much time with a new baby. Crystal can now spend two hours per week getting their finances up-to-date and have a full understanding on each produce line. This helps Paul manage the growing side of their business.

Crystal says knowing the average price for the products you are sending to the market and exactly the number of crates has made a significant improvement to the business. She said “If we don’t track everything we will go broke! It isn’t about how much money you have in the bank you have to understand the details in order to be able to ensure the bills don’t creep up on you and you know your costs.”

The Agrimaster support team has been a huge help as they are available on the phone or use their website to find FAQ’s or a better understanding from other people’s questions. Juggling a new baby, a business and a home can be hard work however Crystal is making sure she is using the tools so she has extra time to spend with Paul and baby Benjamin. The discipline on ensuring that you enter the data regularly has helped their business to know what each line is doing. They can now look at when they are selling and what season they should be growing in to make the most money. MORE INFORMATION If you’re interested in Agrimaster please contact Tegan Pridham on (08) 6380 8800 or Tegan.Pridham@mastergroup.net.au. You can also find out more on their website agrimaster.com.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

69


YOUR INDUSTRY

Working with fertilisers es m o c t u o r e t t e b to get

F

BY PETER COLLINS THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION

inding ways to manage fertilisers better is essential to support agricultural productivity while improving water quality in rivers and estuaries. Nutrient run-off from agricultural land represents the largest source of nutrients entering estuaries in South West WA.

The Department of Water and Environmental Regulation (DWER) has intensified its work on nutrients this year through the Regional Estuaries Initiative (REI). Learning from the experience of past work here in WA, and others’ experiences elsewhere in Australia, is an important part of the government’s approach to developing and adjusting responses to excess nutrients in water catchments. In August, the department hosted the Nutrient Summit 2017 which brought together a diverse range of experts to discuss best practice in managing nutrient run-off into Western Australian estuaries. More than 100 people gathered at the Mandurah Performing Arts Centre to hear farmers and scientists from across Australia and New Zealand address the topic. DWER Director General Mike Rowe opened the summit and labelled it as an important forum for local farmers, scientists and government to share ideas on how to best tackle nutrients in our waterways.

70

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

“The summit brought together successful and informed farmers and scientists, as well as government agencies, to share their experiences and stories,” Mr Rowe said. “The focus was on sustaining productive agriculture while maintaining healthy estuaries, through developing new and innovative ways of working together.” Farmers and horticulturalists play a critical role in helping government address excess nutrients in the landscape. The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development estimates that WA farmers apply around $400 million more phosphorus than needed each year. Therefore, getting fertiliser management right on farms will financially benefit farmers while helping improve water quality in our rivers and estuaries. The Regional Estuaries Initiative focuses on the Peel-Harvey, Leschenault, Vasse-Wonnerup and Geographe, Hardy Inlet, Wilson Inlet and Oyster Harbour catchments.

33QUEENSLAND sugar farmer David Defranciscis explaining irrigation rates and nutrient management at his sugar cane field. David Defranciscis is a third generation Burdekin farmer who is actively involved in scientific trials to reduce fertiliser use while increasing productivity, and is an industry liaison representative for the RP20 collaborative research project funded by the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection to look into soil health and nutrient management in the Burdekin cane industry.

It builds on the department’s work with catchment councils and other groups on actions identified in past water quality improvements plans, and the experiences of recent current initiatives such as the Revitalising Geographe Waterways programs. Picking up on work started in the Geographe with the dairy industry’s national framework for nutrient management Fert$mart, REI has expanded to all the catchment areas. This year graziers with more than 40 hectares of cleared arable land located in the REI catchments were offered to participate in a soil testing program.


YOUR INDUSTRY

33DR Svenja Tulipani taking baseline water samples to measure effectiveness of using the nano-clay to remove phosphorus from drain water in Keralup.

The program provides eligible grazing farmers access to subsidised soil and pasture tissue testing, nutrient maps, farmer workshops and individual agronomic advice. In short the project aims for fertilisers, and profits, to stay on the farm.

“Water treatment techniques like this provide options to support the health of rivers and estuaries while longerterm nutrient reduction activities in the catchment are being worked on,” Dr Tulipani said.

Enthusiasm for the project was demonstrated by over 100 South West grazing farmers putting their hands up to become involved. The program started in 2016, and has already tested and mapped soils on 90 farms, providing farmers with technical advice on how to reduce fertiliser use. The department has also been embracing innovation in intercepting phosphorus as it moves through the landscape. Several trials using promising new products to stop phosphorus becoming accessible to algae in rivers and estuaries have been underway in the hotspots of Peel-Harvey and Vasse. In the Peel-Harvey catchment a trial has been underway testing a new WA created phosphorus-binding clay designed to address high phosphorus loads. If successful, the clay may prove a costeffective measure to reduce phosphorus loads and help prevent algal blooms in rivers and estuaries.

Another innovative trial in the Vasse is underway to reduce the amount of nutrients leached from the newly constructed oval as a result of fertilisers applied when the land was used for farming. 33ADDING the nano-clay to the drain water in Keralup.

swimming pools. The department closely monitored changes in phosphorus levels before, during and after the treatment.

The partnership between the City of Busselton, the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation, and Iluka Resources is trialling the use of the soil amendment product Iron Man Gypsum (IMG) beneath the new oval.

“Laboratory tests and a small trial in This site of the sporting complex was Lower Vasse River using the clay product previously grazed and fertilised, have shown promising results, which has left a legacy of high however large scale use in a phosphorus content in the fast flowing phosphorus rich phosphorus-binding sandy soils. Without treatment agricultural drain has never clay may help reduce the site would continue to been tried,” Department of phosphorus loads and leach phosphorus into local Water and Environmental help prevent algal waterways, even without Regulation environmental blooms further fertiliser applications. officer Dr Svenja Tulipani said.

Punrak Drain in Keralup was selected for the trial because it carries one of the Peel-Harvey catchment’s more concentrated phosphorus loads and drains into the Lower Serpentine River.

This trial carries on the tradition of the State Government’s innovation in tackling algal blooms, with State agencies and CSIRO developing the nutrient binding clay product Phoslock, which is now a commercial product used worldwide to reduce algal blooms.

Nearly a quarter tonne of the clay was used in the largest trial to date to treat around 3,200 kilolitres of phosphorus rich water, the equivalent of about 80 backyard

The new clay is considered a next generation product that provides a potentially lower cost and more versatile application than its predecessors.

Dr Kath Lynch, the Geographe Capes District Manager from the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation, said the trial incorporated IMG into the subsoil under the newly laid turf. “This is a really exciting trial and we are happy to be working alongside the City of Busselton to assess the effectiveness of the soil amendment in reducing nutrient loss off the new oval site,” Dr Lynch said.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

71


YOUR INDUSTRY

33MIXING the Iron Man Gypsum into the soil for the new turf.

application. Sediment reductions are being achieved through support for sustainable grazing practices.

“If this trial is successful we may be able to address the nutrient legacy from the past as well as reducing future nutrient runoff from the oval.” IMG binds phosphorus, keeping it within the soil and making it available for plant growth rather than washing into local waterways. Using soil amendments such as IMG offers a treatment option to reduce nutrient leaching from large areas of turf and is particularly useful on sandy soils that have been fertilised for a long time. The water monitoring stations called lysimeters will be monitored once a month over winter and autumn to track how effective the soil amendment treatment is at reducing nutrient leaching.

The trial at the Vasse Sporting Complex is the largest of four soil amendment trials being undertaken as part of the Revitalising Geographe Waterways program. Dr Lynch recently visited the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland to look at programs underway there to reduce nutrients from the catchment causing water quality issues around the reef. 33TRIAL evaluation of removing soluble phosphorus from drain flows using an Iron Man Gypsum amended sand treatment bed.

33MONITORING stations allow the department to measure the amount of phosphorus leaching from the soil.

Along with rising sea temperatures through climate change, fertiliser run-off from agricultural land draining into the marine environment is one of the main threats to the Great Barrier Reef, and the industries and communities that rely on it. Increased levels of nutrients and sediment are creating poor water quality, impacting reef health and its resilience to climate change. This run-off is also a main contributor to the outbreaks of coraleating crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS), as the nutrients cause algae outbreaks that feed the starfish. Land erosion from grazing has also been identified as a key source of increased sediments. “Programs underway in the Great Barrier Reef catchment confirm the importance of working with farmers and industry to map and reduce nutrient run-off from agricultural areas,” Dr Lynch said. “These include voluntarily working with farmers to reduce fertiliser use through better soil testing and fertiliser

“The experience of the Great Barrier Reef water quality improvement programs also suggests we should prioritise and intensify actions in catchments that have the greatest impact on water quality.” While grazing and the dairy industry contribute a lot of nutrients in the south west, and are therefore the primary focus at present, intensive horticulture, turf and turf management industries and urban fertiliser use also contribute to the problem. The department recommends that all irrigators using fertilisers and irrigation prepare Nutrient and irrigation management plans (NIMPs). NIMPs provide detailed guidelines for minimising water wastage and fertiliser losses when establishing or growing crops, gardens, trees or turf. NIMPs demonstrate that inputs such as water and fertiliser are well-matched to the plant growth cycle resulting in healthy plants and minimal contaminant leaching into the surrounding environment. Good planning and operational practice is vital for irrigated and fertilised plants so that water is used effectively and plants flourish with a maximum uptake of essential nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Well-prepared NIMPs offer potential economic benefits as they promote cost savings through the efficient use of water and agricultural chemicals, while offering protection to the quality of local water resources. Social benefits also arise if the community perceives that farmers and landscape managers operate with minimal environmental impact. MORE INFORMATION Go to the Regional Estuaries Initiative website http://rei.dwer.wa.gov.au

72

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


POMEWEST

pomewest WA Grower SPRING 2017

73


POMEWEST

contacts Pomewest Committee and Officers Harvey Giblett, Chair e: newtonbros@wn.com.au Mario Casotti

e: mario@casottigroup.com

Wayne Ghilarducci e: strathspey@modnet.com.au Jason Jarvis

e: twinpack@bigpond.com

Sam Licciardello

e: sam@orchard1sixty.com.au

Mark Scott

e: markpscott@bigpond.com

Susie Murphy White, Project Manager e: susan.murphy-white@agric.wa.gov.au Nardia Stacy, Executive Manager e: nardia@fruitwest.org.au

APC–Pomewest FFS Income 2016–17 Project General Account Budget

$ 450,000

Biosecurity Account Budget

60,000

APC-Pomewest major projects 2017–18 Project Commercialisation for WA (FW Co-operative Ltd)

$ 120,000

Note less 50% salary reimbursed for professional services of Nardia Stacy as executive officer as in 16–17 financial year.

New Technology Project (Susie Murphy White)

52,000

Study Tour to NZ

31,000

Flavonoid Project

40,000

Market Access Project

50,000

Annual Meetings & Communications

14,500

Medfly Surveillance Trapping Network (Ashmere Consulting)

60,000

Codling Moth (DPIRD)

35,000

Maturity Standards Legislation and Compliance

45,000

Industry Sponsorships and Association Memberships

12,500

Promotion & Publicity Local Project (Fresh Finesse)

24,000

Administration

45,000

APC fee for service charge POME fruit effective from 1 January 2015

Type of fruit

$/kg

Fresh fruit — apples, pears, Nashi, other

0.015

Processing fruit

0.005

Biosecurity FFS for fresh fruit

0.002

Biosecurity FFS for processing fruit

0.001

WA Grower SPRING 2017

Executive Manager BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

S

pring has sprung and that means we are well on the way with the onset of the next season of apples and pears. The WA industry is looking forward to more volumes of quality apples and capitalising on export opportunities in 2018 this strategy should assist with lifting the value of our product after a particularly challenging year at retail.

It has been well documented that the future of the industry requires growers to continue to work together to improve eating experiences for the consumer. It is important to identify viable varieties to increase the worth of our product. WA Grown, freshness, safety and eating qualities will hold demand steady on the domestic and export markets before Pomewest continues to look for activities and projects to assist and support our growers in this venture.

Hail damage in the east The Pomewest committee and WA pome growers pass on their sympathies for our colleagues in Victoria, Tasmania and especially the Adelaide Hills who have endured significant losses due to hail damage which will affect significantly volume nationally for the next season. This type of news is a terrible blow for the industry as a whole — as we all know growing fresh produce is not easy at the best of times, let alone having an act of nature to completely change the game for a season is a situation that nobody would like to be faced with.

148,060

APC Administration Charge

74

From the Pomewest

33THE future of the industry requires growers to continue work together to improve eating experiences for the consumer.


POMEWEST

Update from Susie Murphy White

Access to China

2018 fruit is beginning to size up nicely and measuring the fruit growth during the season enables growers to take the opportunity to make changes to thinning strategies, nutrition and water requirements, as required. This season Susie is undertaking the fruit sizing and crop estimates for WA. She will be visiting orchards each month to measure fruit size. Growers are encouraged to measure fruit weekly in between visits to build an informative dataset that can assist in the decision making during the growing season.

Pomewest welcomes the news announced by Australian Government focusing on market access for mainland apples in China. To this end, we are happy to announce our involvement the funding acceptance of the National Systems Approach project to market access due to start in February 2018 to assist with this process. An article is on page 76 written by Kim James in this edition of the WA Grower.

If you would like to participate in this project please contact Susie.

ANABP 01/BRAVO™ The commercialisation project for developing new varieties sees the BRAVO™ branded apples activities continue to be ’talk of the town’ — with weekly shipments now into the retail market in Singapore being very well received. The licensed managers Fruit West Co-operative Ltd are looking to other key premium markets in the near future and have recently conducted a national road trip this November to visit for their 67 growers across Australia, where information was shared and strategies moving forward were discussed.

measuring fruit growth during the season enables growers to take the opportunity to make changes to thinning strategies, nutrition and water requirements.

Promotion Pomewest has also supported major promotion events this reporting period including Perth Royal Show, 2017 Perth Hills Festival, the Apples in School’s Program and Ride2Work Day Breakfast at Elizabeth Quay in the Perth CBD. More on this also is reported in this edition.

Merry Xmas Industry Summit A WA Pome Industry Summit, sponsored by Pomewest, is planned for 7 February 2018 at the Mercure Bunbury Sanctuary Golf Resort, Bunbury between 3.00pm to 6.30pm. The program will include presentations relating to Pomewest’s current projects and opportunity to discuss project aspirations and goals for the industry for the future. This type of engagement was suggested at our regional dinner meetings last February, as it offers an opportunity for all growers in all areas to get together to discuss our direction. So I encourage you all to attend.

I would like to take this opportunity to wish you all greetings for the season from both myself, Susie and the Pomewest Committee. I would like to thank all our project consultants and the other horticultural industries and stakeholders who also support our industry. This includes vegetablesWA who continue to provide us with this valuable opportunity to report our activities throughout the year. We wish our members a very Merry Xmas and fruitful New Year. Personally I would like to thank you all for your support during the year and look forward to another great year for pome fruit in 2018.

Invites you to a

WA Pome Industry Summit

Wednesday 7 February 2018 Mercure Bunbury Sanctuary Golf Resort, Bunbury, WA

Join us for a grower information presentation to update on projects and discuss future innovations for the industry.

3.00pm–3.15pm Registration and Welcome

3.15pm–3.45pm

Commercialising a new Variety

Presentation and discussion

3.45pm–4.15pm

Market Access

Presentation and discussion

4.15pm–4.30pm Promotions

Presentation and discussion

4.30pm–5.00pm

Forward thinking Industry discussion

5.00pm–6.00pm Sundowner/networking function Note: Program is subject to change

RSVP by Thursday 1 February 2018 Nardia Stacy t: (08) 9368 3869 e: nardia@fruitwest.org.au

This event will be funded by the Agricultural Produce Commission fee for service collection for the APC Pome, Citrus and Stonefruit Committee — Pomewest subcommittee.

MORE INFORMATION Contact Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@pomewest.net.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

75


POMEWEST

National systems approach project H

orticulture Innovation Australia approved a national systems approach project in early October 2017. The project, led by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) includes three states — New South Wales, Victoria and Western Australia.

$6.5m project

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

76

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


POMEWEST

33CYDIA pomonella — codling moth.

reduce pest risk with: trapping, baiting, pesticide application & fruit inspection The national project is valued at $6.5m and thanks to the contributions from Pomewest and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) the Western Australian project budget value will be $978,000. The four-year DPIRD project is designed to develop market access options for apples produced in the Manjimup and Pemberton region and will include evaluation of measures within a Systems Approach to improve market access options for apples produced in the region. The systems approach project will determine the cumulative efficacy required to satisfy trading partners that apple trade via a Systems Approach will provide an acceptable level of protection from pests of quarantine concern.

The project will focus on a Systems Approach to pest management with the key pests of quarantine concern being Mediterranean fruit fly and moths in the region. A phytosanitary system that meets acceptable pest thresholds can replace or compliment prescribed phytosanitary treatment (such as an end point treatment). The project will use the expertise and knowledge of CSIRO, DPIRD and local apple producers to show how surveillance, good biosecurity and production practice combined with effective pest management in the area can be developed to improve domestic or international market access. DPIRD plan to recruit a project officer to be based in Manjimup. A variety of measures within a Systems Approach can be used to reduce pest risk, such as trapping, baiting, pesticide application, fruit inspection (dissection of harvested fruit), or by inspection in the shed prior to packing. By collecting evidence of absence data from two or more measures within a Systems Approach the data sets will be analysed and modelled by CSIRO to produce supporting evidence for market access applications. Accreditation of a Systems Approach for domestic market access is normally done by the national Subcommittee on Domestic Quarantine and Market Access (SDQMA) and for international market access via the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR) and the bilateral agreement process between countries.

33MEDITERRANEAN fruit fly.

A multi-component Systems Approach to quarantine security shows great potential for expanded use in many areas. It presents more difficulties in terms of acceptance than a single end point treatment, however it will have fewer negative effects on product quality and should open the way to trade not currently possible. The challenge will be to control pests of quarantine concern, quantification of risk arising from each measure, and the integration of those to provide a reliable estimate of end point risk. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Nardia Stacy at Nardia.Stacy@dpird.wa.gov.au

33MEDFLY damage.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

77


POMEWEST

n i e v i t get acols Scho

T

BY NOELENE SWAIN FRESH FINESSE

here’s no doubt kids LOVE apples and yet consumption is constantly under threat by highly marketed snack food products. With approximately 25% of Aussie kids now considered overweight or obese, it is important to teach kids to enjoy fresh fruit. The current healthy eating focus within schools continues to present opportunities to work with kids through primary schools. 78

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


POMEWEST

WA primary schools celebrate Fruit and Veg Week in September each year with a particular focus on the Great Vegie Crunch held on 4–8th September when schools across the state focused on activities to highlight the need to eat more vegetables and fruit. This created an excellent opportunity to engage with schools by providing a carton of apples to implement activities within the classroom.

The Apples in Schools program supplied 20 WA primary schools in September, involving over 2,000 students across 56 classes. Evaluation forms, photos and work samples were returned by participating classes, demonstrating the apples provided an extremely positive experience within schools. Resources were actively used within classroom programs as well as sports carnivals, social justice activities and playground initiatives.

Fresh apples were an excellent trigger for discussions on healthy eating, sustainability, seasons and importance of supporting local producers. They were also integrated across the curriculum into lessons on maths, English, sport, art, drama, music, health, cooking and more. Some schools made the apples the focus of school wide programs and included extensive coverage through their newsletters and parent communications. Many primary schools make active use of Apple Slinky machines — either in the canteen, the classroom, or even some Principals where heard to use it as a recess treat and opportunity to connect with the students. These fun gadgets put some fun into eating apples which is well received by students. Support was also provided at two Health Expos held in senior high schools. These full day expos attract a variety of health agencies and involve the whole school to visit the displays staggered through the day. Apple slinkies were made and shared with some of the 2,500 students in attendance. The attitude of the teenage students was extremely positive to apples being a great healthy and delicious snack. This is an excellent positive program which has achieved a strong response from teachers and active integration into the classroom programs. Continued support in the future is expected to build positive eating habits and awareness with children. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Nardia Stacy, Pomewest Nardia.Stacy@dpird.wa.gov.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

79


POMEWEST

Aussie Apples at Perth Royal Show

BY NOELENE SWAIN FRESH FINESSE

A

pples were once again involved at the IGA Perth Royal Show with a move across to the Walk through WA display in the Centenary Pavilion to achieve an audience focused on regional WA and the fresh food produced in these regions.

This move placed the apple stand amongst other regional displays with a large four metre by six metre stand well positioned in the pavilion. With excellent background signage of apple varieties, supply map and general orchard lifestyle images, this location proved ideal for engagement with individuals, families and children interested in local food.

The apple offer included samples of the new BRAVO™ apples and the opportunity to explain the story behind this premium variety. An estimated 15,000 people sampled the BRAVO™ over the eight day show. Armed with Apple Slinky machines, the apple team also managed to swirl and twirl their way through over 2,000 BRAVO™ apples and over 1,000 Pink Lady and Granny Smith apples whilst chatting to show goers about the importance of eating locally produced fruit.

Product presentations and cooking demonstrations conducted by Nardia Stacy and Noelene Swain on the Talk through WA stage and the Taste WA stage throughout the show provided further opportunity to share the apple industry story. BRAVO™ apples were served at the launch cocktail function and media interest also achieved good coverage through print, video and social media. An electronic and paper survey was conducted to gather email addresses and details on reactions to the new BRAVO™ apple. It is clear that people are truly impressed with the variety. A separate data report has been prepared to summarize this survey. Sale of a small stock of Apple Slinky machines appealed to those keen to continue the apple ‘magic’ at home. Such a simple tool provides a key easy mechanism for kids (of all ages!) to enjoy apples fresh or to prepare apples for cooking. These machines have a strong

80

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

following in Primary Schools and school canteens. Even young adults drooled affectionately over the apples as they recalled their primary school memories. Thanks are extended to the volunteers who assisted with manning the stand during the show. This is an excellent forum for the general public to engage directly with growers, and for growers to gain a first hand understanding of what the public think of the produce they buy. Further thanks Horticulture Innovation Australia, Fruit West Cooperative and WA Farm Direct for the support to underwrite this major promotional activity for WA. The poor weather this year dampened attendance early in the show however the new pavilion proved most successful. The show provides an excellent opportunity to engage with the public. We would recommend continued involvement in this location in 2018. MORE INFORMATION For more information contact Nardia Stacy at Pomewest on Nardia.Stacy@dpird.wa.gov.au


YOUR BUSINESS

your

business WA Grower SUMMER 2017

81


YOUR BUSINESS

Could benchmarking improve return on investment for

WA horticulture? W BY MATT O’DEA AGRIBUSINESS MANAGER, NAB

At a glance • Benchmarking is the process of comparing a farm business’s performance with highly profitable producers • Farmers who benchmark tend to have better performing businesses than farmers who do not • More farmers are choosing to talk to other farmers to gain insights and ideas for improvements.

hile astute farmers are continually searching for ways to improve efficiency and productivity, a growing number are using benchmarking to help identify opportunities for growth.

And according to NAB Agribusiness, recent data shows that farmers who benchmark their business data against a comparable cohort tend to have better performing businesses than farmers who do not. Benchmarking — a process of comparing a farm business’s key performance indicators with those of highly profitable producers — can help farmers identify areas that would benefit from further development, and also pinpoint what will generate the greatest return on investment.

Sharing ideas

Motivated by peer's successes

82

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

It can be done using industry averages, or through setting up groups of farmers with similar operations that get together on a regular basis to talk about their businesses. There has been great success in benchmarking in broadacre farming in WA and now the horticulture industry has the opportunity to be involved, with vegetables WA working on a benchmarking concept with the support of the WA Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development. Matt O’Dea, NAB’s Head of Agribusiness Western Australia and South Australia, said when benchmarking is done well it also provides an overview of the business as a whole.


YOUR BUSINESS

“Farm businesses often have limited capital so it’s important to know where you can invest most effectively,” Mr O’Dea said. “I believe farmers can benefit from sharing ideas, and being motivated by their peers’ successes. “It can be challenging though, because in some cases you’re opening up your business for other people to appraise. In order to benefit you must be open to change and willing to accept evaluation without taking it personally.

Mr O’Dea said he is seeing more farmers choosing to talk to others to gain insights and ideas for improvements.

“Many farmers already use a SWOT analysis to identify strengths (S), weaknesses (W), opportunities (O) and threats (T), and benchmarking can really help. “Benchmarking can also play an important role in the governance process by raising some thought-provoking questions about the way your farm is running.”

“I believe the more you engage with other people the better off you are. It’s easy to feel as though you’re on your own, but once you start talking to other farmers you’ll often find they’ve faced similar challenges and they’re very willing to help. “However, it’s important to compare apples with apples. If you’re in a drought area, for instance, there’s little point in benchmarking yourself against someone who isn’t.

farmer might find someone is doing something to save costs they hadn’t previously picked up on.” MORE INFORMATION If you like more information, please contact Donna Collins, Agribusiness Manager at the Perth Agribusiness Centre on 0427 383 901 and she can arrange an on farm visit to discuss your needs. For more information about vegetablesWA benchmarking, or to get involved, please contact Bryn Edwards, Benchmarking Lead on 0417 409 821.

“But benchmarking groups can still be valuable even when you’re in hardship because it gets people talking, and a

Is this a good look for your industry? Burn or bury those

emical waste!

not your ch . .. g in cl cy re n o s e ld attitud

o

You can’t ignore it any more, most QA programs require responsible waste management. On our websites you can locate your nearest drumMUSTER collection site with an interactive map. You can also find out the status of the next ChemClear collection in each state. It’s quick and simple. Contact your WA consultant, Graeme Passmore: 0429 933 307 1800 008 707 | www.drummuster.org.au 1800 008 182 | www.chemclear.org.au WA Grower SUMMER 2017

83


YOUR BUSINESS

Benchmarking tonnes of valuable business insight that’s free and easy to access

V

egetablesWA, in partnership with broadacre benchmarking ‘gurus’ Planfarm, have kicked off the benchmarking project and have begun visiting farms to work with forward thinking growers.

“Initial interest and participation levels by growers wanting to know more about their business performance and take action are impressive,” said Bryn Edwards, Benchmarking Lead. “We’ve refined the process of collecting information so it’s as easy as possible and immediately providing valuable insight for the grower and that’s paying off”.

As mentioned in previous articles, benchmarking is a simple process that involves measuring and comparing individual costs and usages of key production inputs and yield outputs. In this way, it is possible to identify very quickly the specific target areas that an individual grower can focus on to save costs and increase returns. The levy funded project, which also has co-investment by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) provides the opportunity for growers to understand their business to new depths. This service will be provided for at least the next three years at no cost to the grower. It also means that growers can chart and actually see how their decisions impact their business performance from year to year.

So how do I get involved and what will I need to do? First off get in touch with Bryn to register your interest — he’s more than happy to answer any questions and queries you many have upfront.

Next, we will book in a time to come and visit you on the farm to collect information required to participate. Most of the information comes from documents you will already have; so it’s just a matter of collecting these together beforehand. In fact, if you’re comfortable sharing these before the visit we will pre-load these and take up even less of your time on the visit confirming the detail.

Even at this early stage of the process, growers that have participated are reporting great benefit in spending focused time looking at the whole picture of their business and key measures that identify how they are actually tracking. The information gathering part of the process will be open to growers till the end of February 2018. After this all the information will be analysed and each of the participating growers will be given their own individual performance report compared to WA and wider vegetable industry averages.

Free

& easy to access

84

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR BUSINESS

New ACCC online tool Again, once your individual report has been created we will organise a time to come back to your farm to hand this over personally and talk you through the report to help you clearly understand it and how you can turn the learnings into an actual focused plan of action. As stated previously, this process will be repeated for at least the next three years at no cost to yourself other than your time and concentration. “This is a new initiative for the vegetable industry in WA, so we’ve gone to great lengths to overcome any barriers to participating for the growers so they can enjoy the business insights and benefits that benchmarking can easily provide”. MORE INFORMATION Register your interest and get in touch with Bryn Edwards, Benchmarking Lead, at (08) 9481 0834 or bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation, using the vegetable fund research and development levy, co-investment from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development and contributions from the Australian Government. Hort Innovation is the grower owned, not-for-profit research and development corporation for Australian horticulture.

ts in a l p m o c s u o m y n o n a r o f

T

he ACCC has launched a new online tool for people in the agriculture sector to anonymously report concerns about competition or fair trading issues.

The ACCC are particularly targeting it at the horticulture and viticulture industries. Launching the tool in October, Commissioner Mick Keogh said: “Farmers in the horticulture and viticulture industries have expressed concerns about potential retribution from others in the supply chain if they contact the ACCC”. “This easy-to-use, secure and anonymous channel allows farmers to report potential breaches of laws the ACCC enforces. This could include, for example, suspected breaches of the new Horticulture Code of Conduct.” “People can now contact our agriculture team from any web-enabled device such as a PC, smart phone, laptop or tablet. The tool encrypts the information and removes the person’s IP address so their identity is kept anonymous. The ACCC won’t know who is contacting us,” Mr Keogh said.

People can also obtain a password to log back into the online tool and have ongoing anonymous communication with the ACCC.

The ACCC will use the information received as the basis of potential investigations. “I encourage anyone in the agriculture sector with concerns about negative consequences from contacting the ACCC to use this new tool,” Mr Keogh said. Note, the online tool is only for anonymous reports. Otherwise the ACCC standard contact form remains our preferred way of receiving reports.

MORE INFORMATION For more information see the ACCC website www.accc.gov.au/contact-us

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

85


YOUR BUSINESS

the cancer risk you cannot see

W

orking on the farm can be dirty and dusty, but sometimes that dust can contain silica, a known carcinogen. Exposure to silica dust over a lifetime of work on the farm can increase your chances of lung cancer, silicosis, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and kidney disease.

Use a combination of control measures to reduce your risk: • V  ehicles: Operate tractors with an enclosed cab and air conditioning (avoid leaving the window open when disturbing soil). • Vehicle maintenance: Ensure that air conditioning filters are regularly changed, cleaned and inspected. • Dust control: If working on silica-containing materials using tools, make sure that you’re using on-tool local exhaust ventilation and/or water suppression. • Respiratory protective equipment (RPE): It’s important to use the correct RPE, but remember if your RPE doesn’t fit, it doesn’t work.

Silica is present in almost all soils; it can also be found in materials such as rock, sand and concrete. When these materials are disturbed, silica dust can be released.

Tilling the soil is one of the most common farming activities that can cause silica dust to become airborne. Any activity where you are breaking, cutting, crushing, moving or grinding a silica-containing material can expose you to silica dust.

Silica is only harmful when it’s airborne and can be breathed in to your lungs. That means this danger isn’t always visible; silica dust is 100 times smaller than a grain of sand so you can’t see it and you could be breathing it in without knowing.

An Australian study found almost one in three farmers or farm workers had medium or high exposure to silica dust at work. Farmers and farm staff working on crop farms were found to be most at risk of exposure.

86

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Prevent exposure by keeping the dust out of the air. MORE INFORMATION For more information on silica dust and other workplace carcinogens call 13 11 20 or visit cancer.org.au/workcancer


We work for you, not the insurer Centrewest Insurance Brokers have partnered with vegetablesWA, to provide you with excellent and responsive service as your Insurance Brokers. Whether you’re a small or large grower operation, we help you review and manage risks on your property. Our service is personal, offering you an insurance package that is tailor-made to suit your specific requirements. Our package will provide you with financial protection against the most probable insurable events, through to those less likely, giving you peace of mind. Types of insurance available: Farm Pack Crop Insurance Workers’ Compensation Corporate Travel Professional Indemnity

Management Liability Cyber Risk & Liability Caravan Insurance Boat Insurance Home Building &/or Contents Insurance

Motor Vehicle Landlords Insurance Marine Transit Aviation Insurance Income Protection Insurance

Growers who participated in the pilot program received a reduction in premium of between 10% and 40%! Contact Gavin Statham today to review your insurance. Gavin Statham Senior Insurance Broker | T 08 9349 7900 | M 0488 988 697 | E Gavin.Statham@centrewest.com.au

SPARAXIS PTY LTD TRADING AS CENTREWEST INSURANCE BROKERS ABN: 44 009 265 105 AFSL: 245406


YOUR BUSINESS

e r u lt u c ti r Ho Code of Conduct

88

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR BUSINESS

Changes have been made to the Horticulture Code of Conduct, which regulates the sale of produce between growers and wholesalers. Following these changes, some growers have now been presented with a new Terms of Trade, Horticulture Produce Agreement and associated Schedule by their wholesaler. Growers should seek independent legal advice in negotiating the terms of these agreements. Growers without an existing legal provider should do their own duediligence but may consider contacting the lawyers below. vegetablesWA cannot provide legal advice but growers are also welcome to contact us to gain a broader understanding of the code. Further information may also be found on the ACCC website. Victoria Maitland, Director Leaker Partners t: (08) 9324 8590 m: 0466 336 549 Yung T. Nguyen, Managing Director Yung Nguyen & Co. Lawyers t: (08) 6114 3112 m: 0418 444 505 On 1 April 2017, the Horticulture Code came into effect. The Code replaces the old Horticulture Code established by the Trade Practices (Horticulture Code of Conduct) Regulations 2006.

Horticulture Produce Agreements

www.accc.gov.au Example Horticulture Produce Agreement – Agent

Example Horticulture Produce Agreement – Merchant

Grower

Agent

Grower

Grower’s Name:

Agent’s Name:

Grower’s Name:

Merchant’s Name:

ACN (if applicable):

ACN (if applicable):

ACN (if applicable):

ACN (if applicable):

ABN (if applicable):

ABN (if applicable):

ABN (if applicable):

ABN (if applicable):

Address:

Address:

Address:

Address:

Email:

Email:

Email:

Email:

Phone:

Phone:

Phone:

Phone:

Merchant

Terms and conditions

Terms and conditions

1.

Agreement

1.

Agreement

1.1.

For the Term of this agreement, the Grower agrees to deliver, and the Agent agrees to arrange, on behalf of the Grower, the sale of Horticulture Produce of the type, quantity, quality and specifications stated in this agreement, for the payment of a commission / fee / extra cost [delete whichever does not apply] stated or calculated in accordance with this agreement.

1.1.

For the Term of this agreement, the Grower agrees to deliver, and the Merchant agrees to buy, Horticulture Produce of the type, quantity, quality and specifications set out in this agreement or as ordered by the Merchant and confirmed in writing by the Grower from time to time, for the price/s stated in, or calculated in accordance with, this agreement.

2.

Term

2.

Term

2.1.

This agreement will commence on the Start Date and will continue for the Term of the agreement unless it is terminated earlier in accordance with clause 18.

2.1.

This agreement will commence on the Start Date and will continue for the Term of the agreement unless it is terminated earlier in accordance with clause 17.

Event

Date

Event

Date

Start Date

[insert date] or date the last party signs (whichever is the latter)

Start Date

[insert date] or date the last party signs (whichever is the latter)

Term

This agreement will commence on the Start Date and will terminate on [insert end date] / the date the agreement is terminated under clause 18 [if there is no end date] – [Note: Delete as appropriate].

Term

This agreement will commence on the Start Date and will terminate on [insert end date] / the date the agreement is terminated under clause 17 [if there is no end date] – [Note: Delete as appropriate].

3.

Agent’s reporting obligations

3.

Merchant’s reporting obligations

3.1.

For the purposes of this agreement, the Reporting Period is [Note: Insert period: monthly/quarterly]

3.1.

For the purposes of this agreement, the Reporting Period is [Note: Insert period: monthly/quarterly]

3.2.

For each Reporting Period, the Agent will give the Grower a statement for the Reporting Period, specifying for the Grower’s Horticulture Produce received by the Agent during the Reporting Period:

3.2.

For each Reporting Period, the Merchant will give the Grower a statement for the Reporting Period, specifying for the Grower’s Horticulture Produce received by the Merchant during the Reporting Period:

1

33SAMPLE Horticulture Produce Agreements can be found on the ACCC website.

The new Code applies from 1 April 2017. If you trade in horticulture produce on or after this date, you must comply with the terms of the Code. There is a 12-month transition period for parties with existing written agreements. After this transition period ends, all agreements need to comply with the current Code. This includes agreements entered into before 15 December 2006, which were not covered by the earlier code.

1

—— Sample Horticulture Produce Agreement: Merchant (www.accc. gov.au/publications/examplehorticulture-produce-agreementmerchant) —— Sample Horticulture Produce Agreement: Agent (www.accc. gov.au/publications/examplehorticulture-produce-agreementagent). MORE INFORMATION The full range of ACCC information is at: Horticulture code guidance materials

• Frequently Asked Questions about the new Code are on the website at: Horticulture Code FAQs (www.accc.gov. au/update/horticulture-code-faq) • To make it as straightforward as possible for you the ACCC has produced sample Horticulture Produce Agreements, depending on whether they sell their produce to an agent or a merchant (as defined in the Code): WA Grower SUMMER 2017

89


YOUR BUSINESS

e r u lt u c ti r o H

A GUIDE FOR BUSINESS

How the

Code of Conduct

I

f you’re a farmer growing fruit or vegetables and sell through an agent or to a merchant, there’s a law that says you must have a written contract. It’s called the Horticulture Code of Conduct (Code).

helps you

The Code also says that this contract must include certain things, like how price is calculated and when you get paid.

The Code details when agents or merchants must pay you and how they must treat you.

Having a written contract protects you. It details what you and the agent or merchant can and can’t do.

If someone breaks certain parts of the Code, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) can ask a court to issue a penalty.

This creates transparency around your relationship with the agent or merchant. The Code also sets out a way for the parties to try to resolve disputes.

The Code: • Requires growers and traders to have a contract called a horticulture produce agreement (HPA) and applies to all HPAs

33THE Horticulture Code applies to transactions between growers of fruit and vegetables, and traders of fruit and vegetables.

90

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR BUSINESS

• Obliges all parties to deal in good faith

This includes all HPAs entered into prior to 15 December 2006 when the original Code was introduced. If a HPA is changed before 1 April 2018, the whole Code will apply from the date it is changed.

• Obliges merchants to explain how price will be calculated • Includes penalties for breaching certain sections of the Code • Requires you, agents and merchants to keep certain records. If you have an existing written HPA signed before 1 April 2017, you have until 1 April 2018 to make sure it includes the things the Code says it should include.

Some parts of the Code will apply to all HPAs from 1 April 2017. These parts include the obligation to deal in good faith and the dispute resolution procedure. Use the information in this overview and on the ACCC website to ensure your HPAs follow the Code.

Who the Horticulture Code applies to The Horticulture Code applies to transactions between: • growers of fruit and vegetables, and • traders of fruit and vegetables. The Code covers fruit and vegetables that are unprocessed. This includes mushrooms and other edible fungi, nuts, herbs and other edible plants but does not include nursery products. The Code calls these things ‘Horticulture Produce’. The Code calls you, the person who grows the fruit and vegetables, a grower. The Code calls agents and merchants ‘traders’. A trader cannot act as both an agent and a merchant under the one HPA.

An agent is a person who sells fruit and vegetables on your behalf for a commission or a fee. A merchant is a person who buys your fruit and vegetables to resell them.

For more information go to

www.accc.gov.au

The Code does not apply to a merchant or a grower supplying a merchant who: • buys fruit and vegetables for export • buys fruit and vegetables to sell directly to consumers (for example, a supermarket) • buys fruit and vegetables to process them (for example, to turn tomatoes into sauce).

Documented terms of trade The Code says that all traders have to publish and make publicly available a document setting out the general terms on which they are prepared to trade with growers. Typically this would cover things like delivery requirements, quality requirements, when deliveries can be rejected and when you will be paid.

Horticulture produce agreements A trader and a grower can only trade in fruit and vegetables if they enter into a contract called a HPA. Traders must trade as an agent or a merchant under a single HPA. They can’t trade as both. A HPA must be in writing. You can accept one by either signing or by accepting a written notice of offer in writing (such as by email). Under the Code your HPA must include: • how you are to deliver your fruit and vegetables WA Grower SUMMER 2017

91


YOUR BUSINESS

• under what circumstances the trader can reject your fruit and vegetables • any quantity and quality requirements • the FreshSpecs Produce Specifications or other specifications used to determine quality • if a trader plans to pool horticulture produce, the quality requirements of the produce to be pooled • when the trader must pay you • whether an agent will pursue bad debts for you • how price (merchant) or commission (agent) will be calculated.

Trader obligations A trader must: • accept fruit and vegetables delivered under a HPA unless the HPA allows the trader to reject the fruit and vegetables • exercise all reasonable care and skill in handling and storing fruit and vegetables owned by you. A merchant must pay you for fruit and vegetables within the time the HPA says they must pay you. If they don’t, you can, after giving written notice, stop deliveries or end the HPA. An agent must: • pay you the price they get for your fruit and vegetables, but can keep any commissions, fees and extra costs you have agreed to in the HPA • act in your best interests and sell your fruit and vegetables on an arm’s-length basis.

Produce ownership Ownership of fruit and vegetables under a HPA passes: • directly from you to the third-party buyer once the agent sells the fruit and vegetables, in an agent transaction • in a merchant transaction: —— on delivery of the fruit and vegetables to the merchant — if the price or a method or formula for calculating the price has been agreed before delivery —— at the time the agreed service is completed — if the price or a method or formula for calculating the price has not been agreed before delivery and the merchant is to perform a service —— at the time the grower and merchant agree on a price — if the price or a method or formula for calculating the price has not been agreed before delivery and the merchant is not providing a service.

Cooling-off period If the HPA is for 90 days or more, or the HPA does not set out a term, either party may end the HPA in writing within 14 days of entering into the agreement, or within a period (of seven days or more) agreed by the parties.

Record keeping Under the Code you must keep certain types of records for at least six years. Traders must keep:

If you and a trader disagree over a HPA, you can resolve the dispute using any process you and the trader want to. However, the Code sets out a dispute resolution process. If either you or the trader commences this process, you must both participate in it.

You and the trader must first attempt to resolve the dispute. If you and the trader cannot resolve the dispute after three weeks, then either of you can ask a mediator to help you. You and the trader must each pay half the costs of the mediator as well as your own costs of attending the mediation, unless you agree otherwise.

The ACCC’s role The ACCC regulates the Code and is responsible for ensuring people understand it and comply with it. The ACCC can seek penalties or issue infringement notices if certain sections of the Code are breached. If you want to know what a HPA should look like, the ACCC have prepared some examples which are available on the ACCC website. MORE INFORMATION

• any written notice by the trader of the offer or acceptance of a HPA

More information on new requirements under the Code is available on the ACCC website.

• any written termination by the trader of a HPA

CONTACTS

• statements for each reporting period given to a grower.

Growers must keep: • any HPA they enter into • any written notice by the grower of the offer or acceptance of a HPA • any written termination by the grower of a HPA. WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Dispute resolution

• any HPA they enter into

• any notice of rejection of horticulture produce, including reasons for the rejection

92

Traders must also make a written record of the name of all growers and traders they deal with. Growers must make a written record of all traders they deal with. These records must be kept by traders and growers for six years from the day the record is made.

ACCC Infocentre: 1300 302 502 Website: www.accc.gov.au/horticulturecode Small business helpline: 1300 302 021 Horticulture Mediation Advisor Phone: 1800 475 467 Email: adviser@horticulturecode.com.au Website: www.horticulturecode.com.au ISBN: 978 1 920702 06 9 © Australian Competition and Consumer Commission 2017 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence publishing.unit@accc.gov.au.


YOUR BUSINESS

INFORMATION FOR TRADERS

Enforcement of the

e r u lt u c ti r o H A

Code of Conduct

re you buying fruit and vegetables from farmers to resell in Australia?

Horticulture traders must be aware of their obligations under the new Horticulture Code of Conduct which began on 1 April 2017, replacing the old Horticulture Code. It applies to transactions between growers and traders of horticulture produce (i.e. unprocessed fruit, vegetables, nuts, herbs and other edible plants). Traders can be either agents or merchants. You are an agent if you facilitate the sale of horticulture produce on behalf of a grower for a commission or a fee. You are a merchant if you buy a grower’s horticulture produce to resell

it in Australia at a wholesale level in an unprocessed form.

• imposes financial penalties for certain breaches

If you are an agent or merchant, you must comply with the Code when dealing with growers.

• requires traders to keep a number of records for at least six years, including the name of every grower you deal with

Key changes Much of the Code remains the same as before. As before traders must publish their terms of trade, enter into horticulture produce agreements (HPAs) before trading with growers, and ensure growers are paid within the agreed timeframe. But there are a few key differences you need to be aware of. The Code now: • applies to all agreements, even those entered into before 15 December 2006

• introduces an obligation on all parties to deal with each other in good faith. The Code doesn’t define good faith. Its meaning in the Code comes from what Courts have decided it means over time. Courts have found that acting in ‘good faith’ requires you to act reasonably and not to exercise your powers arbitrarily or for some irrelevant purpose. You can find more information about your obligations at www.accc.gov.au/ horticulturecode. WA Grower SUMMER 2017

93


YOUR BUSINESS

Transition period There is a transition period to allow the industry to adjust existing agreements to be compliant with the Code. Your current trading arrangements will affect how long you have to make your HPAs compliant with the Code. There is no transition period for a number of obligations under the Code including:

33IF you amend your existing written agreement or enter into new HPAs before 1 April 2018, the entire new Code will apply to you from the day you amend the agreements or enter new HPAs.

• dealing in good faith • keeping certain records • the dispute resolution procedure. This means you must comply with these parts of the Code immediately if you trade in horticulture produce.

Transition period for my agreements I am currently trading in Horticulture produce without an agreement. You do not have a transition period. You must comply with the new Code and enter a compliant HPA before trading in horticulture produce. I am trading under written HPAs that comply with the old Code. You have until 1 April 2018 to amend or enter into new HPAs that are compliant with the new Code. Until you amend or enter into new HPAs, your existing HPAs must continue to comply with the old Code. If you amend your existing HPAs or enter into new HPAs prior to 1 April 2018, the entire new Code will apply to you from the date you amend your existing HPAs or enter new HPAs.

ACCC enforcement approach While the industry is adjusting to the new Code, the ACCC will be focusing on educating growers and traders about what the changes mean. However, one of our priorities is to ensure small businesses receive the protections of industry codes. We may still pursue breaches of the Code where there is: • a blatant or deliberate breach of the law • substantial consumer or small business detriment • likely to be a worthwhile educative or deterrent effect from our intervention. The ACCC can initiate investigations from complaints we receive, or from information we have gathered ourselves.

What are the consequences of non-compliance? The Code now contains penalty provisions. Not complying with a penalty provision could result in the ACCC taking court action seeking a financial penalty for the breach, or issuing an infringement notice.

Infringement notices I was not required to comply with the old Code because I traded under a written agreement entered into before 15 December 2006. You have until 1 April 2018 to enter into HPAs that are compliant with the new Code. If you amend your existing written agreement or enter into new HPAs before 1 April 2018, the entire new Code will apply to you from the day you amend the agreements or enter new HPAs.

The ACCC can issue infringement notices ($9,000 for body corporates, and $1,800 for individuals) where we have reasonable grounds to believe that a person has breached one of the Code’s penalty provisions. The ACCC can issue an infringement notice for each alleged breach. We are more likely to use an infringement as opposed to court action if: • the conduct relates to isolated or non-systemic instances of noncompliance • there have been lower levels of harm • the facts are not in dispute.

94

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Infringement notices are a way of resolving the ACCC’s concerns and avoiding legal proceedings. Paying it is not an admission of guilt. If you choose not to pay the infringement notice, we may decide to institute proceedings against you.

Financial penalties We can seek penalties up to $54,000 for each penalty provision breach. Ultimately a court will determine the final penalty (if any) imposed. The ACCC takes court action where it considers litigation is the most appropriate way to achieve its enforcement and compliance objectives. Penalty provisions include: • Not dealing in good faith • Trading without a Codecompliant HPA • Traders failing to publish a Codecompliant terms of trade • Not keeping adequate records, such as the names of growers you deal with.

Compliance checks The ACCC has the power to ask for information or documents you must keep, produce or generate to check your compliance with the Code. This includes your terms of trade, HPAs, and the names of growers you’ve dealt with. MORE INFORMATION • Our website: www.accc.gov.au/ horticulturecode • ACCC Small Business Helpline: 1300 302 021 • Subscribe to our dedicated Agriculture email alert network at www.accc.gov.au/media/subscriptions • Small business online education program: www.accc.gov.au/ccaeducation © Australian Competition and Consumer Commission 2017 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence publishing.unit@accc.gov.au.


YOUR MARKET

your

market WA Grower SUMMER 2017

95


YOUR MARKET

ready-to-eat salad bowls

up +32%

d a l a s with

Aussies are making friends BY CHANEL DAY NIELSEN

A

ustralian consumers are actively taking the fight against obesity and chronic illness into their own hands by moving toward a healthier diet with a focus on simple, natural ingredients and less processed food.

This trend has created room for the ‘Fresh Salad’ category to record substantial sales growth. Nielsen Homescan data shows that fresh salad — which includes packaged salad leaves, salad mixes, salad kits and shredded/slaw packs — has increased its sales volume (kg) by 11%, while dollar sales are up by 12% for the year ending 9 September 2017. Right across the country, Australian consumers have increased their fresh salad consumption with volume (kg) growth in NSW and WA leading the charge — both up +14% in the past year driven by an increase in buyers.

Fresh salad appeals to all demographic groups — especially families with the eldest child aged 12–17 years. Over 90% of these families purchased fresh salad in the past year buying 3.5kg on average annually.

96

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR MARKET

Nielsen Consumer & Media View (CMV) research reveals that compared to five years ago, there has been a 28% increase in the number of respondents claiming that their diet is mainly vegetarian; and the number of consumers who say they purchase more fresh and chilled food than they used to has grown by 11%. Among Australians who say they are trying to lose weight, 78% say they are placing priority on changing their diet. With health concerns top-of-mind and the growing need for convenient food options to aid consumers’ busy lifestyles, there is an opportunity for growers to find creative avenues to grow sales, specifically with value-added products.

33THERE is an opportunity for growers to find creative avenues to grow sales, specifically with value-added products.

While spinach bags and leafy mix bags are the top selling salad items in dollar terms nationally; ready-to-eat salad bowls and kits are the fastest growing segments — up +32% and +25%, respectively. And there is room to grow even more by encouraging new consumers to try these products. Just 29% of households have purchased salad bowls in the past year (up from 23% last year) and 21% of homes have purchased kits (up from 19% last year).

MORE INFORMATION Contact Chanel Day (Associate Director, Analytics) phone (02) 8873 7669 or email chanel.day@nielsen.com

We understand that producers working in the horticulture sector face a unique set of challenges, which often present opportunities. You need to adapt to rapidly changing weather conditions, crop development, emerging technologies, price fluctuations and varying global economic conditions. To find out more about Rural Bank’s range of specialist farm finance products and services, contact Stephen Fidge, Gingin Community Bank Manager on 08 8575 1560 or Agribusiness Relationship Manager, Garry Harvey on 0437 393 910.

Bendigo and Adelaide Bank Limited, The Bendigo Centre, Bendigo, VIC 3550. ABN 11 068 049 178 AFSL 237879. Product issued by Rural Bank Limited, ABN 74 083 938 416 AFSL 238042 and distributed by Bendigo Bank. Before making any investment decision you should consider your situation and read the relevant Terms and Conditions available at www.bendigobank.com.au or from any Bendigo Bank branch. S52792_4 (376628_v1) (7/11/2017)

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

97


YOUR MARKET

Export success

Odeum Farms BY CLAIRE MCCLELLAND MARKET DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

Odeum

has invested over $1 million into the export business over the last 11 months.

O

nly 12 months ago, Odeum Farms didn’t have an export program. Having previously relied solely on domestic wholesale, retail and food service sectors the new export business has not only added new revenue but has assisted in diversifying risk in the business.

Over the past 12 months Odeum have experienced steady export sales growth into a number of key export markets, but have had to overcome a number of challenges and invest significantly into establishing this arm of the business. “After exporting sporadically through third parties over the years, a commitment was made by our board in 2016 to build an international client base and begin exporting in our own right. Consequently, Odeum has invested over $1 million into the export business over the last 11 months.” “After a period of intensive planning in late 2016 and international market visits throughout 2017 we have been building our global network and developing the internal processes to make this venture worthwhile,” Nick Paterniti, Export Manager at Odeum Farms said. A core line for Odeum is Brussels sprouts and during the Spring/Summer season, Odeum supplies a significant volume into Australia’s Brussels sprouts market. Like many other growers Odeum has also had great difficulty moving Brussels sprouts interstate as a result of the Tomato Potato Psyllid (TPP) incursion and associated market access issues for leafy vegetable lines.

98

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Despite difficult access domestically, Odeum has a great success this year sending their first shipment of Brussels sprouts to South Korea and serving the market’s increasing demand for volume.

The goal is to further develop the business and allocate more land to increase supply for this and other export opportunities. Historically, Australia’s exports to South Korea are dominated by potatoes that are primarily for processing; making up approximately 99% of Australian vegetable exports to South Korea. A recent revision of market access has seen additional leafy line products such as broccoli, cauliflower, leeks, celery and lettuce be permitted access to South Korea. New access, in combination with tariff reductions under the KoreaAustralia Free Trade Agreement (KAFTA), mean there are increasing opportunities for growers looking to explore the Korean market. In addition to South Korea, Odeum also supplies customers in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Middle East and Hong Kong.


YOUR MARKET

33IN addition to South Korea, Odeum also supplies customers in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Middle East and Hong Kong.

BY CLAIRE MCCLELLAND MARKET DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

In 2017 Odeum made independent visits to their key target markets and have also participated at two key tradeshows; Foodex in Tokyo, Japan and Asia Fruit Logistica in Hong Kong, with the World of Perishables Expo Dubai in December 2017 being the next planned market visit. “It has been important for us to develop a sound understanding of each new target export market, before we jumped in and started doing business. In order to build that understanding we have undertaken several R&D market visits over the past year, and used each as an opportunity to learn and to promote our company and brand,” Nick said. The focus of Odeum’s export program over the next year is to continue to invest in marketing and promotion to further establish their international brand and build long term relationships with their export partners. MORE INFORMATION To find out more on Odeum Farms visit their website www.odeum.com.au If you are interested in exporting contact Claire McClelland on (08) 9486 7515 or claire.mcclelland@vegetableswa.com.au

2017

Asia Fruit Logistica

H

eld in Hong Kong from 6–8 September, Asia Fruit Logistica is a key fresh produce tradeshow which this year was visited by more than 13,000 people and had 813 companies from 43 different countries exhibiting.

This year’s tradeshow saw the Australian pavilion rebranded under the Taste Australia initiative. The Taste Australia is part of a $10.5 million investment from Hort Innovation in trade activities over the next year. Taste Australia is designed to help promote premium Australian produce in current and future markets. Western Australian vegetables were well represented in Hong Kong with a selection of Western Australian corn, carrots, beans, sprouts and celery being displayed. Hong Kong is a key market for Australian vegetables. Australian vegetables have full access (no phytosanitary restrictions) to the Hong Kong market. This makes the market attractive not only to Australian exporters but to other competitor countries as well, making Hong Kong a particularly competitive market. Currently, carrot exports represent approximately 47% of Australian vegetable exports to Hong Kong.

Growers who are currently exporting or interested in export are encouraged to attend Asia Fruit Logistica in 2018. MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in attending next year contact Claire McClelland on (08) 9486 7515 or claire.mcclelland@vegetableswa.com.au or visit the Asia Fruit Logistica website www.asiafruitlogistica.com

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

99


YOUR MARKET

SFFC represents over 270 producers

spanning horticulture, agriculture, aquaculture, viticulture and agri-tourism.

Perth shoppers

s eek genuine, fresh, local produce from greengrocers

M

A number of last year’s participating retailers commented, this is more than just a brand building exercise. It is providing a true connection for consumers with a region, the produce that it grows, its farmers and its community. It tells the whole story.”

ore than one in three people in the Perth metropolitan area recognise the Genuinely Southern Forests brand in less than four years since it was created, according to a recently commissioned Economic Impact Assessment of the Southern Forests Food Council (SFFC). This is good news for consumers as the Food Council gears up to launch its second annual retail marketing campaign with 17 independent greengrocers signed up to take part. The campaign will run from 7 October 2017 through to 9 June 2018, delivering a wider range of seasonal produce to consumers, while providing each greengrocer with four dedicated instore tasting events in direct response to inaugural campaign feedback.

100

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Southern Forests Food Council Executive Chairman Bevan Eatts commented, “This campaign is a terrific platform for Southern Forests producers of both primary and value add product to reach consumers directly from the farm gate, via the market floor and onto our supporting retailers’ shelves.

Jacquie Barns together with her four brothers and parents are the owner/ operators of one of the 17 participating greengrocers, Winthrop Gardens SUPA IGA. They are excited about their partnership with Genuinely Southern Forests and involvement with the campaign, “With a strong sense of family and community, our values align well with the genuine down to earth producers of the Southern Forests. It’s not just about sourcing the freshest and tastiest fruits and vegetables in season, but also knowing it’s grown locally and by people who actually care about the food they produce,” said Ms Barns.


YOUR MARKET

The SFFC represents over 270 producer members spanning horticulture, agriculture, aquaculture, viticulture and agri-tourism with the region producing over 50 different types of fruits and vegetables, truffles, dairy cattle, sheep, beef cattle, vineyards and boutique produce, in addition to value added grocery products including honey, wine, green tea and sparkling juices.

In terms of production, volume is considerable, including 80% of Western Australia’s avocado and cherry production and 50% of the state’s apple and potato production. The Genuinely Southern Forests AllStates Farms market floor at Market City, Canning Vale continues to play an integral role for Southern Forests producers to supply Genuinely Southern Forests produce and for the 17 greengrocer partners to access Genuinely Southern Forests produce. “Genuinely Southern Forests has been able to unite key components of the supply chain from the farmers, to the market floor and now the greengrocers to ensure consumers are able to identify and source genuine fresh local produce from what we think is the best growing region in the world.

We look forward to working with our 17 retail partners, who are truly some of the top greengrocers in Perth, on bringing consumers a greater understanding and appreciation of where their food comes from and providing them with their own genuine taste experience at the in-store tasting events,” said Mr Eatts. A Committee of Management, together with Southern Forests Food Council staff, bring the region’s world-class and varied produce to domestic and overseas markets; and play an integral role in unifying the area’s diverse producers to strengthen economic performance, attract further investment, create sustainable employment and promote regional pride. The SFFC is supported by the Government of Western Australia’s Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, Royalties for Regions and the Shire of Manjimup. The Southern Forests region includes the towns of Manjimup, Pemberton, Northcliffe and Walpole.

2017–18 Genuinely Southern Forests retail marketing campaign participating greengrocers: Benara Fresh Food Market — Morley Canning Bridge IGA — Applecross Como Harvest IGA Xpress — Como Drovers Fruit and Vegetables — Wanneroo Gilbert's Fresh Market — Hilton Gilbert's Fresh Market — Mandurah Gilbert's Fresh Market — Midland Gilbert's Fresh Market — Willetton Leederville IGA — Leederville Napoli Mercato — Harrisdale Peaches Fresh Food Market — South Fremantle Rustico Gourmet Grocer — Riverton Shenton Park IGA — Shenton Park Sisters SUPA IGA — Joondalup The Good Grocer — Applecross Wembley SUPA IGA — Wembley Winthrop Gardens SUPA IGA — Winthrop

MORE INFORMATION For further information contact Bevan Eatts (SFFC Executive Chairman) on 0419 811 823 or email bevan@southernforestsfood.com

331. Southern Forests Executive Chairman and Farmer Bevan Eatts instore at The Good Greengrocer. 2. Customers taste Pemberton Finger Lime at Wembley SUPA IGA instore tasting event. 3. The Barns family own and operate Winthrop Gardens SUPA IGA.

1

3

2

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

101


YOUR MARKET

Harmonised Australian Retailer Produce Scheme (HARPS)

BY JOEL DINSDALE QUALITY ASSURANCE COORDINATOR, VEGETABLESWA

W

ith the deadline for HARPS certification around the corner (1 January 2018), there have been plenty of questions around the HARPS program. The following Frequently Ask Questions aim to resolve questions that vegetablesWA are hearing from growers.

It is important to review your company’s QA requirements at least annually, or when changes occur within the business that, affect the destination of the product. Businesses may find themselves in a situation whereby HARPS may be required in the future if circumstances change — so regular reviews should be conducted by business management teams.

HARPS

A Pre-Assessment Checklist is available on the HARPS website.

Q

What is HARPS?

HARPS is a system that has been adopted by Australia’s five leading grocery retailers — ALDI, Coles, Costco, Metcash (IGA) and Woolworths. Essentially, HARPS is the consolidation of each of the retailer’s individual QA requirements into one audit event to improve food safety outcomes, increase efficiencies, lower costs and release valuable resources back to production. HARPS must be adopted with a GFSI (Global Food Safety Initiative) approved base scheme. These schemes are: • Freshcare Food Safety & Quality Edition 4 (FSQ4) • SQF, BRC Global Standard for Food Safety • GlobalG.A.P. Integrated Farm Assurance. Table 1 can be used to understand if your business needs to become HARPS accredited.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

More information on HARPS can be found at: harpsonline.com.au

Q

I need to adopt HARPS, how do I arrange an audit?

The retailers have approved a list of certification bodies that are endorsed to audit against the HARPS scheme. If your business’s current certification body is on the retailers approved list then you only need to notify your certification body of your requirement to be audited against the HARPS scheme.

TABLE 1 HARPS identification

Supplier & site type

Definition

In scope Yes/No

Timeline

Direct supplier

Has a direct commercial relationship with the customer using the HARPS standard (a supplier that invoices the retailer)

Yes

Transition to HARPS by January 2018

Subcontractor/copacker

A supplier of either bulk or pre-packed produce on behalf of the direct supplier

Yes

Transition to HARPS by January 2018

Indirect supplier

A primary producer/grower, supplying bulk product for further handling, and/or packing by direct supplier or subcontractor/co-packer

No

Transition to HARPS approved scheme by January 2019

Source: HARPS Online

102

All growers/suppliers that are supplying finished product (i.e. shelf ready) in retail packaging (branded or generic), must be approved to the HARPS standards. This also applies to any agent/broker/distributor/ vendor whom is supplying, growing and/or packing whole produce for retail sale.


YOUR MARKET

Q&A

Q

How can I upgrade Freshcare FSQ3 to FSQ4?

Transitioning from Freshcare FSQ3 to FSQ4 can be completed in a number of ways. The upgrade can be completed by the grower without Freshcare approved training if a management representative has completed approved FSQ3 or FSQ4 training and evidence is kept. This involves completing all of the elements in the new edition. All of the forms and resources can be sourced on the Freshcare Growers Online Portal.

You can choose to complete training via Freshcare’s new eLearning portal. This is an online system that allows growers to complete Freshcare FSQ4 training at their own pace online.

If your current certification body is not on the approved list, you will need make contact with any of the retailer approved certification bodies. The audit should be harmonised to include the base scheme and the HARPS audit in the same event.

You can also choose to complete a Freshcare FSQ4 refresher course with a Freshcare approved trainer. This involves going through a training course with one of the approved Freshcare trainers. Completion of this course will enable growers to be audit-ready. vegetablesWA are able to offer Freshcare training to growers looking to upgrade from Freshcare FSW3 to FSQ4.

Q

What’s in the HARPS audit?

A Pre-Assessment Checklist is available on the HARPS website. This checklist will enable you to decide if you are meeting the requirements outlined in the scheme. All businesses will need to review their systems and make any required changes to ensure that they meet all of the HARPS elements in full. The checklist should be completed and sent to the approved certification body prior to the commencement of your audit. vegetablesWA are able to provide assistance and guidance to growers in completing the Pre-Assessment Checklist.

Q

I am certified under Freshcare FSQ3, can I complete a HARPS audit?

Businesses that are currently QA certified under Freshcare Food Safety & Quality Edition 3, will need to upgrade their system to Freshcare FSQ4 or alternatively become certified against any of the other base schemes to ensure they are HARPS ready. This should be completed by all businesses (including indirect suppliers) prior to January 1, 2018 to ensure

Q

What do I need to do to remain HARPS certified?

compliance throughout the supply chain from grower to final point of sale. Those indirect supplier businesses that are currently maintaining a Codex HACCP certification will need to change a GFSI approved base program before the January 1, 2019 deadline. Indirect suppliers that are currently certified with one of the following GFSI approved base schemes: Freshcare FSQ4, SQF, BRC and GlobalG.A.P. need to continue to maintain their current system to ensure that they are HARPS approved.

You will need to ensure that you complete all of the requirements of their GFSI approved base scheme as well as meeting all of the HARPS requirements outlined in the Pre-Assessment Checklist annually or where defined by the base scheme. Recertification will be subject to approval following the successful completion of a base scheme plus HARPS audit completed by a retailer approved certification body. Certificates will be issued to verify compliance. MORE INFORMATION If you have further questions about HARPS compliance or quality assurance and food safety in general, please contact vegetablesWA’s Quality Assurance Coordinator, Joel Dinsdale on 0417 857 675 or via email at joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

103


YOUR MARKET

Country of origin food labelling

Is the food required (or permitted) to carry a label? See page 4 to find out if the Standard applies.

T

he Country of Origin Food Labelling Information Standard 2016 (Standard) commenced on 1 July 2016. It requires most food suitable for retail sale in Australia to carry country of origin information. This information may take the form of a text statement (statements may need to be in a defined box) or a text and graphic label known as a standard mark. For example:

Standard mark

Text statement

NO

You are not required to comply with the Standard.

YES Is it a ‘non-priority’ food? See page 5 to determine whether the food belongs to a non-priority food category.

YES

Go to page 10 to find out the labelling requirements for nonpriority food. • If the food was grown or produced in Australia—go to page 20.

Was the priority food grown, produced, made or packed in Australia? See page 6 for an explanation of these key principles.

Was the priority food imported into Australia?

YES

• If the food was made in Australia—go to page 20. • If the food was packed in Australia—go to page 25. • If yes, see page 29 for the labelling requirements

YES

• If yes, see page 29 for the labelling requirements

Does the food contain Australian ingredients? Go to page 13 to find out how to work out the percentage of Australian content in the food.

Labelling requirements for individual food items vary depending on whether the food: • is a ‘priority’ or ‘non-priority’ food • was grown, produced, made or packed in Australia or another country. While the Standard applies to food that is imported into Australia for retail sale, it does not require country of origin labelling on food exported for sale outside Australia. However, labels permitted by the Standard may be used on exports, subject to the labelling laws in the importing country.

104

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Made in Australia. Last major processing has been done here.

Grown in Australia. For food where 100% of the ingredients are Australian grown.

Product of Australia. For all food where 100% of the ingredients are Australian and all major processing has been done here.

Packed in Australia. Features only a bar chart which shows the percentage of Australian ingredients.

FIGURE 1 Do I need to display a country of origin label on my food product? Source: Country of origin food labelling guide www.accc.gov.au/publications/country-of-origin-food-labelling


YOUR MARKET

The Standard has a two-year transition period, during which businesses must either: • continue to label their products according to the existing requirements around country of origin labelling set out in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code1 (the Food Code), or • adopt the new labelling requirements of the Standard. From 1 July 2018, food to be sold in Australia must be labelled according to the requirements of the Standard. However, food products that are packaged and labelled according to the Food Code on or before 30 June 2018 can still be sold without the new labels after that date.

Food grown, produced or made in Australia Priority foods grown, produced, or made in Australia must use a three component standard mark label. The three component standard mark features text and images in a clearly defined box.

• The kangaroo in a triangle logo indicates that the product is of Australian origin.

Kangaroo logo

• The bar chart is a visual indicator of the percentage of Australian ingredients in the food.

Bar chart

• The explanatory text states whether the food was grown, produced or made in Australia and, in most instances, the percentage of Australian ingredients

Explanatory text

Made in Australia from at least 50% Australian ingredients

In certain circumstances, a food product will be eligible to carry a ‘grown in’, ‘product of’ or ‘made in’ standard mark label. Where this occurs, the business can choose which type of claim is most appropriate for their product. Examples

Looking for further help? An online decision tool is available to assist businesses to determine whether they need to display a country of origin label on their food products and to generate downloadable labels. Use of the tool is voluntary and businesses must take care to ensure that, for any labels generated, the business is complying with the Standard regarding the use of that label. MORE INFORMATION More information about country of origin labelling is available from the ACCC website, including a series of frequently asked questions. Visit www.accc.gov.au/cool for more. The ACCC’s Advertising and selling guide will help businesses to understand their broader ACL obligations when it comes to promoting their goods or services. The guide is available from the ACCC’s website: www.accc.gov.au/ publications/advertising-selling. Visit www.accc.gov.au for more information about your rights and responsibilities. You can contact the ACCC by using our small business complaint form or by contacting our small business helpline on 1300 302 021. The ACCC cannot provide legal advice or approve labels. We can only provide guidance about your rights and obligations under the law. You should seek your own independent legal advice to ensure compliance with the Standard and the ACL. If you need further assistance contact Claire McClelland or Joel Dinsdale on (08) 9486 7515.

A supermarket sells pumpkin that is sourced from an Australian farmer. The pumpkin could be labelled as:

Grown in Grown in Grown in Australia Australia Australia

A butcher sells steaks that are made from Australian cows that are butchered in Australia. The beef could be labelled as:

Australian Australian Australian beef beef beef

A fish market sells whole barramundi that was caught in Australia. The fish could be labelled as:

ProductProduct of Product of of Australia Australia Australia

Produced Produced in Produced in in Australia Australia Australia

Grown in Australia

The online descision tool can be found at www.business.gov.au

1

During the transition period, a business will be taken to be complying with the Standard if they continue to label their products according to the country of origin labelling requirements set out in the Food Code.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

105


YOUR MARKET

High potential markets

fast facts

Global import scenario • Both quantity and value of imports have grown for the past five years, value growth is more than quantity growth showing the improvement in quality. • Table grapes is the highest imported fruit in value, and apple in quantity. • Avocado has the highest growth in imports, both quantity and value terms. • Quantity growth in melon is almost stagnant. • Strawberry has the highest unit value of imports.

Australia’s position • Australia is the highest unit value exporter among the top twenty exporters for avocado and plum and second highest in strawberry, second only to South Korea. WA has a premium in the export of avocados among Australian states, but not for plums.

High potential markets • Singapore is a high potential market for all of the fruits analysed. Other markets showing good potential for several fruits included Japan, Hong Kong, Kuwait, Indonesia, China, Malaysia and Thailand. • Selected Middle East markets have good potential in strawberry imports. • North East Asian markets such as China, Japan and South Korea are premium importers of most of the fruits. On several instances we have a tariff advantage in these markets compared to competitors based on our recent trade agreements.

Market access

33The Market opportunities for WA fruits help exporters identify premium markets for their premium products.

• Table grapes and oranges have the lowest level of market access restrictions. • China, Japan and South Korea have high level of market access restrictions. • Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia are open markets, while Middle East markets are phytosanitary markets with low level of restrictions. • Plum growers will benefit from gaining access to China as China is the largest importer of plums in the world and Chile is almost the sole competitor during WA supply period. Similar opportunities are identified for different fruits.

Seasonal advantage • WA has a seasonal advantage in the export of most of these fruits to northern hemisphere markets. For example, third quarter is the seasonal window for strawberries as US is the only competitor during this period of the year.

106

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR MARKET

WA fruit production is currently worth

$480 million

BY MANJU RADHAKRISHNAN RESEARCH OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

W

A fruit production is currently worth $480 million annually and has grown by 62% in value of production and 250% in value of exports over the past four years. With a goal to continue this growth, DPIRD has produced a report on Market opportunities for WA fruits to help exporters identify premium markets for their premium products.

The report provides an overview of international markets and examines export potential for selected fruits — apples, melons, avocados, table grapes, oranges, plums and strawberries.

33OF the fruit analysed, apples rank first in terms of tonnage imported globally.

The analysis provides a guide to the following questions in relation to the destination market. • What are the long term and short-term import trends for the market? • Is it a viable market for WA product? • Is it a premium market? • Who are WA’s potential competitors in each market during different seasons? • Is there a premium segment that we can target? • Does WA have a seasonal advantage? • What is WA’s tariff position compared to other suppliers? • Does Australia already have a presence in the market? • Do we have access to this market?

Approach The markets that were predominantly Through answering these questions, gives anwere overview the industries and the analysed Figure in this1 report theofAsian and selected the markets were rated as having, high, factors analysed to identify potential markets. Middle East markets, with the inclusion of medium or low potential for importing a few European markets. each selected fruit (see Figure 1).

The analysis shows Singapore has high potential for all the fruits analysed. Japan and Hong Kong have high potential in five of the fruits analysed, and Kuwait, Indonesia, China, Malaysia and Thailand have high potential in four. Following are a few highlights on specific fruit industries.

Apple • Of the fruit analysed, apples rank first in terms of tonnage imported globally. • There is very high competition in the market from China, US, New Zealand and South Africa, all of which are world leaders in apple exports. • Australia’s export price is 59% higher than the average world export price of apples. • WA would benefit from focussing on the speciality segments such as BravoTM or value added supply (see Figure 2).

FIGURE 1. Selected fruits and factors analysed

Industries

Factors

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Demand factors

Apples Avocados Grapes Melons Oranges Plums Strawberries

1. Import value and trends 2. Import quantity and trends 3. Import price and trends 4. Share of import during WA supply season 5. Price of import during WA supply season

Market potential 1. High 2. Medium 3. Low

6. Global share and rank

Supply factors 7. Competitors 8. Level of competition 9. Share and price of competitor during WA supply season

Market access factors 10. Tariff situation (average tariff, Australia’s tariff and competitor’s tariff)

FIGURE 1 Selected fruits and factors analysed Source: Market opportunities for WA fruits

10

Market opportunities for WA fruits

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

107


YOUR MARKET

FIGURE 5. High potential markets for apples United Kingdom

• All of the analysed countries have positive growth rate in unit value during the past five years. China

Orange • Australia has high volume opportunities in premium markets such as China, South Korea and Japan.

UAE

China

Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Thailand

Indonesia

• Australia has tariff advantage in all of these markets based on our trade agreements.

Malaysia Singapore

Malaysia Singapore

Thailand United Arab Emirates

• Main competition is from South Africa which is the second biggest exporter of oranges, with an export price, 29% less than that of the world average.

Indonesia

United Kingdom

FIGURE 2 High potential markets for apples 16

Plum

Source: Market opportunities for WA fruits Market opportunities for WA fruits

Melon

Avocado

• Australia is currently not supplying at the high end of the market. There could be opportunities to supply a premium product (see Figure 3).

• WA would benefit from gaining access to premium markets such as Thailand, high volume markets such as Japan and fast growing market such as China.

• Large number of competitors in the market, recent access to Japan can create opportunity for WA melons as Japan is a high value importer and Mexico is the sole competitor.

• China and Japan are not premium importers of avocados at this stage, however as these countries are premium importers of other fruits; WA has the opportunity to create a premium segment there.

• Proximal high value markets import melons outside of the current WA export season. As WA can produce melons throughout the year, supplying outside the current export season could be considered. • WA may benefit from addressing the market access issues in Vietnam.

Table grapes • Table grapes are the highest imported fruit globally in value terms. • WA has good tariff advantage with the trade agreement with high potential countries such as South Korea, China and Japan.

Kuwait Bahrain UAE Hong Kong Vietnam Bahrain

Maldives

• WA has a clear seasonal advantage in the export of strawberries as US is the only major exporter during third quarter (July to September). • Strawberry would benefit from gaining market access to China with our counter seasonal production and Japan, which is a high value and high unit value importer of strawberries. The report provides market intelligence available from desktop research so that potential exporters from WA can make informed decisions. Please note this report serves as a guide only. Potential exporters are required to do their own research on markets, market access, profitability, importers and competitors before exports commence. The report is available to download from the following link: www.agric.wa.gov.au/fruit/marketopportunities-wa-fruits

Japan

Japan

• Australia would benefit from market access to China, as China is the number one importer of plums in the world, and Chile is almost the sole competitor during WA supply season. Moreover, China has a double digit growth in both quantity and unit value of imports for the past five and ten years.

Strawberries

FIGURE 8. High potential markets for melons

Hong Kong

• Australia has the highest export price among the top 20 exporters, however WA export price is 38% less than Australian average.

Singapore

Kuwait Maldives

MORE INFORMATION

Singapore

For more information contact Department of Primary Industries & Regional Development, Manju Radhakrishnan on (08) 9368 3069 or manju.radhakrishnan@agric.wa.gov.au

United Arab Emirates Vietnam

FIGURE 3 High potential markets for melons Source: Market opportunities for WA fruits

108

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

Market opportunities for WA fruits

19


YOUR PRODUCTION

TOMATO POTATO PSYLLID (TPP) TRANSITION TO MANAGEMENT PLAN — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Kế hoạch để kiềm chế Rầy Cà chua Khoai tây (Tomato potato psyllid — TPP) Loài côn trùng gây hại rầy cà chua khoai tây (Bactericera cockerelli) đã xuất hiện tại Úc lần đầu tiên vào tháng 2 năm 2017. Điều này khiến Tây Úc phải thực hiện chương trình đối phó an toàn sinh học toàn diện để giảm thiểu tác hại của TPP đối với các doanh nghiệp tại WA. Phối hợp với ngành công nghiệp, Bộ Công nghiệp Cơ bản và Phát triển Nông thôn (Regional Development — DPIRD) đang thực hiện kế hoạch 8 tháng để triển khai các hệ thống khoa học, an ninh sinh học và kinh doanh nhằm mục đích giúp các nhà trồng trọt và ngành công nghiệp kiềm chế TPP.

Kế hoạch Chuyển tiếp sang kiềm chế TPP là gì? Mục đích của kế hoạch Chuyển tiếp sang kiềm chế là để nâng cao năng lực kiềm chế TPP của các nhà trồng trọt và ngành công nghiệp.

Một phần then chốt của kế hoạch này là xác định tình trạng vi khuẩn Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) đi kèm với TPP, và đã được biết là nguyên nhân gây ra bệnh Zebra Chip ở khoai tây tại những nơi khác trên thế giới. Vào thời điểm in ấn, CLso chưa thấy xuất hiện tại WA. Nếu CLso xuất hiện, điều đó sẽ làm thay đổi cục diện nguy cơ và các sách lược kiềm chế TPP tại WA. Chuyển tiếp sang kiềm chế là vì trên toàn quốc chúng ta chấp nhận rằng không thể tận diệt TPP và mọi cố gắng nên tập trung vào mặt kiềm chế. DPIRD có trách nhiệm báo cáo với Ủy ban Tham vấn Loài gây hại Thực vật Khẩn cấp (Consultative Committee on Emergency Plant Pests — CCEPP) toàn quốc về việc thực hiện kế hoạch này.

Kế hoạch này gồm có những gì? Kế hoạch Chuyển tiếp sang kiềm chế bắt đầu từ tháng 9 năm 2017 — tháng 5 năm 2018, bao gồm: • nghiên cứu khoa học và phát triển để mở mang kiến thức của chúng ta về

TPP, đặc tính sinh học của nó và các biện pháp kiềm chế

• các kế hoạch kiềm chế toàn quốc và doanh nghiệp để giúp kiềm chế TPP tại các trang trại và toàn bộ chuỗi cung ứng • giám sát theo mục tiêu đối với phức hợp TPP/CLso • tiếp cận thị trường và mậu dịch.

Nghiên cứu và phát triển TPP Nghiên cứu khoa học và phát triển là yếu tố then chốt để mở rộng kiến thức của chúng ta về TPP và tăng thêm các biện pháp kiềm chế cho các nhà trồng trọt.

Xem xét tài liệu về TPP Cuộc xem xét tài liệu sẽ được hoàn tất để xác định các công trình nghiên cứu chất lượng nhất về TPP/CLso tại Úc và ở nước ngoài hiện nay. Và sẽ tìm hiểu về tất cả các đề tài như các quy cách thực hành Kiềm chế Loài gây hại Kết hợp (Integrated Pest Management — IPM) trong nhà kiếng và ngoài thực địa, các loại cây trồng hoa mầu khác nhau, thời tiết và các thực vật ký chủ. Bất kỳ lỗ hổng nào về kiến thức xác định được trong cuộc xem xét sẽ giúp định hướng việc đầu tư vào nghiên cứu trong tương lai.

khoai tây và ớt tây — nhưng hiện chưa đăng ký để sử dụng với TPP — cũng sẽ được đánh giá.

Các cuộc thử nghiệm Tác nhân Kiềm chế Sinh học • Tác nhân Kiềm chế Sinh học (Biological Control Agent — BCA) là sinh vật như một loại côn trùng hoặc bệnh thực vật, được sử dụng để kiềm chế một loài gây hại như TPP. • Các nhà nghiên cứu của Bộ đã bắt đầu cuộc thử nghiệm hỗn hợp với Dịch vụ Sinh học để đánh giá các BCA có triển vọng đang bán trên thị trường để xác định tính hiệu quả của chúng đối với TPP. • Các cuộc thử nghiệm này sẽ đánh giá tính hiệu quả đối với 3 loài côn trùng khác nhau, bao gồm brown lacewings, ladybirds và mirid bug đối với cà chua, ớt và ớt tây.

• Các cuộc thử nghiệm được thực hiện trong các nhà kiếng của Bộ và cần phải gieo TPP vào cây ký chủ và sau đó thả BCA ra để xác định tính hiệu quả của chúng đối với TPP.

Các cuộc thử nghiệm trước thu hoạch Các biện pháp xử lý trước thu hoạch sẽ giúp đạt được chất lượng tối đa đối với sản phẩm sẽ bán trên thị trường và là phần quan trọng trong việc kiềm chế TPP dọc theo toàn bộ chuỗi cung ứng.

Các cuộc thử nghiệm hóa chất • Mục đích của các cuộc thử nghiệm thuốc trừ sâu tại các nhà kiếng của Bộ là để xác định các hóa chất hiệu quả để sử dụng với cà chua, khoai tây và ớt tây. Một số loại thuốc trừ sâu khác nhau sẽ được đánh giá. • Tính hiệu quả của các loại thuốc trừ sâu đã đăng ký để sử dụng với cà chua,

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

109


YOUR PRODUCTION

TOMATO POTATO PSYLLID (TPP) TRANSITION TO MANAGEMENT PLAN — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

• Kết quả sơ bộ về tính hiệu quả của ladybirds như là tác nhân kiềm chế TPP hiện đang được đối chiếu.

dính' đã được đặt ở các trang trại thương mại và phi thương mại, tại và quanh khu vực nội thành Perth đã biết là có TPP. Bộ đã được cộng đồng WA hỗ trợ mạnh mẽ với hơn 1000 trang trại đã đăng ký cho phép đặt 'bẫy dính' trong thời gian giám sát này.

Các cuộc thử nghiệm tiêu diệt sâu bọ sau thu hoạch Cần phải tiêu diệt sâu bọ ớt tây, ớt và cà chua để đem bán trên thị trường quốc tế và liên tiểu bang. Bộ đang tiến hành cuộc thử nghiệm quy mô nhỏ về tính hiệu quả của hoá chất trong việc tiêu diệt sâu bọ sau thu hoạch đối với các loại cây trồng này.

Chuyên viên côn trùng học sẽ kiểm tra từng bẫy một và bất kỳ TPP nào thu thập được đều đã được thử nghiệm tìm CLso. Khoảng 4000 bẫy đã được thử nghiệm tại các phòng thí nghiệm chẩn đoán của Bộ. Vào thời điểm in ấn, chưa phát hiện CLso ở Tây Úc.

Kết quả nghiên cứu của Bộ sẽ được đưa vào chương trình nghiên cứu và phát triển TPP toàn quốc.

Đợt giám sát thứ hai sẽ được thực hiện vào đầu năm 2018.

Các tiểu bang khác phải soạn thảo kế hoạch giám sát loài gây hại theo đúng các tiêu chuẩn toàn quốc và quốc tế.

Kế hoạch kiềm chế toàn quốc Kế hoạch Kiềm chế Toàn quốc sẽ được soạn thảo để giúp cộng đồng và các đối tác thương mại tin tưởng rằng TPP đang bị chủ động kiềm chế tại các khu vực sản xuất ở Úc.

Tiếp cận thị trường và thương mại Nhóm công tác tiếp cận thị trường TPP của Bộ tiếp tục hợp tác với các tiểu bang khác và lãnh địa để giảm thiểu tác động của TPP đối với mậu dịch.

AUSVEG qua trung gian Điều phối viên Chương trình TPP Toàn quốc sẽ chỉ đạo công việc soạn thảo Kế hoạch Kiềm chế Toàn quốc, phối hợp với các chính phủ tiểu bang và liên bang cùng các đối tác trong ngành công nghiệp.

Điều này bao gồm việc đề ra các điều kiện di chuyển để cho phép xuất khẩu các sản phẩm ký chủ và không ký chủ và vườn ươm cây trong khi vẫn cung cấp Mức Bảo vệ Thích hợp (Appropriate Level of Protection — ALOP) từ WA tới các tiểu bang khác và lãnh địa.

Các kế hoạch kiềm chế của doanh nghiệp dành cho các nhà trồng trọt Một thành phần thiết yếu của việc Chuyển tiếp sang kiềm chế là soạn thảo và thực hiện các kế hoạch kiềm chế của doanh nghiệp dành cho các ngành công nghiệp bị ảnh hưởng.

Các kế hoạch này sẽ đề ra các biện pháp kiểm soát TPP một cách hiệu quả và chứng minh cam kết của ngành công nghiệp đối với việc giảm thiểu vấn đề lây lan và tác động của TPP. Điều này sẽ rất quan trọng đối với việc hỗ trợ các cố gắng liên tục để đổi mới và duy trì việc tiếp cận thị trường, và là nền tảng của các chương trình chứng nhận và bảo đảm.

Như vậy, phương thức có hệ thống đối với kế hoạch kiềm chế của doanh nghiệp sẽ được thực hiện. Với sự hỗ trợ của điều phối viên kế hoạch kiềm chế của doanh nghiệp, mỗi ngành công nghiệp sẽ hoàn tất các kế hoạch kiềm chế của doanh nghiệp, giải quyết toàn bộ chuỗi cung ứng của họ. Kế hoạch đã hoàn tất sẽ bao gồm:

• hiểu biết về loài gây hại và đặc tính sinh học của mầm bệnh và cách xác định chúng • xác định các cơ chế gây nguy cơ

110

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

• áp dụng các biện pháp kiểm soát và kiềm chế

• nhận thức và thực hiện an toàn sinh học, ví dụ như biển báo, giám sát và vệ sinh

• quản lý sau khi đã qua cổng trang trại.

Phần lớn thông tin đều có sẵn từ các nguồn địa phương, liên bang hoặc quốc tế. Cùng với các tổ chức trong ngành công nghiệp, thông tin sẽ được trình bày theo định dạng quen thuộc, sử dụng quy cách thực hành tốt hiện nay, an toàn sinh học, Bảo đảm Chất lượng và các tài liệu chứng nhận nếu phù hợp. Mục đích là để phát huy các quy cách thực hành hiện tại để kết hợp TPP mà không tạo ra thêm công việc. Bộ mong sẽ hợp tác với các nhà trồng trọt để cung cấp các công cụ cần thiết sao cho sự chuyển tiếp sang kiềm chế được suôn sẻ.

Giám sát Gần đây Bộ đã hoàn tất chương trình giám sát TPP vào mùa xuân năm 2017. 'Các bẫy

Khu vực Kiểm dịch hiện đang được áp dụng, bao gồm khu vực nội thành Perth và các khu vực chính quyền địa phương lân cận. Các điều kiện Khu vực Kiểm dịch đã được đề ra sau khi tham khảo ý kiến ngành công nghiệp trồng trọt của WA và được áp dụng đối với các loại cây ký chủ được sản xuất tại nhà hoặc các vườn ươm cây trong Khu vực Kiểm dịch. Muốn biết thêm chi tiết, xin quý vị xem ở trang 18 hoặc truy cập www.agric.wa.gov.au/tpp. THÊM THÔNG TIN Ian Wilkinson, Điều phối viên Dự án TPP Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development Điện thoại: (08) 9780 6278 Email: ianstewart.wilkinson@dpird.wa.gov.au Gavin Foord, Điều phối viên Kế hoạch Kiềm chế của Doanh nghiệp Foord Systems Điện thoại: 0435 018 189 Email: gfoord@westnet.com.au agric.wa.gov.au/tpp


YOUR PRODUCTION

TOMATO POTATO PSYLLID (TPP): QUARANTINE AREA NOTICE FAQS — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Phức hợp Rầy cà chua khoai tây (TPP)

Hỏi đáp về Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch (QAN) Rầy cà chua khoai tây đã được phát hiện lần đầu tiên ở Úc trong khu vực thành thị Perth và một số vùng phụ cận. Một Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch đang có hiệu lực áp dụng các các biện pháp hạn chế di chuyển một số mặt hàng thương phẩm và sản phẩm từ vườn gia đình trong các khu vực này để hạn chế rầy lây lan.

Kể từ 01/11/2017 các loại cây ký chủ rầy trong phạm vi vùng kiểm dịch không được phép di chuyển vào các nơi được khoanh vùng chuyên biệt trong tiểu bang Tây úc mà không được xử lý theo yêu cầu chuyên biệt. Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch có hiệu lực trong vấn đề di chuyển áp dụng với tất cả các loiaj cây trong họ cà (Solannaceae) và họ khoai lang (Convulvulaceae) bao gồm các loại sau đây và không chỉ giới hạn trong các loiaj này mà thôi: Tên khoa học

Thí dụ (tên thường gọi)

Solanum tuberosum

Potato — khoai tây

Lycopersicon spp. Tomato — Cà chua Capsicum spp.

Solanum melongena Solanum betaceum

Ornamental & weed Solanum spp.

Physalis spp. Lycium spp.

Convolvulus spp. Ipomoea batatas

Pepper, paprika, capsicum, chilli — Ớt cay, Ớt gia vị, Ớt chuông

Phần hỏi đáp về Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch để giúp các người sản xuất và ngành rau quả. Xin lưu ý phần hỏi đáp này sẽ được tiếp tục cập nhật theo yêu cầu. Xem các cập nhật trên trang internet www.agric.wa.gov.au/tpp Bản cập nhật ngày 01/11/2017

1

Nightshades, potato vine — Nụ áo, cà dại Groundcherry

Matrimony vine, goji berry, African boxthorn

Field bindweed — Rau muống Sweet potato — khoai lang

Xem Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch trên trang internet của Bộ Nông Nghiệp www.agri.wa.gov.au/tpp

Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch (QAN) là gì?

Một QAN là một thông cáo trong khuôn khổ đạo luật An ninh sinh học và quản lý nông nghiệp 2007 công bố một khu vực kiểm dịch do có sự xuất hiện của một loại sâu bệnh hại nào đó. Trong trường hợp này, Thông cáo kiểm dịch được công bố do rầy TPP được phát hiện trong khu vực thành thị và một số vùng khác.

Eggplant — Cà tím Tamarillo

Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch có hiệu lực trong vấn đề di chuyển áp dụng với tất cả các loiaj cây trong họ cà (Solannaceae) và họ khoai lang (Convulvulaceae)

2

Mục tiêu của việc công bố vùng kiểm dịch là để ngăn chặn sự di chuyển cây ký chủ rầy loại có thể lây lan rầy TPP từ vùng kiểm dịch sang các vùng khác của tiểu bang tây Úc?

Công bố Vùng kiểm dịch là một phần của kế hoạch đối phó căp quốc gia mà bao gồm cả các biện pháp kềm chế rầy TPP và tăng cường giám định đối với vi khuẩn CLso Candidatus liberibacter solannacearum — một loaifi vi khuẩn đã tạo phức hợp với rầy TPP ở những vùng khác trên thế giới.

Cho đến nay chưa có phát hiện vi khuẩn CLso nào tại Tây Úc.

3

Vùng kiểm dịch bao gồm những đâu?

•P  erth metropolitan area •A  ugustaMargaret River • Beverley

• Boddington

• Boyup Brook

•B  ridgetownGreenbushes • Brookton • Bunbury

• Busselton • Capel

• Carnamah • Chittering • Collie

• Coorow

• Cranbrook • Cuballing

• Dandaragan • Dardanup • Denmark

•D  onnybrookBalingup

• Gingin

• Harvey

• Kojonup

• Mandurah • Manjimup • Moora

• Murray

• Nannup

• Narrogin

• Northam • Pingelly

• Plantagenet • Toodyay

• Victoria Plains • Wagin

• Wandering • Waroona

• West Arthur • Wickepin • Williams

• Woodanilling • York.

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

111


YOUR PRODUCTION

TOMATO POTATO PSYLLID (TPP): QUARANTINE AREA NOTICE FAQS — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Kununurra

Không còn cấm di chuyển các loại rau quả của cây ký chủ rầy trong thông cáo này. Việc xử lý cây ký chủ như cây giống,cây trong vườn ươm vẫn cón bắt buộc khi chúng được di chuyển ra khỏi vùng kiểm dịch đến các khu vực trồng trọt được khoanh vùng đặc biệt trong tiểu bang.

Broome

Điều lưu ý quan trọng là các biện pháp kiểm soát liên bang vẫn còn áp dụng cho hàng loạt các loại cây trồng và sản phẩm. Thông tin thêm về yêu cầu đối với việc di chuyển cây trồng và sản phẩm từ Tây úc đến các tiểu bang khác có trong trang internet của Bộ trong mục tiếp cận thị trường (TPP market assess section).

Carnarvon

Geraldton

Northam Perth

7

Bunbury Esperance

Albany

TPP Quarantine Area Effective as of 1 November 2017 0

75

150

225

300

REFERENCE: Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia 1994 Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994 Zone 50 Vertical Datum: Australian Height Datum 1971 Date: 30/10/2017 Job Number: 2017037 File name: TPP_T2M_Quarantine_Area

375

Legend

Kilometres

Quarantine Area Specified Local Government Areas Local Government Areas in above

4

DISCLAIMER While all reasonable care has been taken in the preparation of the material in this document, the Western Australian Government and its officers accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions it may contain whether caused by negligence or otherwise or for any loss, however caused, sustained by any person who relies on it.

Nhừng khu vực nào là nơi được khoang vùng chuyên biệt?

Cây ký chủ rầy TPP không được di chuyển tử vùng kiểm dịch vào các nơi được khoang vùng chuyên biệt mà không qua xử lý đặc biệt.

Khu vực được khoanh vùng chuyên biệt là những khu vực trồng trọt quan trọng mà chưa phát hiện rầy TPP, nhừng nơi này bao gồm: • Albany

• Jerramungup

•B  roomehillTambellup

• Morawa

• Broome

• Carnarvon

• Chapman Valley • Esperance

• Gnowangerup

• Greater Geraldton • Irwin

5

6

Việc di chuyển các sản phẩm của loại hoa màu là ký chủ của rầy có còn bị cấm không?

• Mingenew

• Northampton

• Ravensthorpe • Shark Bay

• Three Springs

•W  yndham-East Kimberley

Tại sao thông cáo này trở nên có hiệu lực vào lúc này?

Thông cáo này thay thế cho thông cáo trước vừa hết hiệu lực và đưa ra các biện pháp kiểm soát rầy đã qua chọn lọc.

Các biện pháp nào được chứng nhận đới với các loại cây không mang trái (chẳng hạn như cây giống)?

Các cây là ký chủ rầy trong phạm vi vùng kiểm dịch nên được: • Chuẩn bị theo yêu cầu theo các khoản (a) hoặc (b) dưới đây và các biện pháp xử lý được tiến hành không quá 36 giờ trước khi di chuyển, và • Lưu giử ghi chép các biện pháp xử lý cùng với thông tin chi tiết về công ty vận chuyển và chuyến hàng. a) Đối với cà chua, ớt chuông, ớt cay, và cà tím: –– Phun Abamectin (giấp phép số #14722) với nồng độ 18g hoạt chất/lít nước theo liều lượng 300 lít nước/ha hoặc phun Bifenthrin (giấy phép số # 9795) với tỉ lệ 20ml/lit nước bằng loại sản phẩm có nồng độ 250g hoạt chất/lít. –– Phun Spirotetramat tỉ lệ 40ml/l loại sản phẩm chứa 240g hoạt chất/l (Movento 240SC), và –– Sau 24 giờ phun Methomyl loại sản phẩm chứa 225g hoạt chất/l theo tỉ lệ 200ml/l. Lưu ý: KHÔNG dung Methomyl cho các trường hợp như trồng trong nhà ni-lon, nhà lưới, nhà kính. Nếu không áp dụng các biện pháp kể trên thì cây lả ký chủ rầy chỉ được di chuyển khỏi phạm vi vùng kiểm dịch khi: • Được chuẩn bị đúng theo các phương pháp được chứng nhận được đăng trên trang internet của Bộ, hoặc • Được thanh tra xác nhận đã qua xử lý theo hướng dẫn của thanh tra.

8

Nếu một chuyến hàng cần được thanh tra chứng nhận thì ai chịu chi phí xử lý, ai chi trả cho thanh tra để chứng nhận lô hàng?

Nếu phải yêu cầu có chứng nhận thì phí chứng nhận và phí thanh tra theo qui định sẽ áp dụng cho chủ là người sản

112

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

xuất/người chủ hàng yêu cầu được cấp chứng nhận.

9

Ai chịu trách nhiệm đảm bảo rằng lô hàng đã được xử lý?

Chủ lô hàng có trách nhiệm đối với công tác xử lý khi di chuyển hay điều hành việc vận chuyển hàng hóa là ký chủ rầy đến các khu vực hạn chế ngoài phạm vi vùng kiểm dịch.

Phải lưu giử ghi chép theo như qui định trong thông báo vùng kiểm dịch bao gồm cả ghi chép về biệp pháp xử lý.

10

Hậu quả ra sao nếu tôi không tuân thủ Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch QAN?

Không tuân thủ Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch QAN có thể dẫn đến bị phạt hoặc bắt buộc sửa sai theo điều khoản 133 trong bộ luật An ninh sinh học và quản lý nông nghiệp 2007, hoặc cả hai hình thức trên. Ai muốn di chuyển vật liệu là ký chủ rầy hoặc các loại có nguy cơ mang theo rầy từ vùng kiểm dịch đến các khu vực hạn chế nên cân nhắc tác hại của việc đưa rầy và các vùng sản xuất nông nghiệp quan trọng của tiểu bang.

11

Trách nhiêm báo cáo của tôi là gì?

Chủ lô hàng vận chuyển đến các địa điểm bên ngoài vùng kiểm dịch bắt buộc phải lưu giử ghi chép vveef các xử lý cùng với các thông tin về công ty vận chuyển và lô hàng.

12

Nên liên hệ ai để biết thêm chi tiết?

Thắc mắc liên quan đến Thông cáo vùng kiểm dịch và chuyển tiếp quản lý rầy sang chiến lược quản lý liên hệ: • Tiến sỹ Ian Wilkinson, DPIRD (08) 9780 6278

Thắc mắc về các loại nông dược liên hệ • Tiến sỹ Darryl Hardie, DPIRD, 0404 819 600

Thắc mắc về các yêu cầu pháp lý liên quan đến sử nông dược liên hệ: • Chris Sharpe, DPIRD (08) 9368 3815

THÊM THÔNG TIN Muốn biết thêm thông tin: • Thông tin thêm, bao gồm cách tìm và báo cáo sâu hại có trong trang internet của Bộ www.agric.wa.gov.au/tpp • Dịch vụ thông tin sâu bệnh hại: (08) 9368 3080 hoặc email: padis@dpird.wa.gov.au


YOUR PRODUCTION

Tomato potato psyllid (TPP) Summary of APVMA permits Permit no.

Description

Potatoes

Permit no.

Description

PER84743

Sulfoxaflor

PER84249

Abamectin

Chilli pepper

PER84249

Lambda-cyhalothirin

PER84245

Spirotetramat

PER84249

Methomyl

PER84442

Pyrethrin

PER84245

Spirotetramat

PER84757

Spinetoram

PER84442

Pyrethrin

Chilli pepper (field and protected cropping systems)

PER84757

Spinetoram

PER84229

Abamectin

Potatoes (field only)

Chilli pepper (field only)

PER84743

PER84229

Bifenthrin

Sulfoxaflor

Sweet potatoes

PER84229

Methomyl

PER84249

Abamectin

PER84743

Sulfoxaflor

PER84249

Bifenthrin

Eggplant

PER84245

Spirotetramat

PER84245

Spirotetramat

PER84442

Pyrethrin

PER84442

Pyrethrin

PER84757

Spinetoram

PER84757

Spinetoram

Sweet potatoes (field only) PER84743

Sulfoxaflor

Tomato

Eggplant (field and protected cropping systems) PER84229

Abamectin

Eggplant (field only)

PER84245

Spirotetramat

PER84229

Bifenthrin

PER84442

Pyrethrin

PER84229

Methomyl

PER84757

Spinetoram

PER84743

Sulfoxaflor

Tomato (field and protected cropping systems) PER84229

Abamectin

Tomato (field only)

Other vegetables PER84442

Pyrethrin

Fruiting vegetables (excluding sweet corn and cucurbits)

PER84229

Bifenthrin

PER84757

PER84229

Methomyl

Fruiting vegetables (excluding sweet corn) — field only

PER84743

Sulfoxaflor

Capsicum

PER84743

Spinetoram Sulfoxaflor

Root and tuber vegetables

PER84245

Spirotetramat

PER84757

PER84442

Pyrethrin

Root and tuber vegetables (field only)

PER84757

Spinetoram

PER84743

Capsicum (field and protected cropping systems) PER84229

Abamectin

Spinetoram Sulfoxaflor

Nursery stock — non-food (field and protected cropping systems) PER84229

Abamectin

Capsicum (field only)

Nursery stock — non-food (field only)

PER84229

Bifenthrin

PER84229

Bifenthrin

PER84229

Methomyl

PER84229

Methomyl

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

113


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permits Permit no.

Description

Disease

Avatar (indoxacarb)

Garden weevil

PER81196

Bifenthrin

PER14701

Pyriproxyfen

Issued date Expiry date

Asparagus PER82992

15-May-17

31-May-22

Specified whitefly & mite species

8-Feb-16

31-Mar-21

Silverleaf whitefly

4-Feb-15

30-Jun-20

Beans

Beetroot PER14184

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off & downy mildew

1-Jul-13

30-Jun-22

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

1-Apr-14

30-Jun-19

PER81260

Imidacloprid

Aphids & thrips

1-Dec-15

30-Sep-20

PER82811

S-METOLACHLOR

Blackberry nightshade

25-Jan-17

1-Feb-20

PER14891

Trifloxystrobin

Alternaria leaf spot

1-Jan-15

30-Sep-19

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

29-Mar-16

31-Mar-21

Bitter melon PER82341

Brassica leafy vegetables PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

18-Jun-12

30-Nov-25

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Downy mildew & other diseases

21-Dec-14

31-Oct-19

PER14127

Pendimethalin

Weeds

31-Oct-13

31-Aug-18

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

11-Nov-14

30-Jun-19

PER13154

Dual Gold Herbicide

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

20-Feb-12

31-Mar-22

PER14907

Emamectin

Various pests

9-Dec-14

30-Nov-19

PER14584

Imidacloprid

Aphids, whitefly & thrips

1-Apr-14

31-Mar-19

PER14184

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off & downy mildew

1-Jul-13

30-Jun-22

PER81876

ABAMECTIN

Leaf miner

24-Jun-16

30-Apr-19

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly & mite species

8-Feb-16

31-Mar-21

PER14596

Chlorpyrifos

Vegetable beetle adults

PER82459

CLETHODIM

Various grass weeds

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

19-Apr-17

30-Sep-21

13-Jul-14

30-Jun-18

Broccoli PER14384

Admiral Insect Growth Regulator (pyriproxyfen) Silverleaf whitefly

Brussels sprouts PER14432

Pendimethalin

Weeds

23-May-14

30-Jun-19

PER14384

Admiral Insect Growth Regulator (pyriproxyfen)

Silverleaf whitefly

13-Jul-14

30-Jun-18

PER80910

Iprodione

Grey mould

1-Aug-15

31-Jul-20

ABAMECTIN

Leaf miner

24-Jun-16

30-Apr-19

PER82039

BIFENTHRIN

Symphyla

20-Nov-15

31-Oct-18

PER14384

Admiral Insect Growth Regulator (pyriproxyfen) Silverleaf whitefly

13-Jul-14

30-Jun-18

Bulb vegetables PER81876 Cabbage

Capsicum PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

19-Dec-13

30-Nov-21

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Tomato potato psyllid

7-Apr-17

28-Feb-20

PER81408

PHOSPHOROUS ACID

Phytophthora soil fungus

7-Sep-15

30-Sep-20

PER13031

Maldison

Fruit fly

6-Oct-11

30-Nov-18

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

22-Oct-14

30-Jun-18

Carrot PER14184

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off & downy mildew

1-Jul-13

30-Jun-22

PER14816

Azoxystrobin

Powdery mildew, sclerotinia rot (white mould), black rot

1-Jun-14

30-Jun-19

PER80169

Metribuzin

Grass & broadleaf weeds

3-Mar-15

31-Mar-18

13-Jul-14

30-Jun-18

Cauliflower PER14384

114

Admiral Insect Growth Regulator (pyriproxyfen) Silverleaf whitefly

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR PRODUCTION

Current Minor Use Permits can also be searched by specific crop or pest types at https://portal.apvma.gov.au/permits Permit no.

Description

Disease

PER82039

BIFENTHRIN

Symphyla

Issued date Expiry date 20-Nov-15

31-Oct-18

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Various insect pests

29-Mar-12

31-Mar-22

Celeriac PER13088 Celery PER81914

EMAMECTIN

Heliothis, light brown apple moth & cluster caterpillar

19-Apr-17

31-Oct-19

PER83203

FIPRONIL (REGENT 200 SC)

Western flower thrips, onion thrips

16-Mar-17

13-Mar-22

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, cercospora & septoria

1-Oct-14

30-Jun-19

PER14436

Applaud Insecticide (buprofezin)

Greenhouse whitefly

9-May-14

30-Jun-19

PER82358

Esfenvalerate

Helicoverpa armigera

5-Feb-16

31-Mar-21

PER14843

Indoxacarb (Avatar Insecticide)

 Heliothis, light brown apple moth, lucerne leaf roller & vegetable weevil

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER13496

Linuron

Range of weeds

4-May-12

30-Apr-22

Chicory PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

19-Mar-14

30-Jun-19

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Broadleaf weeds

29-May-15

31-May-20

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

1-Apr-14

30-Jun-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis & alternaria

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, cercospora & septoria

1-Oct-14

30-Jun-19

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

11-Nov-14

30-Jun-19

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

11-Nov-14

30-Jun-19

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Tomato potato psyllid

7-Apr-17

28-Feb-20

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

19-Dec-13

30-Nov-21

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

30-May-14

31-Dec-18

BIFENTHRIN

Symphyla

20-Nov-15

31-Oct-18

Triadimenol

White rot (sclerotium)

22-Oct-14

31-Oct-19

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

29-Mar-16

31-Mar-21 31-Mar-21

Chillies

Chinese cabbage PER82039 Chives PER14906 Cucumber

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly & mite species

8-Feb-16

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

19-Dec-13

30-Nov-21

PER81702

DOMINEX DUO EC INSECTICIDE

Loopers

24-Mar-16

31-Mar-21

PER13031

Maldison

Fruit fly

6-Oct-11

30-Nov-18

PER80891

Pyranica Miticide

Two-spotted mite & European red mite

30-Sep-15

30-Sep-20

PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

 omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

21-Feb-15

31-Mar-18

PER80138

Alpha-cypermethrin

Cucumber fruit fly

26-Feb-15

31-Mar-20

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

22-Oct-14

30-Jun-18

PER80101

SUMITOMO SAMURAI SYSTEMIC INSECTICIDE

Cucumber fruit fly

10-Nov-15

30-Sep-18

PER14840

Bupirimate

Powdery mildew

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

Cucurbits

Custard apple PER14743

Trichlorfon

Various insect pests

1-Jun-14

30-Jun-20

PER83212

Octave WP Fungicide (prochloraz)

Anthracnose

1-Sep-16

31-Aug-18

PER14227

Paramite (etoxazole)

Two-spotted mite

31-Oct-13

30-Jun-18

PER14894

Clothianidin (Samurai Systemic Insecticide)

Citrus mealybug

24-Feb-15

31-Aug-18

PER14905

Sulfoxaflor (Transform Insecticide)

Citrus mealybug

29-Mar-15

31-Mar-18

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

115


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.) Permit no.

Description

Disease

Issued date Expiry date

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

29-Mar-16

31-Mar-21

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

16-Apr-14

31-Mar-18

PER80717

Trichlorfon

Fruit fly

28-Oct-15

31-Oct-20

PER14839

Zineb

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

1-Aug-14

30-Sep-19

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly & mite species

8-Feb-16

31-Mar-21

PER81914

EMAMECTIN

Heliothis, light brown apple moth & cluster caterpillar

19-Apr-17

31-Oct-19

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Tomato potato psyllid

7-Apr-17

28-Feb-20

PER14186

Success Neo (spinetoram)

Melon thrips

3-Oct-13

30-Sep-18

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Broadleaf weeds

29-May-15

31-May-20

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

1-Apr-14

30-Jun-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis & alternaria

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, cercospora & septoria

1-Oct-14

30-Jun-19

FIPRONIL (REGENT 200 SC)

Western flower thrips, onion thrips

16-Mar-17

13-Mar-22

Terbutryn

Broad leaf weeds

1-Sep-14

30-Sep-19

Eggplant

Endive

Field lettuce PER83203 Field peas PER14937

Fresh fruit & vegetables PER84555

VAPORMATE (ETHYL FORMATE)

PER81637

Chlorpyrifos & maldison

PER80099

Alpha-Cypermethrin

PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

Tomato potato psyllid

12-May-17

30-Jun-19

14-Aug-15

31-Aug-20

Mediterrean fruit fly & Queeensland fruit fly

26-Feb-15

31-Mar-20

 omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

21-Feb-15

31-Mar-18

PER80100

Sumitomo Samurai Systematic Insecticide

Mediterranean fruit fly & Queensland fruit fly

10-Nov-15

30-Sep-18

PER80101

SUMITOMO SAMURAI SYSTEMIC INSECTICIDE

Cucumber fruit fly

10-Nov-15

30-Sep-18

PER81876

ABAMECTIN

Leaf miner

24-Jun-16

30-Apr-19

PER80719

Naturalure Fruit Fly Bait Concentrate

Mediterranean fruit fly & Queensland fruit fly

9-Apr-15

31-Mar-20

PER14680

Naturalure Fruit Fly Bait Concentrate

Mediterranean fruit fly & Queensland fruit fly

31-Mar-14

31-Mar-19

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

16-Apr-14

31-Mar-18

PER82053

BROMOXYNIL

Broadleaf weeds

14-Sep-16

31-Mar-21

PER82054

CARBENDAZIM

Botrytis

14-Sep-16

31-Mar-21

PER82015

Clethodim

Winter grass

14-Sep-16

31-Mar-21

PER14626

Copper as tribasic copper sulphate

Downy mildew

10-Jul-14

30-Jun-19

PER14628

IOXYNIL (TOTRIL)

Broadleaf weeds

17-Feb-15

31-Jul-20

PER82087

IPRODIONE

Botrytis

1-Aug-16

31-Jul-21

PER14604

Lambda-cyhalothrin

Selected insect pests

1-Apr-14

31-Mar-22

PER82055

METHABENZTHIAZURON

Annual grass & broadleaf weeds

14-Sep-16

31-Mar-21

PER14886

Pendimethalin

Grass & broadleaf weeds

1-Aug-14

30-Sep-19

PER82063

TEBUCONAZOLE

Orange rust

14-Sep-16

31-Mar-21

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

23-Jul-12

30-Jun-22

Bentazone (Basagran)

Broadleaf weeds

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER14959

Haloxyfop

Storksbill

21-Dec-14

30-Nov-19

PER14326

Captan

Grey mould

19-Dec-13

30-Nov-21

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Downy mildew & other diseases

21-Dec-14

31-Oct-19

Fruit tree

Garlic

Green beans PER13626

Green peas (processing) PER14896 Leafy lettuce

116

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit no.

Description

Disease

Issued date Expiry date

PER14906

Triadimenol

White rot (Sclerotium)

22-Oct-14

31-Oct-19

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

19-Mar-14

30-Jun-19

PER14473

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb

Downy mildew, purple blotch & botrytis rots

18-Dec-13

30-Jun-18

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

16-Apr-14

31-Mar-18

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

PER82551

diazinon

Onion fly & onion seedling maggot

Leek

1-Jul-14

30-Jun-21

23-May-16

31-Mar-21

Lettuce PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly & mite species

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Broadleaf weeds

8-Feb-16

31-Mar-21

29-May-15

31-May-20

PER14696

Abamectin

PER14210

Acramite Miticide

Two-spotted mite

1-Apr-14

31-Mar-19

Two-spotted (red spider) mite

17-Oct-13

PER14430

30-Sep-18

Azoxystrobin (Amistar 250 SC)

Bottom rot

21-Mar-14

30-Jun-22

PER14257

BALAN (benfluralin)

Grass & broadleaf weed control

29-Oct-13

31-Mar-18

PER14351

DC-Tron Plus

Various bugs

24-Dec-13

31-Mar-21

PER14318

Metalaxyl-M

Damping off

23-Dec-13

30-Sep-22

PER14431

Rizolex Liquid

Bottom rot

21-Mar-14

30-Jun-22

PER81136

SWITCH FUNGICIDE

Anthracnose

12-Oct-15

30-Sep-18

PER14964

Chlorothalonil

Antracnose (shot hole)

21-Dec-14

30-Nov-19

PER14650

Paramite (etoxazole)

Two-spotted mite

7-Nov-14

31-May-18

PER13170

Dimethoate

Various fruit fly species

13-Oct-11

30-Sep-20

Melons

Onions PER14602

Boscalid, Iprodione & Chlorothalonil

Botrytis neck-rot

24-Jul-14

30-Sep-18

PER14773

Basagran (bentazone-sodium)

Broadleaf weeds

16-Apr-14

30-Jun-18

PER13119

Diazinon

Onion thrips

6-Mar-12

31-Jul-18

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

30-May-14

31-Dec-18

PER14858

Pendimethalin

Grasses & broadleaf weeds

1-Apr-15

31-Mar-20

PER14184

Phosphorous (phosphonic) acid

Damping off & downy mildew

1-Jul-13

30-Jun-22

PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

5-Feb-10

30-Jun-22

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

16-Apr-14

31-Mar-18

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly & mite species

8-Feb-16

31-Mar-21

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly & mite species

8-Feb-16

31-Mar-21 31-Mar-21

Paprika

Parsnip

Peas

Peppers PER81196

Bifenthrin

Specified whitefly & mite species

8-Feb-16

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Tomato potato psyllid

7-Apr-17

28-Feb-20

PER14840

Bupirimate

Powdery mildew

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER82359

Pirimor (pirimicarb)

Aphids

5-Feb-16

31-Mar-21

PER14353

Rovral Aquaflo Fungicide (iprodione)

Sclerotinia rot

1-Jul-14

31-Mar-22

PER14454

Ridomil Gold MZ

Downy mildew

10-Mar-14

30-Jun-19

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

29-Mar-16

31-Mar-21

Calypso Insecticide

Mediterranean fruit fly

13-Dec-13

30-Nov-18

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Tomato potato psyllid

7-Apr-17

28-Feb-20

PER80344

Chlorpyrifos

Black beetle, wingless grasshopper, red-legged earth mite

2-Jan-15

30-Sep-20

Pome fruit PER14562 Potatoes

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

117


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.) Permit no.

Description

Disease

Issued date Expiry date

PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

 omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

21-Feb-15

31-Mar-18

PER10822

Sodium hypochlorite

Various insect & fungal pests

30-Jan-09

30-Nov-25

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Broadleaf weeds

29-May-15

31-May-20

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

11-Nov-14

30-Jun-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis & alternaria

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

1-Apr-14

30-Jun-19

PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

5-Feb-10

30-Jun-22

PER13444

Propiconazole

Cercospora

1-Apr-12

31-May-22

PER13441

Ambush Emulsifiable Concentrate Insecticide

 reen peach aphid, green looper, light brown apple moth & G budworms

11-Apr-12

31-Mar-27

PER13300

Abamectin

Broad mite

11-Oct-13

31-Dec-21

PER14212

Imidacloprid

Aphids

31-Oct-13

30-Jun-18

PER13152

MCPA 250 Selective Herbicide

Broadleaf weeds

4-Dec-11

30-Sep-21

PER14493

Phos acid

Downy mildew

1-Jul-14

31-Jan-19

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

11-Nov-14

30-Jun-19

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

18-Jun-12

30-Nov-25

PER14906

Triadimenol

White rot (sclerotium)

22-Oct-14

31-Oct-19

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

16-Apr-14

31-Mar-18

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

23-Jul-12

30-Jun-22

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

18-Jun-12

30-Nov-25

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

19-Mar-14

30-Jun-19

PER14471

Lambda-cyhalothrin

Various pests

30-May-14

31-Mar-19

PER14142

Ioxynil

Broad leaf & grass weeds

17-Oct-13

31-Mar-19

Radicchio

Radish

Rhubarb

Rocket

Shallots

Silverbeet PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

23-Jul-12

30-Jun-22

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

18-Jun-12

30-Nov-25

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, cercospora & septoria

1-Oct-14

30-Jun-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis & alternaria

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

1-Apr-14

30-Jun-19

Snow peas & sugar snap peas PER14765

Hexythiazox (Calibre 100 EC miticide)

 omato spider mite, two-spotted mite, broad mite, tomato T russet mite

21-Feb-15

31-Mar-18

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER14470

Mancozeb & Dimethomorph

Downy mildew

1-May-14

30-Apr-22

Native budworm, tomato grub & cluster caterpillar

PER80954

METHOXYFENOZIDE

1-Oct-15

30-Sep-20

PER14892

Use registered\Pymetrozine (Chess Insecticide) Aphid pests

6-Jan-15

31-May-22

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

22-Oct-14

30-Jun-18

PER14505

Pyrimethanil

Grey mould (botrytis)

1-Jul-14

30-Jun-19

Various insect pests

29-Mar-12

31-Mar-22

Potato moth

12-Jun-12

31-May-22

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Various insect pests

29-Mar-12

31-Mar-22

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

23-Jul-12

30-Jun-22

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

18-Jun-12

30-Nov-25

Specified alliums PER13088

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Specified leafy vegetables PER13322

Success Neo (spinetoram)

Specified root vegetables PER13088 Spinach

118

WA Grower SUMMER 2017


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit no.

Description

Disease

Issued date Expiry date

PER14456

Tebuconazole

Sclerotonia rot

1-Apr-14

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

DM, cercospora & septoria

1-Oct-14

30-Jun-19

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Broadleaf weeds

29-May-15

31-May-20

30-Jun-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Botrytis & alternaria

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER14839

Zineb

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

1-Aug-14

30-Sep-19

PER14703

Tramat 500 SC Selective Herbicide (ethofumesate)

Various weeds

1-Aug-14

31-Jul-19

PER14906

Triadimenol

White rot (sclerotium)

22-Oct-14

31-Oct-19

PER14457

Alpha-cypermethrin

Red-legged earth mite, onion thrips

19-Mar-14

30-Jun-19

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

16-Apr-14

31-Mar-18

PER14142

Ioxynil

Broad leaf & grass weeds

17-Oct-13

31-Mar-19

PER13626

Metolachlor

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

23-Jul-12

30-Jun-22

PER12008

PROPACHLOR

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

18-Jun-12

30-Nov-25

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

30-May-14

31-Dec-18

PER14842

Copper Oxychloride, Cuprous Oxide or Cupric Hydroxide

Downy mildew

1-Oct-14

30-Sep-19

PER14473

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb

Downy mildew, purple blotch & botrytis rots

18-Dec-13

30-Jun-18

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

PER14890

Methomyl (Lannate-L)

Western flower thrips

PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

PER14337

Trifluralin

Weeds

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER14536

Abamectin

Two-spotted mite

30-May-14

31-Dec-18

PER14474

Methoxyfenozide

Lepidopteran pests

25-Nov-14

31-Mar-19

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Tomato potato psyllid

7-Apr-17

28-Feb-20

PER82572

NIMITZ 480 EC NEMATICIDE

Root knot nematode

15-Apr-16

31-Jan-20

PER14864

Pirimicarb

Aphids

11-Nov-14

30-Jun-19

PER14484

Fluazifop

Grass weeds

16-Apr-14

31-Mar-18

PER13153

Regent 200 SC

White fringed weevil & wireworm

14-Dec-11

31-Dec-21

PER12047

Thiabendazole

Field rots caused by scurf & root rot

29-Jun-11

30-Sep-21

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Tomato potato psyllid

7-Apr-17

28-Feb-20

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

29-Mar-16

31-Mar-21

PER81713

MAINMAN 500WG INSECTICIDE

Silverleaf whitefly

24-Mar-16

31-Mar-21

PER83990

METALAXYL-M

Fungal root rot

28-Feb-17

31-Dec-17

PER14725

Paramite Selective Miticide

Tomato spider mites

22-Oct-14

30-Jun-18 31-Oct-19

Spring onions

1-Jul-14

30-Jun-21

25-Nov-14

31-Oct-19

5-Feb-10

30-Jun-22

10-Mar-14

30-Jun-20

Swede

Sweet corn

Sweet potato

Tomatoes

Tomatoes (protected) PER80219

Apollo Miticide (clofentezine)

Two-spotted mite

18-Aug-15

PER80210

Pyrimethanil

Botrytis

13-Nov-14

30-Jun-20

PER80216

Torque Insecticide (fenbutatin oxide)

Two-spotted mite

17-Feb-15

31-Mar-18

PER14337

Trifluralin

Weeds

10-Mar-14

30-Jun-20

PER11935

Triadimenol

Powdery mildew

5-Feb-10

30-Jun-22

PYRETHRINS

Tomato potato psyllid

17-May-17

31-May-19

PER14722

Abamectin

Tomato red spider mite

17-Feb-15

30-Sep-20

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Two-spotted mite

29-Mar-16

31-Mar-21

Turnip

Vegetables PER84442 Zucchini

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

119


what’s on... Upcoming important events!

January

February

Growing Leaders 2018 First Residential

Pome Industry Summit

Fruit Logistica

WHEN 7 February 2018 WHERE Mercure Bunbury Sanctuary Golf Resort, Bunbury TIME 3.00pm to 6.30pm The program will include presentations relating to Pomewest’s current projects and opportunity to discuss project aspirations and goals for the industry for the future. The Summit offers an opportunity for all growers in all areas to get together to discuss our direction.

WHEN 7–9 February 2018 WHERE Berlin Connect with more than 3,000 exhibiting companies and 75,000 trade visitors from 130 countries at the leading global fresh produce show. Berlin offers you fresh inspiration, the best information, and a host of new opportunities for your business.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 15 January 2018 Growing Leaders 2018 is the only national industry specific leadership program for the Australian vegetable industry and was designed in consultation with vegetable industry people and with their specific needs in mind. In its eleventh year, the program now has a graduate population of 100 people of all ages and from all sectors of the industry including growing, processing, wholesale and extension have now successfully completed the program.

Contact Nardia Stacy, nardia@pomewest.net.au

Contact Jill Briggs, admin@ruraltraininginitiatives.com.au

From 7–9 February 2018 companies from across the entire fresh produce sector — from global players to small and medium-sized companies and organisations from all over the world — will again be present in Berlin. The entire spectrum of the fresh fruit and vegetable sector. www.fruitlogistica.com

US Industry Leadership & Development mission WHEN 3–16 February 2018 WHERE United States AUSVEG are heading a vegetable grower mission to the United States in February 2018. There are nine positions available for vegetable levy-paying growers and they will visit farms, research centres, agribusinesses and the World Ag Expo in California, Arizona and Florida. This is shaping up to be a unique tour to some of America’s largest vegetable growing regions. It is a great opportunity for participants to develop their networks and gain an insight into US farming practices, challenges and technologies. The subsidised cost is $2,500 for levy-paying growers and this includes air and land travel, single room accommodation and most meals. Expressions of interest can be sent to dimi.kyriakou@ausveg.com.au or info@ausveg.com.au

WA Grower advertiser contacts Name

120

Website/Email

Bentonite WA (p25)

www.bentonitewa.com.au

Centrewest Insurance Brokers (p87)

www.centrewest.com.au

Clause Pacific (p55)

kevin.swan@hmclause.com

Dobmac Ag Machinery (OBC)

www.dobmac.com.au

drumMUSTER (p83)

www.drummuster.org.au

edp australia pty ltd (p20)

www.edp.com.au

Address

Contact name

Contact no.

PO Box 636, Balcatta, WA 6914

Gavin Statham

(08) 9439 7900

0418 140 929 Kevin Swan

0400 622 314

36-38 Industrial Drive, Ulverstone TAS 7315

Mark Dobson

(03) 6425 5533

31-37 OBrien Street, Mooroopna, VIC 3269

Mick Schirmer

1800 008 707 0437 252 122

Growise (pIFC)

www.growise.com.au

Hort Innovation Australia (IBC)

www.horticulture.com.au

Madec (p16)

www.harvesttrail.gov.au

Mirco (p60-61)

www.mircobros.com.au

54 Hurst Road, Henderson, WA 6166

(08) 9410 2233

Neutrog Australia Pty Ltd

www.neutrog.com.au

288 Mine Road, Kanmantoo, SA 5252

(08) 8538 3500

Organic 2000 (p27)

www.organic2000.com.au

59 Safari Place, Carabooda, WA 6033

Paliz Agriculture (p9)

www.paliz.com.au

21/110 Inspiration Drive Wangara, WA 6065

Smith & Georg (p6)

www.smithandgeorg.com.au

9 Quinns Road, Forreston, SA 5233

Total Eden (p12)

www.totaleden.com.au

WA Crates (p17)

service@wacrates.com.au

WA Grower SUMMER 2017

0411 086 292 Level 8, 1 Chifley Square, Sydney, NSW 2000

(02) 8295 2300 1800 062 332

Crate Yard, Market City

(08) 9407 5182 Hossein Darvish

(08) 9303 9638

Hugh Bygott

1800 991 985

Jon

0417 911 158 (08) 9456 4092


Let’s talk about your industry

Sam Turner Relationship Manager Hort Innovation

Meet a vegetable industry Relationship Manager and see how he can support you. Sam is keen to chat with you. He is your link to the latest R&D developments and how these can help your business grow. It’s easy to request a phone call – just go to the ‘Contact Me’ form at horticulture.com.au/contact-me. Alternatively, call 02 8295 2300 or email membership@horticulture.com.au and let us know you would like Sam to call you.

horticulture.com.au


ONION GRADING & PACKING SOLUTIONS M & P Onion Peelers • Small Peeler for 18-45mm Onions or Shallots • Large Peeler for Onions over 45mm • Stainless Steel Construction • Variable Speed Drive • Dry Peeling Process

• Manual Orientation of Onions • Adjustable Operator Station • 415v 3 Phase 50 Hz • Unique Peeling System

Baxmatic®

Fully automated Bagging System Combination Weighing Scale (Optional)

• High capacity (up to 1200 bags/hr) • Quick start-up & changes • Automatic bag placement • Automatic sewing & closing • Bag sizes from 2.5kg to 50kg • Heavy duty construction • Integrated labelling • Online support system • 12 & 16 Head Combination Scales • Up to 1500 scale movements per hour

Turn Key Pack House Solutions • Onion Toppers • Pre Sizers • Intake Hoppers • Dirt Separation • Inspection Tables • Box/Big Bag Fillers • 5-25kg Baggers • Semi & Fully Automatic Palletisers

36-38 Industrial Drive (PO Box 93) Ulverstone TASMANIA. 7315 AUSTRALIA Phone: (03) 6425 5533 Fax: (03) 6425 5847

PO Box 1021, Pukekohe. New Zealand Phone: 0272 907 281

Email: dobmac@dobmac.com.au Website: www.dobmac.com.au A leader in the design, manufacture & supply of specialised agricultural machinery

WA Grower Summer 2017  
WA Grower Summer 2017  
Advertisement