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Page 1

VOL. 54 NO 3. SPRING 2019 $25.00 (inc GST)

wa

grower WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948

HortConnectWA turns 1

Harvey Giblett

Thank you from the Pome industry!

Irrigation & Water Use Efficiency Update This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by vegetablesWA together with: • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA


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inside Your vegetablesWA magazine

12

102

80 3

Biosecurity Blitz 2019

44

STONEFRUIT WA

81

CEO’s Report

4

Insect research comes full circle

46

Chairman’s Brief

82

APC-VPC Update

6

VegNET IEO Update

48

83

President’s Report

8

Vegetable grower seminar

Hort Connections

51

WA growers in Jakarta

84

Introducing Amber Atkinson

9

PNRM Smart Farms Project

52

Good Choice champaign

86

Introducing Melissa Denning

10

55

Committee sprouts new talent

86

YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

WA POTATOES

11

President’s Report

56

12

Executive Officer’s Report

57

Tips to minimise stress at tax time

88

Nation-wide TPP surveillance

15

Students’ potato research

58

Managing soilborne diseases

90

Good farm hygiene

17

Marketing Update

60

National labour hire licensing

94

Increasing water use efficiency

20

Export focus for WA potato industry 62

Labour hire

96

Soil microbes and compost

23

YOUR PRODUCTION Aphids in vegetable crops

Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus 25 TOOL TIME Environment monitoring

63

87

vegetablesWA benchmarking report 98 Seasonal workers

100

Farm succession

102

Seminis advertorial

104

Executive Manager’s update

64

27

Hort Connections 2019

66

28

Fungicides against apple scab

68

Harvey Giblett

70

Future Orchards

72

Produce safety conference

106

73

Export Update

110

New-look Farm Biosecurity website 30 YOUR INDUSTRY

POMEWEST

YOUR BUSINESS

31

HortConnectWA turns 1

32

Plant biosecurity system released

33

WA CITRUS From the industry

74

$10M funding for eradication of Qfly 34

Production calendar reminders

75

European wasps targeted

36

Industry days in the regions

78

Gascoyne Food Festival

40

Biosecurity binge

79

WA citrus fruit promotion

80

YOUR MARKET

105

VIETNAMESE TRANSLATIONS

112

PERMITS

116

WHAT'S ON

120

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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VOL. 54 NO 3. SPRING 2019

WORKING FOR WA GROWERS SINCE 1948


YOUR CONTACTS

contacts vegetablesWA

Management Committee

702-704 Murray Street, West Perth WA 6005 t: (08) 9486 7515 e: office@vegetableswa.com.au

President Dan Kuzmicich m: 0408 910 761

Chief Executive Officer John Shannon m: 0488 111 526 e: john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au Operations Manager Rebecca Blackman t: (08) 9486 7515 e: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au COVER IMAGE: Harvey Giblett © Craig Kinder, courtesy of Genuinely Southern Forests

Published by vegetablesWA This issue of the WA Grower is brought to you by: • vegetablesWA • APC — Vegetable Producers Committee • Potato Growers Association • Pomewest • WA Citrus • Stonefruit WA

© 2019 All articles and other material published in this magazine is vegetablesWA copyright (unless otherwise stated) and may not be reproduced in part or full without the written permission of the authors and publisher. DISCLAIMER: vegetablesWA make no representations and expressly disclaims all warranties (to the extent permitted by law) about the accuracy, completeness, or currency of information in WA Grower. Reliance on any information provided by vegetablesWA is entirely at your own risk. vegetablesWA is not responsible for, and will not be liable for, any loss, damage, claim, expense, cost (including legal costs) or other liability arising in any way, including from any vegetablesWA or other person’s negligence or otherwise from your use or non-use of WA Grower, or from reliance on information contained in the material or that vegetablesWA provide to you by any other means.

Vietnamese Industry Extension Officer Truyen Vo m: 0457 457 559 e: truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au Industry Extension Officer Sam Grubiša m: 0427 373 037 e: sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au Benchmark Lead Bryn Edwards m: 0417 409 821 e: bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au Quality Assurance Coordinator Joel Dinsdale m: 0417 857 675 e: joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au Finance & Administration Officer Sandie McLeod t: (08) 9486 7515 e: sandie.mcleod@vegetableswa.com.au Export Development Project Lead Manus Stockdale m: 0448 897 652 e: manus.stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au Labour Scheme Facilitator Melissa Denning m: 0477 477 044 e: melissa.denning@vegetableswa.com.au Communications & Policy Officer Amber Atkinson t: (08) 9486 7515 e: amber.atkinson@vegetableswa.com.au

Life Members

A.J. Anderson*, D.J. Arbuckle, J. Arbuckle Snr*, J.H. Arbuckle* (M.B.E.J.P), H.R. Ashby*, S. Calameri, M. Dobra, A. Harris*, A. Ingrilli, G. Kiriros*, R.G. Leach*, F. Natoli, S. Sawle*, R.M. Schultz, C.P. Stevens, W.R. Stevens* (M.B.E.J.P) and J. Turley. * Deceased

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WA Grower SPRING 2019

Carnarvon

Vice President Maurice Grubiša m: 0413 050 182 Metro North Committee Peter Dobra m: 0408 616 515 Gingin Lauren East m: 0419 047 371 Manjimup Paul Glavocich m: 0413 922 287 Gingin Peter Ivankovich m: 0428 919 211 Myalup Anthony Lieu m: 0401 558 886 Metro North Duc Nguyen t: (08) 9941 8376 Carnarvon Paul Shain m: 0419 041 045 Carnarvon

Agricultural Produce Commission APC Manager Ingrid Behr t: (08) 9368 3127 e: APCManager@dpird.wa.gov.au

Advertising For information on WA Grower advertising rates and sizing please go to: www.vegetableswa.com.au/wa-growersmagazine and click on the download media kit link.


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

your

industry associations

Your industry associations

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

CEO’s Report BY JOHN SHANNON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

T

he vegetablesWA team has recently welcomed two new staff members, Melissa Denning and Amber Atkinson. Melissa will make our labour facilitator project come to life with the aim of improving grower use of the Seasonal Labour Program and Pacific Labour Scheme. Growers using these visa categories have reported significantly higher productivity than with Working Holiday Makers (Backpackers), but only a small number of WA growers have used these workers so far. Melissa has previously worked for the Pacific Labour Scheme, helping growers access the program, and as the Labour Attaché at the Timor Leste Embassy helping growers access both schemes. Any grower who has problems with

labour please give Melissa a call on (08) 9486 7515. Amber Atkinson also comes onboard as our new communications officer. She will now direct and coordinate all of our communications activities. We’re very lucky to have someone join the team who has the agri-food experience in communications that Amber has. I look forward to even further improving our communications programme with Amber.

Along with these pieces of news I am sad to also acknowledge the departure of our outstanding Operations Manager, Rebecca Blackman. Over the past eight years Bec has provided me, the association and all of our grower members with peerless service. When Bec first joined me at

ORGANIC 4

WA Grower SPRING 2019

vegetablesWA we had two and a half staff members and now we have 10, so she has seen and made way for much change and development. We could not have provided growers with so much assistance without her before, but now we look forward to seeing Bec scale fresh new horizons in her career as we as an organization do so too. Despite any staff changes, vegetablesWA will always continue to take up the problems of our members. Please call any of us at any time on any issues. MORE INFORMATION John Shannon, phone 0488 111 526 or email john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au


WA crates The professional packaging service for WA’s finest fresh fruit and vegetables

0 email: service@wacrates.com.au


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Agriculture Produce Commission

Vegetable Producers Committee

Update

T

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

he Agricultural Produce Commission Act 1988 (the Act) provides Western Australian agricultural producers with the legal framework to collect funds to provide for the development and security of growers and producers and their industry sectors. The Agricultural Produce Commission on 18 March 2005 established the APC Vegetable Producers’ Committee (VPC).

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WA Grower SPRING 2019

In April of each year the VPC Committee approves projects for the following year The following projects were approved for fee for service funding in 2019–20 financial year. TABLE 1 Projects approved FY20 Project 1.

Part Funding for vegetablesWA

2.

The Great Vegie Crunch

3.

Industry Extension Officers

4.

Export Readiness Workshops

5.

Human Resources, Industrial Relations and Business Extension Coordinator

6.

Quality Assurance Coordinator

Total of approved projects

$ 450,000 17,250 250,000 10,000 125,000 75,000 967,250

Fee for Service Charge As advised in June, the vegetable Fee for Service for financial year 2020 has changed, the notice includes the rates and the categories which are detailed in Table 2. These rates are effective from 1st July 2019. This charge to apply to all vegetables except herbs, potato, mushroom and Kununurra vegetables.


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

TABLE 2 Fee for Service categories 2019–20

CATEGORY A $ RATE PER KILO: 0.005 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Bamboo shoots Beans — broad Beans — fava Beans — other Beans — runner Beanshoots Bok choy Capsicums Chillies Choysum Daikon — radish top Eggfruit Fennel Horseradish Luffa Pak choy Paprika Paprika — red Peas Radish — Chinese Silverbeet Snow peas Sprouts Tomatoes Wasabi Water spinach Wong bok

CATEGORY B $ RATE PER KILO: 0.0009 • Beetroot • Gourds • Melons — watermelon • Parsnips • Pumpkin — butternut • Pumpkin — Japanese • Pumpkin — Kent • Pumpkin — other • Pumpkin — Queensland Blue • Swedes • Sweet potatoes • Turnips

CATEGORY C

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.0065 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.0024

• Cauliflower • Cauliflower — fancy • Cauliflower — Romensco • Onions • Radish • Rhubarb • Radicchio

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.0035 • Broccoli

Artichokes Asparagus Babyleaf — all varieties Chicory Endive Kale Kohl rabi Leafy greens Lettuce Lettuce — mixed salad Micro greens Okra Rocket Spinach — English Taro Watercress

• Broccolini • Celeriac • Celery • Chard • Garlic • Leeks • Shallots • Spring onion • Squash • Squash — spaghetti • Sweetcorn • Whitlof — Chinese cabbage • Zucchini

CATEGORY E

• Brussels sprouts • Cabbage

CATEGORY F

CATEGORY D

$ RATE PER KILO: 0.004 • • • • • • • •

Choko Courgettes Cucumber Cucumber — Lebanese Marrow Melons — honeydew Melons — rockmelon Melons — other

CATEGORY G $ RATE PER KILO: 0.0008 • Carrots

CATEGORY H $ RATE PER KILO: 0.01 • Other vegetables

TABLE 3 APC-VPC Committee Members MORE INFORMATION

Member

Terms

Email/Phone

Chairperson Maureen Dobra

2019–21

mdobra@looseleaf.com.au (08) 9575 2086

Joyce Babun

2018–21

If you need assistance completing your Fee for Service return or working out the new calculations please contact the Agricultural Produce Commission:

Peter Ivankovich

2019–22

• Jennifer Tiong:

Amanda (Calameri) Rodriguez

2019–22

Lisa Tana

2017–20

James Wringe

t: (08) 9368 3465 e: apcadmin@dpird.wa.gov.au

Mar 2017 – May 2020

Committee EO John Shannon

john.shannon@vegetableswa.com.au (08) 9486 7515 / 0488 111 526

Industry Association vegetablesWA

www.vegetableswa.com.au (08) 9486 7515

• Satjinder Kour t: (08) 9368 3734 e: apcadmin@dpird.wa.gov.au More information can also be found on the APC website https://apcwa.org.au/ producers-committees/vegetable

All terms are three years commencing in June (unless otherwise stated)

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

vegetablesWA

President’s Report 33CHEF’S Paddock Tour

B

BY DAN KUZMICICH PRESIDENT, VEGETABLESWA

eautiful during the day… chilly at night here in the Gascoyne Region Carnarvon, looking forward to the month of September where it should warm up a bit at night.

The harvest season is in full swing here and I have noticed that there has been a lot more zucchini’s planted this season. Some growers have changed it up with planting other crops however mainly more zucchini’s, hope it goes well for them. The tomato growers have struggled to get a decent price so far this season, which is disappointing, hopefully the price picks up so the growers can at least cover costs or make a profit. At one stage tomato growers had stopped harvesting because of the low price as it wasn’t viable for them to pick. That’s not a good position to be in, I was receiving phone calls within industry with concerns saying that Carnarvon tomato growers where forced to stop harvesting their crop because of quarantine issues which wasn’t true. I reassured them that at the moment it wasn’t viable for the growers to harvest due to such low prices.

Northern Territory and Queensland and get the opportunity to compare WA growing issues with the rest of Australia. Hort Connections 2019 was very informative as usual and there is plenty of information to absorb, I do recommend that growers attend this event as there are benefits to be gained. They provide a lot of speakers from around the world you just have to select what you want to listen to.

The Gascoyne Food Festival has been and gone, once again it 2019 Gascoyne Food was a success. The Festival a success! Food Festival started off with the Taste of the Gascoyne Sunset BBQ held in the middle of town centre.

Hort Connections was on in June in Melbourne which I attended, and it was freezing, I love Melbourne, but it was just way too cold for my liking. The event was great, and I got the opportunity to catch up with other growers from around Australia. Since I have been attending these events I have been able to build relationships with other growers in other states such as Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania,

8

WA Grower SPRING 2019

I attended the event which had great variety and the quality of food which was served. Great to see industry coming together on that night, I was very happy to see representatives from Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), vegetablesWA, Carnarvon Growers Association (CGA) and others engaging with growers having a chat in a social environment and discussing a range of issues within industry. The Chef’s Paddock Tour was on the next day, I didn’t attend but I got to hear about it at the Long Table Lunch event.

Great to see young growers getting involved getting out of their comfort zone to tell their story and show case their product to the end user. The Long Table Lunch had that buzz about it as soon as you arrived, people came from far and wide to attend this event: • Hon. Alannah MacTiernan — Minister for Regional Development; Agriculture and Food • Bill Bulmer — Chairman of Ausveg, we appreciate the effort to travel from Melbourne to experience this event


YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

New starter

Amber Atkinson I congratulate Stuart Laws on his work with the chefs to produce some quality dishes.

• vegetablesWA team — connecting with growers undertaking workshops and grower visits while in town • Growers from Perth regions who came to visit while in town and had a look around • Good friends of mine from south of the state flying their own plane to attend The Long Table Lunch; Peter and Rad Ivankovich. I have to say the event was the best one I have been to. I congratulate Stuart Laws on his work with the chefs to produce some quality dishes (tapas style) which included local prawns, fish, beef, goat and a huge variety of fruit and vegetables. The best dish was the asparagus salad, on its own was so tasty, enough to turn you into a vegan. Anyway, the weather played its part for the event which created such a good atmosphere at Bentwaters Plantation which is owned by Joanne Simmons and is a beautiful spot. Once the event was over, enjoying the wonderful food washing it down with a couple of drinks, people met up at the Carnarvon Hotel and enjoyed the rest of the night overlooking the beautiful fascine. After all the festivities great food, wine and beer over the last few days it was time for visitors to leave and head home, it was back to reality, so we had to say goodbye. Reality certainly smacked me in the face as I had to get organised for my FreshCare audit.

Freshcare audits always create unnecessary stress, so I gave Joel Dinsdale (Quality Assurance Coordinator at vegetablesWA) a call to touch base and make sure I am up to speed with my internal audit. I’m glad I did, I thought I had it all covered, however, I was missing some important documentation, some of the accreditation certificates of suppliers that I use. So, we decided to do an Internal Audit over the phone which ensured that I had covered everything that I needed for the Freshcare Audit. Growers that are reading this, I strongly recommend that you get in contact with Joel about any concerns with your Freshcare Audits. The Freshcare Audit went smoothly and quick, No Corrective Action Record (CAR), thanks Joel. Ok… time for me to say goodbye. Till the next report stay well and stay safe.

MORE INFORMATION Contact Dan Kuzmicich on 0408 910 761 or damir.kuzmicich@bigpond.com

A

BY REBECCA BLACKMAN OPERATIONS MANAGER, VEGETABLESWA

mber commenced with the vegetablesWA team early September as the Communications & Policy Officer.

She is a Digital Marketing and Communications Specialist with extensive agricultural, tourism and events marketing experience. She prides herself with having an excellent eye for graphic and digital design, with extensive InDesign and Photoshop skills.

Previously working in communications roles and as a journalist with Kondinin Group and The West Australian, it has provided Amber with an all round experience in the industry. We look forward to having Amber on board to enhance the communications with growers and stakeholder. MORE INFORMATION Contact Amber on (08) 9486 7515 or email amber.atkinson@vegetableswa.com.au

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Melissa Denning

appointed as Labour Scheme Facilitator to the Horticulture Labour Scheme Project Melissa managed the coordination of the Seasonal Worker Programme as Labour Attache at the Embassy of Timor-Leste for two years and has a strong background in international Human Resources.

V

egetablesWA is delighted to announce the appointment of Melissa Denning as the Labour Scheme Facilitator to head up the Horticulture Labour Scheme Project. Melissa commenced her position on 26th August.

“I am incredibly pleased to welcome Melissa to the vegetablesWA team to drive the Horticulture Labour Scheme Project. Her skills and experience will be paramount to the success of this project and I look forward to seeing the benefits for WA horticulture growers,” said CEO John Shannon. Melissa will drive the 12 month trial project that will identify WA horticulture businesses willing to participate in the trial and assess their labour needs, constraints and opportunities. The intention of the project is to establish improved linkages for growers with the Australian Government’s Pacific Labour Scheme and the State Government’s Seasonal

Labour Programme to better match workers to the identified needs of the participating businesses.

“Obtaining and retaining reliable labour is one of the biggest challenges facing vegetables growers in WA,” Mr Shannon said. Melissa said, “I’m very excited to be joining vegetablesWA and know that my experience in Timor and the Pacific will be of great benefit to this project.” MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in the project contact Melissa on 0477 477 044 or melissa.denning@vegetableswa.com.au.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

BETTER CROPS. BETTER VALUE. Proper use and application of TriCal soil fumigant helps everything grow better.

08 8347 3838 | info@trical.com.au

trical.com.au

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WA Grower SPRING 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

your

production Your production WA Grower SPRING 2019

11


YOUR PRODUCTION

in vegetable crops BY VO THE TRUYEN INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

Aphids are commonly seen in spring and autumn when the weather is mild and humid.

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WA Grower SPRING 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

Aphids

on wild brassica

A

phids are a major pest to vegetable crops. They are sap-sucking insects and are the most common group of virus vectors or carriers. All potyviruses such as Celery mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus and Carrot virus Y1 are transmitted by aphids. Aphids are commonly seen in spring and autumn when the weather is mild and humid. Aphid colonies produce honeydew, encouraging sooty mould growth and reducing plant vigour.

Aphids are generally found on the underside of leaves and attack soft growing tips. In lettuce winged aphids are usually found on the outer leaves, whereas aphid colonies are usually found on the undersides of wrapper leaves. Aphids have winged and non-winged forms. Aphid colour varies with species and what they have been feeding on.

Types of aphids According to AUSVEG there are five main types of aphids2: 1 C  urrant lettuce aphid (Nasonovia ribis-nigri): This is a serious pest of lettuce. It is primarily a contamination pest, colonising lettuce hearts and rosettes, making them unsaleable. Under heavy insect loads, lettuce hearts fail to form or die. Adults can be winged or wingless and are greenish to yellow-green, with irregular narrow dark bands on the abdomen.

It causes direct damage to leaves, stems by sucking sap and indirectly through the transmission of many viruses. 3  Melon aphid (Aphis gossypii): Also known as the cotton aphid, it can be a major pest of cucurbits. Wingless adults are light to dark green. The winged form varies in colour from green to almost black. Large populations in a seedling crop can cause leaves and growing tips to die. They also transmit plant viruses while they feed. 4 Green peach aphid (Myzus persicae):  A major pest of crops such as tomatoes and capsicum, it can be found on cucurbit, solanaceous, brassica and leafy vegetables. They have a small body and are light to dark green. Large numbers cause malformation of new growth including flower buds. They transmit a large number of viruses. 5 O  ther types: including Sowthistle aphid (Hyperomyzus lactucae), Brown sowthistle aphid (Uroleucon sonchi), Turnip aphid (Lipaphis erysimi), Cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae), and Foxglove aphid (Aulacorthum solani). 33SEVERAL aphid generations appear on the underside of a cucumber leaf.

Aphids as virus vectors Most importantly aphids transmit plant viruses while they feed. Some particular aphids can transmit viruses like necrotic yellows, potato virus Y, watermelon mosaic virus types I and II, lettuce mosaic virus, and other similar mosaic viruses. A virus can only be transmitted by an aphid in one of two ways: 1. Non-persistent transmission: It takes less than one minute of feeding for an aphid to acquire the virus and the same time to infect another plant when feeding. The virus remains viable on aphids’ mouthparts for a few hours only. 2. Persistent transmission: It takes several hours of feeding for an aphid to acquire a virus, which then circulates through the aphid’s body to the salivary glands before transmission occurs. This takes at least 12 hours. The aphid can also transmit the virus for many weeks or the rest of its life without needing to obtain more virus from an infected plant.

2 Potato aphid (Macrosiphum  euphorbiae): Usually green, but sometimes yellowish or pink, the potato aphid is a pest of tomato, eggplant, capsicum, potato, beetroot, and sweet potato. 1 https://ausveg.com.au/app/data/technicalinsights/docs/120029_VG07128_pdf_file_3719. pdf 2 https://ausveg.com.au/biosecurityagrichemical/crop-protection/aphids/

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

TABLE 1 Chemical reference for aphids control Permit

Trade name

Chemical

Label

APHIDEX WG

Pirimicarb

Group 1A

Expiry -

Crop Fruiting vegetables (excluding cucurbits) including: capsicum, chilli peppers, eggplant, tomatoes

Label

ROVER

Dimethoate

1B

-

Capsicum

Label

SUPRATHION 400 EC

Methidathion

1B

-

Eggplant

Label

DERRIS DUST

Rotenone

21B

-

Vegetables

Label

MOVENTO 240 SC

Spirotetramat

23

-

Eggplant, peppers (capsicum and chilli), tomatoes (field and protected cropping systems)

Label

BENEVIA

Cyantraniliprole

28

-

Fruiting vegetables (excluding cucurbits) including: capsicum, eggplant, peppers, tomato (trellis and field)

Label

PYRETHRUM SPRAY

Pyrethrins

3A

-

Vegetables

Label

CONFIDOR 200 SC

Imidacloprid

Label

DURIVO

Thiamethoxam+ chlorantraniliprole

Label

TRANSFORM^

Label

4A

-

Capsicum, eggplant, potato

4A/28

-

Fruiting vegetables (excluding cucurbits) including: tomato, capsicum, eggplant

Sulfoxaflor

4C

-

Fruiting vegetables, including chilli, capsicum, eggplant, okra and tomatoes (excluding sweet corn and mushrooms)

VERSYS^

Afidopyropen

9D

-

Fruiting vegetables excluding cucurbits (capsicum, chilli, eggplant, okra, tomato)

Label

NATRASOAP

Fatty acids - K salt

-

-

Vegetables

Label

ECO-OIL

Botanical oil

-

-

Capsicum

Label

BROADBAND OD

B. bassiana

-

-

Protected vegetables and ornamentals

Label

BIOCOVER

Petroleum oil

-

-

Peppers

Label

CHESS

Pymetrozine

9B

-

Tomatoes, eggplants and capsicums (including open field and protected cropping)

PER8930

THIMET

Phorate

1B

31-07-19

Eggplant peppers (including chillies, capsicums & paprika). ST16006 permit renewal

PER12489

CONFIDOR 200 SC

Imidacloprid

4A

31-05-20

Peppers (chillies, and paprika only) field and greenhouse crops

PER12221

PETROLIUM OIL

Petroleum oil

-

30-11-22

Eggplant (aphids), okra, peppers including capsicum, chilli and paprika

^ DO NOT use in covered or protected situations such as glasshouses, greenhouses, shade houses or plastic tunnels * In protected cropping situations, use only in well-ventilated structures

Aphid management Integrated Pest Management (IPM) can provide effective control of aphid populations. Aphids have many predators, including ladybird beetles, lacewings, hover flies and parasitic wasps. The parasitic wasp Aphidius colemani effectively controls aphids and are commercially available.

Sticky traps are a useful monitoring tool for aphids. The presence of honeydew, or black from sooty mould growing on the honeydew is a sign of aphid activity. Ensure weed populations are controlled around crops. Insecticides can be used if high numbers of aphids are present, but resistance can develop. Plants cannot be cured once infected by a virus. Take the following measures to protect your crop from infection.

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WA Grower SPRING 2019

• Exclude or avoid the virus: Plant virus-free seed and healthy seedling transplants, cuttings, and tubers; grow crops in regions where the virus seldom occurs; and avoid movement of transplants with possible virus infection or aphid infestation between regions. • Reduce virus levels: Control weeds and other hosts of viruses and aphids around crops; destroy old crops promptly to reduce the number of aphids moving from sources of infection to young crops.

• Chemical control: Appropriate insecticides are usually effective in killing aphids breeding on plants and can provide good control of viruses transmitted in a persistent manner. However, they are usually ineffective for preventing spread of the non-persistent viruses, due to the extremely short feeding times of this category of transmission.

Integrated Pest Management can provide effective control of aphid populations.

• Protect the crop: Use virusresistant varieties; use highly effective mulches and oil sprays to deter aphids from landing and feeding; use tall barrier crops, windbreaks to reduce the numbers of aphids entering the crop.

MORE INFORMATION Contact Truyen Vo on 0457 457 559 or email truyen.vo@ vegetableswa.com.au


YOUR PRODUCTION

Nation-wide tomato-potato psyllid surveillance to provide the status of CLso in Australia

T

1930s, TPP had become a serious and he Department for destructive pest of potatoes in most of Primary Industries and the southwestern United States, giving rise to the description of a new disease Regional Development known as ‘psyllid yellows’, which is (DPIRD) will lead a Hort due to an association of TPP with the bacterium CLso. In recent years, Innovation Australia funded other solanaceous crops including program in collaboration tomato, capsicum, eggplant, tobacco with all state and territory and tamarillo have suffered extensive economic losses associated with jurisdictions for the TPP outbreaks. The disease surveillance across complex was first found in New Zealand in 2006. Australia of tomatoThe three year In February 2017, TPP potato psyllid (TPP) project aims for early was detected in Perth, and Candidatus detection of TPP. prompting a large biosecurity response Liberibacter from DPIRD. Eradication solanacearum (CLso). was deemed not feasible, and This landmark project will see jurisdictions across Australia work closely in collaboration to monitor for an insect — a function usually carried out at a state level.

transition to management concluded in 2018. However, DPIRD continues to conduct surveillance across Perth and surrounding regions for CLso. The other Australian states and territories remain free of TPP to date.

33BACTERICERA cockerelli nymphs.

Currently, each state works separately with industry to survey agricultural areas producing known TPP host plant species. While this is worthwhile, it is more likely that TPP will arrive via entry points (e.g., ports, airports, produce markets) and that incursion of TPP into

The three-year project began in August 2019, and aims for early detection of TPP in regional Western Australia, and metropolitan areas of Queensland, Northern Territory, Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania and South Australia. This new project will also provide supporting evidence of Australia’s freedom from CLso. TPP, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is one of the world’s most destructive potato pests. It was recognised in the early 1900s as having the potential to be an invasive and harmful insect, particularly in western United States and Mexico, to which the psyllid is native. By the 1920s and WA Grower SPRING 2019

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A national workshop on TPP was held in Perth. Here, DPIRD provided training for entomologists from around the country and within WA in TPP surveillance, identification, CLso testing, databasing, and reporting protocols.

33DEPARTMENT of Primary Industries and Regional Development officers Kate Newman and Darryl Hardie with traps as part of the ‘adopt-a-trap’ surveillance program for tomato potato psyllid.

any state or territory is likely to occur in a metropolitan area, and then spread from that area either naturally or anthropogenically (by human activities), from plant movements to regional areas. This was one pathway identified following the TPP incursion in WA, where TPP spread from initial detection in metropolitan Perth. By consulting with the member states and territories, and employing a dedicated entomologist per state, this new national surveillance project aims to fill surveillance and detection gaps.

Adopt-a-trap is already underway in Kununurra and Carnarvon, with Geraldton and Albany set to begin later in spring. The exact timing for trapping is tailored for each region, avoiding periods when temperatures exceed 35°C, or fall below 15°C, to suit the optimal environmental requirements of TPP.

The timing for trapping is tailored for each region to suit the optimal environmental requirements of TPP.

Each state and territory is managing the distribution and evaluation of their own traps. An Adopt-a-trap program is being utilised to deploy as many traps as possible in each state to make the most of the given budget. In addition to the TPP trapping currently conducted in the Perth metropolitan area, WA regional centres close to areas of horticultural importance will be the focus of surveillance for this new project. These centres are Kununurra, Carnarvon, Geraldton and Albany. The first season of sampling through

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DPIRD’s innovative surveillance app, MyPestGuide, may be utilised to standardise methods, sampling and reporting across the states and within WA. Results will be transferred to the national database AUSPestCheck after each sampling season and growers will be kept informed through articles such as this, and through industry bodies. In addition to the surveillance efforts across the country, this project will assist with the diagnostic cost of testing some of the 1690 TPP required to be captured and tested to provide the status of CLso in Australia at a 99% level of confidence. CLso testing in the project partner states will only be done on TPP detected.

A national workshop on TPP was held in Perth. Here, DPIRD provided training for entomologists from around the country and within WA in TPP surveillance, identification, CLso testing, databasing, and reporting protocols. This training will build national capacity to quickly identify and manage TPP if it establishes in new locations. Furthermore, within WA the Adopta-traps will be assessed for other pests of agricultural or biosecurity significance, such as Mediterranean Fruitfly, Queensland Fruitfly, Browsing ant, Yellow Crazy ant and Brown Marmorated Stink bug- increasing bang for biosecurity buck. MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in adopting a trap, and are located in one of the four regional areas of Kununurra, Carnarvon, Geraldton or Albany, please contact project manager Melinda Moir at melinda.moir@agric. wa.gov.au or CLso surveillance manager Don Telfer at don.telfer@agric.wa.gov.au.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development


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Good farm hygiene l diseases

virus. 33TOMATO spotted wilt

helps to contro in vegetable crops

BY DR DOMINIE WRIGHT AND DR CRAIG WEBSTER DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

A

Hort Innovation funded project to help vegetable growers control the threat of virus and bacterial diseases has identified that on farm hygiene is key for WA farms. Researchers from Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) and regional based consultants have conducted surveys of diseases in WA vegetable crops to inform an area wide management strategy for managing bacterial and virus diseases in crops.

Recent surveys were conducted across WA including Geraldton, Carnarvon, Perth, Manjimup and Myalup, focusing on capsicum, pumpkin and zucchini, as well as beans, cauliflower, broccoli and lettuce. DPIRD senior research officer Dr Dominie Wright said the surveys found that most farms are relatively free of diseases, with only 15% of the crops surveyed being found to have viruses or bacterial disease (see Figure 1). “Viruses and bacterial diseases were seen across all WA regions surveyed. “What was key is that the farms that had no diseases present had good farm hygiene practices in place, including the removal of weeds, and harvested crops to minimise the spread of disease from infected source to new crops.”

Number of crops with no disease 85% Number diseased crops 15%

FIGURE 1 Viral and bacterial diseases

Diseases found in vegetable crops The surveys found the most common diseases within WA vegetable crops are:

1. Cucurbits • Zucchini yellow mosaic virus • Watermelon mosaic virus • Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus • Bacterial diseases

33PEPPER mild mottle virus on capsicum.

2. Capsicums and chillies: • Pepper mild mottle virus (fruit blistering) • Tomato spotted wilt virus • Cucumber mosaic virus

33ZUCCHINI yellow mosaic virus in cucurbit crop.

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Controlling diseases in crops

Suggested methods for controlling spread of disease include:

1 Grow sorghum buffers beside consecutive crops

Virus are spread by aphids and thrips (vegetable and western flower). This reduces the number of infected vectors feeding on the plants.

4

Removal of weeds and volunteer hosts (bacterial disease in zucchini)

Volunteer hosts and weeds provide a safe-haven for insect vectors and for the virus to persist. Removal reduces the incidence of virus infection in crops.

Sorghum buffers reduce the number of infected vectors feeding on the plants.

2 Removal of infected plants

There are several viruses that are soilborne and spread by contact (tools, hands and plant to plant). These are pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV). For these two viruses it is very important to remove infected plants as soon as possible, and use a non-host crop in rotation. Bacteria can survive in soil for many years. It is important to remove an infected crop to reduce the carryover into the soil. Identifying and removing infected plants early in crop life will help reduce its spread to neighbouring plants.

(bacterial disease in broccoli) 5 Irrigation

Bacteria like warm, humid conditions to survive. They can be spread by rain splash, and wind. By reducing overhead watering, or changing the time of day to reduce the length of time leaf wetness occurs will reduce the risk of bacterial infection.

3 Crop rotation

The use of crop rotation will reduce the build-up of CGMMV and PMMoV in the soil, and thus reduce the percentage of plants infected with the virus. If a crop has been identified as having a bacterial disease, it is important to rotate this crop with a crop from a different family. For example do not follow zucchini with pumpkin or melons. Use tomatoes, beans, corn, etc.

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Growers are encouraged to submit crop samples to be tested free of charge.

33L–R: Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus. Tomato spotted wilt virus.

The project team will examine the effect additional management options such as mulching and windbreaks have on the introduction of diseases into crops in upcoming field trials.

Any WA grower interested in participating in the survey can contact:

Growers are encouraged to submit crop samples to be tested free of charge.

• Rebecca Clarke: E: rebecca@raitech.com.au

• Dr Craig Webster: E: craig.webster@dpird.wa.gov.au • Dr Dominie Wright: E: dominie.wright@dpird.wa.gov.au

MORE INFORMATION For further information contact Dr Craig Webster, DPIRD. Phone (08) 9368 3139 or email craig.webster@dpird.wa.gov.au. Dr Dominie Wright, DPIRD. Phone (08) 9368 3875 or email dominie.wright@dpird.wa.gov.au

• Annie von Blommestein: E: annie@cga.com.au

• Rachel Lancaster: E: Rachel@eatswa.com.au

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

Horticulture Innovation Australia funded project VG16086 area wide management of vegetable disease: virus and bacteria diseases

Save the date Vegetable

Industry Summit

& Grower Tour

17–18 OCTOBER 2019

HortConnectWA Brunch Friday, 18 October 2019 10:30am-1:00pm Crown Towers Ballroom, Crown Perth

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Increasing

water use efficiency BY DAVID ROWE DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES & REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

T

he announcement of a proposed 10% reduction in licenced groundwater allocations for horticultural businesses in North Wanneroo has caused concern among vegetable growers. Lower rainfall in response to a changing climate has seen significantly less water recharging the Gnangara system, a resource shared by the Water Corporation for public drinking water. The reduction is designed to balance the system and maintain access for both of these important users. However, to maintain or increase production going forward, improvements in water use efficiency will need to be found.

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Given that water required to grow a crop is directly related to the crop area being grown and the environmental conditions in which that crop is grown, some of the ways water use savings can be achieved are: • reducing evaporation • reducing the irrigated area • increasing evenness of irrigation (uniformity) • scheduling irrigation based on crop demand.

Reducing evaporation Reducing evaporation will deliver savings in water by reducing the amount of water a plant requires to remain healthy. Reducing evaporation can be

33DRIP lines apply water accurately to the base of this celery crop.

achieved by influencing environmental factors such as wind speed, humidity, temperature, and solar radiation. This can be done by protecting the crop with windbreaks, shade netting, tunnel houses, or plastic mulch.

In a netted apple trial run by the Department in 2015–16, water use was reduced as a result of increasing the shade factor by placing netting over the crop. Additional benefits were a greater proportion of first grade or premium quality fruit.


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water over the area being irrigated. It is calculated by dividing the average depth of water applied to the driest quarter of irrigated area by the average depth of water over the total irrigated area. DU is technically a ratio but is commonly expressed as a percentage where a higher percentage indicates greater evenness between the depths of water applied across the field. The minimum industry standard for DU on horticultural crops is 75% for overhead irrigation.

irrigation water required to compensate for various levels of irrigation inefficiency (DU). An overhead irrigation system delivering water at 85% uniformity would require 18% less water than an irrigation system with 70% distribution uniformity.

Growing an even crop requires that the whole crop receives a specific minimum amount of water. A system with a low DU will need to run longer to ensure that the driest quarter of the crop receives that minimum amount.

Scheduling irrigation based on crop demand

For example, using the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) Irrigation Calculator (which estimates total plant water use of a crop based on crop factors and historical weather data) you can calculate that a lettuce crop planted in November in a sandy soil in Wanneroo will use approximately 4ML/ ha over a 45 day growing period.

Additional benefits of irrigation systems with higher DU are lower electricity cost for pumping and potentially reduced nutrient requirements resulting from reduced losses below the crop.

Even the most well designed system will fail to irrigate efficiently if not operated effectively. Learning how to schedule irrigation based on crop demand will lead to the most efficient use of any system. Crop water demand is directly related to evaporation, which is influenced more by solar radiation and wind speed, than by temperature and humidity. By using evaporation as a reference point, the daily plant water requirement can be calculated.

DPIRD Irrigation Calculator

www.agric.wa.gov.au/ irrigation-calculator

Reducing the irrigated area can be achieved by applying water only to areas where the crop can use it. A good example of saving water this way is using drip irrigation. Well-designed drip irrigation systems apply water very evenly and directly to the base of the plant and, unlike overhead sprinklers, water is not applied to wheel tracks and headlands where there are no plants. Wheel tracks and sprinkler lines typically make up 15–20% of the total area being irrigated by sprinklers, so there is a significant potential for water saving by applying irrigation only to the plant beds. Drip irrigation is also much less prone to losses through wind drift and evaporation compared to overhead irrigation.

Distribution uniformity Distribution uniformity (DU) describes how evenly an irrigation system applies

Figure 1 shows the plant water requirements plus the additional 9

Plant water use Additional water required

8 7 Water use (ML/ha)

Reducing the irrigated area

Calculating daily water requirement and applying the required amount of water can minimise both overwatering that wastes water and nutrients, and under watering that leads to crop stress and reduced yields or longer growth periods.

6 5 4 3 2 1 0

50

55

60

65

70 75 80 Distribution uniformity (%)

85

90

95

100

FIGURE 1 Plant water use and additional irrigation required for a lettuce crop at different DUs. WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Soil tension sensors (tensiometers) confirm the effectiveness of irrigation in this strawberry crop.

Confirming the effectiveness of irrigation should be done with technology such as soil moisture or soil tension sensors that will show if water applied has been used, is remaining in the root zone, or has drained past the root zone and is therefore no longer available. In combination, this multipronged approach can improve water use efficiency. While it is daunting to face a reduction in water allocations, DPIRD is supporting growers by both demonstrating water saving techniques and assessing the cost versus the benefits of these techniques. MORE INFORMATION Keep an eye out for articles in upcoming WA Grower magazines and visit the DPIRD website for tips on irrigation scheduling and soil moisture monitoring. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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on soil microbes and compost

T

he Soil Wealth and Integrated Crop Protection (ICP) projects work with growers nationally to put soil management and plant health research into practice.

The importance of soil microbiology We hear so much about soil microbiology these days, but what really is the value of these microbes when growing a crop?

To understand soil microbes we have to understand the numbers that are An average soil can have involved. An average In this edition we delve up to 30,000kgs of microbes soil can have below the surface into the per hectare. world of soil microbes, up to 30,000kgs and how to support them of microbes per through building organic hectare. This is the matter and using compost. equivalent of 42 cows! Soil Wealth ICP Phase 2 (VG16078) is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund.

Another important fact to remember is that there is no “ideal”, it is more about numbers and types of microbes

found which in turn indicates what is happening in the soil. High levels of fungi often show that the soil is going through the process of breaking down organic matter. If we can balance the ratios to suit the crop grown and increase the numbers of microbes, this in turn will lead to a healthier soil and the ability to increase microbial numbers even more. Why do we want a healthy soil with high numbers of microbes in the correct balance? Microbes: • Decompose organic matter into plant available nutrients • Help improve soil structure • Increase soil nutrition • Breakdown complex compounds into plant available nutrients • Are involved in nutrient cycling and nutrient availability

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Using compost is a great way to build soil microbes and organic matter.

• Help improve soil water holding capacity • Contribute to increased soil health. A great way to build soil microbes and build organic matter is through the use of compost.

Your one-stop-shop for compost Compost is a mixture of recycled organic materials that have been processed by natural organisms, breaking down the original materials into a usable form.

Compost has many benefits for soil. It can feed plants, stimulate beneficial microbes, improve soil structure and help the soil retain nutrients, water and warmth. However, compost is also a potential source of microbial, chemical and physical contamination. Human pathogens in manure, heavy metals in sewage sludge and plastics left in green waste bins all have the potential to contaminate growing sites and fresh produce. Growers may therefore be reluctant to use compost, in spite of its potential benefits, because of concerns about how it could affect the safety of the food they grow. The Soil Wealth ICP team have developed a number of useful resources over the years to guide you in making the right decision about compost.

These include: • Using compost safely: a guide for the use of recycled organics in horticulture: this guide describes how fresh produce growers can use compost without affecting their food safety assurance program. • Safe compost for fruit and vegetables: a guide for the supply of recycled organics to fresh produce growers: this guide describes how producers of recycled organic products can ensure that the composts they supply meet the requirements of food safety programs such as Freshcare in accordance with AS 4454-2012 Composts, soil conditioners and mulches. • Using compost in commercial vegetable production with Dr Doris Blaesing: watch this webinar recording to find out more about the good, the bad and the ugly of compost use in vegetable production with Dr Doris Blaesing from RMCG. • Compost use in vegetable production — a grower's perspective: hear from Rob Hinrichsen of Kalfresh in QLD about using compost in commercial vegetable production systems. This video captures Rob's experiences in soil biology, short and long-term compost, the financial implications of using compost, and advice for starting out.

• What is compost worth? Using compost in Australian vegetable systems: this case study outlines the economic considerations when using compost in vegetable production systems. It is based on lessons learned from several Soil Wealth and ICP demonstration sites. • Compost Trial Virginia, SA podcast: the Soil Wealth and ICP team follows the implementation of a compost trial for vegetable growers in Virginia SA. We speak to the growers, the compost supplier and Dr Doris Blaesing. • Recycled organics (compost) in vegetable production: watch this webinar recording with Rob Niccol from Australian Native Landscapes and Dr Kelvin Montagu from AHR who discuss the value proposition of recycled organics and explain how the compost can be successfully integrated into vegetable farming in Australia. Simply search ‘compost’ on the Soil Wealth ICP website to access all these great resources. MORE INFORMATION You can access all the resources in this article, as well as news and events from around the country at soilwealth.com.au. For more information, please contact project leaders Dr Gordon Rogers on (02) 8627 1040 or gordon@ahr.com.au and Dr Anne-Maree Boland on (03) 9882 2670 or anne-mareeb@ rmcg.com.au. Project Number: VG16078

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au

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Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus

alternative hosts & non-hosts

S

ix crops were found to be non-hosts of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), providing potential alternative cropping options for growers: sweet corn, snake bean, capsicum, okra, sorghum and peanut.

Non-hosts include, corn, capsicum & okra.

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33FIND out where any beehives that come onto your property have come from, to prevent infection from honeybees.

Weed species common in these production areas were surveyed and then tested for the ability to host the virus. The following species were found to carry the virus: • wild melon; • wild luffa; • amaranth; • black nightshade; • fat hen; • wild gooseberry; and Further work is needed to find out if these weeds spread the virus to crops.

Understanding CGMMV spread in contaminated soil

WA Grower SPRING 2019

A variety of bee products were sampled and viable CGMMV was found in adult bees, pollen and honey. When specific hives were sampled repeatedly over time, only the honey remained infected with CGMMV.

Early detection is key to minimise the spread of disease and economic impact.

Previous work in the NT showed that the virus could remain viable for 12 months without host plants, but in this project the researchers found shorter periods for infection. Seedlings transplanted into potting mix contaminated with CGMMV resulted in 11/100 plants becoming infected. When seeds were directly sown into the potting mix with CGMMV sap, it was found that CGMMV only remained infectious in soil up to 36 weeks. Damaged root systems seem to allow the virus to infect plants.

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The team improved a field immunostrip test to effectively detect CGMMV, but other viruses can confuse the test. Laboratory testing is still required to be certain of infection.

Determine the importance of weeds, non-host plants and honeybees in disease spread

• pigweed;

• sabi grass

Improving CGMMV diagnostics for plant and seed

The research team held grower meetings in affected areas, and developed grower resources in several languages.

Grower recommendations • Plant only clean seed that has been tested at 9,400 seed numbers per batch • Avoid sharing seed and if you do, make sure it has been tested • Do not save seed from any plant or crop suspected of being infected with CGMMV • Adopt and maintain on-farm biosecurity procedures, including ‘Come clean, go clean’ routines and disinfection of tools, equipment, machinery and footwear, particularly

when moving from an area infected with CGMMV • Plant crops in clean soil and grow non-hosts plants in infested CGMMV soils to reduce the virus load in the ground • Early detection is key to minimise the spread of disease and economic impact. Learn to recognize CGMMV symptoms early and avoid disturbing the area once infection has been identified. Isolate any symptomatic plants with a buffer zone • Find out where any beehives that come onto your property have come from, to prevent infection from honeybees • Use the redeveloped field immunostrip available from Agdia but also send samples into your state diagnostic laboratories for confirmatory testing • Seed testing of Asian cucurbits is reliable for subsamples up to 500 seeds for most species except cucumerina where the sample size should not exceed 250 seeds. MORE INFORMATION Download the fact sheets here: www.horticulture.com.au/growers/helpyour-business-grow/research-reportspublications-fact-sheets-and-more/ vg15013 Contact Truyen Vo for more information on Truyen.vo@vegetableswa.com.au


TOOL TIME

TOOL

TIME

your

production WA Grower SPRING 2019

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TOOL TIME

Environment monitoring delivering benefits to farmers and suppliers across their value chain BY GERHART LOOTS | TELSTRA GLOBAL IOT SOLUTIONS EXECUTIVE, PRODUCTS AND TECHNOLOGY

TOOL

TELSTRA CAPTIS ENVIRONMENT MONITORING IOT SENSORS

WHAT DOES IT DO

REMOTELY MEASURES THE VOLUME OF LIQUID FERTILISER PRODUCT STORED IN TANKS ON FARMS

WHO WOULD USE IT

HORTICULTURE GROWERS, AGRIBUSINESS FARMERS

THE COST

$$$$$ MORE INFORMATION

https://exchange.telstra.com. au/environment-monitoringdelivering-benefits-to-farmersand-suppliers-across-theirvalue-chain/

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ENSURING FOOD AVAILABILITY for Australia’s future is a top national priority. Making sure the country can feed itself well into the future is vital for our children and their children. When CSBP Fertilisers came to Telstra with a desire to help their customers manage key resources in the growing of crops, we knew that our Internet of Things network could help. Using more than 3.5 million square kilometres of coverage offered by our leading Narrowband IoT (NB-IoT) network, we’ve saved key water resources in Western Australia and helped keep costs down while freeing up time for patient care in Victorian hospitals. Bringing our leading IoT network and monitoring solutions to

farmers for CSBP’s agricultural supply chain presented a fresh new challenge. In partnership with Wesfarmers subsidiary CSBP Fertilisers, we wanted to apply the NB-IoT network and Telstra Environment Monitoring to remotely measure the volume of liquid fertiliser product, Flexi-N, stored in tanks on farms. CSBP was interested in finding a cost-effective way to implement this technology. We were able to work with them to develop a commercially viable approach. Together we developed a solution that uses technology to collect data on the levels of fertiliser in the tanks and can alert CSBP when levels are low so the resupply process can commence automatically.


TOOL TIME

More than 150 of our Telstra Captis Environment Monitoring IoT sensors were quickly deployed onto tanks around Western Australia, with 26 growers taking part in the pilot during the 2019 growing season.

26 growers taking part in the pilot during the 2019 growing season.

Before the deployment of IoT sensors, CSBP’s challenge in managing its supply chain was the sporadic and manual nature of orders coming from farmers. They needed to be able to meet the demand for fertiliser and reduce lead times to supply the fertiliser during peak periods. In order to remain competitive, CSBP wanted to offer farmers an automated solution that removes the need for them to manually read fertiliser level readings on a tank gauge then telephone CSBP to order another load of fertiliser.

The company is now looking at a further deployment for this tank measuring solution to be used in water tanks, diesel tanks and weather stations across Western Australia. The way we have adapted the standards of its NB-IoT network specifically for extended coverage for solutions in more regional areas is one of the reasons why we have just won a prestigious industry award. Together with technology partner Ericsson, we are honoured to have been recognised at this year’s GSMA Asia Mobile Awards with its ‘Best IoT Innovation for Mobile Networks in Asia Award’ for this deployment. The Telstra IoT Network is one of the largest in the world and we are the only carrier in Australia to offer both Cat-M1 and Narrowband IoT technology. Our customers can now connect a range of IoT solutions in more places than ever before on Australia’s largest, most reliable and most secure ready-built LPWA Network. Our work with CSBP Fertilisers has proven NB-IoT network technology and devices are a modern and cost-effective way to optimise the efficiency of agriculture operations and supply chains.

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Introducing the new-look Farm Biosecurity website BY SHARON ABRAHAMS | PLANT HEALTH AUSTRALIA

TOOL

FARM BIOSECURITY WEBSITE

WHAT DOES IT DO

CONTAINS INFORMATION ON DISEASES, PESTS AND WEEDS

WHO WOULD USE IT

HORTICULTURE GROWERS

THE COST

FREE MORE INFORMATION

www.farmbiosecurity.com.au

SOURCING INFORMATION ON how to secure your farm against diseases, pests and weeds just became a whole lot easier, with growers and producers now having improved access to a vast suite of resources on the Farm Biosecurity website. Animal Health Australia (AHA) and Plant Health Australia (PHA) are excited to announce the launch of the new-look site for the Farm Biosecurity Program, a joint initiative of the two organisations managed on behalf of members. “Each month more than 10,000 people view Farm Biosecurity’s online resources, many of whom are new to the site,” said Mr Stuart Kearns, Manager of Farm Biosecurity Programs at PHA. “It’s plain to see that the site and its materials are consistently delivering down-to-earth, practical information in an easy to understand format to primary producers.” The new-look website, which was launched as part of the 2019 Australian Biosecurity Symposium, retains the structure of the original Farm Biosecurity site, which had been home to the Program’s content for the past six years. While it may look a little different, producers returning to the site will find

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WA Grower SPRING 2019

the same valuable information they have come to expect from Farm Biosecurity. Farm Biosecurity provides information on the ‘Six Essentials’, which are core principles that underpin on-farm biosecurity across plant and livestock sectors, as well as templates and resources for implementing those principles on your property. Producers also have access to a range of information specific to their enterprise and production systems, via the Crops and Livestock menus, including in-depth manuals on how to apply the Six Essentials to their operations. A core function of the site is the Profiler (Toolkit), which enables producers to select the make-up of their enterprise and production system, before bringing all of the relevant resources onto one page for easy access. “The new-look site is part of our commitment to keep on-farm biosecurity relevant, accessible, and easy to put in place,” said Dr Simon Humphrys, AHA’s Executive Manager of Biosecurity and Product Integrity. The launch also marks the first step in a new era for the Farm Biosecurity Program, which focusses on drawing attention to the practical management

considerations when facing biosecurity decisions and helping you to understand how a farm management strategy can not only minimise the risks of a disease or pest incursion, but also facilitate trade by demonstrating your commitment to bestpractice biosecurity on your property.

“For every task which has a biosecurity implication, we want to have some information available on how you can secure your farm to secure your future,” Dr Humphrys said. “We look forward to what the future holds for our Program.”

About the Farm Biosecurity Program Farm Biosecurity is a national awareness program that provides information to livestock and plant producers and related service providers about on-farm biosecurity, and prevention of animal diseases and plant pests. The program is a joint initiative of Animal Health Australia and Plant Health Australia. It encourages producers to identify risks to their livestock and plant products and minimise these risks by incorporating on-farm biosecurity measures into their everyday operations.


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your

industry Your industry WA Grower SPRING 2019

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HortConnectWA

1 s n r tu

The event was about celebrating HortConnectWA’s first birthday and I would like to thank everyone who has supported us during this building phase and look forward to year 2 bringing more like-minded young horticulture professionals together.

It’s about connecting growers and young professionals, helping them share knowledge and innovative ideas, create valuable professional networks and empower them to ‘own’ the sector. An initiative of vegetablesWA, WA Potatoes, WA Citrus, Pomewest and WA Stonefruit HortConnectWA will

1

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WA Grower SPRING 2019

Images © Matt Jelonek

T

he 16th August 2019 marked HortConnectWA’s first birthday after launching at the WA Horticulture Update last year.

4

5 collaborate, share information and offer professional development across the West Australian horticulture industry. In the start of our second year we would like to announce that Buy West Eat Best have come on board as an association partner and we would like to thank them for their support in helping grow the horticulture industry. As we look forward to year 2 we have a number of events planned. BBQ & Beer events have now wrapped up for the year and the next event will be the HortConnectWA Brunch at Crown on the 18th October and then next year from January 2020, a series of professional and business workshops which will be held in the regions.

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6

7

8 1. Truyen Vo, Rebecca Blackman, Bryn Edwards, Manus Stockdale (vegetablesWA) 2. Sarah Gordon, Tara Cooke and Melissa Worthington (BWEB) 3 Sandie McLeod (vegetablesWA) and Kari Jennings (EBM) 4. Rebecca Blackman (vegetablesWA) 5. Sarah Gordon (BWEB), Jennifer Risley (SFFC), Mitchell East (Willara Gold), Rebecca Blackman (vegetablesWA) 6. Manus Stockdale (vegetablesWA), Crystal and Paul Glavocich (Glavocich Produce) 7. Kari Jennings (EBM), Kaela Bonomi and Ben Bonomi (Bon Electrics) 8. Melissa Worthington BWEB, Nardia Stacy (Pomewest) and Hollie Glossop.

For more information and to stay up-todate with the events, become a member or a corporate member. One year membership July 2019 to June 2020: • BRONZE Single $65 • SILVER 5 people $315 • GOLD 10 people $600 • PLATINUM 20 people $1,100 Prices inclusive of GST MORE INFORMATION Interested and want to know more? You can check us out on Facebook but for a more personal touch, you can get in touch with the team at HortConnectWA on (08) 9486 7515 or office@hortconnectwa.com

Latest snapshot of plant biosecurity system released

P

lant Health Australia (PHA) is pleased to release the National Plant Biosecurity Status Report for 2018 which documents some of the key events of the year and the many layers of the plant biosecurity system that is protecting our plant industries and our environment.

Australia is fortunate to be free from many serious exotic plant pests and diseases, but factors such as globalisation, international and interstate travel, climate change and the movement of an increasing volume of goods are all increasing biosecurity risks.

including government agencies, industries and the research sector. It is the 11th such report, one of several tools used to help monitor the continuous improvement of our plant biosecurity system. The report covers the role of governments, industry and the community, the most concerning exotic plant pests to the environment and our plant industries. Content is framed against the system’s three layers of protection: pre-border, border and postborder.

The report covers the role of governments, industry and the community. “We maintain our freedom from many serious plant pests by devoting considerable resources to plant biosecurity,” said the Chairman of Plant Health Australia, Steve McCutcheon.

“The system supports sustainable plant production, our unique ecosystems and way of life, while maintaining and enhancing market access, benefitting all Australians.” “Our modern, dynamic and integrated plant biosecurity system relies on a cohesive partnership between government and industry. We all work together to respond to challenges faced and prepare for those ahead.”

The surveillance and diagnostics services that are required to detect and identify new pests are described, and a summary given of the status of emergency responses active during the year. More than 600 plant biosecurity research, development and extension projects underway around Australia are also listed. For the first time, a timeline of notable biosecurity events during 2018 is provided, which links to features throughout the document. MORE INFORMATION Download the full report here: www.planthealthaustralia.com.au/ national-programs/national-plantbiosecurity-status-report

Compiling the 2018 National Plant Biosecurity Status Report relied on the input of more than 100 organisations WA Grower SPRING 2019

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$10M funding injection

to support the eradication of Qfly

A

ustralian research into sterile insect technology has been strengthened through a $10 million collaborative project managed by Hort Innovation, with significant cash contributions by Western Sydney University (WSU) and the Government of South Australia. Funded under the Hort Frontiers strategic co-investment portfolio, this three-year project will support ongoing research to combat Queensland fruit fly and provide support for operations

SITplus Facility, South Australia.

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to continue and amplify at the National Sterile Insect Technology (SIT) Facility at Port Augusta in South Australia, which opened in 2016.

and ultimately leading to a collapse in subsequent generations of wild flies.

Hort Innovation SITplus Coordinator Dan Ryan said Hort Innovation, along with WSU and the South Australian government invested considerably into the development of the use of sterile insect technology.

“SIT enables farmers to reduce their pesticide use and expand their production of high-quality Qfly free produce, enabling better trading opportunities. Sterile flies can also be used to create buffer zones around pest free areas, and to suppress populations in areas where fruit fly is established.”

“This new funding will not only support ongoing production but also refinement of our techniques in anticipation of the introduction of a full male-only strain of flies to the facility, which is being developed through a separate Hort Innovation funded project,” he said.

Western Sydney University Director of the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Professor Ian Anderson, said this next iteration of the research will look to further optimise SIT Q-fly production to support national operations.

“Our SITplus program, which is worth more than $50 million, is based on similarly successful international programs. SIT involves the strategic release of millions of sterile flies to greatly outnumber the wild population, with the intention to limit the opportunity for wild flies to mate

“This research aims to fill in the identified knowledge gaps in producing high performing and healthy SIT Q-fly which have emerged through the work already undertaken as part of the SITplus program,” he said.


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South Australian Minister for Primary Industries and Regional Development Tim Whetstone said South Australia has been leading the way in the use of SIT to eradicate Qfly.

This three-year project will support ongoing research to combat Queensland fruit fly.

“SIT technology has been a key part of our eradication response to fruit fly outbreaks in South Australia, and our government is committed to investing in and protecting our vital $1.2 billion horticulture industry,” he said.

“This research will be undertaken at our facilities in Western Sydney NSW and will investigate the thermal biology of Q-fly, the assessment of the pathogen (bacteria and viruses) load of Q-fly and its impact on Q-fly health and performance. “We will also test different pupae substrates and conditions for SIT Q-fly production. It is predicted that the research outcomes will then be implemented into the factory production systems at Port Augusta.”

SITplus has now moved into an operational pilot phase of the research and development partnership that aims to deliver an integrated pest management solution to the major national horticultural pest Queensland fruit fly (Qfly). MORE INFORMATION For more info go to: www.horticulture.com. au/hort-innovation/news-events/$10mfunding-injection-to-support-theeradication-of-qfly

Save the date Vegetable Vegetable

Industry Summit

ur Tour er To ower Grow & & Gr 17–18 OCTOBER 2019

Industry Summit

Friday, 18 October 2019 2:00pm-5:30pm Crown Towers Ballroom, Crown Perth

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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166 nests found and destroyed this season.

Hungry & European wasps targeted to protect WA fruit 36

WA Grower SPRING 2019


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T

he 2018-19 European wasp season has ended with a record number of 166 nests found and destroyed. This was the highest number of nests found in a single season in the 42 years the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has been carrying out surveillance and eradication activities. European wasp is considered one of the worst wasps in the world — harmful to humans, our outdoor lifestyle and to our horticultural and agricultural industries. It is exotic to Western Australia, but is established in the eastern states where there are no active management programs. Each year fertilised European wasp queens arrive in WA via interstate freight and vehicles. DPIRD’s program has to date been able to successfully eradicate incursions and prevent their permanent establishment in WA. We remain the only jurisdiction in the world to have prevented European wasps from gaining a permanent foothold over such a long period. Since 1977, DPIRD has detected and destroyed 1361 European wasp nests. This is considerably lower

Adopt a trap initiative.

than in the eastern states. This year’s detections of 166 nests is less than 10% of the number of nests typically found in the ACT or in an Adelaide Local Government Area in a high incidence year.

DPIRD 2018-19 response program DPIRD initiated a response program in March to tackle the unprecedented number of nests found, which involved the injection of additional staff and trapping into its existing program. Department Chief Plant Biosecurity Officer Dr Broughton said surveillance efforts focused on bushland and national parks across the Darling Scarp — in the Mundaring, Kalamunda, Swan, Gosnells and Canning Local Government Areas (LGAs), which were of biggest concern.

“Undetected nests in these areas posed the risk of European wasp moving further into the bushland in the following season, which would make them even more difficult to locate,” she said. 64 of the 166 nests were found over a three month period between March and July, many of these in difficult to access bushland areas. This compared to the 102 nests found in the nine months prior.

2018-19 European wasp highlights

166

166 nests found and destroyed

47

Nests found in 12 LGAs, spanning 47 suburbs

136 (82%)

136 of all nests located and destroyed were in our focus areas across the Darling Scarp — in the Mundaring, Kalamunda, Swan, Gosnells and Canning LGAs

98%

98% of nests found were underground

3,800

Close to 3,800 traps installed, up from about 2,200 used last year

1,300km2

Surveillance carried out across some 1,300km2

1,000

Almost,1,000 enquiries and reports received

77

77 reports led to the location of nests

25%

25% of reports that led to the location of nests were of EW seen in backyards, with many seen drinking from sprinklers, bird baths, pools and dog bowls and human food and drinks

Eradication

was confirmed in some of last year’s hot spots, including parts of the City of Swan and Bedfordale

Hot spots

Significant hot spots for 2018–19 were the suburbs of Martin in the City of Gosnells (27 nests), Welshpool (12 nests), Kalamunda (11 nests) and Mundaring (11 nests)

Detection

Wasps continued to be detected toward the end of the season in Banjup, Orange Grove, Lesmurdie, Walliston and Pickering Brook WA Grower SPRING 2019

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“Additionally, 82% of all nests located and destroyed were in the focus areas of the Darling Scarp, highlighting the benefits of additional surveillance and staff to locate nests. “Being able to locate and destroy such a large number of nests in and surrounding bushland puts us in the best position to keep numbers low if there are any remaining populations in these areas.”

Dr Broughton said staff efforts involved some heroic adventuring and detective work, trekking through thick bushland, traversing rough terrain in national parks, and tracking wasps up suburban streets and across rivers. “Locating nests is much more difficult than most people would realise. Once wasps are detected through traps and lures, the wasp must be tracked back to its nest, which is usually underground and hidden, with entrances the size of a 20 cent piece.

“Finding these nests in dense scrub and suburban hiding spots such as garden beds and walls was a real feat for our staff.” Dr Broughton said a good example was in the suburb of Martin in the City of Gosnells, where a staggering 27 nests were found on the edge or within bushland. “Staff searched for three weeks to find what they hoped to be the last nest in that area, and eventually found it buried

Seasonal surveillance starts in October.

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in the steep side of a quarry. This nest could have led to the formation of more than 10 new nests in 2019–20,” she said. Seasonal surveillance, which starts in October, will target areas where nests have been destroyed, and also areas where there was wasp activity prior to the end of the season. This will determine whether DPIRD has achieved any localised eradication, and help to determine where to focus efforts in 2019–20.


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Impact of European wasp

Permanent establishment of European wasp would have serious consequences that are being experienced in other states, such as not being able to eat outdoors where there are nearby nests, due to the wasp’s aggressive behaviour when scavenging for human food and drinks, particularly meat. This poses risks that most people wouldn’t be aware of, such as scavenging wasps appearing in schoolyards and in pet bowls left outside. Their mostly hidden and underground nests are also a serious threat, as they can grow to the size of a basketball, or larger, which can be easily stepped on — disturbing thousands of angry wasps that will sting repeatedly. Additionally, there are serious agricultural and environmental risks, with European wasp known to predate on insects and even small birds. Overseas, this pest has had a dramatic impact on apiculture industries, as well as vineyards and orchards.

states, and wasps continuing to arrive on interstate freight and vehicles,” she said. “In 2019–20, the department will be looking to work more closely with local government staff working in operations, health, environment, and parks and maintenance teams, to improve their awareness of European wasp. “We will also be offering to LGAs information sessions on our current activities, as well as training in surveillance methods. This increased engagement will begin late September 2019.”

Look and report! In 2018–19, 77 public reports led to the detection of nests. Public reporting fills in our surveillance gaps by reporting European wasp in areas where we don’t have traps, and help to locate nests, as European wasp sightings means there might be a nest close by.

The department’s message to the public is to keep a lookout at all times, as European wasps are often seen in the most unlikely locations!

To learn more visit agric.wa.gov.au/wasps. What to look for The European wasp has distinct behaviours that make it easy to identify. Look out for: 1 Wasps scavenging on human food and drinks

4 Wasps flying with raised legs (all other wasps dangle their legs)

2 Wasps scavenging on pet food 3 Wasps flying in and out of a single hole in the ground (90% of nests are hidden underground)

5 Black feelers/antennae (paper wasps have orange/yellow antennae).

Dr Broughton said the department had received fantastic assistance and support from local governments, community groups and other agencies throughout 2018–19. “We reached out to some 50 community groups, 150 schools, businesses such as Bunnings and nurseries, and had regular contact with close to 70 local government staff from 16 LGAs. Assistance was also provided by the Department of Biosecurity, Conservation and Attractions (DBCA).

“We are particularly grateful to those stakeholders that maintained and inspected their own traps. These included the Bungendore Park Environmental Group, DBCA and LGAs of Belmont, Kalamunda, Nedlands, Perth, Swan, Vincent and Mundaring.” Dr Broughton said the involvement of these stakeholders would be essential in the coming season. “The invasion threat of this pest is increasing, due to rising numbers and continued spread in the eastern

In 2018–19 nests were found from the most seemingly unimportant reports. Examples included European wasps being seen on desks and in lunchrooms, in a parked car, feeding on insects from a car grill, at a petrol station, inside the Busport and in an underground carpark. A report of European wasp seen feeding on a crab carcass led to the location and destruction of five nearby nests. A European wasp was recognised in a backyard when spotted fighting with meat ants over a cat biscuit, and another seen feeding on meat left out for magpies. MORE INFORMATION If you see anything that makes you wonder, even if doubtful, contact DPIRD immediately. Enquiries and reports of European wasps can be made via the MyPestGuide app or online reporting (mypestguide.agric.wa.gov. au), DPIRD’s Pest and Disease Information Service on (08) 9368 3080 or you can email photos to padis@dpird.wa.gov.au.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Gascoyne Food Festival 2019

Festival wows crowds with world class views, brews & food Long Table Lunch at Bentwaters Plantation.

Comfortable in our Skins

Sweeter Bananas, banana skins, Nguyen passionfruit and burnt honey

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The Taste of the Gascoyne Sunset BBQ

T

he Gascoyne Food Festival has pulled out all the stops to deliver another sell-out line up of events to over 2,000 guests across the region. From gourmet dining experiences in Carnarvon, Dirk Hartog Island, Exmouth and Mount Augustus, to new events at Wooramel River Retreat and Quobba Station, Western Australian chefs cooked up the best of local produce through August and September.

Sell out launch events in Carnarvon during August hosted media, industry, government and tourists and included the Taste of the Gascoyne Sunset BBQ for 260 guests and the iconic Long Table Lunch along the banks of the Gascoyne River for 280 guests.

Dirk Hartog Island also welcomed a sell-out crowd to its once-in-a-lifetime Gourmet Island Escape experience. The menus showcasing a smorgasbord of the finest food from the region, including seafood, fresh fruit, vegetables, herbs and rangelands meats. Carnarvon Events The Taste of the Gascoyne Sunset BBQ kicked off the culinary events in Carnarvon, with guests enjoying an Asado-style BBQ featuring rangelands goat and lamb as well as local fish and prawns alongside amazing fresh Gascoyne salads and premium Sweeter Bananas for dessert. Local business Borich & Sons also got behind the event serving up a family recipe for breskvich peaches.

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Chefs Paddock Tour

The highly anticipated Long Table Lunch at Bentwaters Plantation, emceed by much-loved TV personality Carmen Braidwood, served an eightcourse shared-degustation prepared by a stellar group of Western Australian chefs, led by Stuart Laws of Showcase Events WA.

The team of eight chefs prepped mouthwatering dishes including buttermilk Kailis Spanish Mackerel, BBQ Sea Harvest king prawns, Harvey Beef and a huge array of local fruits and vegetables. An arguable favourite was the dessert prepared by Chef Chase Weber called “Comfortable in our Skins”, including Sweeter Bananas, banana skins, Nguyen passionfruit and burnt honey.

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Minister Alannah MacTiernan Minister Alannah MacTiernan joined the Carnarvon celebrations and in her speech made the welcome announcement of a $1.4 million investment into the Carnarvon Research Centre to support new programs and upgrades for a sustainable, profitable and diverse industry in the Gascoyne. “Horticulture is absolutely central to Carnarvon’s economy and identity, and our investment alongside fantastic events like the Gascoyne Food Festival — will help this sector grow and prosper,” said the Minister.

Gascoyne Food Statements Popular Perth Chef Scott Bridger of Bib & Tucker was moved by his second visit to the region, “it was an amazing few days cooking with a bunch of legends for the annual Long Table Lunch, and inspiring to meet the producers that work so hard to bring the amazing Carnarvon produce to Perth,” said Scott.

Gascoyne Food Council Spokesperson Doriana Mangili said, “we can’t understate the impact of this annual festival to our region. In welcoming the broad range of guests from media, government, chefs, tourists and other business people, we provide invaluable exposure to our industry for its hard work and create new opportunities.”


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The Western Australian group of chefs led by Stuart Laws.

“Along with the support we already receive from Buy West Eat Best, the Minister's announcement of 1.4 million investment into our industry is going to provide an incredible platform for us to continue to grow and thrive and we are very grateful,” said Doriana. “This year’s festival is once again the result of an exceptional amount of effort by all involved. The Carnarvon Visitor Centre has become more integral to the planning and delivery of the events which has already created some amazing outcomes in showcasing our region. And of course an especially big thanks to our guests,” Doriana said.

Participating chefs: 33L–R: Michael Nixon, GFC; Fred Fairthorne, Farmer Jacks Founder and Food Hero Award winner; and Minister Alannah MacTiernan.

Gascoyne Food Hero 2019 The sold out Long Table Lunch in Carnarvon provided the perfect opportunity to announce the Gascoyne Food Hero Award, presented to Farmer Jacks Supermarket’s Founder and Owner, Fred Fairthorne. Fred was honoured for his ongoing commitment to the supporting Gascoyne food through investment, support and advice and through his supermarkets. The Gascoyne Food Council created the award to recognise its recipients for their incredible commitment and dedication to the region, that has led to better opportunities for the food industry and boosted the profile of the Gascoyne. MORE INFORMATION Contact The Carnarvon Visitor Centre.

1. Stuart Laws (Showcase Events WA) 2. Melissa Palinkas (Young George) 3. Chase Weber (The Standard) 4. Leigh Nash (Dingo Sauce Co.)

5. Nic Wood (Santini Bar & Grill) 6. Gord Kahle (Cook and Mason) 7. Scott Bridger (Bib & Tucker) 8. Kyle Lyons (Otherwise Brewing Co.) 9. Rohan Park (Event Support) 10. George Cooper (Tiller Dining) 11. Russell Blaikie (must Winebar) 12. Marie Fisher (Froth Craft Brewery) 13. Tyler Little (Froth Craft Brewery) WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Biosecurity

33CRUSADER bug

2019

P

est reporters around Western Australia are gearing up for Biosecurity Blitz 2019, the state’s annual pest and disease surveillance campaign.

This is the fifth year of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) run initiative, which asks the public to report interesting insects, plants or animals using the MyPestGuide™ Reporter app. This year, the event begins on 19 October and finishes on 16 November.

To participate, simply download the MyPestGuide™ Reporter app, get outside, take photos of interesting organisms and send them in to the department during the Blitz.

Experts from the department will view and respond to all Blitz reports, providing an identification and information about the organism back to you through the app. DPIRD Development Officer Laura Fagan said that receiving a large number of reports over a concentrated period provides valuable data to support the department’s ongoing biosecurity efforts.

Download the app at mypestguide.agric.wa.gov. au/reporter “The Biosecurity Blitz provides us with a snapshot in time of the state of our environment,” Ms Fagan said. “Over this period, the more reports we get, the better, as it gives us a broad understanding of the kinds of insects, diseases and weeds we have around us, which is critical to detecting and preventing the establishment of new exotic pests.” Reports of all organisms are welcome but for something more challenging, there are specific activities available on the department’s website to keep participants busy during the Biosecurity Blitz.

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Biosecurity Blitz 2019 runs from 19 October to 16 November. 33CITRUS gall wasp

“Another big target area for the department is pests of citrus plants, which many people have in their backyard,” Ms Fagan said.

Reports can be made by downloading the department’s reporting app MyPestGuide™ Reporter for iOS and Android or by submitting a report through the community website at mypestguide.agric.wa.gov.au/ reporter

“So we’re encouraging people to take photos of their citrus plants, even if they are healthy, as these data are important to show freedom from certain exotic pests, such as citrus gall wasp and citrus canker.”

Biosecurity Blitz 2019 reports support the department’s ongoing surveillance efforts to demonstrate freedom from exotic pests and diseases, which underpins access to essential trade markets. By getting involved,

For instance, European house borer is a particular focus of this year’s Blitz, as it has now been found further north than expected, and people are encouraged to check for signs of EHB activity.

everyone can help support the Western Australian horticulture industry generate even greater returns on their investments. MORE INFORMATION To find out more and view the available activities, visit the Biosecurity Blitz 2019 website at agric.wa.gov.au/biosecurity-blitz

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

Save the date Vegetable

Industry Summit

& Grower Tour

17–18 OCTOBER 2019

Grower Group Tour Thursday, 17 October 2019 8:30am-4:00pm @ Brookrise Farm, Gingin

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Insect research comes full circle for DPIRD scientist

A

fascination with insects and first-hand appreciation of how pests impacted the family floriculture business in India, has led plant pathologist and molecular biologist, Vineeta Bilgi, to undertake vital research in Western Australia on the horticulture pest, tomato potato psyllid (TPP).

TPP is a tiny sap-sucking insect, detected in WA in 2017, which feeds on the solanaceae group of plants, like tomato, potato, capsicum, chilli and egg plant crops.

The pest acts as a vector for the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), which has not been detected in WA or elsewhere in Australia. Dr Bilgi joined the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development two years ago, after completing her PhD at Murdoch University, to work on the industry response examining biological control agents for TPP and alternative disinfestation control measures. Industry has now transitioned to a management phase for TPP, backed by a national plan to manage the pest

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33DPIRD research officer Dr Vineeta Bilgi is working on a new project to examine alternative postharvest treatments to address the transfer risk of tomato potato psyllid to facilitate opportunities for market access.

in WA and strict movement conditions, including disinfestation treatments to minimise the risk of TPP being transferred interstate or overseas. Dr Bilgi and disinfestation expert, consultant Dr Francis De Lima, are commencing a new project to explore alternative postharvest disinfestation treatments to manage TPP in solanaceous host crops. The three year project, co-funded through the department’s Horticulture Research Recovery Fund and Horticulture Innovation Australia,

will examine disinfestation options, including low doses of methyl bromide, ethyl formate, and phytosanitary x-ray irradiation. Dr Bilgi said the project would help provide valuable scientific evidence from which efficient and effective treatment schedules could be developed to satisfy market requirements and protect WA and eastern states growers, should the TPP be detected. “While there has been some work done on alternative disinfestation treatments for TPP in the United States, Mexico and New Zealand, its effectiveness needs to be confirmed in Australia to satisfy interstate market access requirements,” she said.


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“One important component of the research is to ensure the treatments do not affect the sensory attributes of the crop, such as taste and texture. “If we can identify safe, effective means of removing the risk of TPP from being present on WA produce through alternative treatments, disinfestation could be an option to open up market access and assist the local industry.”

“Both TPP and Medfly are pests of solanaceae crops, so we may be able to kill two birds with the same stone — so to speak,” she said. Dr Bilgi said she was excited to be working on the project with Dr De Lima, using applied science to generate meaningful change and benefits to industry and growers. “I worked in my family’s floriculture businesses as a plant pathologist for years and understand how pests and diseases can easily undo all the hard work and financial investments in producing a high quality crop,” she said.

The department continues to trap TPP as part of a surveillance program of CLso.

The laboratory-scale experiments will focus on fruits with a calyx — the green covering where the plant connects the fruit on which TPP lays its eggs — such as chilli, eggplant and capsicum. Dr Bilgi said the additional benefit of the research was that the findings could be extended to Mediterranean fruit fly, which affects a range of horticulture crops.

“Science shows us that we can do better and, as humans, we are always capable of more.”

Testing of the psyllids is underpinned by molecular diagnostics, which has confirmed WA’s area freedom from CLso. MORE INFORMATION For more information on TPP and the department’s surveillance activities visit agric.wa.gov.au and search for ‘tpp’.

The department continues to trap TPP as part of a surveillance program of CLso, the bacteria that causes zebra chip complex associated with the TPP.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

PREMIUM PROPERTY NEW LISTING

Cowalla / Gingin Shire 2373 Cowalla Road, Cowalla

Asking price is a very competitive $290,000

(exclusive of GST)

48.8ha / 120.5ac

For Sale by Expressions of Interest, closing Wednesday, October 2, 2019 at 4pm (unless sold prior) Quality Horticulture Property • • • • •

North western periphery of the sought-after Gingin shire Huge water licence of 504,150kL 22ha plus of irrigation from five production bores providing good water Ideal for market garden, lucerne, fruit, hot houses etc Two storey 4x2 manor with modern complements

• Managers office, staff rooms with 276m2 GP shed • Machinery/packing shed 560m2 + (29m2) cool room with three phase power • Major arterial routes to Perth via Indian Ocean Drive or Brand Highway

Listing details and photos available at landmarkwa.harcourts.com.au/LEP29646 Adam Shields 0429 104 760

5553603

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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VegNET IEO Update Spring 2019 BY SAM GRUBIŠA INDUSTRY EXTENSION OFFICER, VEGETABLESWA

&D Biosecurity R rvon rna Workshop, Ca

O

h Spring. Why do you always manage to trick us mere mortals with your brisk, yet sunshiny days? Looking through the front window at home, sipping on the days first hot bean water and watching the pink and grey Galahs waddle around, I think to myself “No need to bundle up; today looks like a winner!” And then I go outside, where it’s freezing… however as the sun continues to shine, the day gets a little brighter. The Quality Assurance, R&D Extension and HortConnectWA trip down to Albany and Manjimup in early June, was just the ticket to blow away the winter blues.

Sitting on a grower’s porch with the dappled morning sun on my back, in the middle of a farm while participating in a FreshCare training session cemented two very important thoughts in my head. The first was as we were discussing the extrinsic value of a solid food defence/ fraud strategy; four minds with diverse horticulture experiences, approaching the same matter from very different angles and coming to the same conclusion. Which in turn reinforced my second thought, that growers really don’t get credit (or give themselves credit) for the level of cerebral rumination they achieve while sitting on a tractor. I was under no illusion that an outside HortConnectWA BBQ event in Pemberton in June was a bit of an ask and I am happy to say the heavens didn’t disappoint.

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We arrived to drenching rain, a frosty wind and reports of trees coming down. I can’t describe my relief as we arrived at Pemberley of Pemberton to see our lovely hosts, Dave and Monica had somehow wrangled a couple of tarps to construct a cave like windbreak. As the sun went down and the rain found another gear, growers started to filter in.

With a crew of around 40 folks from the Manjimup/Pemberton horticulture scene in attendance, I couldn’t have been a happier ambassador. There was a lot of talking, even more laughing and a few brand-new introductions, which is at the heart of this HortConnectWA ambassador’s personal ethos. Working on the farm can be all consuming.

Hort Connections Melbou rne


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hop, Wanneroo ks or w D & R ty ri Biosecu It is my hope that the future events and workshops planned by HortConnectWA will give you the opportunity to step away from the farm, take a breath, relax and gain some knowledge or a renewed awareness of just how awesome Horticulture can be.

The rest of June flew by in a flurry of activity. All hands were on deck for the Hort Innovation funded UNE: Weeds in Veg field day at Ivankovich Farms in Myalup. With an information session for over 40 growers held in a shed, followed by a field walk through the weed suppressing cover crop and a yummy lunch (thanks Crooked Carrot); everyone in attendance from Gingin to Albany, left with an increased knowledge and a few ideas for ‘trials’ of their own. Then there was the whirlwind of learning, talking, and networking that was Hort Connections in Melbourne.

, Long Table Lunch Carnarvon

Showcasing beautiful local produce.

I feel like I blinked and July was over. The start of the next phase of Hort Innovation’s VegNET project for myself and Truyen kicked off on July 1st, with us setting up the project to continue until the end of March 2020. We held a biosecurity R&D workshop in Wanneroo for English and Vietnamese growers which was a huge success. Our aim was to highlight issues such as aphids and other bug pests, which start to become an issue as the weather warms up. Quality Assurance Coordinator, Joel Dinsdale was able to WA Grower SPRING 2019

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close the link between habitual pest / disease surveillance and management, a disciplined biosecurity strategy and their role in QA accreditation. WA Citrus and HortConnectWA also collaborated on the first HCWA event in Gingin. It was great to catch up with some familiar faces, but even better to meet a few new ones. I’m happy to report our newest team member and HCWA organiser extraordinaire, Sandie McLeod was indeed a quality addition.

As we slid towards August, my thoughts turned to red dirt and goats. The call from beyond the 26th parallel had begun…it was that time of year again… fun times in Carnarvon!

Annual Industry t Benchmark Repor presentation

An R&D info session on pest, disease and biosecurity including melon disease information was followed by Bryn Edwards presenting the annual Industry Benchmark Report, which was a great start to the weeklong trip. The next few days were locked in for grower and stakeholder visits. As usual, the Gascoyne put on a good show in hosting the Long Table Lunch. Credit goes out

to the chefs for creating some delicious dishes. However, they wouldn’t have been able to do it without the beautiful produce that came from the red dirt up there. And here we are, at the end of winter. The sun teasing us with the promise of blue skies, bright days and shorter germination times. Like an onion I am peeling off the layers. Saying so long to the winter me I have become and embracing the sunshiny warmth. With pure delight I can say I’ve commenced my yearly count down, as the temperature slowly rises to that inevitable, long anticipated apex… when I can start moaning about how hot it is! Embrace this in-between time called spring… as sunburn and sweat await us all! MORE INFORMATION Contact Sam on 0427 373 037 or email sam.grubisa@vegetableswa.com.au.

Save the date Vegetable

Industry Summit

& Grower Tour

17–18 OCTOBER 2019

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Export Readiness Workshop Thursday, 17 October 2019 9:30am–5:00pm Aloft Perth, Rivervale WA


YOUR INDUSTRY

Vegetable grower seminar s n o i t a v o n n i n o s t h provides insig and technologies This year’s line-up included:

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ustralian vegetable growers have converged in Melbourne to learn how they can rise to meet the needs of local and global consumers, and use innovative technologies to develop products that customers want — even if they don’t yet know they want them. Over 250 vegetable growers and industry members attended the Annual Vegetable Industry Seminar, a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Vegetable Fund, which was held on Monday 24 June in Melbourne alongside the Hort Connections 2019 conference. The seminar provided the opportunity for growers from across Australia to hear from international experts about exporting, technologies and practices in global horticulture that can help growers tackle production challenges and satisfy evolving consumer preferences. “Our industry is grappling with global changes and domestic issues that we need to manage so that growers can adopt environmentally-sustainable growing practices, be competitive in an increasingly tight global market, and meet consumer expectations,” said AUSVEG CEO James Whiteside.

250 vegetable growers and industry members attended the annual seminar.

Bryn McFadden and Harrison Enright iTradeNetwork

Visionary to the point of lunacy: overcoming the complexity of capturing data for food & beverage blockchains

Dennis Lin BDO Australia

The true power of vertical integration for branded food businesses

Marcus Van Heijst Priva

Controlled environments and how they transform the fresh produce business

Thomas King Food Frontier

Meat Re-Imagined, and what it means for Australian agriculture

Roger Tripathi Global BioAg Linkages and BioAg Innovations

Bio agriculture’s role in sustainable agriculture in Australia, and the local challenges and global opportunities

Chris McLoughlin Mycelia Organics

Innovation in production and supply chain to capture market share

Casper van Kemper Agrifood and anti-piracy expert

Why are vegetable seeds protected by Intellectual Property Rights and how is this important for a sustainable horticulture?

“Innovative resource use is becoming more and more important in a changing climate, and we’re selling to more environmentally-conscious consumers. “Australian vegetable growers need opportunities to learn about the innovative and ground-breaking growing practices that will shape the future of the fresh produce industry for years to come. “It was fantastic to see so many growers attend this year’s seminar — it’s a great reflection of our industry’s willingness to learn and commitment to continuous improvement and growth, both on an individual level and as a whole sector,” said Mr Whiteside.

MORE INFORMATION AUSVEG is the leading body representing Australia’s vegetable and potato growers, and has joined other leading industry organisations to deliver Hort Connections 2019, the premier event in Australian horticulture. Copyright © 2019 AUSVEG Limited, All rights reserved.

This project has been funded by Hort Innovation using the vegetable research and development levy and funds from the Australian Government. For more information on the fund and strategic levy investment visit horticulture.com.au

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PNRM Smart Farms Project

Fertiliser and irrigation efficiency for horticulture in a drying climate

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n 2018 the National Landcare Program and the City of Wanneroo funded Perth NRM to assess the practical use and adoption of improved soil water monitoring practices by horticulturalists in the North of Perth Food Zone.

Agronomist Neil Lantzke is working with fruit and turf growers in the North Wanneroo and West Gingin areas with soil moisture monitoring equipment.

fixed device. Agronomist Neil Lantzke assisted growers with the installation of the sensors and interpretation of the soil moisture data.

Soil moisture sensors were installed on ten properties (two avocado, two citrus, one mango and four turf properties) with all farms located on sandy soils.

Over the first six months of the project, the growers gained a better understanding of how to interpret trends in the data and the benefits and limitations of soil moisture sensing. Most growers involved in the study now view the soil moisture data regularly and use the information to program their irrigation. The overall response to the study has been positive and some

The soil moisture probes were connected to loggers and growers able to view the soil moisture data digitally in real time using any mobile or

There are increasing pressures on the water resources in the North Wanneroo and Gingin areas.

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YOUR INDUSTRY

1

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4 1. Installing sensors in a citrus orchard. 2. Measuring irrigation uniformity on turf farm.

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3. Root growth checked in a citrus orchard to check watering depth in west Gingin. 4. Severely water stressed mango trees in west Gingin.

growers have bought additional soil water sensors and installed them in other irrigation blocks on their properties.

• Determine the critical soil moisture level or ‘refill point’ where irrigation should recommence; and

At each site there are three sensors that are located at 15cm, 30cm and 60cm soil depth. The top two sensors are within the root zone and the 60cm sensor is used to determine the extent of deep drainage (overwatering).

• If a rainfall event has added significant water to the crop and if so, when irrigation should recommence.

Soil water monitoring can show: • The soil depth the irrigation reached and whether the irrigation filled up the entire root zone; • Whether excessive amounts of water (along with nutrients) were pushed past the root zone; • If the soil dried out to a point where plant stress was likely to have occurred;

Background There are increasing pressures on the water resources in the North Wanneroo and Gingin areas with a hotter, dryer climate resulting in less natural rainfall combined with historic over allocation of ground water. In January 2019, Minister Alannah MacTiernan announced a State Government proposal to reduce groundwater allocations to growers in the North Wanneroo area by 10% from 2028. If the proposed reduction occurs growers will need to adapt. Options include reducing their production area, purchasing or leasing water from

other irrigators, purchasing water from alternative water sources, if they become available, or improving their water use efficiency.

These options either result in reduced production or increased costs to the grower reinforcing the need for support and further water efficiency programs to assist growers to adapt prior to the proposed reduction being enforced. Research indicates that most fruit, vegetable and turf growers on the Swan Coastal Plain are not currently using soil moisture sensors or evaporation data to schedule their irrigation events. The growers generally make irrigation decisions based on subjective observations such as the WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR INDUSTRY

appearance of the plant/tree, the feel of the soil, past experience and daily temperature predictions. Properly designed irrigation systems, combined with the use of soil moisture sensors, improves irrigation efficiency and enables demonstration of responsible water use.

Field day Initial results of the work with the fruit growers was presented by agronomist Neil Lantzke at an Avocados Australia Regional field day held Thursday June 6 on Cowalla Road at Wanerie that was well attended.

Future work — recreational areas and public open space During the project it was identified that the findings could be applied beyond the horticultural industry and an opportunity was identified to expand the project scope to include recreational,

sporting and other public open spaces managed by local governments. As significant water users, local governments face similar issues to the horticultural industry with increased pressure to improve both water and nutrient use efficiency in the management of their extensive network of passive and active open spaces. In spring 2019, soil moisture sensors will be installed at Kingsway Sporting Complex in the City of Wanneroo. This trial aims to use the learnings from the work undertaken with tree crop and turf growers and apply it to public open space. This will provide additional information to assist staff to improve practices, resulting in improved water and nutrient use efficiencies and potentially reduced costs. If the trial is successful there will be an opportunity to replicate the project for wider adoption by other

local governments. Additional funding sources are being explored beyond this project to extend the scope and work with other councils in the Perth metropolitan area. Future activities will include field days and training courses with the view to increasing water and nutrient use efficiency in the sector. MORE INFORMATION Project contact: Graham McAlpine, Perth NRM Project Coordinator, phone (08) 9374 3310, 0417 042 818 or email graham.mcalpine@perthnrm.com

This project is supported by Perth NRM through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program and the City of Wanneroo, with the Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development, Wildeye and vegetablesWA.

Grow Beyond Your Highest Expectations Season after Season Rivulis offers the broadest micro irrigation portfolio in the market featuring the industry’s most recognised product brands and a comprehensive range of services – bringing real solutions to the field. We help growers and our business partners GROW BEYOND their highest expectations with our commitment to: Making Micro Irrigation Accessible Cultivating Sustainable Partnerships Field Trusted Innovation

www.rivulis.com

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+61 7 3881 4071


WA POTATOES

potato

update WA Potatoes

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contacts Potato Growers Association Vaughan Carter President

Busselton

m: 0417 092 505

Daniel Omodei Vice President

Pemberton

m: 0427 761 121

Mia Rose Treasurer

Myalup

m: 0409 112 245

Colin Ayres

Albany

m: 0428 451 014

Garry Bendotti

Pemberton

m: 0427 569 903

Roy Humfrey

Gingin/Dandaragan m: 0427 148 832

President’s Report

Committee

Christian de Haan Manjimup

m: 0429 436 361

y the time my report hits the printing press growers will all have had the opportunity to meet with AgWA Consulting and WA Potatoes to discuss the industry Export Development Plan (EDP) into export markets.

Agriculture Produce Commission Potato Producers Committee Member Glen Ryan Chairperson

Terms 2019–22 m: 0428 827 126 e: glenjr@bigpond.com

Dominic Della Vedova 2019–22 Sam Calameri

2019–22

Terry Ackley

2019–21

Mathew Cocciolone

2017–20

Mia Rose

2017–20

Processing potatoes — local and export

$6.00/t

Seed potatoes — local and export

$150/ha

Ware (fresh) potatoes — local

$8.00/t

Ware (fresh) potatoes — export

$6.00/t

Ware (fresh) potatoes — marketing

$2.50/t

Projects approved 2019–20

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Part funding for PGA

$310,500

Delivery of Registered Seed Potato Certification Schemes & Virus Testing

$96,000

WA Grower SPRING 2019

This research is being undertaken as part of our industry assistance funding package.

Meetings have been undertaken in Bunbury, Albany, Manjimup and Dandaragan districts. Its great to report that there were great attendances at all meetings.

Fee-for-service charge 2019–20

Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid (PSTVd) surveillance of the Seed Scheme

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BY VAUGHAN CARTER PRESIDENT, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

AgWA Consulting representatives Peter Metcalf, Vicki McAllister and Brad McCormick and WA Potatoes CEO Simon Moltoni attended all meetings. The key focus was to explain the findings of the research undertaken so far into the feasibility of developing a competitive export model for growers to participate. The feedback from the meetings held has been really positive with good interaction from growers. With this amount of interest, it’s showing us that our industry wants to see if there is an opportunity in the export space and what this could represent.

WA Potatoes

EXPORT

EXPORT DEVELOPMENT

DEVELOPMENT PLAN

PLAN

From individualistic and isolated to collective and structured export development

From individualistic and isolated to collecti and structured export ve development Fundamental change is essential to build the necessary platform for export growth in the WA potato industry.

Three years on from deregulation, the Western Australia (WA) potato industry is searching for a profitable and sustainable future. The period prior to, and the process of deregulating the potato market in 2016, was disruptive and unsettling for many growers and the supply chain generally. Moving away from a system that delivered production coordination, market and price certainty for 70 years; to then operating in a completely open market, has been confronting for industry participants. Coinciding with deregulation was the closure of the Smith’s Crisp processing plant, two biosecurity incursions that denied businesses access to interstate markets, and an oversupply of local ware production resulting in downward pressure on prices. The WA potato industry has had to quickly evolve into the new operating environment . Current business models deployed in the domestic ware and processing potatoes sectors have produced a number of unwanted

or unanticipated outcomes that collectively have the potential to cripple the industry. Over-produc tion, reduced prices, deteriorating rates of return, and the predatory trading behaviour of a few, is leading growers in a race to the bottom.

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AgWA Consulting representatives are very willing to speak with growers about any questions they may have and also use your zone area representatives who represent you. In signing off, I would like to thank all growers for taking the time to look at the EDP strategy being put forward and participating in something that may turn the WA potato industry into something more than it is now. As we move further along the timeline, growers will be updated regularly as the EDP progresses to the next phases. MORE INFORMATION To contact Vaughan call 0417 092 505 or email marybrook438@gmail.com

The industry is at a major cross road, with les businesses now involved in potato production of the industry is in question.

The existing ware and domestic processing se limited options to expand. In contrast, the seed making some progress underpinned by a retur border access following the recent Tomato Pot and Dickeya dianthicola incident. The potato industry is looking for a strategy to the new operating environment and sustain the in the long term. Because of the uncertainty de has brought to the industry, there is a desire am vast majority of participants to pursue export m way forward.


WA POTATOES

Executive Officer’s Report Milk, eggs — potatoes?

Export Development

Plan

I

SIMON MOLTONI EXECUTIVE OFFICER, POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION

n previous articles I’ve examined the issues facing the dairy industry and what that may mean for our deregulated industry.

Another example to consider is the egg industry. Accelerated rationalisation has seen many small producers exit the industry and consolidation into large producers, often with direct access to retailers, become the new norm.

ss than 70 n, the viability

ectors have d sector is rn to cross tato Psyllid

steer through e industry eregulation mongst the markets as a

3

These large producers have adopted the latest production technologies, the best genetics, and up to the minute automated grading and packing lines. Significant gains in productivity has seemingly not lead to increased profits. Producers are feeling the pinch from increases in energy, labour, and feed costs and despite shortages in supply have still had difficulty negotiating reasonable contracts. Consumers have not benefited either with major concerns around misrepresentation of product leading to a lack confidence in what is being presented for purchase.

I have spent some time on the road since the winter edition. An invitation from the Queensland DPI to present at a biosecurity workshop in Atherton was nervously accepted. The workshop included a field walk in a potato crop to identify pests and diseases. It was reassuring to see that most people were able to spot the pre-planted (imitation) pests. It seems that the Queensland Government take biosecurity seriously with a large staff undertaking many projects to maintain their current low disease status.

Upon arrival in Perth it was repack my bags and join Vaughan and the representatives from AgWA Consulting in our South Africa exploration (of collaborative business models). This highly informative tour, along with the information from NZ, has allowed the COM to progress the Export Development work to the next stage. After approval from COM an industry workshop was held to discuss the findings and develop potential next steps.

All findings have been presented for discussion at very well attended regional meetings in late August. The potential for this project is significant and its important that we keep things moving as quickly and as far as our budget allows. Growers will be kept up to speed and consulted with throughout the process. Arriving back in Perth I was soon on another flight to the annual HortConnections convention that was held in Melbourne. It was great to see so many West Aussies in attendance especially at the Potato R+D extension workshop. A special mention to Darryl Smith who represented WA very well as a panellist at the workshop. The office is busily humming along, and I would like to thank Morena and Georgia for their continued commitment to our members. Cheers, Simon. MORE INFORMATION Contact Simon Moltoni on 0447 141 752 or email simon@wapotatoes.com.au

33VAUGHAN Carter (Chair, WAP), Simon Moltoni (CEO, WAP) and Stiaan Englebrecht (Everseason) in Citrusdal, South Africa looking around covered mandarin cropping.

The message from these previously regulated industries is that reducing the number of growers is not improving the profitability of those remaining. I don’t believe that the answers to improving the sustainability and profitability of our industry lie down the same well worn path. Rather, we should explore all possible alternatives that allow us the best opportunity to take control of our industries destiny.

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Graduate students contribute to potato research DR STEVE MILROY POTATO RESEARCH WA, MURDOCH UNIVERSITY

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Improving post-harvest quality Both Ni Nguyen and Diem Nguyen are studying the use of molecular biology to develop lines with improved post-harvest quality. While this has been done before, our aim is to do it using new approaches that will not result in a GMO.

otato is a crop of global importance, so it is not surprising that the Bruising can be a major cause of potato research at Murdoch product loss during harvest or University is attracting post-harvest transport and the interest of post processing. When bruising graduate applicants Using molecular biology to occurs there is a mixing from a number of develop lines with improved of compounds from different parts of the cell. countries. post-harvest quality. While the students are here training, they make an important contribution to research in areas that are important for the local industry. We currently have four PhD students with research projects in potato: Ni Nguyen and Diem Nguyen are now over half way through their research programs while Hassan Sardar and Iqbal Hossain are in the first six months of their time here.

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The dark colour of a bruise is caused when oxidation products react with amino acid compounds in the outer few millimetres of the tissue. The oxidation processes leading to the dark pigments rely on an enzyme called polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Ni Nguyen is working to down regulate the genes that control the production of PPO. This is expected to dramatically reduce susceptibility to bruising. It will be

of particular value for exporting potatoes by sea to markets in Asia. There are a number of challenges in this project. Most significantly, there are six different genes that regulate the production of PPO in potato with four believed to be important in the tuber. Therefore, rather than manipulating the expression of one gene, Ni needs to work with at least four. Further, Ni is working with three varieties that show a range of levels of susceptibility to bruising. Awkwardly, the genes differ slightly between the genotypes. This has presented a challenge for identifying the exact points on the chromosome that need to be manipulated. Ni has successfully negotiated this challenge and we are now looking forward to the first new lines in the tissue culture facility. The research of Diem Nguyen, also on aspects of post-harvest quality, has a component that is commercially sensitive and so will not be discussed here.


WA POTATOES

New applicants

33NI Nguyen

This year, we have had a number of new enquiries from potential students. Which applicants will be able to pursue their studies within the research group at Murdoch will depend on their ability to obtain a scholarship. Competition is high and only those students with good results in their previous university degrees, good English skills and evidence of a commitment to research will be successful. Nominated research topics include management strategies to deal with high temperature, novel ways of managing nematodes and the efficient use of nutrients. Ni Nguyen is researching ways to develop potato varieties that will have lower susceptibility to bruising.

33HASSAN Sardar

Hassan Sardar will research the mechanisms that allow some potato varieties to handle high temperatures better than others.

Nematodes and biofumigation In recent decades, there has been an increasing interest in the use of biofumigation for disease control. With a number of nematicides being withdrawn from the market, interest has also been expressed in the potential for biofumigant crops to contribute to the management of nematodes as well as soil borne diseases. Indeed some biofumigant varieties have been specifically developed for this purpose. However, the impact of biofumigants appears to be highly variable. Iqbal Hossain has a Master’s degree in nematology from Ghent University in Belgium. The first part of his PhD research plan is to survey potato growing areas in WA to identify which nematode species are most common and where they occur.

their ability to move, to identify their host, and on their reproduction rate. It is possible that after a biofumigant crop has been grown, the concentrations of ITCs in the soil might not be high enough to kill nematodes, but could still play a useful role in slowing the development of populations by interfering with their feeding and reproduction.

Temperature adaptation As part of his PhD project, Charles Obiero examined the climatic records for the potato-growing regions in WA. As expected, average temperatures showed a consistent increase.

Importantly, Charles also showed an increasing frequency of episodes of temperatures that are likely to impair yield. This emphasises the need to identify management practices to reduce the impact of high temperature and to identify varieties that are better adapted to high temperature. While various studies have shown that varieties respond differently to high temperature, there has been less work done to identify the mechanisms that allow some varieties to perform better under high temperature. In his PhD, Hassan Sardar will screen a number of varieties currently grown in WA to test for variation in yield response to an episode of high temperature. He will then select tolerant and susceptible varieties and look at how growth processes differ between them when exposed to high temperature. The aim is to develop a reliable way of screening new cultivars for their likely performance in hot conditions using a sound physiological basis. The results are also likely to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of the impact of heat and so strengthen the basis for developing management strategies for high temperature. In the longer term the work may contribute to the development of more heat-tolerant varieties.

While we know a number of the species which are causing damage, there has not been a systematic study of the species present in our horticultural areas. The second part of his study will be to measure the concentration, distribution and persistence of key ITCs in the soil after a biofumigant crop. Finally, he will examine the impact of the chemicals, not only on nematode mortality but on

Funded by:

POTATO RESEARCH WESTERN AUSTRALIA

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Marketing Update

Find the recipe @ www.todatoes.com.au

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POTATO, MUSHROOM AND THREE CHEESE TART


WA POTATOES

Updates on BY GEORGIA THOMAS PROJECT MANAGER, WA POTATOES

D

igital marketing activities continue to reach around 150,000 consumers each month with recipes, health facts, cooking tips and other information. The ongoing Todatoes campaign is continuing to drive awareness and exposure each week for the local potato industry. Moving into the second half of the year, new initiatives will be reviewed to reinvigorate messaging and continue to encourage local consumption.

Follow us

The most popular image so far this year is this shot of a Midnight Pearl, taken by Georgia while visiting Karri Country Gourmet earlier in the year. The image was shared to Facebook and Instagram, with no paid promotion it achieved reach of over 13,000 unique views, 280 comments and around 2000 engagements.

activities:

Seed for Schools Competition

Seed for Schools Competition Students are well into growing their potatoes and we have received some lovely updates from classes. As a reward for supporting the program and to encourage kids to Imagine a World Without Potatoes, WA potatoes launched an online competition giving away a fantastic prize including some potato themed toys and an air fryer. All kids living in WA, aged 4 to 16 years old were eligible to enter. The prize was drawn on the 6th September. www.todatoes.com.au/ competition-imagine-a-worldwithout-potatoes

Perth Royal Show The WA Potatoes team have been very busy preparing for the 2019 Perth Royal Show. This year we will once again be running the highly popular potato dig for kids to enjoy, while showcasing varieties and potato plants to demonstrate how potatoes grow. Visitors to the stand will also be able to take home a reusable calico potato storage bag, new potato magazine, plus go into the draw for fun daily prizes! An exciting family giveaway will also be launched in the weeks before the show on Nova 93.7 radio. We would welcome any industry volunteers to help out so please get in touch if you are able to spend a few hours on the stand chatting to consumers!

s 13,000 unique view 280 comments 2000 engagements

Buy West Eat Best

Updating variety information

WA Potatoes have signed up for the Buy West Eat Best Good Choice Campaign. The program will run over two years and provide additional exposure for industry through TV adverts, radio, social media and in-store integration. We will work closely with Buy West Eat Best to maximise the opportunity for industry.

WA Potatoes are updating variety information to create a resource for consumers. Please get in touch with us if you have any up and coming varieties that will be available in the next 12 months so we can include the information on our website and in our other marketing materials. MORE INFORMATION Please email georgia@wapotatoes.com.au with any queries or for more information.

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Export focus for WA potato industry New collaborative entity being evaluated to form platform for future potato exports

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BY GEORGIA THOMAS PROJECT MANAGER, WA POTATOES

major effort to develop export opportunities is underway in the WA potato industry. Faced with diminishing industry growth and returns, the Potato Growers Association of WA (PGAWA) have commissioned an Industry Development Plan, and subsequently an Export Development Report which have revealed that current business models do not support growth, and unless industry structures move towards collective models, will continue to decline. The report recommended four options to grow export development in WA, with the PGAWA identifying two of the recommended options for further due diligence and investigation. To understand how the collective export approach could work, WA Potatoes Chair, Vaughan Carter and CEO, Simon Moltoni recently had the opportunity to go on a study tour and discuss with South African citrus growers their journey to success in accessing and developing the United States citrus market. Vaughan concluded that a key learning from the trip for the WA potato industry was that growers must take a stand and create critical mass to drive the structural change in the industry, to develop new export opportunities.

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“Growers must control the supply chain to ensure they know what the customer wants, and to ensure they can guarantee that it’s delivered to these discerning customers consistently,” said Vaughan.

“We are on a very tight timeline with this project and aim to have a completed strategy plan in place by early 2020. It is crucial to keep industry well informed as we move towards an amazing opportunity for a more profitable future,” said Simon.

The market analysis undertaken as part of the Export Development Plan determined that, while the entity will participate in all categories, the lower risk seed and processing categories will be the initial focus.

Please contact the PGAWA Office with any queries, phone (08) 9481 0834 or email simon@wapotatoes.com.au.

CEO of the PGAWA, Simon Moltoni is now undertaking extensive industry consultation on the plan through visits to the regions.

MORE INFORMATION


POMEWEST

pome

update Pomewest

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contacts Pomewest Committee and Officers

Mark Scott, Chair e: markpscott@bigpond.com Mario Casotti e: mario@casottigroup.com Wayne Ghilarducci e: strathspey@modnet.com.au Jason Jarvis e: twinpack@bigpond.com Harvey Giblett e: newtonbros@wn.com.au Sam Licciardello e: sam@orchard1sixty.com.au Susie Murphy White, Project Manager e: susan.murphy-white@dpird.wa.gov.au Nardia Stacy, Executive Manager e: nardia@fruitwest.org.au

APC–Pomewest FFS Income 2019–20 Project General Account Budget including FFS, Project Grant Funding APAL, HIA and DPIRD and Fruit West Co-operative Biosecurity Account Budget (FFS)

$ 588,710 60,000

APC-Pomewest expenditure general account 2019–20

Project $ New technology project (Susie Murphy White) 90,000 Maturity standards legislation & compliance 40,000 Medfly surveillance trapping network (Ashmere 61,557 Consulting) Systems approach to market access 40,000 Disinfestation & quality management of BRAVO 229,280 apples in the cold chain for market access (DPIRD & Fruit West Co-operative are co-funders) Other projects 15,000 Annual meetings and communications 15,000 Industry sponsorships & association 4,800 memberships Promotion & publicity local project (Fresh Finesse) 37,500 Administration including salary and office costs 165,567 APC charge @10% of FFS income 45,000 Total 743,704

From the Pomewest

Executive Manager Season update BY NARDIA STACY EXECUTIVE MANAGER, POMEWEST

Committee news and industry engagement This time of the year marks the commencement of the 2020 season. Before the orchard activity really ramps up, Pomewest hit the road to visit the State’s three major growing areas. The grower dinner meetings were held as part of our 2019 engagement activity between the dates of the 19–26 August in Donnybrook, Manjimup and Perth Hills. The dinners’ attracted over 60 pome fruit producers.

APC - Pomewest expenditure biosecurity account 2019–20 Project Codling moth (DPIRD) Biosecurity Liaison Officer APC charge @10% of FFS income Total

$ 35,000 15,000 6,000 56,000

APC fee-for-service charge POME FRUIT effective from 1 January 2015 Type of fruit Fresh fruit — apples, pears, Nashi, other Processing fruit Biosecurity FFS for fresh fruit Biosecurity FFS for processing fruit

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$/kg 0.015 0.005 0.002 0.001

33GROWER dinner meetings held during August.

Participants were encouraged to contribute to discussion promoting consultancy, communication and networking for the WA pome industry. Each event gave us a valuable insight to providing future services to our growers. In particular to gather an understanding of state industry goals for the next five years. We will share our findings and progress of the strategies going forward in future editions of the WA Grower.

August Committee Meeting A Pomewest Committee Meeting was held on 19 August prior to the Donnybrook dinner held at Blue Moon Packshed, Kirup. The meeting followed an agenda consisting of seasonal updates in the regions, acceptance of the


POMEWEST

ns la p of e m ti e th is g n ri p “S and projects.” ina. Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karen

learning from other sectors who have had success in the field.

5 Acceptance of new global trends such as the shift to plant based diets/anti-plastic packaging and being reactive and proactive to the opportunities they generate.

APAL award winners WA excelled at the APAL Awards Breakfast this year with three award winners, an outcome that recognised each person’s unique passion and dedication to our industry. It was wonderful to see them all recognised nationally for their contributions. Details on page 66.

Work Safe 33APAL Award winners John Hearman, Bec Whittaker and Harvey Giblett.

financial statements for 2019–20, ratifying resolutions of business and project final updates and reports, and discussion on strategic planning for 2020–25. Pome growers were invited to contact committee members to add any industry comment for discussion. The minutes of the meeting are available to our growers and can be circulated on request.

The Hort Connections and APAL Industry Forum Myself, Susie and around 15 growers including three committee members attended this event. The APAL Forum program was well organised, each of the forum speakers were relevant and all focused on solutions to build the sector.

We learnt that increasing demand by the delivery and maintenance of quality is the single most influential factor, along with finding innovative ways to invigorate excitement to the category. Diversity by securing market access and building global trading relationships for the future is critical for industry expansion. Gathering marketing and promotional learnings from other fresh food sectors and exporting regions is also key.

There was plenty of opportunity for the attendees to network with the horticulture industry as a whole, and whilst we are WA focused there are many benefits of being involved in a national coalition. The networks between the States means we have access to first hand learnings from experiences and landscapes — particularly recent incidences of climatic trauma and food safety. Other memorable points: 1 Are farmers professional gamblers? There is value in knowing more about your business by embracing benchmarking for the collection and analysis of data to measure efficiencies and minimise risk.

Pomewest continues to work with Worksafe to ensure safe workplaces for the Industry’s orchards and workers. We will be working for the industry to assist growers and update you with the outcomes as soon as they come to hand.

Biosecurity Liaison officer The Banana, Pome, Citrus and Stone Fruit APC Committees are collaborating together with supporting funding from DPIRD to engage Horticulture Liaison Officer/s for a project that will provide industry biosecurity representation, contact points, preparedness for biosecurity incidents, pest lists, guidelines and grower interaction and communication sessions and publications. The Pome component of the funding $15,000 will be an expense item from the biosecurity account.

Pomewest continues to work with Worksafe to ensure safe workplaces.

2 Globally, factors such as the demand of food is increasing, global warming is a reality, health — the longing of the majority to stay forever young, and technology advances are changing rapidly. 3 Finding better ways to the consumer, then utilising these mindsets to create innovative stories to inspire. Never forgetting the value of locally grown and promoting provenance. 4 Export, demanding and recognising that better quality will equate to better prices. Finding purposeful markets and the ability to take

This edition We continue to report on some of key learnings and grower feedback on the national Hort Connections conference, particularly the APAL Industry Forum. We have an outcome report article by Andrew (DPIRD) on his finding of the baseline fungicide resistance for apple scab, Susie reports details on the June Future Orchard Walk. MORE INFORMATION In closing this report, I again welcome you to contact myself, Susie or Committee members at any time to disuss any industry matters. Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@pomewest.net.au

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Hort Connections 2019

Growing Our Food Future T his year’s APAL Industry forum at the Melbourne Convention Centre started with a focus on the big picture with futurist Dr Stefan Hajkowicz from CSIRO looking at the mega trends impacting on the Australian consumers. This strategic thinking then took us through a wide-ranging agenda, from AgriTech and SmartFarming to export readiness and risk management.

ples and pears, wing and production of ap gro the out ab lot a rnt ry from all “I lea nty of people in the indust ple ng eti me of ure as ple me as I I had the ve positive of the trip for ssi ma a s wa s Thi s. tor different sec efully can benefit ions with people that hop was able to make connect me for years to come.” ndee

WA Young Grower Network atte

▶ L–R: APAL Industry forum, State Associations panel discussion. Plenary session at Hort Connections 2019.

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The industry forum was attended by 180 members from across Australia.

The launch of the new Future Business program started with a panel discussion exploring the idea of ‘Discretionary Mutual Funds’. This topic was a result of insurance premiums rocketing. Could the industry come together to investigate alternative riskmanagement structures that could benefit growers and replace traditional insurances? Richelle Zeally from APAL will follow this project through in the new Future Business program. The state associations formed a panel with the discussion focusing on the theme of ‘Stronger Together’. Climatic challenges and extreme weather events including record temperature highs, bushfires, hailstorms and related bird infestations were discussed, along with valuable tips on systems and processes. WA led the way with the successes of the maturity standards project highlighted by Nardia Stacy.


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s Grower highlight ce from the conferen “The highlight of the trip was the Corteva networking evening at the Aquarium.” “I really enjoyed the motivational speakers. The Tradeshow was good to network with businesses and consultants freely.”

▶ L–R: Mario Cassotti, Karragullen Cool Store, congratulating Bec Whittaker, Ladycroft Orchard, on her award for Women in Horticulture Apples and Pears. Sheree and John Hearman at the Horticulture awards dinner.

The day concluded with the thought provoking ‘Finding Something’ presentation from Cameron Schwab former AFL club CEO of Melbourne and Fremantle, who made us all reflect on how we can be leaders to make change happen. The industry forum was attended by 180 members from across Australia. This year WA had 15 representatives at the forum with three young growers represented on the APAL young member network, three growers nominated for the APAL awards plus representatives from Pomewest and APAL board. I’m sure they have all brought back some great new ideas to share in their orchard and within the industry.

planet’. His message was that diets have to shift to fruit, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and seeds being the main course and our plate needs to be half the size. All speakers in the morning’s plenary session definitely were focused on making sure plants were the new main course.

Congratulations to our APAL award winners!

The Hort Connections conference began with the trade show, which was definitely a highlight with over 300 exhibitors at the Melbourne convention centre. The conference brought together growers, wholesalers, researches, marketers and many others connected with the fresh produce horticulture industry in all about 3500 people attended this year. The plenary sessions set to inspire the audience on ‘How to Grow our Food Future’. How will we feed 10 billion people a healthy diet by 2050? Dr Sandro Demaio from ABC Ask the Doctor set the goal even higher with his aim ‘To feed 9.6 billion people a healthy diet AND have a healthy

After two full days of talks and trade show the conference wrapped up with the horticulture awards for excellence dinner at the Crown Palladium.

Congratulations to our APAL award winners! Always so exciting to go to industry events and have our growers recognised for the great work that they are doing here in WA. Well done to Harvey Giblett, Bec Whittaker and John Hearman who received APAL awards at breakfast before the APAL Industry forum and were nominated for the Awards for Excellence in Horticulture.

Bec Whittaker Women Horticulture Award Apples and Pears Bec Whittaker is the Orchard Manager of Ladycroft Orchard in Manjimup WA. It is her passion for growing and empowering her staff that makes her a worthy candidate for Grower of the Year but as most of her fulltime staff (seven out 10) are also women she is well placed to be Women in Horticulture winner. Her leadership as Orchard Manager empowers her team to take pride in their work and to achieve higher yields per hectare, more uniform colour and size reducing the number of picks while moving towards a more twodimensional intensive apple orchard.

“This being my first experience of this type of event, it was interesting to see the amount of farmers that attend the conference and the various industry around the farm.” “The importance of prepare now for the future, thinking of the ‘shape’ of the orchard to be ready for future innovation like robotic picking.” Her enthusiasm spreads throughout the orchard empowering her staff of mainly women to take on the challenges of producing great apples.

John Hearman Rising Star Award John Hearman is a young grower who has taken on the lead role at Hearman Ag, a family owned business located on Charleys Creek Road in Donnybrook. John has been heavily involved in the business for over 16 years since finishing school in 2003. He now takes on the manager’s role in the orchard business. The last few years have seen John diversify into growing his own apple trees. Setting up a nursery on their property and now being able to supply other growers with high quality apple trees. John’s nursery is special as he is growing bench graft apple trees within a year in bags that can be transplanted without the shock that goes along with uplifting bare root trees. The establishment of these trees into new orchards or as fillers into recent plantings at anytime of the year see’s John’s innovative thinking paying off as trees are fast tracked and established much quicker than bare root trees.

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ey Image © Kevin Lac

Growers need to be vigilant and monitor for scab lesions in spring.

33APPLE scab fruit infection during the 2018–19 season.

Fungicides

still a key weapon against apple scab in WA

N

ew research from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) and Curtin University’s Centre for Crop and Disease Management, funded by APC Pomewest, has confirmed that fungicides are still an effective tool in the fight against apple scab.

BY ANDREW TAYLOR 1 , LINCOLN HARPER 2 AND FRAN LOPEZ RUIZ 2 1 DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DPIRD) 2 CENTRE FOR CROP AND DISEASE MANAGEMENT, CURTIN UNIVERSITY

Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, has been present in WA for several years after WA lost its area freedom in 2009.

Image © Andrew Taylor

The distribution of V. inaequalis in WA is restricted, partially due to regular application of fungicides, slowing the spread of the disease within the state.

33APPLE scab infection showing olive-green lesions on the surface of the leaf.

However, the reliance on fungicides for control from the same mode of action group increases the likelihood of resistance developing. This is of concern because V. inaequalis is considered by world authorities to be a high-risk organism for developing fungicide resistance1. 1 FRAC Fungicide Resistance Action Committee.

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The research As we do not know the origin of the apple scab in WA, a collaborative project between DPIRD and the Centre for Crop and Disease Management (CCDM) at Curtin University was funded by APC Pomewest to investigate and develop an understanding of the baseline levels of key fungicides within the WA population. During the 2018–19 season, orchards were surveyed for the presence of apple scab and isolates were cultured and sent to CCDM for testing. CCDM tested each isolate for both phenotypic (field) and genotypic (mutations) resistance within the populations of V. inaequalis. Pear scab (V. pirina) was also included in the survey as a comparison, as this pathogen has been in WA for many years.


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A total of seventeen isolates of V. inaequalis and nine isolates of V. pirina were successfully cultured from fourteen apple and pear orchards in WA. Apple scab was isolated from commercial orchards in the Perth Hills and Donnybrook growing regions as well as from a retail store in Bunbury. Infected apple cultivars included: Cripps pink, Granny Smith, Sundowner, Gala and ANABP 01A (BRAVO™).

All isolates were tested against fungicides from four modes of action: DMI’s (Group 3), QoI (Group 11), AP (Group 9) and SDHI’s (Group 7). With respect to apple scab, a range of sensitivities were found amongst the isolates for the DMI and SDHI groups, but field control is still achievable.

Growers should include scab control as part of their disease management plans.

Each of the tested QoI fungicides were still effective and no mutations were found in the genetic region known for resistance development. Two isolates showed significant sensitivity shifts with AP fungicides, but remained below the effective level of control. All isolates have been lodged in the DPIRD culture collection to compare isolates for resistance in later years.

What does this mean for industry? • Apple scab is now established in WA, although not widespread in all commercial production areas • Growers in the Perth Hills should include scab control as part of their disease management plans

• ANABP 01A (BRAVO™) is susceptible to apple scab • All currently registered fungicide groups are still effective against apple scab in WA but ranges of sensitivities occur • The Croplife Australia website (www.croplife.org.au) has the current fungicide resistance management guidelines for apple scab and these should be followed to reduce resistance risk • A report on the project is available from Pomewest. MORE INFORMATION For more information, contact Pomewest executive manager Nardia Stacy on (08) 9368 3869 or nardia@fruitwest.org.au

• All growers need to be vigilant and monitor for scab lesions in spring, paying particular attention to new plantings. New growth is highly susceptible to infection Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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Harvey Giblett

& u o y k n a h T s n o i t a l u t a r g n co

W

e thank you, Harvey Giblett for your contribution the WA Pome industry and community over your working life, which has been nothing short of exceptional. It would be difficult to find an equal in any other sector. This year, as Harvey retires from his position of Chair of Pomewest, he will be stepping away from his esteemed industry leadership role for the time being. Not lost to us forever, it is likely he will remain as a member of the Pomewest Committee so his expertise and experience will still be there to draw on in the future.

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33FAMILY business — Harvey with daughters Lucinda and Nicole, and grandchildren, Sacha and Jasper.

“Harvey is a dedicated man and WA’s own apple industry’s living legend, it was excellent to see him recognised on the national stage.” MARK SCOTT, CHAIR POMEWEST It was extremely pleasing to see Harvey being publicly recognised for his contributions in the presence of the entire Australian apple industry at the recent APAL Awards Breakfast on June 24 in Melbourne. Along with fellow esteemed nominee Jon Durham (former APAL CEO), the Lifetime Achievement award was presented to both men in appreciation of their work and commitment to the industry over many years. Harvey was very unaware of his nomination, so the accolade came as a complete surprise, which was truly fantastic for a small number of WA growers and representatives, who were in the room, to witness and celebrate. As most of our readers are aware, Harvey is the owner and manager of a prominent Western Australian pome fruit production, packaging and marketing company — Newton Orchards of Manjimup.

The business was established in 1929 by Harvey’s father in law George Newton and George’s brother Harold, young English migrants. Over 80 years, Newton Orchards has built a strong reputation for trusted and progressive fruit growing, storage, packing and marketing with integrity, to supply primarily Western Australia, but also eastern seaboard and international markets. Overseeing a team including some of the country’s best orchard managers, Harvey’s five Manjimup properties together produce the second largest fruit tonnage in WA, approximately 7000t across a number of varieties, supplying fruit to WA, eastern states and export markets through major retailers, independent retailers and wholesale markets.

has entailed highly successful staff management and duty of care. In recent years’ he has inspired the next generations to join him in the business — his three children, Nicole, Michael and Lucinda, son-in-law Paul Good, and his young grandchildren Jasper, Sacha, Riley and Anna are the fourth generation now growing up on the orchard. Harvey has driven constant revision and improvement of orchard techniques and is always at the forefront of trialing and assisting development of new technologies, including the locally developed Cripps Pink and ANABP 01A varieties (marketed as Pink Lady and BRAVO™ respectively). He has championed efforts to lift the quality standards of apples though the current WA industry-led Apple Maturity Project and is keen to re-establish an export market for WA grown apples.

Harvey’s five Manjimup properties together produce approximately 7000t.

In particular, Newtons has strong direct relationships with Coles (30 years) and Woolworths (10 years) which are pivotal to West Australia’s year-round apple supply. The business is still family-owned and operated, with an underpinning philosophy of innovation and excellence — the vast majority of this progress and reputation can be attributed to Harvey’s tenure at the helm. With anywhere up to around 300 itinerant staff working for Newton Orchards at certain times during the year, to produce around six million kilos of apples, Harvey’s career

Harvey remains extremely wellrespected for his expertise, knowledge and altruism. He is known for his willingness to disseminate and share valuable information among both local growers and competitors within the industry for the “greater good” of Western Australian pome fruit production. On behalf of the apple and pear community in Western Australia — a much deserved win, well done Harvey and thank you!

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Future Orchards

F

BY SUSIE MURPHY WHITE PROJECT MANAGER, POMEWEST/FRONT LINE ADVISOR FOR FUTURE ORCHARDS

uture Orchards Project has been going now for 13 years and is the most successful tech transfer project that Hort Innovation have funded.

In the past five years since I have been involved in the FLA we have had 13 orchard walks at 11 different orchards, eight trials on seven different orchards, two focus orchards, six growers each year involved in the Orchard Business Analysis and 10 or more growers recording fruit sizes each year. There are also five growers on the Community Orchard Group who give input into the trial selection and project outcomes. In the last part of the project it’s time to

▶ WINTER Orchard walk in orchard discussion at T & C Fontanini.

consider what the next round of future orchards may look like so talk to your local APAL representative (or myself) to ensure the next project reflects what growers need to improve production, quality, profitability and sustainability. The current theme has been about climate change and climate change mitigation. The next Orchard Walk will move into the next theme of the ‘Future ▶ POLLINATION under nets trial site at Foxes.

Spring Future Orchard Walk

18th November 2019 Pemberton

Orchard’ and will cover the bigger picture of what the orchard of the future will look like and how growers need to position themselves to take advantage of all that this includes.

The Spring Future Orchards Walk will be at our focus orchard — Michael, Kaye and Mat Fox of Pemberton on Monday 18th November. Here we will view and discuss the following trials in the orchard; pruning the tops under nets, pollination under netting and outside the net. This year we are set to investigate the benefits of SNAP pruning on V trellis vs Click pruning on single leader and grafting over poor coloured Rosy Glow to a high colour strain using bench and step grafts. Make sure you come along in November and discuss the orchard of the future. MORE INFORMATION Contact Susie Murphy White: (08) 9777 0151 or susan.murphy-white@dpird.wa.gov.au

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WA CITRUS

citrus

update WA Citrus

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contacts WA Citrus Committee Producer Committee Members Richard Eckersley, Chair m: 0417 911 534 e: chair@wacitrus.com.au Shane Kay Mary Ann O’Connor

Harvest trials

Andrew Sorgiovanni Daniel Ying Cliff Winfield

Affiliate Committee Members Damien Guthrey Brett Heather

WA Citrus Office Building 16, 3 Baron-Hay Court, SOUTH PERTH WA 6151 Bronwyn Walsh, Industry Development Manager m: 0400 873 875 e: industrymanager@wacitrus.com.au Kate Cox, Administrative Services m: 0439 899 600 e: admin@wacitrus.com.au Helen Newman, Biosecurity Representative e: biosecurity@wacitrus.com.au

what’s on... 2019 WA Citrus AGM; Citrus Australia Regional Forum: markets; and End of Year Mini-golf and Dinner NOVEMBER 27 The Vines, Swan Valley

Export workshop NOVEMBER 28 Northern Valley Packers, Bindoon

2020 Technical workshop: pests, spray application SUMMER TBC WA

Citrus Australia National Market Outlook Forum MARCH 3–4 Melbourne

International Society of Citrus Nurseryman Congress AUGUST South Africa

International Citrus Congress NOVEMBER 8–13 Turkey * Dates and location of industry events are subject to confirmation based on availability of speakers, venues and attendance.

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T

he last three months have been busy, with growers either picking or pruning. Thanks to the David Monks, Bron, Kevin, Rachelle and Kate for organising and conducting our July industry events.

Feedback was positive and the turnout at the three events was great. We look forward to hearing about more R&D findings as the harvests of trials in northern and southern orchards provide the last of the numbers for crunching.

Worksafe visited citrus businesses to do on farm inspections, providing industry with information around improving safety in the workplace. So far this has been a positive experience for those growers that were visited with only minor improvements needed. At the AGM on November 27th, Richard Eckersley will be stepping down from the position of Chair of WA Citrus. He will continue on the WAC committee and looks forward to supporting the new Chair. At the August meeting of the CSC Mick Mann was thanked for his excellent

chairmanship of the Committee for the last two years. Joseph Ling was appointed as the new Chair. Mick also indicated he will be stepping down from the Committee at the end of his term in May next year. Nominations for positions on the CSC will open in May 2020. From Citrus Australia, Mara Milner, Quality Manager, was in WA for the national quality testing program and joined WA citrus growers at Gingin variety day and for dinner. The 2019 maturity standards have been approved and remain a relevant tool for consumers to have a great experience with local citrus. The Regional Advisory Group (WARAG) met in August with members listing clarification on the new labour conditions; Worksafe; recognition of Australian ethical trade codes and the cost of export inspections as challenges to WA businesses. Ben Cant and Nathan Hancock will be in WA for the Citrus Australia Regional Forum on November 27th.


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Production calendar arrives in citrus mailboxes

A

production calendar was sent out to West Australian citrus growers in August. The poster was produced as part of an R&D project using State government funding, providing timely reminders for good management practices, such as irrigation, nutrition, pest management and canopy management.

As growers review packouts for 2019 and plan for the 2020 season, some reminders for the next three to four months are in the next few pages. Pruning after harvest encourages new growth that will bear bigger fruit, more efficient application of foliar nutrient and gibberellic acid (GA) sprays and assists in reducing crop load in an ‘on’ year.

Pruning late navel varieties from flowering to fruit set has been known to result in excessive fruit drop.

Season reminders

Pre-bloom to flowering stage Keep an eye out for bud break and record when it happens for each variety and block. Pre-bloom to flowering is a critical period for spring flush and flower development and is a high demand period for nutrients. The key management goal for this stage is to ensure the trees are well supplied with all required nutrients leading into flowering and fruit set.  Tag the spring flush to ensure you collect the correct leaves for nutrient analysis in February/ March. The buds that have burst (as shown in the photo) will form your spring flush.  After harvest consider foliar applications of low biuret urea and micro nutrients to promote flowering for the coming season, particularly if you suspect a light flowering year. Further foliar micronutrient sprays applied to the new spring flush when it emerges will also boost tree nutrition and help improve fruit set and fruit size. Apply the spring micronutrient

spray when leaves of the new spring flush are at least 1.5cm long — large enough to adsorb a good proportion of the applied nutrients.  Aim to apply 40 to 50% of annual nitrogen requirements in the prebloom to flowering period (August to October). Nitrate forms of nitrogen such as calcium nitrate and potassium nitrate are the best forms to use during this stage as they are quickly and easily taken up by the roots. Ammonium and urea forms of nitrogen can be too slow to convert to nitrate in the soil and can therefore be lost before they are taken up by the roots. Apply nitrogen in split applications to avoid loss to leaching.  Phosphorus is also important at this time and should be applied just before and during the bloom period. Apply the bulk of phosphorus now and the remainder at monthly intervals. Apply 30 to 40% of annual potassium during the prebloom period.

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Season reminders continued... Petal fall The key management goal for this stage is to ensure the trees are well supplied with all required nutrients leading into fruit set.  Record the timing of petal fall as it is an important stage for wind and thrips blemish.  Review packout data for the incidence of wind blemish. Monitor wind speed and direction from petal fall for six weeks to assess the potential need or effectiveness of windbreaks. A high percentage of rind blemish is a direct result of wind events in the first six to twelve weeks after petal fall, that is until late December. As soon as the petals fall and the small immature fruit is exposed, wind blemish to the rind can occur with any movement of leaves, branches, twigs, dead wood, thorns and even other fruit.  Adequate water in their root zone is important to take up nutrients, monitor irrigation requirements very closely. Although your soil may appear moist, if you have a dig around, you may be surprised that the soil is not as wet as you think. Small amounts of rain (5mm or less) should not be factored into your irrigation schedule.

Fruit set & fruitlet shedding Cell division starts at the end of petal fall and goes until fruit reach approximately 30mm in diameter in late December. It occurs in fruitlets that remain after fruit set and shedding. Over 60% of potential fruit size at harvest is determined in the Cell Division stage. Adverse climatic conditions, water stress and nutrient deficiencies will negatively impact on fruit development and size at harvest. Water stress at this time can also cause excessive fruit drop. Mild climatic conditions will favour fruit set and above average minimum temperatures will enhance fruit growth.  In addition to pruning, chemical thinning in mid November can be used to thin a heavy crop in an “on” year. This will assist in maintaining good fruit size.  Apply 25% of annual nitrogen at the end of the vegetative growth flush in November. Preliminary studies suggest that nitrogen applications during early fruit growth can assist in the management of internal dryness in imperial mandarins. Be careful not to over stimulate trees with nitrogen during this period as any growth flush will compete with the fruitlets and result in poor fruit set.

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 Apply 30% of annual Potassium after fruit set (10mm size). Supplement potassium with foliar applications of KNO3 at 15–20mm size to promote cell division.  Calcium is important during this period to reduce albedo breakdown. A series of calcium foliar sprays are recommended throughout the cell division stage for the management of albedo breakdown. Magnesium, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium compete with the uptake of calcium. Application of these nutrients should be closely related to leaf analysis and should not be over supplied. Stress to the plant can also affect the uptake of calcium so conditions should be monitored.  Good water availability is critical during the cell division stage — now is not the time to skimp on water applications. Any water stress during this stage will have negative impacts on fruit development that cannot be made up for in later stages. Monitor irrigation requirements closely, ensuring an adequate supply of water at all times. Continuous water flow through the plant is also critical for the transportation of nutrients through the plant (particularly calcium). There are opportunities to cut back on water applications in later stages of fruit growth.


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Pests and diseases As the temperature warms up it’s important to identify insects in your orchard, whether they are pests or beneficials. Monitor, include and add biosecurity pests to your sheet to record their absence. • Weeds: maintain a good weed control program to reduce the incidence of Fullers Rose Weevil (problem in export markets) and to help control snail populations. • Citrus gall wasp: monitor for galls in last year’s spring flush and for wasp emergence from any existing galls. Act quickly by pruning off any galls and destroying the material. https://agric.wa.gov.au/n/3398 • Thrips, including Kelly’s citrus thrips: monitor for thrips weekly from petal fall to calyx closure. https:// agric.wa.gov.au/n/1122

• Fruit fly: continue monitoring and bait spray programs for fruit fly until after harvest, clean up any fruit left in the orchard. https:// agric.wa.gov.au/n/1608.

down to where bait is at the base of the tree. Copper should not be used alone as it does not kill the snails.

• Red scale: monitor scale crawlers, applying targeted oil sprays when crawler activity is evident. If red scale is a problem consider the release of Aphytis melinus as a biological control in October/ November.

Young snails, less than 7mm in diameter for round snails and 7mm in height for conical snails, are not likely to be controlled by baits. So monitoring for size and repeat baiting may be necessary. In the summer, if snails are a problem bait while conditions are still moist before the summer dormancy period.

• Ants: will require monitoring and control throughout summer. • Aphids: if controlling aphids, only spray the growth flushes. • Snails: baby snails are on the move in Spring. When snails are present in trees copper foliar sprays may be necessary as copper acts as a repellent to snails. Spraying the whole tree can help move snails

Band spraying trunks can provide a barrier to going up tree.

MORE INFORMATION More information about pests and their management is available on the Department of Agriculture and Food website at www.agric.wa.gov.au and in the NSWDPI crop protection manual.

33ADULT greenhouse thrips (Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis).

More information at www.agric.wa.gov.au

33CITRUS are hosts for Medfly year-round. 33RED scale..

33CITRUS thrips damage.

33CITRUS thrip scurfing.

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Industry days ions G

rowers in the Manjimup/Pemberton, Harvey and Gingin production areas went along to a citrus field walk followed by an industry dinner to meet New South Wales Department of Primary Industries Research Horticulturist Dr Dave Monks and local Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) staff members Kevin Lacey and Rachelle Johnstone.

Citrus field walk.

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g e r e in th

The format involved a field walk tailored to the interests of each area. At all sites Dr Monks talked about the project he is managing ‘Evaluation of new citrus varieties 2017-2022’ (CT17006), funded by Hort Innovation using the citrus research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. This project also helps fund citrus variety evaluation work carried out in Western Australia. Manjimup/Pemberton growers walked through a new lemon orchard. Discussion focused on growing lemons as many trees have recently been planted in the area and the related increase in production is expected in the near future.

Harvey and Gingin growers looked at some potential new mandarin and orange varieties in the field which may be suited to local growing conditions and mature in timeslots which would leverage market advantage.

Rachelle Johnstone gave a presentation on snail management at dinner in Harvey. Snails are a well-established pest in the area and Rachelle has been monitoring three sites since February this year. The presentation focused on the importance of monitoring and timing of baiting for effective snail control.


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33DAVID Monks talks to WA growers about varieties in Harvey, Manjimup and Gingin.

Baiting should begin in early autumn

Kevin Lacey provided a number of varieties for participants to view on the tree and taste at both the Harvey and West Gingin field walks and discussed their maturity times and potential strengths and weaknesses.

MORE INFORMATION Information on many of the citrus varieties available to WA growers can be found on the DPIRD website at www.agric.wa.gov.au/ citrus/mandarins-and-tangors-westernaustralia and www.agric.wa.gov.au/citrus/ orange-varieties-western-australia

Biosecurity binge Baiting should begin in early autumn when snails begin to move and feed and before they start laying eggs. For more information on snail management in citrus orchards go to www.agric.wa.gov.au/citrus/managingsnails-citrus-orchards This was Dr Monk’s first visit to WA and it provided him with the opportunity to develop an understanding of local industry and hear firsthand what growers’ expectations and needs are in terms of new varieties. It also exposed him to the range of different growing conditions experienced by growers in the South West of WA.

Whilst travelling with David Monks, we saw a practical footbath for washing boots to remove foreign matter before entering orchards. The footbaths are self contained, with a lid and are available at Elders.

In August Bronwyn travelled to Brisbane to attend three biosecurity events related to the WA citrus industry. First up was a national update for growers on citrus canker. WA submitted information providing evidence to apply for freedom from citrus canker. Next was attending a meeting of the newly formed Citrus Australia Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Committee. During the meeting the current surveillance and research priorities were discussed, with the next meeting in September.

Footbath used at a Manjimup orchard, available from Elders. Lastly the Plant Biosecurity Research Initiative Symposium was held over two days. Included in the cross commodity research presentations, were Xylella and HLB, two citrus exotic pests, that are in the top 20 priority pests for horticulture.

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West Australian citrus fruit WA citrus point-of-sale material was distributed in Market City on 6th June to over 300 retailers. Store visits and social media posts show that this material is still on display. Fresh Finesse provided fruit tasting samples in 30 independent stores from June to early August with about 3,000 samples distributed. Runners refreshed themselves with WA fruit supplied at the WA Marathon, Rottnest Relay and Women’s Classic Run in June including signage sponsorship.

We are also working closely with Perth and Fremantle Netball Association by providing fruit to taste at games, carnivals, goal shooting competitions and holiday clinics, as well as stickers for cut fruit sales, and kids holiday clinics. WA citrus fruit was promoted in a video segment for Our State on a Plate – Episode 8 that aired on Channel 9 in 16th June. Presenter Stuart Laws covered background information about the industry and promoted our fruit and industry standard. Footage is available on YouTube and via http://bit.ly/ WACitrusTV. 1. Point-of-sale material distributed to buyers at Canningvale markets. 2. Half time fruit bags supplied at netball canteens.

1

2

Please ‘Like’ or share posts to spread the word about our fruit to family, friends and consumers:

3. WA fruit promoted at Rottnest Relay.

@wacitrus

4. Filming for State on a Plate

#wacitrus WACitrus

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STONEFRUIT

stonefruit

update Stonefruit WA

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STONEFRUIT

contacts Stonefruit Sub-Committee Danny Di Marco, Chair e: dimarconson@gmail.com Anthony Fullam

e: afullam@wn.com.au

Bruno Delsimone

e: bdelsimone@mercermooney.com.au

Anthony Caccetta

e: antc83@hotmail.com

Mark Scott

e: markpscott@bigpond.com

Sebastian Fiolo

e: karragullen@bigpond.com

Mick Padula

e: mickpadula@yahoo.com.au

Shay Crouch, Value Chain Facilitator

e: shay.crouch@perthnrm.com e: (08) 9374 3306

APC fee for service charge Stone fruit effective from 1 November 2009 Type of fruit

$/kg

All fresh stone fruit (apricots, cherries, loquats, nectarines, peaches and plums)

0.015

Processing fruit

0.006

what’s on... 2019 WA Stonefruit Season Launch WHEN Early December A follow on from the previous year a season launch will be held to prompt West Australians to be looking for local stonefruit in the shops over the summer months.

2020 Hort Connections 2020 WHEN 15-17 June 2020 WHERE Brisbane Convention Centre An event set to be the most influential space for networking, education and business for the entire fresh produce industry.

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Chairman’s Brief

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BY DANNY DI MARCO CHAIRMAN, STONEFRUIT

here was no doubt the 2018–19 season was another challenging season for all, between hailstorms, Rainbow Lorikeets, and the supply demand curve volatility each week. The committee has been busy in pursuing opportunities and projects to improve the Western Australian stonefruit industry for growers and consumers.

Two major projects which are new this year are the participation in the Good Choice campaign with Buy West Eat Best and the grower tour to Indonesia. The Good Choice campaign will see us promote WA stonefruit, specifically Yellow Nectarines, across radio, TV, out of home and instore mediums. Make sure you keep an eye out for this work over the summer months. It will complement the work we have already done over the last few years and the work Shay will continue to do.

The second project is already underway, and we started exploring our export market with a delegation of growers visiting Indonesia in early July to build on current buyer relationships and create new opportunities for growers. The effects of this trip will be seen throughout this coming season and beyond. I’d like to thank the committee and staff, including Shay and Wilma, for their work in getting these new projects up and running and continuously working to build the industry. ● MORE INFORMATION Contact Danny on 0435 270 055 or email dimarconson@gmail.com.


STONEFRUIT

Hort Connections Melbourne 2019

Hort Connections 2020 will be held in Brisbane on the 15-17 June, 2020.

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BY SHAY CROUCH VALUE CHAIN FACILITATOR, STONEFRUIT

very year AUSVEG come together with Horticulture Innovation Australia (HIA) to bring industry stakeholders from across horticulture to one place, this year it was Melbourne and I, on behalf of the committee was able to attend this sought-after event. As well as presentations from keynote speakers such as Sandro Demaio from Ask the Doctor on ABC, and Kieran Murphy from Agriculture Victoria, there is a major trade show element which allows for extensive networking opportunities.

While I was there, I attended a farm tour in the Weribee area to learn how horticulture is situated between heavy residential areas, only 30 minutes from the Melbourne CBD and 40 minutes to Geelong. The tour also gave me the opportunity to go to the new wholesale markets at Epping. The new markets are quite different to the old facilities and this aligns with the changes seen in how we buy and sell produce in the digital age. The conference gave me the opportunity to meet with Summerfruit Australia CEO, Trevor Ranford, and discuss current projects and look at other opportunities. His role is somewhat different to when John Moore was

33INSIDE the new wholesale markets in Epping, Victoria. The new facilities have forklift free zones and have dedicated walkways, previously missing from the old markets.

in the role, though you can still keep up to date with everything related to stonefruit on a national level via The Drupe which Trevor publishes on a weekly basis. HIA are the lead agency for the national marketing campaign, Taste Australia. They were able to show me some of the marketing material they have created for Indonesia and other South East Asian markets. Each country has its own nuances and the marketing materials reflect this with regional variations. This information on how the Taste Australia campaign works was very timely, given the grower tour which shortly followed. We will look to leverage the

Taste Australia work when we come to promotions in overseas markets. I found Hort Connections a great event, with great networking opportunities as the conference brings everyone together. The potential to learn from participants across the horticultural industry is evident, and it would be worth establishing the interest from stonefruit growers for creating a presence in future years. Hort Connections 2020 will be held in Brisbane on the 15-17 June. â—? MORE INFORMATION

For more information contact Shay via email or phone (08) 9374 3306.

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Western Australian growers hit up Jakarta

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BY SHAY CROUCH VALUE CHAIN FACILITATOR, STONEFRUIT

akarta is home to 10 million people across a convoluted social class system, of which the middle class is the fastest growing in the world. We, as WA stonefruit growers, are looking to access a greater portion of this market by improving relationships, consumer awareness and marketing activities.

This project was made possible by WA State Government through funding from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, WA.

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In 2017–18 Indonesia was WA’s second largest export market for agrifood products. For the five years to June 2018, WA fruit exports to Indonesia increased from $51,000 to $1.4 million1 of which stone fruit, mainly plums, accounted for 61% of the WA total fruit exports into Indonesia.

These figures only emphasise how important it is for the WA Stonefruit industry to work with our closest neighbour and encourage further growth into a market who is seeking our premium product.

WA fruit exports to Indonesia increased from $51,000 to $1.4 million.

Through funding from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s Asian Market Success Program, the committee was able to send a delegation of growers to Jakarta to explore and understand this important export market. 1 Australian Bureau of Statistics, International Trade Essentials


STONEFRUIT

33WHITE peaches heavily packaged on the shelf at Ranch Market in Jakarta. Clingwrap around fruit and stonefruit was often seen in the premium retailers.

33THE entire delegation meeting with the store manager at KemChicks in Jakarta. WA plums are seen on the shelf here during the summer months.

Local street stall in Jakarta. Even with many larger supermarkets around the city, these vendors remain relevant and convenient.

The delegation met with current and potential buyers, visited the retail markets across different levels from the traditional markets through to the premium retailers including; Food Hall, Hero, KemChicks, Aeon and Ranch. All of these retailers occupy different segments of the market and promote and market accordingly. The Indonesian consumer is looking for a sweet, crunchy piece of fruit, often favouring white flesh peaches and nectarines. Stonefruit is a relatively exotic and new item for Indonesia, with many people not fully across the diversity and variations in the flavour profiles of the fruits. When looking at placing more of our product into their market, we are looking at the premium retailers as well as a thought out and targeted marketing campaign within these retailers. The final day of the tour involved meeting with important officials at the WA Trade Office within the World Trade Centre. The discussion was based around how AusTrade, the WA Trade Office and Australian agribusiness consultants saw Western Australian stonefruit, especially

plums, could penetrate the market there in Jakarta and Indonesia.

The delegation is now working to share their learnings to the wider stonefruit industry so we can all work together to make the most of this market right on our doorstep. The enthusiasm and commitment from the delegates made the trip very worthwhile and the committee thanks you for representing the whole WA Stonefruit industry. Being able to partner with DPIRD and the WA Trade Office on this project has come with many benefits and future opportunities, which the committee will work to pursue so stonefruit growers in WA are innovative and sustainable. � MORE INFORMATION

For more information contact Shay via email or phone (08) 9374 3306. Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

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Look for the logo

Good Choice Have you seen those catchy Buy West Eat Best (BWEB) ads where the shopper nearly buys imported produce, but there is a crowd of West Australian producers behind him/her, shaking their heads? The committee, as part of the strategic direction for the industry, have partnered with BWEB to be a part of their next major campaign, Good Choice, over the next two years. Keep your eye out for our ads.

You will see this marketing go live via a WA Stonefruit specific TV commercial and radio ad, on both Metro and Regional stations.

There will be a partnership with Flybuys (Coles) for specific programming as well as in store digital signage, complemented with social media and digital content.

The aim of partnership in this campaign it to increase awareness of the Western Australian stonefruit being in season, and in turn improve sales. Project coverage should see all growers seeing the campaign via one medium or another. We are excited about this next chapter for the WA stonefruit industry. ● MORE INFORMATION

For more information contact Shay via email or phone (08) 9374 3306.

Stonefruit AGM held during May, 2019.

Committee

sprouts new talent

The Annual General Meeting for the Stonefruit sub-committee was held on the 22nd of May at the Lesmurdie Club.

The meeting discussed the recent development of the Strategic plan which the committee has been working on with the help from Perth NRM CEO, Paul Bodlovich. The plan was accepted by the assembly of growers and focusses on increasing the demand for WA stonefruit over the next decade, on both the domestic and international market. The committee also proposed some changes to the governing procedures.

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These amendments were both accepted with the changes outlined below.

• Amendment 1 From ‘A member will only be able to serve two (2) consecutive terms.’ To ‘A member will only be able to serve three (3) consecutive terms.’ • Amendment 2 An addition of ‘When the vacancies of a zone do not receive any nominations, nominations from other zones can be accepted onto the sub-committee to fill the sub-committee to a maximum of eight members.’

With the amendments above, we had two new nominations to the committee. Mike Padula and Sebastian Fiolo have now joined the committee. Welcome, we look forward to your contribution to the Western Australian stonefruit industry. Shay gave a quick recap of the activities she has been carrying out over the previous 12 months before the meeting concluded with dinner. ● MORE INFORMATION

For more information contact Shay via email or phone (08) 9374 3306.


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your

business Your business WA Grower SPRING 2019

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r u o y e is im in m o t s Tip e im t x a t t a s s e r t s

The ins and outs of business finance

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elebrity chefs and national convenience store franchises have done much in the past few months to throw the issue of staff wages and underpayments into the national spotlight. The Federal Government’s subsequent announcement of plans to criminalise wage theft seems on the surface a logical response. The detail, however, has left many small business owners fearing it may unfairly target those who make honest mistakes in trying to adhere to a complex award system. The starting point for small businesses in Western Australia that employ staff is to know which industrial relations system they fall under, whether it’s the state system or the national system.

Pay & conditions

Start times, break times and penalty rates have to be calculated.

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Generally, the national system applies to incorporated business — those with ‘Pty Ltd’ or ‘Ltd’ in their name — while the state system applies to sole traders, unincorporated partnerships and some trusts. You can avoid costly mistakes by understanding the applicable pay and employment obligations. If your business belongs under the national system, the Fair Work Ombudsman can provide assistance and information

to meet your employer obligations. In the state system, contact Wageline for assistance.

While deliberate wage theft should be exposed, a complex awards system can lead to genuine mistakes.


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Tips & suggestions The Small Business Development Corporation (SBDC) supports the Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, who has called for laws and regulations governing pay and conditions to be simplified as part of a sweeping review of the nation’s industrial relations system.

Even large organisations with access to human resources teams have made well publicised mistakes. For small businesses, it is not necessarily employees’ hourly rates that catch out employers, but the multitude of start times, break times and the amount of penalty rates that also have to be calculated. When you factor in superannuation, tax, employment conditions and record keeping demands, small businesses with any doubts about their obligations are advised to seek advice.

Take stock of your finances With tax returns hopefully lodged and summer just around the corner, now may be a good time to reassess your business goals, plans and ambitions. Whether you’re just starting out in business or you’ve been your own boss for years, there is always an opportunity to improve your business practices and prospects. So with that in mind, the SBDC has put together a few tips and suggestions.

1 Sort out your record collection As a business owner, you need to keep records of all of your financial transactions under Australian tax law. This includes documentation explaining how your income and expenditure figures were calculated, as well as documents supporting these calculations and any other choices you have made within your tax return. Among the records the Australian Tax Office sees misreported the most are cash income and expenditure records; personal drawings; separation of private expenses from business expenses; motor vehicle claims; and stock records. 2 Marketing matters Make this the year you master your online presence. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, TripAdvisor — names you’ve probably heard, but do you know how to use these rapidly growing platforms to promote your business and engage with current and potential customers? More than two thirds of Australian internet users have a social media profile, with

half of them checking it daily. Even if you’re not connecting with customers through these channels, your competitors will be. The SBDC runs workshops explaining a range of digital marketing options. 3 Rank your bank If you borrow from a lending institution, meet with your lender to discuss your business plans for the coming year. It is also an opportune time to compare interest rates on debt and savings and to investigate other financial services offered by your bank’s competitors. 4 Save on assets The Federal Government recently raised the instant asset write-off to $30,000. With your finances and tax situation now becoming clearer, this could be a good time to consider making that major business asset purchase. If you buy an asset that comes under the threshold, you can claim the business portion of the asset’s use in your tax return for that financial year. But before making any large purchases, talk to your accountant about the best tax strategy for you.

MORE INFORMATION The SBDC provides a range of services to the small business sector, from business workshops to advisory services and much more. Visit smallbusiness. wa.gov.au or contact one of our experienced team on 13 12 49.

Make this the year you master your online presence.

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Estimating the $ benefits of managing soilborne diseases Hort Innovation project VG15010

Can you estimate what’s possible for my farm?

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oilborne diseases are one of the main challenges for vegetable producers. The project, A multifaceted approach to soilborne disease management (VG15010), is working with growers to trial practices that may reduce the economic impact of soilborne diseases.

A healthy soil contains a diversity of beneficial organisms that help to suppress pathogens.

33RHIZOCTONIA can cause considerable damage to a spinach crop in warm wet soils especially if combined with physical damage at soil level.

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Susceptible host

Practices being trialled include for example: seed treatments, fungicide and biological soil drenches, biofumigants, cover cropping, soil amendments and using calcium cyanamide fertiliser.

No disease

No disease

No disease

Growers want to know what the economic benefits are from adopting these practices and what is involved. This article outlines some of the challenges in quantifying the benefits for any individual farm.

Disease

Pathogen

No disease

No disease

Main messages 1  Managing soilborne diseases is all about risk management. It is about managing the risks of crop damage. At the same time, the practices or systems that help to manage these diseases come with their own risks. So, we need to manage these new risks in order to maximise the benefits. In addition, we need to consider the longerterm risk management benefits from adopting a practice or system. 2  The economics will depend on each situation. We need to consider each situation and the farming system, not just an individual practice in isolation. Results from one site will not necessarily be translatable to another site. The economics depends on a range of factors including but not limited to current yields, potential yields and disease inoculum levels as well as how the practice fits with other practices in the farming system. 3  Consider the longer-term benefits. While short term benefits are easier to quantify, longer-term benefits need to be considered when comparing practices or systems. In situations where short term benefits are small/negligible there may be substantial longer-term benefits that make the practice very worthwhile.

Understanding the disease triangle in order to understand how to reduce crop losses The occurrence of soilborne disease requires 1) a susceptible host plant, 2) pathogen inoculum in the soil and 3) environmental conditions that favour disease development (e.g. temperature and moisture) (Figure 1). For disease to develop, all three factors are required. If only one or two factors are present, no disease will develop. The

No disease

Favourable environment

FIGURE 1 The disease triangle severity of disease depends on the interaction between host, pathogen and environment. For example, Rhizoctonia can cause considerable damage to a spinach crop in warm wet soils especially if combined with physical damage at soil level e.g. windy conditions (Hort Innovation, 2014). However, if conditions do not favour Rhizoctonia, then the same level of inoculum may cause only negligible damage in the same crop.

What are the options for managing soilborne diseases? Generally, the main options include practices that improve soil health such as: cover cropping, biofumigants, organic amendments and reduced tillage; and other options include: a diverse rotation, tolerant or resistant cultivars, farm hygiene, paddock drainage, delayed/adjusted sowing/ planting time, irrigation monitoring (avoiding under-watering and overwatering), crop protection products and soil fumigation. None of these options alone, will manage soilborne diseases. An integrated approach is required. Sole reliance on chemical control may lead to fungicide resistance or enhanced breakdown of the active ingredient.

An integrated approach is required. This means adopting a system that includes several practices that can be truly integrated. You need to work out what fits your production system.

Improving soil health will help to manage soilborne diseases One of the reasons that soilborne diseases are an increasing problem for vegetable growers, is declining soil organic matter and declining soil health. Maintaining soil health in vegetable production systems can be challenging due to the intensive nature of the systems, the requirement for tillage (to provide a good seed bed for smallseeded crops), high cost structures and supply chains that demand a daily supply of produce.

A healthy soil contains a diversity of beneficial organisms that help to suppress pathogens, has good structure which allows better nutrient and water holding capacity, and is not compacted. How do I know if a certain approach will be worth it? How do I compare different management options? The economics will vary depending on each situation. In short, it depends on 1) costs, 2) benefits, and also 3) risks involved. It depends not only on the economics but also the logistics of how the practices fit into your system. There is no onesize fits all. So, this makes it difficult to provide a definitive answer about economics of a practice or system. The economics will vary depending on each situation. WA Grower SPRING 2019

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Consider the system. What other changes are required of e.g. introducing a cover crop or soil amendment? What practices need to be integrated, is new equipment required? For example, researchers in Queensland found that when planting vegetable crops following a cover crop, using a small amount of compost at planting, worked well to ensure good soil contact (Stirling et. al., 2016 p.202–203).

Challenging factors Eleven factors that make it challenging to estimate the economic benefits for your situation based on results from another site: 1 D  iversity of vegetable farming systems. Farming systems vary by crop type, markets (e.g. fresh or processing), climate, soils and rotations, just to name a few. For example, a carrot producer in Tasmania may have a different system compared to a producer in Queensland due to different rotations and markets but also the growers’ selection of practices e.g. cover cropping, compost, controlled traffic. 2  Practices in one year/season will influence the next crop. This highlights the importance of considering the economics over a rotation or several years, rather than one individual crop or year. Sometimes an economic loss in one year can be more than made up in the next crop e.g. growing a break crop. 3  Benefits are not additive. So, you cannot assess the benefits of each practice individually and then add several together. You need to assess the benefits of the system. E.g. in one of our demonstration sites we found that using calcium cyanamide fertiliser resulted in economic benefits of around $400/ ha. However, this was based on the farming system at that site. If you consider using calcium cyanamide on your farm you need to consider what the potential benefits may be and then work your own figures.

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Image © Dr Len Tesoriero

Farming systems vary by crop type, markets, climate, soils and rotations.

FIGURE 2 Healthy lettuce plants on left and Pythium root rot of lettuce on right. Note reduced root system and pale brown discolouration 4  Post-harvest costs are a substantial cost for many fresh vegetable lines. Therefore, postharvest costs need to be considered when assessing different systems. If improvements can be made in crop quality, there can be substantial savings for post-harvest grading (e.g. labour costs), reduced losses in the supply chain due to better shelf life as well as keeping customers happy (and therefore, more likely repeat business). 5  Soilborne disease can cause episodic crop losses or cause chronic yield reduction. Crop losses are more obvious when a disease kills plants or causes obvious symptoms such as wilting or yellowing. However, some soilborne diseases might not kill plants but might reduce yield (see Figure 2). 6  Economic thresholds are not defined for soilborne diseases in vegetables. The South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI) is currently developing soil DNA testing (Hort Innovation project VG15009). These tests will be useful for managing the risk of soilborne disease. However, defining economic thresholds will require more research. 7  Diversity in paddock history and soilborne disease inoculum levels. Paddocks with a history of disease and with tight rotations will often have a higher level of inoculum compared to paddocks coming out of a pasture phase or with a diverse

rotation. Inoculum levels also vary by pathogen because, in addition to other factors, they vary in their ability to over-winter e.g. some pathogens produce resting spores. 8  We need to consider longer term benefits. It is easy to assess short term benefits e.g. from increased yield or price in the first year, but it is more difficult to estimate longer term benefits e.g. from improved soil health. Still, longer term benefits need to be considered. Some practices take years before benefits become noticeable e.g. it may take years before seeing benefits from using organic amendments. 9  Trends in crop yield or quality. You might already be producing good quality, high yielding crops but are yields starting to decline? Which practices will help to maintain yields? Would it be economic and/or make life easier in the longer term, to adjust your practices? 10  We need to consider risk management. Remember the disease triangle. Some practices might help to keep the disease inoculum at low levels. This will help to reduce the risk of crop damage/losses in years/season that provide an environment favourable for the pathogen. So, in the short term you might not necessarily see substantial benefits from implementing changes, but you may avoid or reduce crop damage in future years/seasons.


YOUR BUSINESS

11  New practices come with their own risks. So, we need to manage these risks to maximise the benefits. For example, if using cover crops you will need to manage the risk of creating weed or disease problems. This could mean that you need to ensure the cover crop is terminated early enough to avoid creating weed problems or you need to select a cover crop species that will not host diseases for your cash crop (e.g. avoid brassica cover crops if you grow brassica cash crops).

Two frequently asked questions

The answers to these questions depend on each situation including the logistics e.g. the logistics of have more land but it involves travelling with equipment. A useful tool to help with these questions is the ‘Developing a block of land for vegetable production’ Excel-based calculator and Business Case fact sheet (HAL, InnoVeg project).

MORE INFORMATION

More information is available a:

Fact Sheet. https://ausveg.com.au/ infoveg/infoveg-search/businesscase-developing-a-block-of-land-forvegetable-production/ 3. Hort Innovation (2014) Pests, Diseases and Disorders of Babyleaf Vegetables: A Field Identification Guide. Authors: Ekman, J, Tesoriero, L. and Grigg, S. 4. Stirling, G., Hayden, H., Pattison, T. and Stirling, M. (2016) Vegetable farming systems. In: Soil Health, Soil Biology, Soilborne Diseases and Sustainable Agriculture. CSIRO Publishing, Australia. 

www.soilwealth.com.au

THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN PREPARED BY:

REFERENCES

RM Consulting Group Pty Ltd trading as RMCG: rmcg.com.au

1  What is the most economical rotation intensity e.g. should I include frequent short-term break crops or have one longer-term break crop (e.g. pasture) but less frequently?

1. Horticulture Australia Limited (2012) Developing a Block of Land for Vegetable Production. Excel-based calculator. https://ausveg.com.au/infoveg/ infoveg-search/calculator-businesscase-developing-a-block-of-land-forvegetable-production/

2  Would it be economic to purchase more land to allow for longer rotations?

2. Horticulture Australia Limited (2012) Business Case: Developing a Block of Land for Vegetable Production.

Custom designed and manufactured vegetable grading and packaging solutions. Complete turnkey installations and after sales support.

electric bin tipper & moving floor hopper

potato / onion grading line

carrot / vegetable hydrocooler

stainless steel 5 drop lift roller sizer with electronic size adjustment

vegetable polisher

www.edp.com.au phone: (03) 5820 5337

email: sales@edp.com.au

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National labour hire licensing is coming s w e n d o o g ’s it d n a for horticulture

BY ROB HAYES STATE MANAGER – NATIONAL HARVEST LABOUR INFORMATION SERVICE, MADEC

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national labour hire licensing scheme for horticulture was announced by the Liberal party prior to their re-election. Now, with new Agriculture Minister Bridget McKenzie at the helm, growers need to ready themselves for a more robust labour hire licensing landscape. As a large employer of harvest labour in all Australian states, MADEC looks forward to operating under a scheme that does not require separate applications for individual state licences, and that a more level playing field will exist for ethical labour hire providers. A national scheme will also provide an opportunity for the industry to improve its reputation, and support growers who are doing, and want to do, the right thing by workers.

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Addressing a real problem

Unfortunately, horticulture has seen past cases of exploitation and underpayment of workers, but licensing will help to establish better standards.

The announcements to introduce national schemes follow the release of the Fair Work Ombudsman’s Harvest Trail Inquiry report and the Migrant Workers’ Taskforce report. ▶ LICENSING will help to establish better standards for horticultural workers.

The Harvest Trail Inquiry report identified five key areas of concern regarding employment of harvest workers, namely: 1 Widespread non-compliance among the employers investigated 2 Misuse of piece rates 3 Significant reliance by growers on overseas workers 4 That consumers can play a role in addressing exploitation 5 The negative impact where labour hire arrangements were illegally used. The FWO was so concerned about the negative impacts of poor labour hire practices that they devoted an entire chapter of their report to it.


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▶ LABOUR hire licensing will give growers and workers confidence that they are dealing with a labour hire provider that has been approved and audited by the responsible government authority.

MADEC operates the National Harvest Labour Information Service (NHLIS) for the Federal Government. About MADEC and the National Harvest Labour Information Service Building confidence and a level playing field As one of Australia’s largest harvest worker employment and referral agencies, MADEC sees the introduction of labour hire licensing as a positive for the industry. MADEC operates the National Harvest Labour Information Service (NHLIS) for the Federal Government. It connects job seekers with growers via a website (Harvest Trail), call centre (1800 062 332) and harvest guide. MADEC also provides labour hire services. Labour hire licensing will give growers and workers confidence that they are dealing with a labour hire provider that has been approved and audited by the responsible government authority. There are concerns that labour hire licensing will lead to widespread shortages of workers as unscrupulous operators leave the industry. However, evidence from Queensland shows this did not occur after licensing was introduced there in June 2018.

Growers, contractors and workers have adjusted well to the new Queensland scheme. Ongoing audits by the Queensland Labour Hire Licensing Authority have resulted in several contractors having their licences cancelled.

While the specific details of any national labour hire licensing arrangement are yet to be released, it is highly likely they will be similar to the requirements of the Queensland scheme. This includes meeting certain standards such as being a fit and proper person to supply labour, being financially viable, and complying with relevant laws. There will be penalties for operating without a licence or for using an unlicensed provider.

The National Harvest Labour Information Service (NHLIS) comprising a website (Harvest Trail), call centre and Harvest Guide helps connect growers with workers. It is a no-cost service that is funded through the Australian Government and managed by MADEC. MADEC is a community based, not-for-profit organisation that delivers employment, training and community development initiatives. MORE INFORMATION MADEC is a not-for-profit agency and is a licensed labour hire provider in Queensland. We can help growers anywhere in Australia to find harvest workers. There is no charge to use the NHLIS service and all growers have to do is call one of our trained consultants on 1800 062 332.

We are keen to work with industry to ensure there is a smooth introduction to national labour hire licensing.

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Are you doing your due diligence?

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ogue labour hire firms are underpaying workers, failing to meet their taxation obligations, and abusing work visas. As noted in a report by NSW’s Independent Commission Against Corruption (page 56), it is recommended that employers complete sufficient due diligence checks when engaging labour hire operators.

In 2018, a labour hire scam operation in Western Australia was identified in which payroll taxes were not being paid to the State Government. See the media statement from the State Government on the following page.

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Anonymous information can be reported on (08) 9262 1380.


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Media statement

Employer warning: labour hire scam operating in Western Australia • Employers using contracted payroll processors urged to check their payroll tax is being paid to the State Government • Recent payroll tax audits have identified some contracted payroll processors are not passing on payroll taxes to the State Government, despite receiving payments from the employer Finance Minister Ben Wyatt has today urged employers who have contracted their payroll processing function to another company to check that their payroll taxes are being paid to the Commissioner of State Revenue.

Comments attributed to Finance Minister Ben Wyatt:

Recent audits have identified that some payroll processors, particularly those using 'labour hire' contracts, are not passing on payroll taxes to the Commissioner of State Revenue despite receiving payments from the employer.

“Similarly, employers considering using an external party to pay employee wages, benefits, PAYG, superannuation and payroll tax should conduct appropriate due diligence before entering such an agreement.

Employers using a payroll processor are urged to:

“The Western Australian Government is collaborating with State Revenue offices around the country to share intelligence and ensure a co-ordinated approach is taken to raise awareness about this scam.”

1 Ask the payroll processor for proof that the relevant payroll tax has been paid to the State Government; and 2 Contact the Department of Finance, Office of State Revenue to confirm the relevant payroll tax for your organisation has been paid.

“I urge all employers using a contracted payroll processor to confirm their relevant payroll tax is being paid to the Commissioner of State Revenue.

MORE INFORMATION Contact the Office of State Revenue if you have encountered a labour hire organisation that meets this criteria.

Characteristics associated with high risk labour hire operators   The organisation regularly

changes its business name and/ or its ABN, yet the contact person and workers being supplied remain the same   The organisation has no ABN, an invalid ABN or the ABN does not match the Australian Business Register   The organisation does not list any known physical business premises

 The  organisation has no

telephone landline and/or online website, or never answers telephone calls

 The  organisation uses a generic email service such as Gmail, Hotmail or BigPond

 The  organisation is charging an

 The  organisation has changed its

 The  organisation has an opaque

 The  organisation lacks relevant

hourly rate below the minimum award wage rate

ownership structure, including having a sole owner and/ or sole director with suspect contact details

  The organisation has recently

formed, has no track record and/or has recently registered for GST (ABN check shows the entity was just registered)  The  organisation has an ABN that matches to a similarly named, but not identical or related, entity

bank account details just prior to a significant payment

licences and/or a licence that has been recently acquired   The organisation relies heavily on subcontractors to perform work   The organisation has company directors with a history of closing down and re-starting businesses under a different name

 T he organisation has a history

of adverse court, regulatory or tribunal findings WA Grower SPRING 2019

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th ve n h n du an en vis e fu rnm ds and t us str d th pa it n e fro de in ies e rt ho d a nt. m ve g th & D fu rt nd F th lo e R ep nd ic ult str or m e A pm ve egio artm ed ure ate o us en geta na e by t nt .c gic re in trali levy ble l om le fo a .a vy rm n u in ati ve o stm n o en n t

P ve rep Pl ge are an ta d T fa ble by H his rm s o ort pro W D f P In je Pt A re eve rim nova ct h y an a s lo a e ry ti a Lt d Go nd fu arc pm In on s be d e

2��

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WA Grower SPRING 2019 FIN ANC IA� �EA R

T

1�

he second-ever annual report into the financial and production performance of the state’s vegetable growing business continues to shed light on the state of the industry. 7–

YOUR BUSINESS

vegetablesWA

releases second benchmarking annual report VEGETABLE INDUSTRY BENCHMARKS WESTERN AUSTRALIA


YOUR BUSINESS

TOP GROWERS IN 2017–18

11.9%

HAD A 11.9% LOWER VEGETABLE OPERATING COST PERCENTAGE The WA Vegetable Industry Benchmarks Report was produced by vegetablesWA together with Planfarm, with funding from the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s Agribusiness Innovation Fund and Hort Innovation. vegetablesWA Benchmarking Lead Bryn Edwards said the report contains data supplied by growers from six of the states seven vegetable growing regions. “This builds on the foundation of information we established with last year’s report and is the start of us being able to track industry performance over time,” Mr Edwards said. “Western Australian vegetable growers achieved an average return on capital of 6% in the 2017–18 financial year”. “The top 25% had a return on capital of 15% while the bottom 25% had a return on capital of 3%, highlighting the varied performance of vegetable growers around the state”. “Importantly, the data in the report showed the vegetable industry can generate great returns comparable with any other industry or investment type.”

9%

HAD A 9% HIGHER RETURN ON CAPITAL THAN THE AVERAGE GROWER

$32,792

HAD A VEGETABLE OPERATING PROFIT PER HECTARE OF $32,792

Paul Omodei, Director at Planfarm, provided further detail, “Interestingly, the most profitable growers, as measured by vegetable operating profit per hectare, were not those from a particular area, of greater scale or a particular vegetable type, but those that were able to achieve a higher income per hectare while keeping costs as a percentage of income below 65%.”

Bryn and Paul will provide further detail in the upcoming Industry Summit on 19th October 2019 at Crown Towers Ballroom, where they will discuss the following topics:

“The key to keeping costs below 65% was controlling labour spend through focused, well organised and efficient workflow processes.”

• Key vegetable business financial performance metrics and findings during FY 2017–18

“The most profitable growers were also focused heavily on vegetable production, allocating 100% of their area to growing vegetables.” Overall, there was a 10% increase in sold vegetable production between 2017–18 and the two preceding years 2015–16 and 2016–17. vegetablesWA CEO John Shannon said the report is starting to paint a detailed picture of the operations of the vegetable industry, allowing the organisation to more effectively lobby on its behalf.

• Key insights from the FY 2017–18 Benchmarking initiative • General overview of vegetable production across WA during FY 2017–18

• Insights in the performance of the Top 25% most profitable growers during FY 2017–18 • Comparison of FY 2017–18 against FY 2016–17 This free service is now open to all Western Australian vegetable growers to review FY 2018–19. MORE INFORMATION To get involved please email: bryn.edwards@vegetableswa.com.au You can download a copy of the report at https://vegetableswa.com.au/ in the ‘Business Management’ section in the Resources area.

“This data means we can identify areas of need within the industry so we can focus on those and boost the industry overall.” WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR BUSINESS

Seasonal workers Who they are and how to find them

BY PETER ANGEL STATE MANAGER – MADEC, NATIONAL HARVEST LABOUR INFORMATION SERVICE

W

ithout sufficient staff growers cannot get their produce

The service does not cost anything to use and is very easy to navigate. The Harvest Trail website lists vacancies and the National Call Centre puts callers directly through to growers that have listed their jobs.

Vietnam. Recent changes mean they can now work to qualify for a second and third year the same way as traditional backpackers can. And they can now work for the same employer for the whole three years which I think will interest growers.”

Who is available?

The Seasonal Worker Programme that brings in Pacific Island and East Timorese workers is a highly valuable long-term option.

You don’t have to do it alone

There are several groups of people that will respond to a vacancy listing, with working holidaymakers making up a large number. The traditional backpackers from predominantly European countries are keen to do three months’ farm work in regional areas to qualify for a second year visa to continue their holiday in Australia.

These are highly motivated workers that want to save Australian dollars that can change the lives of their families back home.

The National Harvest Labour Information Service (NHLIS) is funded by the Commonwealth Government and operated by MADEC Australia to assist growers to find workers, especially for peak periods when extras are needed.

Mr Angel advises that “there is another visa which allows young people from developing countries to come, including those on our international doorstep such as Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and

They also work hard because they want to be invited back again the next season. Training any employee takes effort, and the experience these workers gain is retained because they can come back year after year.

to market.

“It doesn’t matter how efficient an irrigation system is or how effective pest control, if there are not the people on the ground when needed, a farm cannot be profitable,” says MADEC’s State Manager Peter Angel.

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The NHLIS does not cost anything to use and is very easy to navigate.


YOUR BUSINESS

Start planning your workforce now for the busy summer period.

“Growers tell me that starting a new season is so much easier when your workforce already knows what to do and is fully productive immediately,” Mr Angel said. “There is also the new Pacific Labour Scheme which is a variation that allows a worker to stay continuously for up to three years and is more focused on semi-skilled positions.”

And of course the Aussie workforce should always be an employer’s first preference.

▶ JILL and Alex — Two American backpackers grading potatoes in Tasmania.

While seasonal farm work is not popular with Australian workers, some will relish the opportunity for a start that may lead onto more permanent work such as tractor drivers, forklift drivers, machine operators, supervisors and ultimately even farm managers.

Don’t delay, start now The advice from MADEC is that now is the time to start planning for the essential workforce you need for your busy summer period. Some options can be accessed quickly, but others such as the SWP can take months to arrange. MORE INFORMATION Talk to the staff at the Call Centre for how to list a vacancy, or ask to be put through to one of the very experienced State Managers for more detailed information. Simply call 1800 062 332 or go to www.harvesttrail.gov.au.

The National Harvest Labour Information Service connects growers with workers and is provided as a no-cost service through a call centre and website. It is funded through the Australian Government and managed by MADEC, a not-forprofit organisation.

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YOUR BUSINESS

oving the farm M from one

family member to another BY CHRIS PUCKRIDGE RURAL FINANCIAL COUNSELLOR RFCS WA

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YOUR BUSINESS

H

ow to progress the family property and business from one generation to the next is a challenge facing many West Australian producers. This challenge is more difficult without earlier family discussion and planning.

A good progression involves ensuring the business retains sufficient skills and resources to continue.

The idea of ‘succession’ planning is often better replaced with ‘progression’ planning, which better describes the process farm businesses experience. The parents do not have to be removed as ‘succession’ might imply, but rather there is an adjustment of roles over time to allow progress. The new ideas and energy that younger members can bring to a business and an industry can be really beneficial and for many families the process of progression is very rewarding. However, for some families it can be difficult, stressful and confusing — particularly when there are competing demands on the business.

Many vegetable producers, like in other industries, are in the stages of moving towards retirement and as they do their thoughts naturally turn to the future of their operation and the next generation. One of the challenges in this process can be balancing the expectations of the parties involved. Often there are members of the family that won’t be involved in the family business, but need to be considered as part of a progression plan. It can be a complicated process, so it’s worth having a think about some of the issues that may be relevant to your family and business. Progression invites both opportunities and risk to a business. The purpose of planning is to capture as many of the opportunities while minimising the risks.

33THE new ideas and energy that younger members can bring to a business can be really beneficial and for many families the process of progression is very rewarding.

For farming businesses a good progression involves ensuring the business retains sufficient skills and resources to continue. However, it also has to take into account the diverse needs of family members. Considering other family members that don’t want to or can’t be involved with the farm business isn’t as straightforward as it may seem. For that reason it’s worthwhile knowing some of the legal implications of a progression plan — it may not be as easy as a simple division of assets. The phase that your farm business is in is also an important factor to consider — an expanding business will have different requirements and risk profiles to one that is established and well-resourced. A good progression plan will take these factors into account and adjust strategies accordingly. There may be a variety of strategies employed to prepare farm businesses and families for progression and like

most things in life one size doesn’t fit all. What works for one business and family isn’t the right fit for another, which is why it is worth seeking some professional guidance to help decide what the best strategy — or strategies — will be. If done well a solid plan gives the best chance at an outcome everyone is comfortable with, however no plan at all can leave a business in difficulty and families stressed. So, if you haven’t started thinking about your retirement and potential business progression, then maybe today is the day to begin — a good plan goes a long way to achieving a great outcome. MORE INFORMATION If planning for the future is presenting problems you can contact the Rural Financial Counselling Service of WA on 1800 987 762 to have a confidential discussion.

Regain Focus, Create Solutions Rural Financial Counselling Service

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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ADVERTORIAL

Seminis

Taking off now, Seminis’ rind pattern watermelon, Zepplin As an attractive and versatile variety, Zepplin ticks a lot of boxes. Zepplin performs in the Western Australian and Northern Territory heat, has an excellent flesh colour and firmness. “Zepplin is our newest dark round, seedless watermelon,” says Seminis’ WA and NT Regional Business Manager, David Rose. “Growers have been impressed by the fruit flesh colour and small seed pocket. The fruit has good firmness, which makes it very suitable for transporting long distances which is often the case in Western Australia. It’s shown consistent yields in trials with a high pack out, meaning less is being left in the field. It also looks great in the bin!”

With an average fruit weight of 8.5kg, Zepplin is an ideal size in the field and on the shelves. The mid-maturing variety has firm, dark red and sweet flesh that leaves consumers with a delightful and memorable eating experience. Zepplin has a reliable plant canopy and will maintain its vine health and fruit protection in the heat, reducing external fruit quality defects such as sunburn, leading to more marketable fruit. To enable maximum seedless watermelon yield, Seminis extended flowering pollinator, Wingman, is recommended to grow alongside the seedless watermelon variety.

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“Our experience has shown that Wingman is a prolific flowering pollinator over an extended window when compared to some traditional diploid pollinators. You need high quality pollen to be available for as long as possible to ensure that your seedless watermelons set good fruit numbers, and that the fruit is a uniform, round shape.”

MORE INFORMATION For more information on Zepplin or to place an order, please contact David Rose on 0408 875 917 or david.rose@bayer.com.


YOUR MARKET

your

market Your market WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR MARKET

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YOUR MARKET

Fresh Produce Safety Centre Conference 2019 T

BY JOEL DINSDALE QUALITY ASSURANCE COORDINATOR, VEGETABLESWA

he Fresh Produce Safety Centre Ltd (FPSC) is an industryled, not-for-profit company established to enhance fresh produce safety across Australia and New Zealand through research, outreach and education.

Each year the FPSC organises a conference at Sydney University that draws great minds in the food safety/ fresh produce sectors to discuss the latest content that is relevant to industry.

This year’s focus question was... What do you believe is the single most impactful environmental change that has or will have implications on fresh produce food safety?... ...with the focus theme Environmental Change: Implications for fresh produce food safety.

The keynote speakers were Nigel French (NZ Food Safety Science Research Centre) and Keith Warriner (University of Guelph). The key focus point was the impacts of climate change on food safety — noting that practices, growing regions and microbial activity are likely to change, so we as food producing businesses need to react accordingly to continue to produce high quality, safe fresh produce for local and export consumption into the future.

This year’s focus point was the impacts of climate change on food safety.

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YOUR MARKET

FRESH PRODUCE SAFETY CENTRE AUSTRALIA &

The conference had six sessions with a range of knowledgeable speakers briefing the attendees on their latest findings and innovation1: 1 The Environment 2 Future Technologies 3 Be Prepared 4 Risk and Integrity: Changing food safety culture through a whole-ofbusiness attitude 5 High Risk Horticulture 6 Outcomes of Innovation Forum Of particular note was a session run by Richard Bennett highlighting the changes to the Guidelines for Fresh Produce Food Safety (2019) which can be found in all Freshcare FSQ4.1 documents or on the FPSC website. If 1 For more information and session notes, see http://fpsc-anzconference.com)

NEW ZEALAND

Guidelines for Fresh Produce Food Safety 2019

you are an industry stakeholder and you are not across this document — I would encourage you to review this document as it contains all of the food safety facts pertinent to fresh produce and it follows the format of the Freshcare FSQ4.1 Code of Practice. SP Singh (NSW DPI) conducted a session updating industry on the latest findings and the release of the Melon Food Safety Guidelines and Toolbox (which are available online at NSW DPI website). This was important given the recent Listeria monocytogenes outbreak that affected the rockmelon industry. Jenny Eckman (AHR) provided an interesting update on one of her projects entitled A day in the life of a pathogen in leafy greens — new findings. This session was of particular interest to those growers in the leafy greens sector where on a worldwide level, many

Download a copy at https://fpsc-anz.com/

SPONSORED BY

microbial detections occur. Jenny and her team will be releasing the final findings in the near future as the project draws to a close, but the interim briefing suggests that the project has provided some great results that will no doubt shed some light on the use of manures, contaminated water and microbial loads in the leaf green sector. MORE INFORMATION For those growers that missed out on the 2019 Conference but would like to attend future FPSC events, I would suggest getting onto the FPSC mailing list at http://fpscanzconference.com The newsletter provides lots of practical and innovative information and technology in the Food Safety sector that is designed to assist the fresh produce sector. Do you have a quality assurance or food safety question? Email your questions to joel.dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au.

Get on the FPSC mailing list at http://fpscanzconference.com

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WA Grower SPRING 2019


Vegetable

Industry Summit

& Grower Tour 17–18 OCTOBER 2019

vegetablesWA Export Readiness Workshop Thursday 17 October 2019 9:30am–5:00pm Aloft Perth

27 Rowe Ave, Rivervale WA

FUNDED BY

The Export Readiness Workshop held at Aloft Perth will provide expert advice to vegetable growers considering exporting. Topics covered in this workshop will include a comprehensive introduction to export from the Export Council of Australia, freight and logistics and grower perspectives on getting into export and marketing produce overseas. A visit to a freight forwarder at Perth Airport is planned which will provide growers a practical insight into how produce is prepared for air freight. At the conclusion of the Export Workshop a Sundowner will be held at Aloft Perth giving growers an opportunity to network further with speakers and other industry members.

Program

FUNDING: BOTH TRAVEL AND ACCOMMODATION IS AVAILABLE FOR 10 VEGETABLE LEVY PAYING GROWERS — RSVP TODAY TO AVOID MISSING OUT

RSVP by 3 October 2019: Manus Stockdale P: (08) 9486 7515 E: manus.stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au

9:00am–9:30am

Registration with tea and coffee

9:30am–1:00pm

Export Council of Australia — Introduction to Export

1:00pm–1:30pm

Lunch

1:30pm–2:30pm

Vegetable grower export experience

2:30pm–5:00pm

Visit to Freight Forwarder (bus provided)

5:30pm–8:30pm

Sundowner @ W XYZ® Bar, Aloft Perth


YOUR MARKET

Export Update

Upcoming export workshop Have you ever wondered what is involved in export or whether there is an opportunity to sell your produce overseas? Well the upcoming export workshop will answer your questions! vegetablesWA in collaboration with AUSVEG are holding an export workshop in Perth on Thursday 17 October, the day before the vegetablesWA Industry Summit.

experienced exporters and freight forwarders about their experiences and how to succeed in the export trade. vegetablesWA has secured funding from the Agricultural Produce Commission — Vegetable Producer Committee to cover a limited number of vegetable and melon growers’ travel costs to attend the workshop including two nights accommodation in Perth.

Export Workshop in Perth on Thursday 17 October, 2019.

The workshop aims to give growers a practical overview of what is involved in export. The course material covers the export process, which countries will accept which produce lines, what paperwork is required, how to price your produce for export and how to manage risk. Along side the theory of export growers will hear from

vegetablesWA Export Readiness Workshop Thursday 17 October 2019 9:30am–5:00pm Aloft Perth

27 Rowe Ave, Rivervale WA

FUNDED BY

The workshop is part of AUSVEG’s Vegetable Industry Export Program (VG16061) which is funded by Hort Innovation via the Vegetable Industry Levy.

If you’re interested in attending, please contact Manus Stockdale at vegetablesWA to register your interest by 3 October 2019.

Last year's Export Readiness Workshop...

FUNDING: BOTH TRAVEL AND ACCOMMODATION IS AVAILABLE FOR 10 VEGETABLE LEVY PAYING GROWERS — RSVP TODAY TO AVOID MISSING OUT

t growers the export process and wha of w rvie ove d goo lly rea a “The workshop provided the workshop was hearing e. One of the best parts of duc pro ir the ort exp to do need to warder — after all what ing and from a freight for ort exp are t tha s wer gro bles and how from vegetable d to do to export your vegeta nee ly ual act you t wha is w growers what to kno market! do you get them to the export export our ent that our company could fid con re mo ling fee op ksh I came away from the wor iness. Attending the ortunity to strengthen our bus opp an be ld wou it t tha export and what product and need to do to prepare for we t wha of a ide ter bet a workshop gave me rt exporting next year!” All going well we hope to sta us. to le ilab ava is nce ista ass

Peter Dobra, Loose Leaf Lettuce Company

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YOUR MARKET

AUSVEG Reverse Trade Mission — Fresh Produce Display.

AUSVEG Reverse Trade Mission Fresh Produce Display

In June, four WA businesses took the opportunity to display their vegetables at the Taste Australia Fresh Produce Display which was part of the Hort Connections convention in Melbourne.

Australia, the production systems and export processes.

The Fresh Produce Display attracted more than 35 buyers from six export markets in Asia who were in Australia for the 2019 Reverse Trade Mission. The Reverse Trade Mission is part of the Vegetable Industry Export Program (VG16061) run by AUSVEG and gives buyers of Australian produce the opportunity to visit Australia and gain a better understanding what vegetables they can source from

WA growers that displayed their produce had the opportunity to speak to directly with buyers to better understand what the markets are looking for and start building commercial relationships with them. Lloyd Williams from Trandos Farms said “Participating in the Taste Australia Produce Display was a great experience. I was able to talk to existing customers as well as develop leads for new export sales to new markets”.

The buyers spent two days touring key vegetable growing regions visiting farms and processing facilities.

33TOP: Lloyd Williams and Jim Trandos (WA Corn Growers). ABOVE: Richard Hunt (Sumich).

MORE INFORMATION If you are interested in attending the Export Workshop or would like to know more about how you can get involved in export development activities please contact Manus Stockdale on (08) 9486 7515 or email manus.stockdale@vegetableswa.com.au

WA Grower SPRING 2019

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YOUR PRODUCTION

APHIDS IN VEGETABLE CROPS — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Rầy mềm (Rệp cây) trên rau cải Rầy mềm có 2 dạng hình thể: có cánh và không cánh. Chúng cũng có nhiều màu sắc khác nhau tùy theo ác loài và tùy theo loại hoa màu chúng chích hút.

Các loại rầy mềm

33RẦY mềm trên đọt cây cải dại

VÕ THẾ TRUYỀN CHUYÊN VIÊN KHUYẾN NÔNG VIỆT NAM, HIỆP HỘI RAU CẢI TÂY ÚC

Rầy mềm (Rệp cây) là loiaj côn trùng gây hại nghiêm trọng trên rau cải. Chuusng là loại côn trùng chích hút và là môi giới chính lan truyền các loại bệnh do siêu vi khuẩn. Hầu hết các loại siêu vi khuẩn thuộc nhóm potyviruses như siêu vi khuẩn khảm trên các loai rau cần, bầu bí dưa và dưa leo, và cà rốt 1 là do rầy mềm lây truyền.

Theo tài liệu của AusVeg thì có 5 nhóm rầy mềm: 1. Nhóm rầy mềm trên các loại cải (Nasonovia ribis-nigri): Đây là loại gây hại nghiêm trọng trên các loại cải chủ yếu là do chúng còn nhiểm trong phần búp cây không bán ra thị trường được. Khi bị nhiểm rầy mềm nặng cây cải vún không hình thành phần búp được hoặc chết. Các cá thể trưởng thành có thể mang cánh hoặc không cánh, màu vàng xanh có vệt sậm màu ngang phần bụng. 2. Rầy mềm khoai tây (Macrosiphum euphorbiae): Thường có màu xanh, đôi khi cũng có màu hồng hay vàng nhạt. Chúng tấn công khoai tây, cà chua, cà tím, các loại ớt, khoai lang… gây hại trực tiếp đến lá và than cây do chích hút trực tiếp và truyền nhiều loại bệnh siêu vi khuẩn. 3. Rầy mềm bầu bí dưa (Aphis gossypii): Còn gọi là rầy mềm bông vải và là loại gây hại quan trọng trên các loại hoa màu họ bầu bí dưa. Thành trùng không cánh có màu xanh nhạt đến xanh xậm. Loiaj thành trùng có cánh

Rầy mềm thường thấy xuất hiện trong mùa thu và mùa xuân khi thời tiết mát và ẩm ướt. Quần thể rầy mềm thường tiết ra mật làm nấm mồ hóng phát triển và làm hoa màu kém sinh trưởng. Thường thì rầy mềm trú ở mặt dưới lá và cũng xuất hiện tấn công đọt non. Trên cải vún thì loại có cánh thường xuất hiện ở các lá ngoài trong khi quần thể lớn hơn thường tập trung bên dưới các lá quấn nhau trong tim đọt.

1 https://ausveg.com.au/app/data/technicalinsights/docs/120029_VG07128_pdf_file_3719. pdf

33NHIỀU thế hệ rầy mềm cùng tồn tại ở mặt dước là dưa leo

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WA Grower SPRING 2019

có màu thay đổi từ xanh đến xậm đen. Khi tạo thành quần thể đông đúc chúng làm cây suy kiệt nghiêm trọng và chết. Chúng cũng lây truyền nhiều laoij bệnh siêu vi khuẩn. 4. Rầy mềm Green peach (Myzus persicae): Là loại gây hại chính trên cà chua và ớt capsicum. Chúng cũng tấn công các loại hoa màu khác như bầu bí dưa, các loại hoa màu họ cà, họ cải và các loại rau ăn lá. Thường chúng có kích thước cơ thể nhỏ màu xanh nhạt đến xậm. Quần thể rầy mềm đông đúc tấn công gây chùn đọt, hư bông. Chúng cũng truyền nhiêu loại bệnh siêu vi khuẩn. 5. Các nhóm rầy mềm khác: bao gồm rầy mềm rau diếp gai (rau tàu bay) (Hyperomyzus lactucae), (Uroleucon sonchi), Rầy mềm củ cải (Lipaphis erysimi), Rầy mềm bắp cải (Brevicoryne brassicae), và rầy mêm cây mao địa — Foxglove aphid (Aulacorthum solani).

Rầy mềm là côn trùng môi giới truyền bệnh siêu vi khuẩn Tác hại lớn nhất của rầy mềm là lây truyền bệnh siêu vi trùng khi chích hút. Một số loiaj rầy mềm chuyên biệt lây truyền vác loại bệnh siêu vi trùng như khảm bầu bí dưa tuýp I và II, cháy lá, khảm trên họ thập tự…


YOUR PRODUCTION

APHIDS IN VEGETABLE CROPS — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

BẢNG 1 Bảng tham khảo các loại thuốc phòng trừ rầy mềm. Giấy phép

Tên thương mại

Hóa chất

Nhóm

Hết hạn

Mùa vụ

Label

APHIDEX WG

Pirimicarb

1A

-

Các loại rau ăn trái như ớt, ớt chuông, cà chua, cà tím, (ngoại trừ bầu bí dưa)

Label

ROVER

Dimethoate

1B

-

Ớt chuông

Label

SUPRATHION 400 EC

Methidathion

1B

-

Cà tím

Label

DERRIS DUST

Rotenone

21B

-

Rau cải các loại

Label

MOVENTO 240 SC

Spirotetramat

23

-

Cà tím, các loại ớt, cà chua (Cả trong nhà kín và trồng ngoài đồng)

Label

BENEVIA

Cyantraniliprole

28

-

Các loại rau ăn trái như ớt, ớt chuông, cà chua (cà trồng trên cây trụ và cà bụi), cà tím, (ngoại trừ bầu bí dưa)

Label

PYRETHRUM SPRAY

Pyrethrins

3A

-

Rau cải các loại

Label

CONFIDOR 200 SC

Imidacloprid

4A

-

Ớt chuông, cà tím, khoai tây

Label

DURIVO

Thiamethoxam+ chlorantraniliprole

4A/28

-

Các loại rau ăn trái như ớt, ớt chuông, cà chua, cà tím, (ngoại trừ bầu bí dưa)

Label

TRANSFORM^

Sulfoxaflor

4C

-

Các loại rau ăn trái như ớt, ớt chuông, cà chua, cà tím, đậu bắp (ngoại trừ bầu bí dưa, bắp non và nấm) KHÔNG được áp dụng trong môi trường có mái che như nhà kính, nhà mùng, nhà ni-lon,

Label

VERSYS^

Afidopyropen

9D

-

Các loại rau ăn trái như ớt, ớt chuông, cà chua, cà tím, (ngoại trừ bầu bí dưa) Không được áp dụng trong môi trường trồng có mái che

Label

NATRASOAP

Fatty acids - K salt

-

-

Rau cải các loại

Label

ECO-OIL

Botanical oil

-

-

Ớt chuông

Label

BROADBAND OD

B. bassiana

-

-

Rau và hoa trồng trong nhà có mái che

Label

BIOCOVER

Petroleum oil

-

-

Các loại ớt

Label

CHESS

Pymetrozine

9B

-

Cà chua,cà tím, và ớt chuông (kể cả trồng ngoài đồng và trong nhà có mái che)

PER8930

THIMET

Phorate

1B

31-07-19

CÀ TÍM, CÁC LOẠI ỚT (gia hạn giấy phép ST16006)

PER12489

CONFIDOR 200 SC

Imidacloprid

4A

31-05-20

Ớt cay và ớt Paprika trồng ngoài đồng và trong nhà có mài che

PER12221

PETROLIUM OIL

Petroleum oil

-

30-11-22

Cà tím, (rầy mềm), đậu bắp, các loại ớt (trường hợp trồng trong nhà có mái che chỉ được áp dụng khi có hệ thống thông gió tốt)

Có 2 loại cơ chế lây truyền bệnh siêu vi trùng: • Truyền bệnh không kéo dài: Chỉ cần không tới 1 phút là rầy mềm có thể trích hút siêu vi trùng từ cây bệnh và truyền sang cây khỏe. Tuy nhiên siêu vi khuẩn chỉ tồn tại trên phần phụ bộ miệng của rầy mềm vài giờ thôi.

Phòng trừ rầy mềm

• Truyền bệnh kéo dài: Rầy mềm phải chích hút nhiều giờ mới trích được siêu vi trùng và để chúng tuần hoàn trong cơ thể và lưu trú trong tuyến nước bọt trước khi có thể truyền bệnh. Một khi đã hoàn thành giai đoạn này chúng có thể truyền bệnh suôt đời mà không cần phải chích hút cây bệnh để trích sieu vi khuẩn nữa.

Treo bẩy dính màu vàng là biện pháp hửu hiệu để theo dõi sự xuất hiện của rầy mềm. Quan sát sự xuất hiện mật và mồ hóng của giuap phát hiện rầy mềm đang hoạt động.

Phòng trừ tổng hợp là biện pháp căn bản để khống chế rầy mềm. Trong tự nhhieen có nhiều loại ăn rầy mềm như bọ rùa, bọ cách gân, các loại ong ký sinh…Loài ong ký sinh Aphidius colemani khống chế rầy mềm rất hiệu quả và đã được thương mại hóa.

Nên đảm bảo diệt cỏ dại trong và xung quanh vướn. Phun thuốc khi rầm mềm xuất hiện với mật độ cao, tuy nhiên dể gây hiệt tượng lờn thuốc.

• Phòng ngừa: Sử dụng giống sạch bệnh, tránh di chuyển cây giống nghi nhiểm bệnh giửa các vùng trồng. • Giảm thiểu siêu vi khuẩn: Khống chế cỏ dại và hoa màu ký chủ mọc hoang xung quanh vùng trồng. Vệ sinh khu trồng ngay sau khi thu hoạch. • Bảo vệ: Sử dụng giống kháng bệnh. Trồng cây chắn gió. • Phun thuốc: Sử dụng các loiaj thuốc được đăng ký có thể diệt rầy mềm hiệu quả và hạn chế lây truyền bệnh. Tuy nhiêu biện pháp này không mang lại hiệu quả lâu dài đối với loại có cơ chế truyền bệnh không kéo dài do chúng chi cần thời gian rất ngắn để lây bệnh.

Một khi hoa màu nhiểm bệnh siêu vi khuẩn thì không chửa trị được. WA Grower SPRING 2019

113


YOUR PRODUCTION

CALCULATE WATER NEEDS FOR CROPS — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

Tính toán nhu cầu nước cho hoa màu DAVID ROWE BỘ NÔNG NGHIỆP VÀ PHÁT TRIỂN NÔNG THÔN TÂY ÚC

Mục đích của công tác quản lý nước tưới là để cung cấp lượng nước tối hảo đảm bảo cho hoa màu sinh trưởng tốt nhất và thu lợi nhiều nhất. Khi tính toán lượng nước tưới theo nhu cầu của hoa màu điều quan trọng là phải biết nhu cầu nước thay đổi như thế nào theo các yếu tố sinh trưởng và yếu tố môi trường.

Các yếu tố ảnh hưởng lượng nước hoa màu sử dụng Các yếu tố môi trường Các yếu tố môi trường liên quan đến khí hậu, thời tiết vào bao gồm các thông số nhu nhiệt đọ, tốc độ gió, lượng bức xạ mặt trời và ẩm độ. Ảnh hưởng của các yếu tố này lên lượng nước hoa màu sử dụng có thể được ước tính bằng cách áp dụng chảo bốc hơi và hệ số bốc thoát hơi nước qua lá tính bằng mi-li-met (mm) trên ngày. Quí vị có thể truy cập số liệu từ các trạm khí tượng này trên trang thông tin của Bộ Nông nghiệp và Phát triển nông thôn, Nha khí trượng hay trên các tiện ích Dịch vụ tin nhắn thời tiết chẳng hạn như một tiện ích đang có của Hiệp hội Rau cải Tây Úc.

HÌNH 1 Ruộng dền tây trong gian đoạn đầu sử dụng ít nước hơn so với lượng nước bốc hơi qua chảo bốc thoát.

Các yếu tố cây trồng liên quan đến nhu cầu nước Các yếu tố này liên quan đến loại hoa màu và giai đoạn sinh trưởng. Thường cây sử dụng nhiểu nước hơn 1. khi tăng trưởng diện tích lá lớn hơn. 2. Phát triển bộ rể nhiều hơn. 3. Vào thời kỳ bắt đầu cho trái. Tỉ lệ tương ứng của việc sử dụng nước của hoa màu so với lượng nước mất đi qua chảo bốc hơi được gọi là hê số hoa màu (CF). Hệ số này rất hửu dụng khi dung để tính toán chế độ tưới dựa trên số liệu từ chảo bốc hơi. Cách đơn giản

114

WA Grower SPRING 2019

HÌNH 2 Lượng nước sử dụng hàng ngày của ruộng vần tây gần thu hoạch cao hơn lượng nước mất đi đo trên chảo bốc hơi vì chúng có tổng diện tích lá rất lớn và bộ rể phát triển đầy đủ.


YOUR PRODUCTION

CALCULATE WATER NEEDS FOR CROPS — VIETNAMESE TRANSLATION

nhất để sử dụng yếu tố hệ số hoa màu là khi lượng nước hoa màu sử dụng được tính bằng mi-li-met như cách tính lượng mưa. Ví dụ: cây xà lách vún 1 tuần tuổi trồng trên đất cát có hệ số hoa màu là 0.8 có nghĩa là lượng nước cây sử dụng bằng 8mm trong khi lượng nước bốc thoát qua chảo bốc hơi trong cùng điều kiện thời tiết là 10mm. Tuy nhiên khi cây này được 6 tuần tuổi thì hệ số hoa màu là 1.3, tức là cây mất đi 13mm nước trong khi lượng nước bốc hơi đo trên chảo bốc thoát là 10mm – như vậy cần phải điều chỉnh chế độ tưới. Thiết lập chế độ tưới hợp lý để thành công Khi tính toán chế độ tưới mỗi ngày điều quan trọng là nên xem xét các yếu tố môi trường và yếu tố hoa màu (đặc biệt là cây đang ở giai đoạn sinh trưởng nào) cũng như điều kiện thời tiết. Sự biến động nhiệt độ, tốc độ và hướng gió, mức độ mây che phủ và lượng mưa có ảnh

hưởng đặc biệt dến lượng nước sử dụng của hoa màu. Công cụ tính toán chế độ tưới của Bộ Nông Nghiệp và Phát Triển Nông Thôn Tây Úc gọi là Irrigation Calculator là một tiện ích trực tuyến trên internet có thể được dung để ước lượng nhu cầu nuuwosc của hoa màu trên trang trại ở Tây Úc cho một loại cây trồng hay nhu cầu cho từng năm (không phải nhu cầu từng ngày một). Khi nạp các dữ liệu thiết yếu chẳng hạn như loại cây trồng của quí vị thì công cụ này sẽ cho biết hệ số hoa màu, các giai đoạn sinh trưởng, và lượng bốc hơi hàng ngày để cung cấp một thông số tương đối lượng nước cần thiết cho suốt mùa vụ của hoa màu ngắn ngày hay lượng nước cần hàng năm cho loại cây trồng lưu niên. Công cụ này chỉ nên được xem nhu là một tiện ích bổ xung chỉ cung cấp hướng dẩn phổ quát vì cách tính toán của công cụ này dựa vào các giá trị

trung bình của 25 năm số liệu thời tiết mà không dựa trên thông số thực tại thời điểm quí vị muốn tham khảo hay phản ánh điều kiện thực tại quá nóng, khô, lạnh, hay ẩm ướt hơn các giá trị trung bình. Khi tính toán tổng lượng nước cần thiết quí vị nên nhớ rằng tổng lượng nước cần tưới luôn lớn hơn tổng lượng nước hoa màu sử dụng vì còn phải sử dụng nước để làm đất, giải nhiệt cho hoa màu, tránh cát bay và pha phân thuốc. THÊM THÔNG TIN Quí vị có thể truy cập Công cụ tính toán chế độ tưới của Bộ Nông Nghiệp và Phát Triển Nông Thôn Tây Úc gọi là Irrigation Calculator trên trang thông tin agric. wa.gov.au/irrigation-calculator. Để biết thêm chi tiết về việc tính toán chế độ tưới dựa trên số liệu thời tiết, xin vui lòng tìm kiếm mục ‘irrigation scheduling’ trên trang thông tin internet agric.wa.gov.au.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development

Hảy ghi nhớ ngày sự kiện

Rau cải

Hội nghị

và tham quan chuyên ngành 17-18 THÁNG 10 NĂM 2019

Hội nghị chuyên ngành Thứ Sáu, 18 tháng 10 năm 2019 Từ 2 giờ đến 5 giờ 30 chiều Tại hội trường Crown Towers Ballroom, Crown Perth

WA Grower SPRING 2019

115


YOUR PRODUCTION Permits

Permits

Current Minor Use Permits can also be searched by specific crop or pest types at https://portal.apvma.gov.au/permits Permit No.

116

Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER10677

Propyzamide

Chicory & endive

Grass & broadleef weeds

30-Apr-23

PER10845

Barmac Zineb Fungicide

Brassica leafy vegetables

Cercospora leaf spot & downy mildew

31-May-20

PER10875

Pirimor WG Aphicide (pirimicarb)

Celeriac

Aphids

30-Sep-20

PER10976

Bentazone

Snow peas & sugar snap peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER10988

Bladex 900 WG (cyanazine)

Snow peas & sugar snap peas

Broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER11440

Sumiclex 500 (procymidone)

Peppers

Sclerotinia rot

31-Jan-20

PER11441

Propachlor

Radish, swede, turnip

Grass & broadleaf weeds

31-Dec-19

PER11747

2,2-Dichloropropionic Acid

Carrot crops (for seed)

Promotion of bolting & grass weed control

30-Nov-19

PER11768

Chlorpyrifos

Pumpkin

African black beetle

31-Mar-21

PER11935

Triadimenol

Parsnips, radish, swede & turnip

Powdery mildew

30-Jun-22

PER11949

Lambda-Cyhalothrin

Beetroot & radish

Various insects

31-Mar-20

PER11951

Phosphorous acid

Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, silverbeet, endive, radicchio, chicory & processing peas

Downy mildew

31-Mar-20

PER11991

Legend Fungicide (quinoxyfen)

Silverbeet

Powdery mildew

31-Mar-21

PER12008

Propachlor

Spinach, silverbeet, spring onions, shallots, rocket & brassica leafy veg

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

30-Nov-25

PER12047

Thiabendazole

Sweet potato

Field rots caused by scurf & root rot

30-Sep-21

PER12048

Prometryn

Parsnip & carrot

Weeds

30-Sep-20

PER12351

Confidor Guard Soil

Leafy lettuce, okra

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Jun-20

PER12357

Linuron

Parsnips

Grass & broadleaf weeds

30-Sep-20

PER12378

Acephate

Tomatoes & sweet peppers

Western flower thrips

31-Oct-20

PER12384

S-metolachlor (Dual Gold Herbicide)

Rhubarb

Various weeds

31-Aug-20

PER12447

Teldor 500 SC Fungicide

Peppers (capsicum & chilli), cucumber & lettuce

Botrytis rot

31-May-21

PER12489

Imidacloprid

Celery, cucumber, peppers & Cape gooseberry

Aphids

31-May-20

PER12565

Scala Fungicide

Capsicum & Lettuce (protected crops only)

Botrytis rots

30-Sep-22

PER12823

Trifluralin

Chillies, paprika & eggplant

Various broad leaf & grass weeds

30-Jun-21

PER12846

Abamectin

Lettuce (hydroponic), snow peas & sugar snap peas

Two-spotted mite

30-Sep-20

PER13088

Success Neo Insecticide (spinetoram)

Specified root vegetables, specified alliums & celeriac

Various insect pests

31-Mar-22

PER13114

Prometryn

Celeriac

Grass weeds listed on label

31-Mar-22

PER13116

Propiconazole

Sweet corn

Northern corn leaf blight

31-Mar-21

PER13152

MCPA 250 Selective Herbicide

Rhubarb

Broadleaf weeds

31-Dec-21

PER13154

Dual Gold Herbicide

Brassica leafy vegetables

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

31-Mar-22

PER13170

Dimethoate

Melons including watermelons (postharvest)

Various fruit fly species

30-Sep-20

PER13300

Abamectin

Rhubarb

Broad mite

31-Dec-21

PER13301

Alpha-cypermethrin

Lettuce

Red-legged earth mite & vegetable weevil

31-May-20

PER13305

Glyphosate (shielded sprayer)

Carrots

Certain broadleaf & grass weeds

30-Jun-20

PER13322

Success Neo (spinetoram)

Specified leafy vegetables

Potato moth

31-May-22

PER13323

Score Foliar Fungicide (difenoconazole)

Celeriac

Cercospora leaf spot & septoria leaf blight

31-Oct-20

PER13367

Linuron

Leeks & celeriac

Grass & broadleaf weeds

30-Apr-21

WA Grower SPRING 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER13441

Ambush Emulsifiable Concentrate Insecticide

Rhubarb

Green peach aphid, green looper, light brown apple moth & budworms

31-Mar-27

PER13444

Propiconazole

Radishes

Cercospora

31-May-22

PER13496

Linuron

Celery

Range of weeds

30-Apr-22

PER13626

Metolachlor

Spinach, silverbeet, spring onions, shallots, green beans & navy beans

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

30-Jun-22

PER13653

Maldison

Leeks, spring onions & shallots

Onion thrips

28-Feb-23

PER13673

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Celery, silverbeet & spinach

Late blight, septoria leaf blight & downy mildew

30-Sep-21

PER13695

Ecocarb Fungicide

Various vegetables

Powdery mildew

30-Sep-20

PER13696

Trifluralin

Parsnips

Wintergrass

31-Mar-23

PER13698

Phosphorous

Lettuce (leaf+hydro), parsley, coriander fennel & bulb (allium) vegetables

Downy mildew

30-Sep-22

PER13716

Abrade Abrasive Barrier Insecticide

Tomatoes (protected)

Various insect pests

31-Jan-20

PER13717

Amistar Top (azoxystrobin + difenoconazole)

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13720

Pristine

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13721

Switch

Tomatoes (protected)

Grey mould (botrytis)

31-May-21

PER13724

Previcur

Tomatoes (protected)

Root rot

31-May-21

PER13726

Trifloxystrobin

Tomatoes (protected)

Powdery mildew

31-May-21

PER13902

Phorate

Sweet potatoes

Aphids, thrips, jassids & organophosphate susceptible twospotted mite & wireworm

31-Mar-23

PER14008

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Garlic

Downy mildew & purple blotch

31-Mar-23 31-Mar-23

PER14035

Diflufenican

Peas

Broadleaf weeds

PER14036

Bupirimate

Eggplant

Powdery mildew

28-Feb-23

PER14045

Mancozeb + Metalaxyl

Brassica leafy vegetables, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, chicory, endive, radicchio, rocket, carrots & parsnip

Various fungal diseases

31-Mar-22

PER14046

Mancozeb

Cucumbers

Grey mould

31-Mar-23

PER14048

Pendimethalin

Spring onions, shallots & radish

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

31-Mar-23

PER14049

Permethrin (Ambush )

Celery

Helicoverpa & looper

31-Mar-23

PER14050

Flint 500 WG Fungicide

Cucumbers & capsicums (protected)

Powdery mildew

30-Jun-23

PER14051

Iprodione

Broccoli seed treatment

Rhizoctinia

31-Mar-23

PER14077

Eco-Oil (Botanical Oil)

Greenhouse & hydroponic capsicum, cucumber & lettuce

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Sep-23

PER14212

Imidacloprid

Rhubarb

Aphids

31-Dec-22

PER14318

Metalaxyl-M

Lettuce

Damping off

30-Sep-22

PER14326

Captan

Leafy Lettuce, cucumber, capsicum & chilli

Grey mould

30-Nov-21

PER14337

Trifluralin

Swedes & turnips

Weeds

30-Jun-20

PER14351

DC-Tron Plus

Lettuce

Various bugs

31-Mar-21

PER14353

Rovral Aquaflo Fungicide (iprodione)

Peppers & celeriac

Sclerotinia rot

31-Mar-22

PER14430

Azoxystrobin (Amistar 250 SC)

Lettuce

Bottom rot

30-Jun-22

PER14431

Rizolex Liquid

Lettuce

Bottom rot

30-Jun-22

PER14470

Mancozeb & Dimethomorph

Snow peas

Downy mildew

30-Apr-22

PER14479

Propiconazole

Various vegetable crops

Various pests

30-Nov-19

PER14494

Trifloxystrobin

Celery, silverbeet, spinach, chicory & endive

DM, cercospora & septoria

31-Aug-22

PER14536

Abamectin

Sweet corn, chillies, paprika, spring onions & shallots

Two-spotted mite

31-Dec-23

WA Grower SPRING 2019

117


YOUR PRODUCTION

permits (cont.) Permit No.

118

Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER14628

Ioxynil

Garlic

Broad leaf & grass weeds

31-Jul-20

PER14701

Pyriproxyfen

Beans

Silverleaf whitefly

30-Jun-20

PER14722

Abamectin

Capsicum, cucumber, eggplant, zucchini, tomato, sweet corn, chilli, paprika, potato, snow pea & sugar snap pea crops

Tomato red spider mite

30-Sep-20

PER14742

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Leeks, spring onions & shallots

Various broadleaf & grass weeds

30-Jun-21

PER14773

Basagran (bentazonesodium)

Onions

Broadleaf weeds

31-Jan-23

PER14839

Zineb

Eggplant, spinach & silverbeet

Anthracnose (Colletotrichum spp.)

30-Sep-19

PER14840

Bupirimate

Cucurbits & peppers

Powdery mildew

30-Sep-19

PER14841

Walabi Fungicide

Chicory, endive, radicchio, silverbeet & spinach

Botrytis & alternaria

30-Sep-19

PER14842

Copper Oxychloride, Cuprous Oxide or Cupric Hydroxide

Spring onions & shallots

Downy mildew

30-Sep-19

PER14843

Indoxacarb (Avatar Insecticide)

Celery

Heliothis, lightbrown apple moth, lucerne leaf roller & vegetable weevil

30-Sep-19

PER14858

Pendimethalin

Parsnip

Grasses & broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-20

PER14886

Pendimethalin

Garlic

Grass & broadleaf weeds

30-Sep-19

PER14890

Methomyl (Lannate-L)

Spring onions & shallots

Western flower thrips

31-Oct-19

PER14891

Trifloxystrobin

Beetroot

Alternaria leaf spot

30-Sep-19

PER14892

Pymetrozine (Chess Insecticide)

Snow peas & sugar snap peas

Aphid pests

31-May-22

PER14906

Triadimenol

Leek, chives, shallot, spring & Chinese onions

White rot (sclerotium)

31-Oct-19

PER14907

Emamectin

Brassica leafy vegetables

Various pests

30-Nov-19

PER14958

Dimethomorph & Mancozeb (Acrobat Fungicide)

Brassica leafy vegetables, leafy lettuce & other leafy vegetables

Downy mildew & other diseases

31-Dec-22

PER7909

Scala 400 SC Fungicide

Cucumber

Botrytis Rot

30-Sep-22

PER80060

Frontier-P Herbicide

Bulb onions

Nutgrass / purple nutsedge

31-Jul-21

PER80099

Alpha-Cypermethrin

Fruiting vegetables, except cucurbits

Mediterranean fruit fly & Queensland fruit fly

31-Mar-20

PER80138

Alpha-cypermethrin

Cucurbits

Cucumber fruit fly

31-Mar-20

PER80210

Pyrimethanil

Protected tomatoes

Botrytis

30-Jun-20

PER80282

Alpha-cypermethrin

Onions

Onion thrips

30-Nov-20

PER80538

Mancozeb

Parsley, chicory & brassica leafy vegetables (Brassica spp.)

Anthracnose & septoria

31-Mar-25

PER80558

Bifenazate

Snow peas & sugarsnap peas

Various mites

31-Aug-20

PER80717

Trichlorfon

Eggplant, Thai eggplant, pepino & Cape gooseberry

Fruit fly

31-Oct-20

PER80891

Pyranica Miticide

Cucumbers

Two-spotted mite & European red mite

30-Sep-20

PER80910

Iprodione

Brussels sprouts & eggplant

Grey mould

31-Jul-20

PER80954

Methoxyfenozide

Snow peas & sugar peas

Native budworm, tomato grub & cluster caterpillar

30-Sep-20

PER81196

Bifenthrin

Cucumber, brassica vegetables, lettuce, beans, peppers, eggplant & peas

Specified whitefly & mite species

31-Mar-21

PER81241

Phenmedipham (Betanal)

Lettuce, chicory, endive, radicchio & spinach

Broadleaf weeds

31-May-20

PER81260

Imidacloprid

Beetroot

Aphids & thrips

30-Sep-20

PER81271

Various Actives

Leeks

Specified grass & broadleaf weeds

31-Oct-21

PER81408

Phosphorous acid

Capsicum

Phytophthora soil fungus

30-Sep-20

PER81702

Dominex Duo EC Insecticide

Cucumbers

Loopers

31-Mar-21

PER81713

Mainman 500WG Insecticide

Tomatoes

Silverleaf whitefly

31-Mar-21

WA Grower SPRING 2019


YOUR PRODUCTION

Permit No.

Product

Crop

Reason for use

Expiry date

PER81914

Emamectin

Celery & eggplant

Heliothis, light brown apple moth & cluster caterpillar

31-Oct-19

PER82055

Methabenzthiazuron (Tribunil Herbicide)

Garlic

Annual grasses & broadleaf weeds

31-Mar-21

PER82063

Tebuconazole

Garlic

Orange rust

31-Mar-21

PER82136

Difenconazole

Brassica vegetables

Ring spot

30-Sep-20

PER82341

Acramite Miticide (bifenazate)

Cucumber, peppers (sweet & chilli), zucchini, eggplant, sin qua, bitter melon, tomato & snake bean

Two-spotted mite

31-Mar-21

PER82359

Pirimor (pirimicarb)

Peppers - chilli

Aphids

31-Mar-21

PER82374

Talstar

Various crops

Brown marmorated stink bug & yellow-spotted stink bugs

28-Feb-23

PER82456

Ridomil Gold MZ WG

Field grown capsicum, chillies, paprika

Downy mildew

30-Sep-20

PER82459

Clethodiim

Brassica vegetables

Various grass weeds

30-Sep-21

PER82460

Paraamite selective miticide

Cucurbits, Asian cucurbits

Two-spotted mite & red spider mite

31-Jul-22

PER82461

Folicur 430 SC Fungicide

Beetroot, chicory, endive, radish, silverbeet

Scletotinia rot

31-Aug-20

PER82551

Diazinon

Leeks & cauliflower

Onion fly & onion seedling maggot

31-Mar-21

PER82556

Fluazifop

Various vegetables

Grass weeds

31-Jan-23

PER82745

Difenconazole

Silverbeet, spinach, chicory, endive

Fungal diseases

31-Aug-20

PER82811

S-Metolachlor

Beetroot

Blackberry nightshade

1-Feb-20

PER82904

Fenhexamid

Snow peas & sugar snap peas

Grey mould & chocolate spot

30-Jun-22

PER82992

Avatar (indoxacarb)

Asparagus

Garden weevil

31-May-22 13-Mar-22

PER83203

Fipronil (REGENT 200 SC)

Celery & field lettuce

Western flower thrips, onion thrips

PER83277

Iprodione

Garlic

Botrytis

31-Jul-21

PER83765

Maxim XL

Spinach & silverbeet

Damping off

30-Sep-20

PER84245

Movento 240 SC

Potato, sweet potato, tomato, capsicum, chilli, peppers, eggplant

Tomato potato psyllid

28-Feb-20

PER84249

Various

Potato

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Jul-20

PER84531

Methoxyfenozide

Sweet corn

Lepidopteran pests

31-Oct-20

PER84734

Verdict (haloxyfop)

Onions

Storksbill

31-Dec-21

PER84743

Sulfloxaflor

Fruiting vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Oct-22

PER84757

Spinetoram

Fruiting vegetables other than cucurbits & root & tuber vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

30-Nov-20

PER84805

Cyantraniliprole

Fruiting vegetables, root & tuber vegetables

Tomato potato psyllid

31-Dec-22

PER84808

Ethofumesate (Tramat)

Onions

Broadleaf & grass weeds

28-Feb-23

PER84878

Switch Fungicide

Protected & field grown capsicum

Botrytis & sclerotinia

30-Nov-22

PER84955

Iprodione

Green beans, carrots, spinach & silverbeet

Sclerotinia, black rot & grey mould

28-Feb-23

PER85003

Ranman 400 SC Fungicide

Spinach & silverbeet

Pythium damping off

28-Feb-23

PER85011

Transform Insecticide

Nursery stock (non-food)

Aphid, mealybugs, mirids, scale, greenhouse whitefly

28-Feb-23

PER85307

Pirimicarb

Faba bean, broad bean & vetches

Bean aphid

31-Oct-19

WA Grower SPRING 2019

119


What's on

what’s on... Upcoming important events!

2019 Industry Summit and Grower Tour Save the Date WHEN 17–18 October WHERE Gingin & Crown Towers vegetablesWA will host its 5th Annual Grower Tour and Industry Summit in October 2019. In our 5th year we will continue to hold the Industry Summit and networking event at Crown however will move to the Crown Towers Ballroom. We will also host the HortConnectWA Brunch in the same location. The grower tour and export events will be held on Thursday 17th October. We ask all growers and stakeholders to save the date to allow you to attend our premier event. For more details contact Rebecca Blackman (Operations Manager, vegetablesWA) e: rebecca.blackman@vegetableswa.com.au

2020 Freshcare training

Hort Connections 2020

WHEN Every month WHERE West Perth Office Run every month in the West Perth office, this training commences at 9am and goes through the entire Freshcare certification.

WHEN 15-17 June 2020 WHERE Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre AUSVEG and PMA Australia-New Zealand Limited (PMA A-NZ) have again united to deliver the joint industry conference and Trade Show, Hort Connections 2020. Hort Connections 2020 will be held at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre 15-17 June 2020.

For more details contact Joel Dinsdale (joel. dinsdale@vegetableswa.com.au) or see the Events page on the website www.vegetableswa.com.au/events

Labour Scheme Workshops WHEN September to November WHERE Most regions Workshops will be held for all horticulture growers from September to November in most regions. More information will be available in the e-news.

Following on from the successful Hort Connections 2019 in Melbourne, next year’s event is set to become the most influential space for networking, education and business for the entire fresh produce industry. For more details: t: (03) 9882 0277 e: info@hortconnections.com.au

For more details contact Melissa Denning at melissa.denning@vegetableswa.com.au

WA Grower advertiser contacts Name

Website/Email

Address

Contact name

Contact no.

Bon Electrics (IBC)

www.bon-electrics.com.au

Lot 4, Bullsbrook Road, Bullsbrook WA 6084

Kaela Bonomi

(08) 9571 1314

www.edp.com.au

31-37 OBrien Street, Mooroopna VIC 3269

Mick Schirmer

0437 252 122

Corteva (OBC) edp australia pty ltd (p93) Landmark (p47)

120

Madec (p101)

www.harvesttrail.gov.au

Organic 2000 (Benara Nurseries) (p4)

www.organic2000.com.au

59 Safari Place, Carabooda, WA 6033

Paliz Agriculture (p22)

www.paliz.com.au

21 / 110 Inspiration Drive Wangara WA 6065

Rivulis (p54)

www.Rivulis.com.au

Seminis (p104)

seminis.com

Signet (IFC)

signet.net.au

TriCal (p10)

www.trical.com.au

WA Crates (p5)

service@wacrates.com.au

WA Grower SPRING 2019

1800 062 332 (08) 9407 5182 Hossein Darvish

(08) 9303 9638 1800 558 009

Fiona

0411 427 220 (08) 8347 3838

Crate Yard, Market City

(08) 9456 4092


Powering WA growers for more than 30 years_ The WA horticultural landscape is unique. At BON Electrics we’ve been working with all sorts of growers in every corner of the state for more than three decades. WA growers rely on us to provide holistic solutions, covering all their electrical, water and refrigeration needs. We can help bring your vision to life through the design and install of new infrastructure, and we can partner with you for ongoing maintenance to keep things running as they should. As a family owned and run business, we take the time to understand your needs, we develop a solution that helps you get to where you want to go and we deliver it with the level of service you expect.

Pictured in the photo, left to right: Brandon Southern (Project Manager), Frank Bonomi (Company Director), Ben Bonomi (Technical Director).

Electrical Back Up Power Solutions | Packing Lines | Control Growing Technology | General Electrical Maintenance Programmable Logic Control Systems | Energy Efficient Lighting Solutions | Energy Harvesting Solutions Refrigeration Systems and Solutions

Water Comprehensive Irrigation System Solutions | Pump Systems and Associated Controls | Filtration Systems and Solutions | Dosing Systems and Solutions | Maintenance of your entire water supply system

“Over the past 20 years BON Electrics have been our electrical contractor of choice. We have worked with them on numerous projects and they continually support our business with ongoing maintenance. We recommend BON Electrics without hesitation, they’re efficient, knowledgeable and consistently deliver the high quality of work required by WA Corn Growers.” - Jim Trandos, Trandos Farms

If you want a partner that understands the ins and outs of the WA horticultural industry, book your free consultation with BON Electrics today.


“All I’ve known is growing veggies and onions. Our customers know they can depend on our quality. We’ve been using Zorvec® Enicade® and we’ve had no disease pressure at all. It’s part of a crop protection strategy that ensures we can deliver, year after year.” Darren Rathjen 5th Generation Farmer and Onion Grower

Watch the video at ZorvecOnions.corteva.com.au

GROWING REPUTATIONS. Zorvec® Enicade® provides unmatched consistency and control of Downy Mildew to achieve a better crop, even under challenging environmental conditions. Watch Darren’s story, find useful resources and hear from Australian onion growers about how Zorvec Enicade’s unique mode of action is providing proven results that help grow their reputations for consistent, quality produce. Visit ZorvecOnions.corteva.com.au

20

35 grams

Rainfast in 20mins

Systemic Protection

Unique Mode Of Action

Long-lasting Optimal Control Active Ingredient Per Hectare

Contact your Corteva Agriscience™ representative or call 1800 700 096. ®

, ™ Trademarks of DuPont, Dow AgroSciences and Pioneer and affiliated companies or their respective owners. FR8283j

Profile for vegetablesWA

WA Grower Magazine Spring 2019  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

WA Grower Magazine Spring 2019  

Horticulture industry information relevant for vegetable, potato, pome, citrus and stone fruit growers.

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