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widely used fabric in the clothing industry. It is grown on just 2.4% of the world’s cropland but accounts for 24% of global sales of insecticides.

What is the Solution? The Zero Waste Movement: 

This new movement is gaining popularity worldwide, and it is now possible to find many zero-waste groups popping up on Facebook, for example.

Zero waste supermarkets are another new idea, although it remains to be seen whether they will take off and become widespread.

Bea Johnson, described by the New York Times as ‘the priestess of wastefree living’, has written a book called Zero Waste Home. The book has been translated into 12 languages. You can watch her TEDx talk here. Johnson refers to buying in bulk as one of the key areas where waste can be reduced.

Trash is for Tossers is a popular blog and aims to help people reduce or eliminate waste.This Japanese town aims to produce zero trash by 2020.

This article in a previous edition of Vegan Sustainability has some tips for reducing your waste.

How do we clean up the Oceans: There are currently some very promising projects which aim to tackle ocean waste: 

21-year old Boyan Slat has created an ocean cleanup array which can remove plastic from the ocean. He claims that a single array could remove half of the plastic in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in just 10 years. You can find out more about the Ocean Cleanup Project here.

The team from SAS Ocean Phoenix, a maritime engineering company based in the South of France, wants to tackle the trash problem with a massive cleanup ship which would ply the polluted Pacific. The boat would suck ocean water into chambers between its parallel hulls, where a series of filters would catch first the big chunks of plastic, then successively smaller pieces. SAS Ocean Phoenix says the staggered filters would allow fish to swim between them and return to the ocean.

The Environmental Cleanup Coalition is an organisation dedicated to cleaning up the oceans. Their website provides a lot of information on the current problem, as well as a variety of solutions to it.

Ultimately, we need to stop debris from entering the sea in the first place. This can be done by making sure there is a suitable waste infrastructure in every country. Beaches and public amenities need to be kept clean at all times, and visitors should be made aware of the need to bring their trash home with them. Education and behaviour modification is key and people need to be made aware of where their rubbish could end up after they throw it away.

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Vegan Sustainability Magazine - Spring 2017  

A free, online, quarterly magazine for vegans as well as non-vegans worldwide who are interested in the Environment and Sustainability.

Vegan Sustainability Magazine - Spring 2017  

A free, online, quarterly magazine for vegans as well as non-vegans worldwide who are interested in the Environment and Sustainability.

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