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Quiltmaker Happy Handwork: 4 Projects to Slow Sew

March/April ‘20

PRE - CUT

PaŹY!

3 PRE-CUT

FRIENDLY Patterns for Spring

P s!! a Sourcing Wool a Plan Your Pre-cuts a Resizing Blocks

Posy p. 26

QuiltingCompany.com


Andrew Lee

The Combat Quilter After 18 years in the military and three combat deployments, when Andrew Lee began quilting it became an outlet that helped him deal with his Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Andrew’s talent for quilting quickly became apparent. Over the past three years he has created dozens of quilts for his fellow veterans, all while crafting amazing works of art like his 12,100 piece quilt “Shock and Awe,â€? which depicts the Ă DJUDLVLQJDW,ZR-LPD1RZ$QGUHZLVWXUQLQJTXLOWLQJLQWR a career while continuing to serve veterans using his new Statler by Gammill. Read more about Andrew at Gammill.com/CombatQuilter.

Gain the tools, knowledge & support to achieve your quilting dreams. Contact your local Gammill dealer today by visiting Gammill.com.


table of contents

pre-cut perfection 20 Boxed Up easy A layer cake and jelly roll make for a dynamic twist on a Log Cabin

26 Posy easy Ramona Sorensen creates a sensational quilt using a stack of fat quarters

38 Rainbow Ridge easy Grab a roll of pre-cut strips to celebrate a special baby

happy handwork 54 Egg Hunt intermediate Craft a sweet tabletopper just in time for spring

64 Penny Vine intermediate

10

16

Bright and cheerful, this bench pillow is as fun to make as it is pretty

68 Furever Friend easy Commemorate your best friend with this pillow by Jen Daly

patterns 10 Vintage Vibe intermediate A charming star quilt fit for a bed is sure to light up your room

16 Cherry Surprise intermediate Hand appliqué and yo-yo’s create a 30’s inspired masterpiece

20

26

32 Solitary Star easy Simple piecing and striking, bold colors are delighfully charming

50 Square Spaces easy Indigo patches and striking design combine in this quilt by Betsy Vinegrad

meet the designers 32 Maria Tavy Umhey 38 Heather Long 54 Jo Moury

32 2

Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


features 44 Plan Your Pre-cuts Know what you can cut from your pre-cuts for maximum use

46 Modern Musings Vivika DeNegre explores the modern quilting movement

60 Wonderfully Wool Tips for sourcing wool and felting your wool finds

72 Resizing Blocks Get ready to make your quilts exactly the size you want with some help from math

78 Extra! Extra! Do you follow us online? If not, you may have missed some of these free patterns and tutorials

departments 5 6 8 19 74 79

38

50

54

64

From the Editor Sew to Speak Find Your Inspiration Creative Spark Basic Lessons Addicted to Scraps

Templates, quilting motifs, and appliqué patterns are on the pattern sheet.

68 Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Sneak Peek Christina Cameli gets a High Score with a cool quilt featuring her new fabric collection with Maywood. Look for the pattern in the QM July/August ‘20 issue.

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Gregory J. Osberg David Pyle John Phelan Melanie Darienzo Josiah Klebaner Jordan Bohrer Scott T. Hill scott.hill@pubworx.com

Quiltmaker® March/April 2020 (No. 192) (ISSN 1047-1634), is published six times a year in Jan/Feb, Mar/ Apr, May/Jun, Jul/Aug, Sept/Oct, Nov/Dec by Peak Media Properties, LLC, dba Golden Peak Media, 4868 Innovation Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80525-5596. Periodicals’ postage paid at Fort Collins, CO 80525 and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Quiltmaker, P.O. Box 422140, Palm Coast FL 32142-2140. Canadian return address: Bluechip International, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2 Canada Reproduction in whole or in part in any language without written permission from Quiltmaker is prohibited. No one may copy, reprint or distribute any of the patterns or material in this magazine for commercial use without written permission of Quiltmaker. Templates and patterns may be photocopied as necessary to make quilts for personal use only. Quilts made from any element of a Quiltmaker pattern may be publicly displayed at quilt shows or donated to charity with credit given appropriately in the following form “Pattern Name, designed by Designer Name. Pattern appears in Quiltmaker Month/Month Year. quiltmaker.com.” SUBSCRIPTIONS: To subscribe to Quiltmaker, renew your subscription or change the address of your current subscription, visit Subscriber Services at QuiltingCompany.com. Or contact: Quiltmaker, P.O. Box 422140, Palm Coast FL 32142-2140; email: quiltmaker@emailcustomerservice.com. Shops: If you are interested in carrying this magazine in your store, email sales@peakmediaproperties.com. Copyright ©2020 Peak Media Properties, LLC

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


from the editor

Use Your Pre-cuts! If you are anything like me, you spot those delicious jelly rolls and layer cakes and you simply can't resist! I am talking about 2½ inch strips and 10" squares you find at your local quilt shop, of course, and not their calorie-laden namesakes you find at the bakery—but equally irresistable! When I simply must have a designers entire collection, they make it very easy to indulge. But then what? Sometimes I find that they sit on my shelf when I get them home because I am just not sure what to do with them (and honestly have a hard time breaking them open). If you feel the same, then this issue is for you. We have several patterns that are perfect for using up your favorite pre-cuts. Rainbow Ridge by Heather Long uses 2½" strips and was designed to celebrate her “rainbow baby” due in 2020. Boxed Up uses 10" squares and 2½" strips to make a twist on a Log Cabin block. Posy is a sweet flower design by Ramona Sorensen that uses 15 fat quarters to make a scrappy yet cohesive quilt. Solitary Star by Maria Tavy Umhey and Square Spaces by Betsy Vinegrad are perfect designs to use 5 inch charm packs. Do you love handwork? Appliqué, embroidery, couching, embellishments, and yo-yo’s are awaiting your glance. Egg Hunt by Jo Moury is a wool masterpiece. She used so many gorgeous stitches to add dimension to her adorable bunny. Penny Vine is a pillow designed by Charisma Horton. She used crazy quilting, English paper piecing, wool appliqué, and embroidery in this design to create a delightful bench pillow. Nancy Mahoney is back with Cherry Surprise—a quilt inspired by a 1930’s pattern featuring bias appliqué and 400 yo-yo’s! Be sure to take a closer look at Nancy's quilting, it is simply spectacular. I have added several of these designs to my quilting bucket list. I sure hope you love this issue as much as I do!

Happy Quilting!

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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ssew to speak

Red, White and Glory It was time to make my granddaughter Lily a quilt and she requested the pattern Red, White, and Glory from Quiltmaker November/December ‘13, in bright colors. The lily fabric in the middle and the four corners is the same fabric I used in her very first baby quilt. The quilt turned out a bit bigger than anticipate and fits nicely on her twin bed. Jan Short • Chicago Ridge, Illinois

Kites in Flight I have been wanting to make a quilt using lavender and green fabrics for quite some time. When reading through Quiltmaker May/June ’15 I came upon Kites in Flight. The design is simple enough to showcase my fabrics, yet it also has a very dynamic aesthetic. I was finally able to put my collection of lavender and green prints and basics to good use! Colleen Mace • Sun City, Arizona

share your projects! We love to see quilts made from our patterns! Send us your digital images for publication consideration in Sew to Speak. Please send clear, focused images with adequate lighting. Digital photo requirements can be found at QuiltingCompany.com. Include a photo of the entire quilt and a close-up of any interesting details. Include your full name and complete contact information, the name of the pattern, the size of the quilt, a short note about why you made the quilt, any awards received and any other details our readers might enjoy. Email to: sewtospeak@goldenpeakmedia.com.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Sand and Sea Instead of a jelly roll, I used 11 new pairs of men’s boxers to make the pattern Sand and Sea from Quiltmaker March/ April ‘17. I used two different brands in the largest sizes, so I could get a good assortment of plaids. This also allowed me to enlarge the quilt size to 81”x 95”. The quilt didn’t win a ribbon in our quilt show, but it did get the most laughs! Most people think I used men’s shirts for it. I also had enough of the leftover units to make 3 baby quilt tops. Vicki Craig • Abilene, Texas


What will you make next? e Quilting Company, where you will find 3,000+ quilt patterns from traditional to modern.

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Mother’s Best Quilt Pattern By Reed Johnson Featured in Love of Quilting May/June 2019

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inspirations

find your inspiration Notions, gifts, books, and gotta-haves for you and your quilty friends

Enchanted Paper Dolls Mix and match to make your own foundation pieced paper dolls. This spritely pattern pack includes twelve full-size foundation template figures with their own hairstyle, arm position, dress, bodice, hands, wings, and crowns. The pattern pieces are also interchangeable so that you may make hundreds of different angels, fairies, and princesses! These are a true delight as individual blocks or sewn together as a quilt.

Bee in My Bonnet Stitch Cards, Set B Stitch away those winter blues with four new cross stitch designs by Lori Holt. Set B includes corn and tomatoes, a tractor, a scarecrow, and a radiant star block. They are tied together with a traditional nine-patch border setting. The Bee in My Bonnet Stitch Cards come with full-color instructions, diagrams, and supply list, including suggested DMC colors. Each set includes four stitch cards printed on durable cardstock.

easypatchwork.de

itssewemma.com

Machingers Quilting Gloves

Ombré Quilts

Machingers light weight and form-fitting quilting gloves are made from nylon knit. This material provides true support, that is comfortable enough to wear for hours. Their seamless design allows for full hand and fingertip surface use and the fully coated fingertips provide excellent grip with less resistance and drag on fabric.

Jennifer Sampou guides quilters with grace on how to capture the beauty of ombré fabrics in her new book, which includes six colorful projects. Whether designing a quilt using large blocks to capture the glow and luminosity of the sky or piecing tiny blocks to create dynamic movement, Jennifer provides tricks and tips to create the most stunning ombré quilts.

quilterstouch.com

ctpub.com

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


B u i l d i n g Yo u r Pa s s i o n Piece by Piece

Experience the home for all things quilting. QuiltingCompany.com


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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Intermediate Finished Size: 96” x 96” Finished Blocks: 15”

Vintage Vibe materials Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted. White Solid 4⅜ yards for blocks and border 3 Light Green Print 1¼ yards for blocks Dark Pink Floral Print 1⅞ yards for blocks Light Blue Print ¾ yard for blocks Dark Pink Print 1⅞ yards for blocks and border 1 Dark Pink and Blue Print 1⅜ yards for blocks Blue Print ¼ yard for blocks White Print ½ yard for blocks Dark Pink Large Floral Print 2⅝ yards for border 5 and binding Backing 9¼ yards Batting 104” x 104”

Quilt designed and made by Pam Boswell. Machine quilted by Teresa Laughlin. Fabric: Paper Daisies by Sue Daley for Riley Blake Designs.

Pam Boswell Lake Charles, LA facebook.com/sassysouthernquilts

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Pretty floral fabrics remind us

cutting Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances. Border strips will be pieced and cut to exact length needed. You may want to make them longer to allow for piecing variations. = cut in half once diagonally = cut in half twice diagonally White Solid 10 strips 1½” x WOF for border 3 28 squares 6¼” (D) 2 squares 5⅞” (C) 12 squares 5⅞” cut to make 24 triangles (I) 24 squares 5½” (E) 12 squares 3¾” (A) 52 squares 3⅜” (B) 16 squares 3⅜” cut to make 32 triangles (H) 116 squares 3” (F) Light Green Print 1 square 6¼” (D) 4 squares 5½” (E) 24 squares 3¾” (A) 32 squares 3⅜” (B) 12 squares 3” (F) Dark Pink Floral Print 1 square 6¼” (D) 6 squares 5⅞” cut to make 12 triangles (I) 12 squares 3¾” (A) 4 squares 3¾” cut to make 16 triangles (G) 80 squares 3⅜” (B) 36 squares 3” (F) Light Blue Print 2 squares 5⅞” (C) 4 squares 3¾” cut to make 16 triangles (G) 16 squares 3⅜” (B) 24 squares 3” (F)

of the promise of spring. Dark Pink Print 9 strips 3” x WOF for border 1 8 squares 3¾” cut to make 32 triangles (G) 52 squares 3⅜” (B) 36 squares 3⅜” cut to make 72 triangles (H) Dark Pink and Blue Print 1 square 5½” (E) 32 rectangles 3” x 5½” (J) 84 squares 3” (F) Blue Print 12 squares 3” (F) White Print 8 squares 5½” (E) Dark Pink Large Floral Print 10 strips 5” x WOF for border 4 11 strips 2½” x WOF for binding

1

About This Quilt

2

Making the Units, Flying Geese, and Blocks

Pam Boswell is back with a feminine quilt that will have you dreaming of warmer weather and spring flowers. This large, bed-sized quilt is intermediate only in the sheer number of units. We recommend using a design wall or large flat surface for placing your units prior to sewing. Study the photo and diagrams carefully for color placement.

Refer to “Triangle-Squares” in Basic Lessons. Pair 12 light green print A’s and 12 white solid A’s to make 24 unit 1’s total.

Unit 1 from A’s Make 24

Similarly, pair 12 light green A’s and 12 dark pink floral print A’s to make 24 unit 2’s total.

Unit 2 from A’s Make 24

Using the same technique, pair 32 light green B’s and 32 white B’s to make 64 unit 3’s total.

Unit 3 from B’s Make 64

In the same way, make units 4–6 in the colors and quantities shown.

Unit 4 from B’s Make 16

Unit 5 from B’s Make 16

Unit 6 from B’s Make 16

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Pair 2 light blue print C’s and 2 white C’s to make 4 unit 7’s total.

Refer to “Stitch-and-Flip” in Basic Lessons. Use light green E’s and white F’s to make 4 unit 9’s as shown.

Sew the patches and units together as shown to make a block W. Make 12 block W’s total. F

E

F

Unit 7 from C’s Make 4

F

Mark diagonal line on wrong side of unit 1, intersecting seams as shown. Place marked unit 1 on unit 2, right sides together with contrasting colors facing one another. Sew 1⁄4" seam on both sides of the marked line. Cut on the marked line, open and press to make 2 unit 8’s as shown. Make 48 unit 8’s total.

F

F

F

H H

F

F

Block W Make 12

Unit 9 Stitch & Flip Make 4

Unit 1

Join the patches, units, and Flying Geese together as shown to make a block X. Make 8 block X’s total.

In the same way, use dark pink and blue print E and dark pink floral F’s to make 1 unit 10 as shown.

Unit 2

I E

F

Unit 8 Make 48

Refer to “Fast Flying Geese” in Basic Lessons. Use white D’s and dark pink print B’s to make 48 Flying Geese 1’s as shown.

Flying Geese 1 Make 48

Unit 10 Stitch & Flip Make 1

Join 1 dark pink floral G, 1 dark pink print G, and 1 white H together as shown to make unit 11. Make 8 unit 11’s total.

Using the same technique, make Flying Geese 2–4 in the colors and quantities shown.

G

G H

Unit 11 Make 8 Flying Geese 2 Flying Geese 3 Make 4 Make 4

Flying Geese 4 Make 64

Block X Make 8

Similarly, sew the patches, units, and Flying Geese together as shown to make a block Y. Make 4 block Y’s total. F

In the same way, make unit’s 12–14 in the colors and quantities shown.

G

G H

Unit 12 Make 8

G

G H

G

G H

Unit 13 Unit 14 Make 8 Make 8 Block Y Make 4

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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In the same way, sew the units and Flying Geese together as shown to make 1 block Z.

Block Z Make 1

3

Assembling the Quilt Center

Refer to the Assembly Diagram. Sew 4 block W’s and 1 block X together as shown to make a row. Make 2 rows. Join 2 block W’s, 2 block X’s, and 1 block Y as shown to make a row. Make 2. Sew 2 block X’s, 2 block Y’s, and 1 block Z together as shown to make a row. Join rows together as shown, watching orientation.

4

Refer to the quilting placement diagram. Quilt the Shasta Daisy Quilting motif over the quilt surface. Bind the quilt.

Refer to “Borders” in Basic Lessons. Join dark pink print border 1 strips and cut to sizes shown in Assembly Diagram. Matching centers and ends, sew border 1 side strips to quilt; repeat to add top and bottom strips.

In similar manner to border 1, add white border 3 and dark pink large floral border 4.

Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Layer and baste together the backing, batting, and quilt top.

Adding the Borders

Join 16 Flying Geese 4’s to make pieced border 2. Make 4 total. Matching centers and ends, sew pieced border 2 side strips to quilt. Join white F’s to either end of 2 remaining pieced border 2’s. Sew top/bottom border 2’s to quilt.

14

5

Quilting and Finishing

Quilting Placement


5˝ x 96½˝ 1½˝ x 87½˝ F

3˝ x 75½˝

1½˝ x 85½˝

5˝ x 87½˝

3˝ x 80½˝

Assembly

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Intermediate Finished Size: 68” x 68” Finished Blocks: 16”

Cherry Surprise materials Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted. White Solid 4⅝ yards for blocks and border 2 Green Print 2½ yards for blocks, border 1, and binding Assorted Prints 2 yards total for blocks and border 2 Backing 4⅝ yards Batting 76” x 76”

cutting Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances. Border strips will be pieced and cut to exact length needed. You may want to make them longer to allow for piecing variations. Quilt designed and made by Nancy Mahoney. Mahoney Fabric: Nancy used fabrics from her personal collection.

Nancy Mahoney Sparta, GA nancymahoney.com

White Solid 7 strips 9½” x WOF for border 2 9 squares 17” (A) Green Print 8 strips 2½” x WOF for binding 6 strips 1½” x WOF for border 1 1 rectangle 21”x WOF for bias strips (stems and vines) 184 template B Assorted Prints 400 template C The appliqué patterns, templates, and quilting motif are found on the pattern sheet.

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Hand appliqué and ever so many yo-yo’s work together to make this classic quilt.

1

About This Quilt

Nancy based this quilt on a classic pattern from the 1930’s called Cherry. She paired flowers made from yo-yo’s with gorgeous turnededge appliqué, then added spectacular quilting to make a quilt that is destined to be an heirloom. She used a Clover Quick Yo-Yo Maker and 1930’s reproduction fabrics to make the 400 yo-yo’s necessary for this quilt top. Note: The quilt top is machine quilted before the yo-yo’s are applied.

2

Making the Blocks and Yo-yo’s

Using the creases and appliqué diagram as guides, arrange the long green stems and green B’s on A as shown. Use matching thread and a blind stitch to appliqué the long stems and leaves in place. Center the appliqué and trim A to 161⁄2" x 161 ⁄2" to make block. Make 9 blocks total. Referring to “Yo-yo’s” in Basic Lessons, use template C to make 400 yo-yo’s from assorted prints.

3

Assembling the Quilt Center

Refer to the Assembly Diagram. Sew 3 blocks together to make a row. Make 3 rows. Sew the rows together.

Fold the white solid A in half both ways diagonally and lightly crease the folds. Prepare green print B’s for turned-edge appliqué.

Refer to “Borders” in Basic Lessons. Join border 1 strips and cut to sizes shown in Assembly Diagram. Matching centers and ends, sew border 1 side strips to quilt; repeat to add top and bottom strips. In similar manner, add border 2. Referring to the Appliqué and Yo-yo Placement Diagram, arrange green B’s, short stems, and vine on border 2 as shown. Use matching thread and a blind stitch to appliqué the B's, short stems, and vine in place.

9½˝ x 68½˝ 1½˝ x 50½˝

1½˝ x 48½˝

9½˝ x 50½˝

Refer to “Bias Strips” in Basic Lessons. Cut green print 1"-wide bias strips and prepare for appliqué. Cut 36 strips 73 ⁄4" for long stems and 4 strips 31⁄4" for short stems. Save the remaining 291" for the vine in border 2.

A

4

Adding the Borders

Block Make 9

Blind Stitch

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Assembly


Creative SPARK

5

Quilting and Finishing

Layer and baste together the backing, batting, and quilt top. Refer to the quilting placement diagram. Outline the appliquéd leaves, stems and vine. Quilt the Rippling Waves Quilting motif on the quilt top as shown.

Wreathmaker Tool in EQ8 EQ8’s Wreathmaker tool allows you to select appliqué patches and instantly repeat them to create a wreath. You can set the number of repeats and spacing, so the possibilities are endless! Here are just a few blocks using the appliqué design from this quilt.

Referring to the Appliqué and Yo-yo Placement Diagram, arrange the yoyo’s as shown. Use matching thread and a blind stitch to attach the yo-yo’s. Quilting Placement

Bind the quilt.

Appliqué & Yo-yo Placement

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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T U C E R P ly friend

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Easy Finished Size: 82” x 82” Finished Blocks: 12”

Boxed Up

materials* Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted.

Quilt designed and made by Ramona Sorensen. Fabric: Grunge Seeing Stars by BasicGrey for Moda Fabrics.

Assorted Prints 28 (2½"-wide) pre-cut strips total to match 10" squares for block Z’s and binding 36 (10" squares) total for blocks White Tonal 3⅝ yards for blocks and border 1 Teal Print 1⅛ yards for border 2 Backing 8 yards Batting 90” x 90” *Pattern uses a matching pre-cut roll of 2½”- wide strips and package of 10" squares. If you prefer to use yardage, see About This Quilt for more information.

Ramona Sorensen Springville, UT

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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cutting* Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances. Border strips will be pieced and cut to exact length needed. You may want to make them longer to allow for piecing variations. Assorted Prints Referring to Block Y Cutting Diagram, cut from each 10" square: 1 rectangle 2½˝ x 9½˝ (I) 1 rectangle 2½˝ x 7½˝ (H) 1 square 2½˝ (A) 1 rectangle 1½˝ x 7½˝ (G) 1 rectangle 1½˝ x 6½˝ (F) Referring to Block Z Cutting Diagram, cut from each 10" square: 1 rectangle 3½˝ x 6½˝ (E) 1 square 3½˝ (D) 1 rectangle 1½˝ x 9½˝ (J) 1 rectangle 1½˝ x 3½˝ (C) 1 rectangle 1½˝ x 2½˝ (B) Cut from each of 18 pre-cut strips: 1 rectangle 2½˝ x 12½˝ (M) 1 rectangle 2½˝ x 10½˝ (L) 1 rectangle 1½˝ x 10½˝ (K) White Tonal 8 strips 2½˝-wide for border 1 18 rectangles 3½˝ x 6½˝ (E) 18 squares 3½˝ (D) 18 rectangles 2½˝ x 12½˝ (M) 18 rectangles 2½˝ x 10½˝ (L) 18 rectangles 2½˝ x 9½˝ (I) 18 rectangles 2½˝ x 7½˝ (H) 18 squares 2½˝ (A) 18 rectangles 1½˝ x 10½˝ (K) 18 rectangles 1½˝ x 9½˝ (J) 18 rectangles 1½˝ x 7½˝ (G) 18 rectangles 1½˝ x 6½˝ (F) 18 rectangles 1½˝ x 3½˝ (C) 18 rectangles 1½˝ x 2½˝ (B) Teal Print 9 strips 3½” x WOF for border 2

Precuts are plentiful in Ramona’s latest design.

1

About This Quilt

Ramona loves to spend her nights playing with classic quilt blocks to create something new. This quilt is her version of a modern log cabin. Ramona used a matching set of pre-cut 2½” - wide strips and 10" squares. If you prefer to use yardage, you will need 35 ⁄8 yards of white tonal and 31 ⁄2 yards of assorted prints.

J

Block Z Cutting Diagram

M

Join assorted print A and white tonal B, then sew white C to bottom. Working in a clockwise direction, continue sewing patches, alternating white and matching assorted print patches as shown to make 1 block Y. Make 18 block Y’s total.

G E L

H

F D

A B C I K

A I

Block Y Cutting Diagram

Block Z Make 18

M G E L

H

F D

A B C I K

Block Y Make 18

Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

D

2

F G H

CB

E

Piecing the Blocks

*See Piecing the Blocks for cutting diagrams

22

In the same manner, join patches as shown to make 18 block Z’s total.

J

J


3

Assembling the Quilt Center

Refer to the Assembly Diagram for block orientation. Sew 6 blocks together as shown to make a row. Make 6 rows; sew row together.

4

Adding the Borders

Refer to “Borders” in Basic Lessons. Join white border 1 strips and cut to sizes shown in Assembly Diagram. Matching centers and ends, sew border 1 side strips to quilt; repeat to add top and bottom strips. In similar manner, add teal print border 2.

3½˝ x 82½˝

2½˝ x 72½˝

3½˝ x 76½˝

2½˝ x 76½˝

Assembly

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Finishing Touch

5

Quilting and Finishing

Layer and baste together the backing, batting, and quilt top.

Ramona chose a fun retro quilt design to finish her quilt. Another option is to use a rounded motif that offsets this very square block pattern. The Basket Blossom quilting motif is reminiscent of flowers and adds a softness to the center of the block and a laciness to the borders.

Refer to the quilting placement diagram. Quilt concentric ovals and squares connected by lines and asterisks across the quilt surface. Join 10 assorted strips. Bind the quilt.

Go to QuiltingCompany.com to download the Basket Blossom Quilting motif. Quilting Placement

Alternate Quilting Placement Diagram

Basket Blossom Quilting

24

Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


T U C E R P ly friend

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Easy Finished Size: 74” x 88” Finished Blocks: 12”

Posy cutting Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances. Border strips will be pieced and cut to exact length needed. You may want to make them longer to allow for piecing variations. 15 Assorted Prints 9 strips 2½” x WOF for binding Cut from each: 8 rectangles 5½” x 6½” (A) 2 template D Cut a total of: 20 squares 2½” (F) White Print 9 strips 3½” x WOF for border 49 rectangles 2½” x 12½” (E) 120 rectangles 1½” x 6½” (C) 240 squares 1½” (B)

Quilt il ddesigned i d bby andd made d bby Ramona Sorensen. Fabric: b i Lucky k Charms h ffor Figo i Fabrics. bi

materials Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted. 15 Assorted Prints 1 fat quarter each for blocks and cornerstones (a fat quarter is approximately 18” x 20”) White Print 3⅝ yards for blocks, sashes, and border Binding ¾ yard Backing 5¾ yards Batting 82” x 96”

The appliqué pattern is found on the pattern sheet.

Ramona Sorensen Springville, UT

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Sew a garden of color and enjoy spring year round!

1

Sew white C’s to 4 matching units. Join units as shown to make a block. Make 30 blocks total.

About This Quilt

Pretty posies spin and dance across the quilt top!

2

Making the Units and Blocks

Refer to “Stitch-and-Flip” in Basic Lessons. Use assorted print A’s and white print B’s to make 30 sets of 4 matching units as shown. B A B

C C

Unit

Grab some fat quarters and create your own garden that needs no watering or weeding. Ramona chose 15 fat quarters, but you can choose 30 different fabrics if you want to make a quilt where no two flowers are alike.

Unit

4 Block Make 30

Refer to the appliqué placement diagram. Prepare assorted print D’s for fusible appliqué. Use the seams and appliqué placement diagram as guides to arrange assorted print D’s on block as shown; fuse in place. Use matching thread and a machine zigzag stitch to sew around D.

D

Appliqué Placement

Machine Zigzag Stitch

Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Refer to the Assembly Diagram. Sew 5 blocks and 4 white E’s together as shown to make a row. Make 6 rows. Join 5 white E’s and 4 assorted F’s together to make a sash. Make 5 sashes. Sew the rows and sashes together, alternating.

Adding the Borders

Unit Stitch & Flip Make 30 sets of 4 matching

28

3

Assembling the Quilt Center

Refer to “Borders” in Basic Lessons. Join white border strips and cut to sizes shown in Assembly Diagram. Matching centers and ends, sew border side strips to quilt; repeat to add top and bottom strips.


3½˝ x 74½˝

Row Make 6

Sash Make 5

E

E

F

Row

Sash

3½˝ x 82½˝

Row

Sash

Row

Sash

Row

Sash

Row

Assembly

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Finishing Touch

5

Quilting and Finishing

Layer and baste together the backing, batting, and quilt top.

Ramona chose to quilt an elaboate custom design to showcase her quilting. If you prefer a simpler option, why not quilt an airy floral motif to accentuate the flower block? The Basket Blossom quilting motif softens the geometric edges of the block and looks so pretty. As an added bonus, it is a fast option for finishing your quilt.

Refer to the quilting placement diagram. Quilt the marked lines and motifs as shown. Bind the quilt.

Quilting Placement

Go to QuiltingCompany.com to download the Basket Blossom Quilting motif.

Alternate Quilting Placement Diagram

Basket Blossom Quilting

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


COLOR YOUR OWN Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Designer Spotlight Maria Tavy Umhey

Traditionally Speaking Tradition is everything to Maria Tavy Umhey. Growing up under the quilt frame, she didn’t start her quilting journey until her career was done and her kids were grown. But don’t let that fool you into thinking that this quilter is anything but prolific. With over 100 published quilt patterns and a selfpublished book on Civil War quilts, her style is steeped in tradition and her quilts are meant to be used. Join us as we learn more about Maria.

My main job now is keeping the cookie jar filled for my grandchildren who are all enthusiastic about the quilts and often help me decide on design options. I am fortunate to live in a beautiful place where I can walk out the kitchen door and enjoy nature every day. Many of my designs are inspired by the natural beauty all around me.

A Quilter’s Legacy Then and Now I grew up in rural Bellvale, New York, and went to the one room Bellvale School until the fourth grade. I received an associate degree from Orange County Community College and a bachelor’s degree from Barnard College. I lived in Bellvale for most of my life until moving to Turah, Montana, twenty-two years ago when my husband retired.

Road to Appomattox* appeared in McCall’s Quilting March/April 2015

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

When I was about nine years old, I went with my grandmother to a Ladies Aid Society meeting to tie a quilt stretched on a big wooden frame. I can remember playing beneath the quilt while the ladies stitched above me. That was my first quilting experience. I didn’t begin making quilts myself until my sons were grown, and I had finished my work as a chemist, county legislator, and business manager.

I enjoy designing colorful, cheerful quilts meant to keep people warm and make them happy. Up-to-date tools and techniques enable me to make quilts with a traditional look in weeks rather than months. I depend on careful use of color and contrast and the simple shapes passed down to us by our grandmothers to produce crisp, uncluttered designs. No intricate blocks with lots of tiny pieces or fancy needle work here. Most of my quilts are quilted using a regular sewing machine not a long arm, mostly in-the-ditch with some free motion embellishment. For me, quilts are objects of delight to be used and enjoyed every day. Whether on a bed, on a wall, or casually thrown over the back of a chair, quilts give a feeling of warmth and comfort to our homes.

Fort Carson* appeared in McCall’s Quilting July/August 2016


For me quilting is a way to connect to past and future generations. I have made quilts commemorating my great-grandfather being wounded at the battle of Spotsylvania in the Civil War, my Uncle Rob surviving the Battle of the Bulge in WWII, and my grandmother’s trip to the state of Washington on the Northern Pacific Railroad as a young bride. When my grandson was in the fifth grade he memorized “The Night Before Christmas”—yes, he could rattle off the whole thing, start to finish. I gave him a quilt with appliquéd reindeer and lines of the poem machine embroidered on it. I hope he will get it out every Christmas so I can be remembered by my great-grandchildren yet to be born.

Enjoying the Work Over one hundred of my quilt designs have been published in magazines. I get a big kick seeing my designs interpreted by other quilters in the pages showing quilts made by readers. I self-published an E-book available on Amazon, Civil War Memorial Quilts– And the Words That Inspired Them, featuring fifteen of my quilts. I also have lots of fun designing and building play structures for my grandchildren; another activity which allows me to use scraps and leftovers to spread happiness.

You can see more quilts by Tavy at Cheerful Quilts at facebook.com/ Cheerful Quilts.

What is your favorite tip about quilting? The best tip I can give to quilters is to pay attention to value (the lightness or darkness the eye perceives in fabrics). Use the darkest fabrics on the motif you want to emphasize and put a light fabric adjacent to it for maximum contrast.

*A digital pattern is available for purchase at QuiltingCompany.com

Ten Pockets* appeared in McCall’s Quick Quilts June/July 2018

Picnic* appeared in McCall’s Quick Quilts June/July 2017

Celtic Family Ties* appeared in Quiltmaker March/April 2017

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Quilt designed and made by Maria Umhey. Fabric: At The Pier for Banyan Batiks.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Easy Finished Size: 28” x 32”

Solitary Star materials

cutting

Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted.

Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances.

Medium Orange Batik, White Batik, Light Orange Batik, and Dark Green Batik 1 fat quarter each for units and border (a fat quarter is approximately 18” x 20”) Dark Blue Batik, Yellow Batik, and Medium Blue Batik 1 fat eighth each for units (a fat eighth is approximately 9” x 20”) Medium Green Batik ½ yard for border Light Green Batik ½ yard for binding Backing 1 yard Batting 32” x 36”

Medium Orange Batik 7 squares 4⅞” (A) White Batik 6 squares 4⅞” (A) Dark Blue Batik 4 squares 4⅞” (A) Light Orange Batik 7 squares 4⅞” (A) Yellow Batik 4 squares 4⅞” (A) Medium Blue Batik 2 squares 4⅞” (A) Dark Green Batik 2 squares 4⅞” (A) 1 rectangle 4½” x 16½” (F) 1 rectangle 4½” x 12½” (D) Medium Green Batik 1 rectangle 4½” x 32½” (E) 1 rectangle 4½” x 20½” (B) 1 rectangle 4½” x 16½” (F) 1 rectangle 4½” x 8½” (C) Light Green Batik 4 strips 2½” x WOF for binding

Maria Umhey Clinton, MT Facebook/Cheerful Quilts

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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A single star shines brightly above in this fast and fun wall hanging.

1

About This Quilt

A cluster of triangle-squares is all you’ll need to whip up this celestial quilt. When Maria first conceived the idea for this design, she had two packs of 5-inch charm squares which she turned into triangle-squares. She made a scrappy border with the rest of the squares, and only had a few extra squares left over. We had her change up the border slightly to create visual interest, but you can consider using charm squares instead of fat-quarters if you prefer.

2

Making the Units

Refer to “Triangle-Squares” in Basic Lessons. Pair medium orange batik A’s and white batik A’s to make 4 unit 1’s total.

Unit 1 Make 4

In the same manner, make units 2–7 in colors and quantities shown.

Sew together light green batik C and dark green batik D as shown to make bottom border strip. Join light green F and dark green F as shown to make right border strip. Matching centers, seams, and ends, sew top and bottom strips to quilt as shown; repeat to add side strips to quilt.

5

Quilting and Finishing

Outline quilt the trianglesquares. Quilt a straight line ½" from the inner edge of border. Quilt wavy lines in the border. Bind the quilt.

Unit 2 Make 8

Unit 3 Make 3

Unit 4 Make 4

Unit 5 Make 8

Unit 6 Make 2

Unit 7 Make 1

3

Assembling the Quilt Center

Refer to the Assembly Diagram. Sew units into rows as shown. Join rows.

Quilting Placement

B

F

E

F

C

D

Assembly

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


COLOR YOUR OWN Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Designer Spotlight Heather Long

When Life Gives You Scraps, Make Quilts! After suffering a devastating pregnancy loss followed by cancer last year, Heather dove back into quilting, saying “My body and health felt out of control but quilting and designing gave me the opportunity to take some control of the chaos.” After hearing such an inspiring story of triumph and positivity in the face of illness and loss, we wanted to hear more about her design process in making this “Rainbow” quilt to celebrate their first child, due to arrive in 2020. Read on as we learn more about Heather's design process.

Images courtesy of Heather Long.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

What was your source of inspiration for this quilt? I love quilts that create movement by using strategically placed fabrics. I originally envisioned this quilt using an ombré fabric to accent the peaks and valleys. I also played around with a few collections that were soon to be released knowing that this quilt would be 21 ⁄2"-strip friendly. When I saw some of the rainbow 21 ⁄2" strip sets available from Robert Kaufman, I knew they were the right fit.

My husband and I suffered a pregnancy loss in March 2018 and in July 2019 we discovered we were expecting our “rainbow baby”—named for the appearance of a rainbow after a storm. I knew this wasn't meant to be a stormy quilt, this was meant for my rainbow babe.

Once I had my fabric selected, I changed the size of the quilt from bed-size to crib-size, and rotated it 90-degrees so the peaks and valleys looked more like a rainbow's arc. It's not perfectly smooth curves and there are highs and lows, and I think that's a wonderful representation of the journey we've been on.


Process Generally an idea just hits me and I immediately need to sketch it out. I've used pencil and graph paper before to design, but I tend to gravitate to my EQ8 more frequently. (I've even used pen on paper napkin when inspiration struck while on a lunch date with my husband!) Sometimes the block comes first and sometimes it's the fabrics. Once I have a block I like, I color it and begin to play with layouts. Sometimes the block changes based on how it looks in a quilt top—it might get bigger or smaller or I just make tweaks here and there. Sometimes I end up with something entirely different than what I started with once I see how the block looks in a top, how the fabrics play together, etc.

Do you have any tips for readers who want to make this quilt? Alternate the direction you sew the long seams of the strips. Sew the pairs of colors together from top to bottom, then sew those sets together from the bottom to the top. This helps avoid distortion in the quilt top.

Visit Heather's website, coffeeandquilts.blog for more information about Heather and her quilts.

Cascading Colors

What do you find most challenging about designing quilts? What do you enjoy most? Sometimes it's a challenge to get the idea in my head to translate on paper or in design software. It's tricky taking an abstract idea and turning it into actual shapes that fit together. And sometimes it just doesn't work. I really enjoy the math behind designing—coming up with the measurements, double checking my numbers, and then when that block fits together perfectly, it's a wonderful feeling.

Vinalhaven Wave

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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T U C E PR l d n e i r f

40

y

Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Easy Finished Size: 48” x 60”

Rainbow Ridge

materials* Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherrwise noted.

Quilt designed and made by Heather Long. Fabric: Kona Cotton Solids by Robert Kaufman Fabrics.

Red, Orange, Light Orange, Yellow Orange, Yellow, Light Green, Green, Light Blue, Medium Blue, Dark Blue, Light Purple, and Purple Solids 24 (2½"-wide) pre-cut strips total for piecing White Solid 2½ yards for piecing and binding Backing 3⅛ yards Batting 52” x 68” *See About This Quilt for more information

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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A rainbow of colors and

cutting

vertical strips give a modern feel to this pretty throw.

Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances. Red Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 20½” (E) 1 rectangle 2½” x 18½” (C) 2 squares 2½” (A) Orange Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 24½” (I) 1 rectangle 2½” x 22½” (G) 2 squares 2½” (A) Light Orange Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 28½” (L) 1 rectangle 2½” x 26½” (K) 2 squares 2½” (A) Yellow Orange Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 26½” (K) 1 rectangle 2½” x 24½” (I) 2 squares 2½” (A) Yellow Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 24½” (I) 1 rectangle 2½” x 22½” (G) 2 squares 2½” (A) Light Green Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 28½” (L) 1 rectangle 2½” x 26½” (K) 2 squares 2½” (A) Green Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 32½” (H) 1 rectangle 2½” x 30½” (J) 2 squares 2½” (A) Light Blue Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 36½” (D) 1 rectangle 2½” x 34½” (F) 2 squares 2½” (A)

Medium Blue Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 38½” (B) 1 rectangle 2½” x 36½” (D) 2 squares 2½” (A) Dark Blue Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 34½” (F) 1 rectangle 2½” x 32½” (H) 2 squares 2½” (A) Light Purple Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 30½” (J) 1 rectangle 2½” x 28½” (L) 2 squares 2½” (A) Purple Solid 1 rectangle 2½” x 24½” (I) 1 rectangle 2½” x 26½” (K) 2 squares 2½” (A) White Solid 7 strips 2½” x WOF” for binding 1 rectangle 2½” x 38½” (B) 1 rectangle 2½” x 36½” (D) 2 rectangles 2½” x 34½” (F) 4 rectangles 2½” x 32½” (H) 4 rectangles 2½” x 30½” (J) 3 rectangles 2½” x 28½” (L) 2 rectangles 2½” x 26½” (K) 2 rectangles 2½” x 24½” (I) 2 rectangles 2½” x 22½” (G) 2 rectangles 2½” x 20½” (E) 1 rectangle 2½” x 18½” (C) 24 squares 2½” (A)

1

About This Quilt

2

Making the Vertical Strips

Heather designed this quilt as a celebration of her renewed health and the upcoming birth of her rainbow baby (a child born after the loss of an infant). Heather used a pre-cut roll of 2½"-wide strips in Bright Rainbow Palette from Robert Kaufman Fabrics to quickly construct this quilt. While she used yardage for the white solid, a roll of white Kona Solids strips and a roll of Bright Rainbow Palette would make quick work of finishing this quilt top. If you prefer to use yardage, simply select 1 ⁄4 yard each of 12 different fabrics. Note: You will need two strips of each of the colors. Refer to Assembly Diagram. Sew white solid B, red solid A, white A, and red C together to make strip 1 as shown. In a similar manner, join patches to make strips 2-24.

3

Assembling the Quilt Center

4

Quilting and Finishing

Refer to the Assembly Diagram. Sew strips 1-24 together as shown. Layer and baste together the backing, batting, and quilt top. Heather quilted wavy swirls over the quilt surface. Bind the quilt.

Heather Long Phoenixville, PA coffeeandquilts.blog

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


1

B

2

D

3

F

4

H

5

J

6

L

7

J

8

H

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

H

F

J

L

K

I

G

C

E

E

G

I

K

L

J

H

A A A A A A

A

A

A

A

A

A

C

E

G

I

K

L

K

I

G

I

K

L

J

H

F

D

B

D

F

H

J

L

K

I

Quilting Placement Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Plan Your Pre-cuts Get more mileage from your stash! If you've ever purchased those delightful pre-cuts without knowing what you were going to do with them—they are just so irresistible after all—you may end up watching them go unused. And while they look absolutely lovely sitting on your shelf, you might actually break open that fat quarter tower if you know exactly what you can do with it. To help, we created a handy reference guide that shows excatly what cuts you can get from your pre-cuts. (Say that 10 times fast!) Keep this chart in your sewing space and refer to it the next time you start a project.

10" squares

16 squares 2½"x 2½"

4 squares 5"x 5" Cut in half diagonally for 32 triangles

Cut in half diagonally for 8 triangles

8 rectangles 2½"x 5"

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Cut 4 strips 2½"x 10", use the 45˚ angle on your ruler to cut 4 triangles

Cut in half diagonally for 2 triangles

Cut in half diagonally twice for 4 triangles

Remove a 1" strip from two sides, then cut 9 squares 3"x 3"


5" squares

2½" strips

4 squares 2½"x 2½"

Approximately 16 squares 2½"x 2½"

2 rectangles 2½"x 5"

Approximately 9 rectangles 2½"x 4½"

Cut in half diagonally for 2 triangles

Use the 45˚ angle on your ruler to cut triangles

Cut in half diagonally twice for 4 triangles

4 strips 1¼"x 5"

Quiltmaker #192 QuiltingCompany.com

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Modern Musings All This By Hand by Vivika Hansen DeNegre

“It s such an incredible feeling making things with your own two hands.” - Carolyn Friedlander We’ve all seen them: modern quilts. Some are bold and graphic, others are sparse and sophisticated. They have a certain presence that identifies them as unique in the quilt world, and a following of devotees who ardently aspire to reflect the aesthetic. These quilts stand out in a crowd because of their cutting-edge design, usefulness (most modern quilts are made as utilitarian objects) and crisp composition. They are products of our time, often designed with a computer, executed with considerable prowess, and held together with a generous amount of precision machine stitching. They are the result of an industrious group of enthusiasts who are dedicated to their craft.

Autumn is Wistful by Chawne Kimber is appliquéd and quilted by hand.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

But wait, there’s more… A growing segment of quilters within the modern movement have been quietly emulating the makers of the past by adding an element of personalization only possible with needle and thread. Handwork—either embroidery, big-stitch quilting, hand piecing, and appliqué—is making a comeback and being used in modern quilts, this time with a contemporary twist. Handwork Revisited Years ago, quilts were judged to be less valuable (and less valued) if they were pieced or quilted by machine. The mark of the best maker was literally measured by each stitch she made. Prizes always went to the quilter who could consistently execute a miniscule stitch. Eventually, machine work became more refined: fast, quick, and easy replaced leisurely, measured, and complex. More quilts could be made with technological advances, and that’s a good thing. But by turning one’s back on handwork, had something been lost? Is more always better? Over the last ten years as the modern movement has matured from a fledgling trend to a tidal wave of creativity, tastes have changed. With experience, many of these modern mavens have learned that they can create work with a variety of textures and techniques. At QuiltCon 2018 and 2019, we saw tied quilts, examples of boro stitching, hand-pieced and appliquéd work, as well as loads of vendors selling floss and embroidery supplies.


Thankfully, many of today’s modern quilters have embraced the visible stitch on their quilts, and the results reflect a respect for tradition as seen through a 21st century lens. Leaders in this trend include modern quilt luminaries such as fabric designer Carolyn Friedlander who whole-heartedly embraces appliqué; former staff member at the MQG Riane Menardi Morrison who finds time to finish her quilts with big-stitch quilting; and award-winner Chawne Kimber whose work frequently includes hand stitching. Each of these quilters has made a substantial impact on the quilts we think of as modern and has done so with her own brand of creativity. A mix of handwork and hard work Gone are the days of eschewing the human touch. Riane Minardi Morrison believes that a good handquilting motif is not just functional but also beautiful. “It supports your piecing by adding a unique design element, and it showcases the hand of the maker,” she suggests. Riane’s work relies on spinning the traditional interpretation of hand quilting by boldly adding color, shape and movement to a finished quilt with highcontrast stitching. She uses heavy-weight thread like

Detail of Counterpart by Riane Menardi Morrison. Photo by Austin Day.

sashiko, perle cotton, or embroidery floss in colors that contrast to the quilt top. In addition, the quilting motifs enhance her piecing and don’t detract from the pieced design. Similarly, in an industry where many of her contemporaries create their quilts exclusively by machine, Carolyn Friedlander is just as happy to create the old-fashioned way: by hand. And despite these differences—or maybe because of them—she has emerged as a leader in the modern quilt movement and has been a keynote speaker at QuiltCon. Carolyn is known for executing beautifully appliquéd compositions, using fabrics she designed for Robert Kaufman. With this amazing success she shares “It’s such an incredible feeling making things with your own two hands.” Photo by Carolyn Friedlander

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Artist and social activist Chawne Kimber always creates highly personal work that has an unexpected element, either in the content of her composition or the techniques she uses. Her piece, “Autumn is Wistful” shown at QuiltCon, uses reverse appliqué to create the text and is hand tied – a technique not frequently seen at quilt shows. This use of a visible knot that holds the piece together adds a sense of time to the piece and a peek into her past. Tied quilts can be important, too. Make Your Own Mark Handwork isn’t only for show quilts or traditional masterpieces. It can be part of everyone’s quiltmaking practice. Keep in mind that the very act of making something—anything—with your own two hands is a radical act. It takes skill, time, patience, and intention. These are all qualities that are honed with experience and practice. As noted by Carolyn Friedlander “… choosing to make stuff at a time when we really don’t need to is a bold move. This shared enthusiasm and excitement can only lead to more opportunities for us to connect and more meaningful ways for us to leave our own marks.” Aren’t we fortunate to have such strong examples within the modern quilt movement of those exquisite qualities?

Detail of Hunt Harriot.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Hunt Harriot by Carolyn Friedlander. Photo by John Pearson.


“Pallbearer” Quilt by Margaret Abramshe

Call for Entries

Pieces of the Past QUILT COMPETITION

Announcing the first ever Quilt Competition – Pieces of the Past – brought to you by Quilting Daily. In celebration of fresh starts and new beginnings, we are honoring the community and industry we treasure by providing an opportunity to share amazing quilts with a world-wide audience. All winners will be published in one of our 4 quilting publications.

Other prizes include: First Place Winner Second Place Winner Third Place Winner 10 Honorable Mentions Early Bird Deadline: June 1, 2020

$1000 $500 $300

Final Deadline: June 30, 2020

Enter by the Early Bird Deadline and save $10 off your entry fee

A division of Golden Peak Media

Inspire • Educate • Connect

Learn more at QuiltingDaily.com


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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Easy Finished Size: 48½ x 62” Finished Blocks: 4½”

Square Spaces materials Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted.

Quilt designed by Betsy Vinegrad. Fabric: Betsy used fabrics from her collection.

Cream Solid 3½ yards for blocks, border, and binding Blue #1 and Blue #2 ¼ yard each for blocks Blue #3 ⅜ yard for blocks Blue #4 ½ yard for blocks Blue #5 ⅛ yard for blocks Blue #6 ⅜ yard for patches Backing 3¼ yards Batting 53” x 70”

Betsy Vinegrad Short Hills, NJ Instagram: Betsy.Vinegrad

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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1

Betsy used a monochomatic palette to create this stunning and simple quilt. Constructed primarily with bands, Square Spaces comes together in no time. We recommend using a design wall to lay out the patches and blocks before sewing the rows together to ensure correct placement and orientation.

2

Making the Units and Blocks

Band A Make 2

Sew 2"-wide cream strips and a blue #1 strip together to make a band A. Make 2 band A’s total. Cut the bands at 2" increments to make 21 unit 1’s total. 2”

Unit 1 Cut 21

Sew 15 ⁄8"-wide cream strips and a blue #2 strip together as shown to make a band B. Make 2 band B’s total. Cut the bands at 23 ⁄4" increments to make 22 unit 2’s total. Band B Make 2

Cream Solid 6 strips 4½” x WOF for border 7 strips 2½” x WOF for binding 2 strips 2⅜” x WOF for band E 4 strips 2” x WOF for band A’s 4 strips 1⅝” x WOF for band B’s 4 strips 1¼” x WOF for band C’s 6 strips ⅞” x WOF for band D’s 20 rectangles 2⅜” x 5˝ (E) 42 rectangles 2˝ x 5˝ (A) 44 rectangles 1⅝˝ x 5˝ (B) 44 rectangles 1¼˝ x 5˝ (C) 44 rectangles ⅞˝ x 5˝ (D) Blue #1 2 strips 2” x WOF for band A’s Blue #2 2 strips 2¾” x WOF for band B’s Blue #3 2 strips 3½” x WOF for band C’s Blue #4 3 strips 4¼” x WOF for band D’s Blue #5 1 strip 1¼” x WOF for band E Blue #6 11 squares 4½˝ (F)

About This Quilt

2¾”

Unit 2 Cut 22

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

3½”

Unit 3 Cut 22

Sew 7⁄8"-wide cream strips and a blue #4 strip together to make a band D. Make 3 band D’s total. Cut the bands at 41 ⁄4" increments to make 22 unit 4’s total.

4¼”

Unit 4 Cut 22

Sew 23 ⁄8"-wide cream strips and a blue #5 strip together to make a band E. Cut the band at 11⁄4" increments to make 10 unit 5’s total. Band E Make 1

Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances. Border strips will be pieced and cut to exact length needed. You may want to make them longer to allow for piecing variations.

Sew 11 ⁄4"-wide cream strips and a blue #3 strip together to make a band C. Make 2 band C’s total. Cut the bands at 31 ⁄2" increments to make 22 unit 3’s total. Band C Make 2

Monocromatic made modern...

Band D Make 3

cutting

1¼”

Unit 5 Cut 10


Referring to block diagrams, join units and patches as shown to make blocks V–Z in quantities indicated. C

A B

B

A

C

Block V Make 21

D

Block W Make 22

D

Block Y Make 22

E

5

Quilting and Finishing

Layer and baste together the backing, batting, and quilt top.

Refer to the Assembly Diagram. Sew patches and blocks together as shown to make a row. Make 12 rows; sew the rows together.

4

Quilt horizontal wavy lines over the quilt surface. Bind the quilt.

Adding the Borders

Block X Make 22

E

3

Assembling the Quilt Center

Refer to “Borders” in Basic Lessons. Join cream border strips and cut to sizes shown in Assembly Diagram. Matching centers and ends, sew border side strips to quilt; repeat to add top and bottom strips.

Block Z Make 10

4½˝ x 49˝

4½˝ x 54½˝

Quilting Placement

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Designer Spotlight Jo Moury

Nain's Magic Room Jo Moury's professional quilting career began when she entered and won a pattern contest sponsored by Quiltmaker and Electric Quilt. Since then, she has graced our pages with her beautiful quilts. Her workmanship is a constant source of amazement for our editors, so we wanted to learn a little more about how she works. Join us as we tour Jo Moury's studio.

Images courtesy of Jo Moury.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

A Studio is Born Once upon a time we had four bedrooms in our home, but one of them has been transformed into a very special place. When she was just a little girl, my granddaughter dubbed it “Nain’s Magic Room” and the name has stuck. Over the years my quilting passion grew and so did my “stuff ”. Bit by bit the room transformed from a shared bedroom/sewing space into a single purpose studio. We put in lots of ceiling lights and electrical outlets, added shelving for fabric storage in the closet and laid a porcelain tile floor, so it is easy to roll out the cutting table and sewing cabinet to their full sizes.

I love the space; it is mine to keep organized or let go messy depending on where I am in the design process. Layout and Workflow Surprisingly one of the things I really like about the space is that it isn’t huge. A 10 by 12-foot room is plenty of space and managing the space really does keep me organized. My first love is, and probably always will be appliqué. I keep all my smaller pieces of batik in large project boxes organized by color in the cutting table cabinet spaces. When I’m designing an appliqué project, these bins come out, and it often looks like a color wheel exploded on the floor!


The sewing is laid out in a typical work triangle with the cutting table on the short wall and my Bernina at a large window for additional light and peaceful scenery. A small bookcase by my mid-arm table holds project bins with my current works-in-progress. The reach-in closet was turned into my main fabric storage area and I literally have a ton of fabric! I keep it folded in wire closet storage baskets from Home Depot. There are six baskets for the colors, one each for light and dark neutral. Then if this wasn’t enough, I have baskets for multicolor fabrics by themes...1930’s and Civil War reproductions, fall, floral, Christmas, and patriotic. The good news is that the basket system keeps the stash “manageable”. When a basket gets too full, I know it’s time to do a little purging and our church charity quilting group is most often the recipient. It’s kind of amusing to see some fabric that I just had to have make its way into the giveaway pile! Both my taste in fabrics as well as fabric style sure have changed over the years.

A Place For Everything I would say my best storage tip is to have a place for everything and (at least) try to keep everything in that place. I’ll admit I love to organize things…the spice cabinet, linen closet, clothing, table linens…you name it and I attempt to keep it organized. Notice I did say “try”. I’m one the few people who can happily browse any store and find interesting storage containers at places like Cabela’s, office supply, and auto supply stores.

• A pretty mail holder from the office supply store—keeps all these rulers upright and readily accessible. Generally, each of these rulers has specific instructions and so I keep the ruler tucked inside the instruction folder; both are ready when I need them. • Cool pencil holders keep my Sharpie markers separate from the watersoluble ones and my drawing pencils separate from quilt marking chalk ones. • A large size pill organizer from the local grocery store to keep my sewing machine needles organized by size and function. • A caddy for baby items keeps my additional HandiQuilter machine feet and cleaning tools as well as my quilting practice sandwiches all in one place and easy to reach. • A kitchen drawer organizer from Lowes sits on my Sweet 16 table, it holds bobbins, the thread I’m using on my current project, and of course, my quilting gloves. • Tiny zip top bags for beading hold a few yards of rickrack or heavy threads for embroidery. I love thread…almost as much as I love fabric! My husband will often comment “how can you possibly need more thread” Well, he doesn’t quilt, and we all know why we need more thread! Once again, I keep piecing thread in a thread organizer bin and all my different weight quilting threads together on spindles on the top shelf of the closet. I guess I could sort these by color, but I’ve found it helpful to keep special use fibers like Superior’s Glitter or Sew Sassy together. This way, if I’m looking for a little bling or wanting a quilting motif to pop, the

Patio Posies* appeared in McCall’s Quilting March/April 2019

threads are together, and I just need to pick the one that makes me happy. In the same way, I keep all my perle cotton and embellishment threads from the Thread Gatherer and Painters Thread each in their own bin. My silk appliqué threads have their own chest that I keep in the family room where I do all my hand work. Everything has a place and I know where to find it when I need it! One last tip to keep in mind when you are organizing your space, save a little bit of room for things that just make you happy! For me, this space is the top of the bookcase I use to hold my work-in-progress bin. My Gram introduced me to sewing, embroidery, and all thing creative when I was just a little girl. A small basket holds some antique lace and trims she used, as well as a few of her hankies. When will I use them…I don’t know, but I think of her and smile every time I see them. A couple of quilting angles are gifts from friends, these and “Alexa” all combine to make the space mine. *A digital pattern is available for purchase at QuiltingCompany.com

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Intermediate Finished Size: 22” x 22”

Egg Hunt Quilt designed and made by Jo Moury. Fabric: Hand Dyed Wool from Weeks Dye Works.

materials

cutting

Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted.

Patches are lettered in order of use.

Cream Wool ¾ yard for background Assorted Dark Brown, Medium Brown, Pink, Green, Blue, Orange, Yellow, Purple, Peach, and Red Wools scraps for appliqué Purple Wool ¾ for backing Buttons 40 ¼”—½” buttons Mini Green Rickrack (⅛”) 1 yard White Cotton Textured Yarn Embroidery Floss Fabric Glue

Jo Moury Haymarket, VA

Cream Wool 1 square 23” (A) for background Assorted Wools 1 pattern B 1 pattern C 1 pattern D 3 each patterns E–G 6 each patterns H–I 2 each patterns J–K 8 pattern L 1 pattern M 1 pattern Mr Purple Wool 1 square 23” (N) for backing The appliqué patterns are found on the pattern sheet.

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Every day is a hoppy day with this adorable Easter scene.

1

About This Quilt

Get ready for Easter with this festive table topper by the talented Jo Moury. Jo used beautiful embroidery stitches and whimsical embellishments to make her design sing! For the flower stems, she used Painter’s Threads Ricrac that features a delightful metallic accent. She decorated her eggs with Sprinkles! Hand-dyed Buttons and Handmade Flower Buttons, all from Just Another Button Company (justanotherbuttoncompany.com). For the embroidery, she used an assortment of regular and variegated embroidery floss and a variety of stitches to embellish her design. Study the photo carefully if you want to create a similar look.

3

Assembling the Quilt Center

Refer to the Assembly Diagram. Lay cream A on top of purple N and pin or glue-baste in place. Sew a palistrina stitch along the edge of cream A, tacking cream A to purple N as you sew. Sew a blanket stitch around purple N to complete the quilt.

A

2

Making the Units, Sections, and Blocks

Make 8 paper copies of template A and tape together to make a full-size template A. Cut out cream A. Repeat with template N and purple wool. Fold A in half both ways and lightly crease the folds. Using the creases and appliqué diagram as guides, arrange the patches on A in alphabetical order as shown. Pin or gluebaste in place. Tack rickrack in place using green thread. Use matching thread and a blanket stitch to appliqué the B–K, M, and Mr patches in place. Outline the tops of I with a bouillon stitch. Sew French knots around each G. Use a stem stitch to appliqué each L and to create the leg detail. Using white yarn, create the tail with French knots. Create nose using pink embroidery floss and a satin stitch. Sew on a black button eye and embellish the eggs with assorted buttons.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Appliqué, Button & Embroidery Placement


N

Assembly

1

2

3 1

2

3

French Knots

4

5 Bouillon Stitch

Blanket Stitch

A Satin Stitch

Stem Stitch

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Wonderfully Wool by Tracy Mooney

Wool projects are dreamily textural making many quilters swoon with delight. But crafting a wool stash can be a challenge to those newly bitten by the wool bug. We have put together a list of a few of our favorite wool suppliers that you can find at your local quilt shop or online from the designers themselves.

Neked Sheep Wool Company All of the wool at the Neked Sheep Wool Company is hand-dyed and felted and ready to use in wool appliqué and rug hooking. Using the finest quality wool and premium dyes, the bright and vivid colors will enhance any project you choose to make. Kelly Ann is the head “woolite” and is happy to assist with all of your wool needs. www.nekedsheepwool.com

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Primitive Gatherings by for Moda Primitive Gatherings offers quality hand-dyed wool in over 70 colors and in four sizes. They offer yardage, as well as pre-cuts and bundles. Because the fabrics are hand-dyed, slight variations in color and sizes occur. Available at quilt shops and online. www.primitivegatherings.us


Weeks Dye Works For over 25 year now, Weeks Dye Works has created threads, wools, and linens. With hand-dyed wool fat-quarters in 85 colors, each color is available in solid, houndstooth, herringbone, and glen plaid. Available at quilt shops. If you are having trouble finding their wool in your area, simply email sales@weeksdyeworks.com for information. www.weeksdyeworks.com

Tracy Trevathan Designs Tracy Trevethan Designs is a small independent design and dye studio in Jordan, Minnesota. They produce soft and colorful hand-dyed wools in 138 colors, featuring mottled solids and patterned wools. Tracy's color palette is contemporary with lots of bright and clear colors. They also create their own line of hand-dyed wool threads for appliqué and embroidery. These threads currently come in 27 different color collections and coordinate with their Hand-dyed Wool Six Pack Collections. Available at quilt shops. If you can't find their wool at your local quilt shop, be sure to visit their online store for a list of stores. www.TracyTrevethan.com

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WoolWerks, I & II By Kim Schaefer for Andover Fabrics The Little Quilt Company has two collections of the finest quality pre-felted 100% wool in a luscious rainbow of colors. WoolWerks I and WoolWerks II by Kim Schaefer for Andover Fabrics is available in 5" & 10" square packs in assorted colors and there is yardage available in 12 colors. Available at quilt shops.

Sue Spargo Sue Spargo’s 100% wool is milled in the USA and hand-dyed in house in their Ohio based studio. It has a superior grade and ultimate thickness to add amazing dimension with layering to your projects. Their wool is dyed to match Sue Spargo's Ellana Wool Thread. Available at quilt shops and online. www.suespargo.com

www.andoverfabrics.com www.littlequiltcompany.com

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Lori Holt Wool (90% wool/10% Nylon) for Riley Blake Designs Lori Holt of Bee in My Bonnet is known for her rich and vibrant colors and delightful vintage design. She has created these woven wool solids to mix and match into all of your projects. With a wide variety of colors, there is something for everyone. Lori's wool is also available in pre-cuts, with two sets to choose from—the Warm & Cozy Bundle and the Cool & Comfy Bundle—which are available in 5" Stackers and 10" Stackers. Made of 90% wool and 10% nylon, Lori’s wool is a dream to use. Available at quilt shops and online.

Stacy West Wool for Riley Blake Designs Stacy West of Buttermilk Basin has done it again with her Woven Wool Collection. Known for her love of wool and traditional colors, these 100% wool basics are as amazing to create with as they are beautiful. Just think of the projects you’ll be able to create with these new wools! Available in shops and online June 2020. www.buttermilkbasin.com

www.rileyblakedesigns.com

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Intermediate Finished Size: 17½” x 37½”

Penny Vine

Quilt designed and made by Charisma Horton. Fabric: Charisma used fabrics from her collection. Pillow fill provided by Fairfield.

materials

cutting

Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted.

Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances.

Assorted Prints ⅞ yard total for units White Tonal ⅜ yard for background and units Green Wool ⅛ yard for leaf appliqué Assorted Wools ¼ yard for circle appliqués Yellow Solid 1 fat eighth (a fat eighth is approximately 9” x 20”) for border Teal Solid and Dark Pink Solid ⅛ yard each for border Green Print ¾ yard for pillow back Batting 11” x 31” Embrodery Floss Pillow 18” x 36” Fusible Web or Fabric Glue

Assorted Prints 6 matching pattern A 1 contrasting pattern A Crazy patches for units 2 & 3 (see Crazy Piecing sidebar) White Tonal 1 rectangle 9½” x 29½” (B) Green Wool 8 pattern E Assorted Wools Cut a total of: 10 pattern C 12 pattern D Yellow Solid 2 rectangles 1½” x 8½” (F) Teal Solid and Dark Pink Solid Cut from each: 1 rectangle 1½” x 30½” (G) Green Print 2 rectangles 22” x 17½” (H)

Charisma Horton Ephrata, WA charismascorner.com

The appliqué patterns, templates, and embroidery guide are found on the pattern sheet.

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Pretty blooms abound in Charisma’s latest work of art.

1

About This Pillow

Penny Vine uses a fabulous combination of techniques that are sure to please. From hand appliqué and embroidery to improv crazy piecing, get ready to get your sew on!

2

Making the Pillow Center

Refer to “English Paper Piecing” in Basic Lessons. Join assorted print A’s as shown to make unit 1. A A A

Unit 1 Make 1

Fold white tonal B in half both way and lightly crease the folds. Prepare C, D, and E patches for appliqué. Using the creases and Appliqué & Embroidery Placement Diagram as guides, arrange the patches on B as shown; fuse or glue in place. Refer to Appliqué & Embroidery Placement Diagram, Embroidery Guide, and embroidery stitch diagrams for the following steps. Use a blind stitch to sew unit 1 to B. Use a backstitch to make the vines and a lazy daisy stitch for the embroidered leaves. Blanket stitch around edges of each wool appliqué. Use a long stitch and French knots to make a star in each flower center. Use a running stich to outline each flower. Referring to Assembly Diagram, join a yellow solid F to each end of pillow center as shown. Join dark pink G to top of pillow center and teal solid G to bottom.

B

Appliqué & Embroidery Placement

G

F

G

Assembly

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Refer to crazy piecing sidebar. Piece 20 unit 2’s and trim to 4¼" x 4¼".

Unit 2 Make 20

In the same manner, piece 4 unit 3’s and trim to 4¼" x 5½".

Unit 3 Make 4

Join 2 unit 3’s as shown in Assembly Diagram. Make 2 total and join to sides of pillow. Join 10 unit 2’s as shown. Make 2 total and join to top and bottom of pillow.


3

Quilting

Crazy Piecing

Layer and baste together the pillow front and batting.

Start by cutting out a central patch. Lay cental patch rightside up on a piece of foundation paper or fabric that is larger than the finished unit size. Lay second patch right-side down, aligning it with edge of central patch. Sew through all layers, using a ¼” seam allowance. Open second patch and press. Add next patch along edge, then sew and press open. Continue adding strips clockwise until foundation is covered, alternating sizes and shapes as desired.

Refer to the quilting placement diagram. Quilt a swirl in center of hexagon. Quilt small swirls around appliqué as shown. Quilt a loopy line in border 1 and freeform feathers in the crazy-pieced border.

4

Pillow Assembly

Fold one short edge of 1 green print H under ¼"; press. Fold same edge under another ¼"; press. Topstitch 1⁄8” from the first folded edge to complete hem. Repeat for remaining green H. ¼”

Quilting Placement

⅛”

With right side up, place the pillow front on a flat work surface. Layer green G’s on top with right sides facing and hemmed edges toward the center so that all raw edges match.

Backstitch

Using a ¼" seam allowance, stitch through all layers on all sides. Trim corners. Turn pillow cover right side out through opening. Push out corners and press. Insert pillow form into the completed pillow cover.

Running Stitch

1 Long Stitch

Blind Stitch

2

Lazy Daisy Stitch

3

French Knots

Blanket Stitch

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Easy Finished Size: 12” x 16” Finished Block: 6” x 10”

Furever Friend

Quilt designed and made by Jen Daly. Fabric: Bonnie and Camille Wovens for Moda Fabrics. s

materials

cutting

Fabric yardage assumes 42” usable width of fabric (WOF) unless otherwise noted.

Patches are lettered in order of use. Measurements include ¼˝ seam allowances.

Cream Solid 1 fat eighth (a fat eighth is approximately 9” x 20”) for center Blue Plaid ⅝ yard for front and back Tan Wool 7” x 7” scrap for dog Batting 13” x 17” Blue Embroidery Floss Water Soluable Marking Pen

Cream Solid 1 rectangle 6½” x 10½” (A) Blue Plaid 2 squares 12½” (E) 2 rectangles 3½” x 16½” (C) 2 rectangles 3½” x 6½” (B) Tan Wool 1 pattern D

Jen Daly Grantham, NH jendalyquilts.com

The appliqué patterns is found on the pattern sheet.

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Human’s best friend is the focus in this adorable pillow by Jen Daly.

1

The inspiration for this pillow is her family’s beloved dog, Casey. Replace the labrador for your own breed of dog by finding a silhouette of your breed online, scaling it to fit this pillow, and making your own template.

A

2

Making the Pillow Front

Referring to Assembly Diagram, join blue plaid B’s and C’s to cream A as shown to complete front pillow assembly. Assembly

Fold pillow front in half both ways and lightly crease the folds. Use the creases and Appliqué & Embroidery placement diagram as guides to trace embroidery motif onto cream A using a water soluble marking pen. Using blue embroidery floss and a backstitch, embroider words. Baste batting to wrong side of pillow front.

D

Prepare tan D for fusible appliqué. Use the creases and Appliqué & Embroidery Placement diagram as guides to arrange tan D on cream A as shown; fuse in place. Use matching thread and a machine blanket stitch to sew around D.

3

Assembling Pillow Back

Fold under one short side of each blue plaid E and press. Topstitch 1⁄4" from folded edge. Overlap the sewn edges, making the pillow back 16½"-wide. Lay pillow back on top of pillow front with right sides facing. Sew around all 4 sides. Turn pillow right side out.

Appliqué & Embroidery Placement

¼”

½”

E

Machine Blanket Stitch

70

Backstitch

Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

E


F rs

Learn to free-motion quilt with any sewing machine! Take your quilting to the next level with two online workshops from Eric Drexler. From stitching for beginners to beyond the basics,enroll now and master your free-motion quilting! Enroll now at QuiltingCompany.com/Courses

Sponsored B


Resizing Blocks It’s not as difficult as you might think—let’s get started! Understanding the Grid

Understanding Seam Allowance

It’s helpful to understand that most geometric blocks fit into a grid. We have placed a grid on top of this block. You can see that the grid is 4 x 4. For the original 12" block, the finished size of each square in the grid is 12" ÷ 4 = 3". To easily resize the block, pick a new finished block size that is evenly divisible by 4—let’s say 8". Then find the finished size of each square in the grid as follows: 8" ÷ 4 = 2". Each square of the grid for an 8" block is 2" finished. To resize the patches, add seam allowances to the new finished size as described in the next section.

So far we’ve considered only the finished size of patches. Once the calculations above are done, seam allowances still need to be added. For squares and rectangles, it’s pretty straightforward: take the finished size of the patch and add ½" to get the cutting dimensions. For half-square triangles (also called trianglesquares), add 7⁄8" to the finished size to get the cut size. For quarter-square triangles, add 1¼" to the finished size to get the cut size.

finished size + ⅞˝ ¼”

Here is another example. It is on a 3 x 3 grid. For the original 12" block, the finished size of each square in the grid is 12" ÷ 3 = 4". Pick a new finished block size that is evenly divisible by 3—let’s say 15". Each square of the grid size will finish at 5" (15" ÷ 3 = 5"). You need to take this block a step further. If each corner section is 5" and there are 4 patches across the section, divide 5" by 4 and you get 1.25". Each of those square patches is 1¼" finished. It’s not evenly divisible by 4, but it is still a common fraction for rotary cutting.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

+ finished size +

⅜” +

finished size + 1¼˝ ¼”

¼”

⅜”

+ finished size +

⅜” +

Half-Square Triangles

Quarter-Square Triangles

¼”


Foundations: Special Considerations Resize foundation patterns using proportion in the same way as applique patches. There is one main difference related to seam allowances. When a foundation is enlarged or reduced using a copier, the seam allowances will be enlarged or reduced as well. So enlarge or reduce the foundation as desired, ignoring what happens to the area outside the seamline. Then to the “body” of the foundation, add ¼" on all sides for the seam allowance, as shown in red below. ¼”

1½” finished size

Understanding Fractions and Decimals It’s useful to know about fraction to decimal conversion, too. Here are the fractions commonly used by quilters, converted to decimals. Fraction to Decimal Conversion 1 ⁄ 8 = .125 ¼ = .25 1 ⁄ 3 = .33 3 ⁄ 8 = .375 ½ = .5 5 ⁄ 8 = .625 3 ⁄4 = .75 7⁄ 8 = .875

Seam Allowance 2

A Recap of the Formulas

1

4

Determine the grid Finished block size ÷ Grid = Finished square in each grid

3 6

New patch dimensions (add ¼" to all sides; add 1" to background patch when appliquéing and then trim after appliqué)

5 7

Squares and rectangles Finished size + ½"

Original Size Foundation

¼”

Triangle-squares or half-square triangles Finished size + 7 ⁄8"

2¼” finished size

Quarter-square triangles Finished size + 1¼"

Seam Allowance 2

1

Proportion (use for changing the size of appliqué and foundations) New size ÷ Original size × 100 = Proportion (%)

4 3 6 5 7

Foundation Enlarged 150%

As a free web bonus, we’ve created handy worksheets you can use to enlarge or reduce blocks for your projects. Find the download link at QuiltingCompany.com.

Quiltmaker #192 QuiltingCompany.com

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selvages) or crosswise (perpendicular to the selvages) grain of fabric, especially the sides that will be on the outside edges of the quilt block. We indicate lengthwise or crosswise grain with an arrow on the pattern piece.

basic lessons

Cutting

We recommend that you read all of the instructions before starting a project and that you cut and sew one block before cutting all of your fabric. Using a rotary cutter, mat and an acrylic ruler, cut the shape to the size indicated in the cutting list. Pressing tabs indicate the direction to press the seam allowances. Our patterns list finished block sizes, which are typically ½" smaller than unfinished block sizes because they do not include seam allowances.

Basic Quilting Supplies • Rotary cutter and mat • Acrylic ruler: Many shapes and sizes are available; a good one to start with is 6" x 24" with ¼" and 1 ⁄8" markings • Scissors: A separate pair for paper and fabric • Sewing machine • ¼" foot • Walking foot

• Darning foot • Pins • Ironing board & iron • Marking pencils/ markers/etc. • Needles • Thimble • Safety pins • Template plastic • Thread

Preparing Your Fabric We recommend that you pre-wash your fabrics. A shrinkage factor is included in our yardage computations.

Machine Piecing It is important to cut accurately and to sew exact ¼" seams.

Templates Trace the patterns on template plastic and cut out accurately.

Planning

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Piecing Align the cut edges of fabric with the edge of the presser foot if it is ¼" wide. If not, place masking tape on the throat plate of your machine ¼" away from the needle to guide you. Sew all the way to the cut edge.

Appliqué The instructions give the appliqué technique used by the designer. Fusible appliqué patterns are already reversed. To convert between fusible designs and turned-edge, you may need to reverse the design. No turn-under allowances are given on appliqué patterns. When positioning patches, leave enough space around the outside edges of the block for trimming and seam allowance. Finger crease the fabric in half lengthwise, crosswise and diagonally as needed to form guidelines for placement of the patches. Use a tear-away stabilizer on the back to support machine stitching that is dense (like satin stitching) and to keep the fabric from tunneling. Choose a stabilizer that matches the weight of the fabric. After the appliqué is complete, gently remove the stabilizer.

Fusible Appliqué

Techniques

Measure, mark and cut the binding and border strips before cutting patches from the same fabric. Cut larger patches before smaller ones. For best use of the fabric, arrange patches with cutting lines close or touching. One or more straight sides of the patch should follow the lengthwise (parallel to the

1 2 3 4 5

About our Patterns

5 4 3 2 1

Getting Started

To find the grainline of your fabric for rotary cutting, hold the fabric with selvages parallel in front of you. Keeping the selvages together, slide the edge closest to you to one side or the other until the fabric hangs Cut straight, without wrinkles or folds. Then lay the fabric down on your cutting mat and cut perpendicular to the fold line. Use this cut edge as your straight-of-grain line. Many patches can be cut from strips of fabric by rotary cutting. First, cut a strip of fabric the width needed. Then, cross-cut strips into patches. To cut from a template, place the template face down on the wrong side of the fabric and trace with a sharp pencil. Reverse (r) templates should be placed face up on the wrong side of the fabric before tracing.

B

B A B

B

Raw-edge appliqué using paper-backed fusible web is a fast and easy way to appliqué. Add 3 ⁄16" underlap allowance to those edges that lie under another. Trace the pattern pieces, also drawing the needed underlap allowances, on the paper side of fusible web leaving at least ½" between all the pieces. Cut about 3 ⁄16" outside each drawn line. To eliminate stiffness, try this variation for patches larger than 1": Cut out the center of the fusible web ¼" inside the drawn line, making a ring of fusible web. Following the manufacturer’s directions, iron the web, paper side up, to the wrong side of the fabric. Cut out the shape on the drawn line. Carefully pull away the paper backing. Fuse the patches to the background where marked. To finish the raw edges, machine satin stitch with a colored thread, or zigzag or blanket stitch using matching or invisible thread.


English Paper Piecing

Stitch-and-Flip

With this method, every fabric patch is basted around a stiff piece of paper and then the edges of patches are whip stitched together. Two templates are needed: one from which to cut the papers and one from which to cut the fabric patches. Use the dashed lines of the pattern to make one plastic template (for papers); Paper use the solid lines to make another plastic template (for fabric patches). Wrong Side Using the smaller template, trace and of Fabric cut one piece of stiff paper for each patch in the design. Using the larger template, trace and cut the number of fabric patches needed. Baste Center the paper template on the wrong side of the patch; pin together. Fold the first seam allowance over the edge of the paper template and hold in place. Baste the seam allowance Whipstitch through all thicknesses. When you reach the end of the seam allowance, fold over the next seam allowance and repeat stitching. Continue in this manner, making sharp folds at each corner, until all the seam allowances are basted in place. For some shapes, the folding will create tails; leave the tails hanging out as shown. Backstitch at the end to secure the stitches. Repeat for each patch. To assemble the pieces, place patches right sides together. With a single strand of thread, whipstitch the patches together from corner to corner, catching only the folded edges. Repeat to join all patches. When all patches are joined, clip the basting threads and remove them from each patch. Carefully pull out the paper templates.

Align a patch (* in this example) on a corner of a unit or second patch right sides together. Mark a diagonal line on the * patch from corner to corner and sew on the marked line. Trim the seam allowance to ¼" as shown. Flip the * patch open and press.

*

Foundation Piecing Make paper copies of each foundation. Sew 2 patches in numerical order. Center fabric under 1 3 #1 extending beyond the seam allowances, wrong side of the fabric to the unprinted side of 4 the paper, and pin in place from the paper side. Turn fabric side up. Using a patch of fabric 2 3 sufficient to cover #2 and its seam allowances, 4 position the #2 patch right sides together on patch #1 as shown, so that the fabric’s edge extends at least ¼" into the #2 area. Pin in 2 1 place. Set a very short stitch length on your 3 sewing machine (18–20 stitches per inch or 4 1.5 mm). Turn the assembly paper side up. Stitch through the paper and the fabric layers along the printed seam line, beginning and ending ¼" beyond the ends of the line. Turn assembly to the fabric side. Trim the 4 seam allowances to approximately ¼". Press the fabric open to cover #2 and seam allowances. Repeat this process to complete the blocks or sections. Use a rotary cutter and ruler to trim ¼" outside the seam line of the foundation, creating a seam allowance. Once all the seams around a foundation section have been sewn, remove the paper foundations.

Yo-yos Fast Flying Geese Align 2 small squares on opposite corners of the large square, right sides together. Draw a diagonal line as shown and then stitch ¼" out from both sides of the line. Cut apart on the marked line. With the small squares on top, open out the small squares and press the unit. On the remaining corner of each of these units, align a small square. Draw a line from corner to corner and sew ¼" out on both sides of the line. Cut on the marked lines, open the small squares and press. Each set of 1 large square and 4 small squares makes 4 Flying Geese. These units will finish at the correct size for each pattern. No trimming is needed.

Triangle-Squares With right sides together and the lighter fabric on top, pair one square of each color that makes the unit. On the lighter patch, draw a diagonal line from corner to corner. Stitch ¼" out from both sides of the line. Cut apart on the marked line. With the darker fabric up, open out the top patch and press the unit. A pair of squares will yield 2 units. These units will finish at the correct size for each pattern. No trimming is needed.

Using the circle diameter called for in the pattern (approximately twice the finished yo-yo size plus ½"), make a template. On the wrong side of the fabric, use the template to draw a circle. Cut out the circle on the marked line. Turn under a scant ¼" to the wrong side of the fabric. Sew a short basting stitch around the circle, leaving a knot and thread tail at the beginning of the circle. Pull on the threads to gather the fabric, making sure the right side of the fabric is on the outside of the yo-yo. Take a few stitches to secure the gathering stitches and tie off. Clip the threads close to the knot.

Borders Squared borders are added first to the sides of the quilt center, then to the top and bottom. Lay the quilt top flat on a large table or the floor. Lay both border #1 side strips down the vertical center of the quilt top and smooth carefully into place. Slip a small cutting mat under the quilt top (you’ll need to do this at the top and the bottom) and use a rotary cutter and ruler to trim the border strips to the same length as the quilt top. Matching centers and ends, sew the border side strips to the quilt. Gently press the seam allowances away from the quilt center. Repeat this process along the horizontal center of the quilt, including the newly added borders. Repeat for any remaining borders. Continued on page 76.

Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Marking Trace the quilting motif on tracing paper. Place tracing paper under the quilt top with a light source behind. Lightly mark the design on the quilt top with a hard lead pencil or a marker of your choice. Test any marking product for removability before using it on your quilt. Straight lines may be “marked” as you quilt by using masking tape that is pulled away after quilting along its edge.

Backing and Basting Make the quilt backing 4"–8" larger than the quilt top. Remove the selvages to avoid puckers. Usually 2 or 3 lengths must be sewn together; press the seam allowances open. Place the backing wrong side up on a flat surface, stretch slightly and tape or pin in place. Smooth the batting over the backing. Center the quilt top right side up on top of the batting. Pin the layers as necessary to secure them while basting.

Basting for Machine Quilting Tops to be machine quilted may be basted with rustproof safety pins. Begin at the center and place pins 3" to 4" apart, avoiding lines to be quilted.

Basting for Hand Quilting Beginning in the center of the quilt, baste horizontal and vertical lines 4" to 6" apart.

Quilting Quilt in the ditch refers to quilting right next to the seam line on the side without seam allowances. Outline quilting refers to quilting ¼" from the seam line. Echo quilting refers to quilting one or more lines of stitching in uniform distances away from a patch.

Machine Quilting Before machine quilting, bring bobbin thread to the top of the quilt so it doesn’t get caught as you quilt: lower presser foot, hold the top thread and take one stitch down and up, lift the presser foot to release the thread tension and tug on the top thread to draw a loop of the bobbin thread to the top of the quilt. Pull the bobbin thread to the top. Lower needle into the same hole created by the initial stitch, lower the presser foot, and start quilting. A walking foot is used for straight-line or ditch quilting. To free-motion quilt, drop (or cover) the feed dogs and use a darning foot. Start and end quilting lines with ¼" of very short stitches to secure.

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20

Curved Piecing

ve ca

ve Cut patches using a small-bladed rotary cutter to maneuver curves. With right sides together, pin the convex patch to the inside, or concave, curve of the second patch at the middle, the ends and a few places in between. Sew with the concave patch on the top, stopping frequently with the needle down to adjust the fabric to lay flat under the needle and presser foot. After stitching, press the seam allowance toward the convex piece.

x

Co n

Mitered borders are added by sewing border strips to all sides of the quilt center and then mitering each corner. When joining each border strip to the quilt, begin and end stitches ¼" from the quilt top corners and backstitch. Referring to the diagrams, fold the quilt right sides together diagonally at one corner. Flip the seam allowance toward the quilt top, match seam lines and pin through both layers about 3" from the corner. Place a ruler along the folded edge of the quilt top, intersecting the final stitch in the border seam and extending through the border strip. Draw a line from the stitch to the outer edge of the border. Pin together along the pencil line. Sew along the line to the edge of the border; backstitch. Trim seam allowances to ¼"; press open. Repeat for all corners.

Co n

Continued from page 75.

Binding Baste around the quilt 3⁄16" from the edges. Trim the batting and backing ¼" beyond the edge of the quilt top. To prepare the binding strips, place the ends of 2 binding strips perpendicular to each other, right sides together. Stitch diagonally and trim to ¼". In this way, join all the strips and press the seam allowances open. Cut the beginning of the binding strip at a 45˚ angle. Fold the binding strip in half along the length, wrong sides together, and press. Starting in the middle of a side and leaving a 6" tail of binding loose, align the raw edges of the binding with the edge of the quilt top. Begin sewing the binding to the quilt using a ¼" seam allowance. Stop ¼" from the first corner; backstitch. Remove ¼” the needle from the quilt and cut the threads. Fold the binding up, then back down even with edge of the quilt. Begin stitching ¼" from the binding fold, backstitch to secure and continue sewing. Repeat at all corners. When nearing the starting point, leave at least 12" of the quilt edge unbound and a 10" to 12" binding tail. Smooth the beginning tail over the ending tail. Following the cut edge of the beginning tail, draw a line on the ending tail at a 45º angle. To add a seam allowance, draw a cutting line ½" out from the first line; make sure it guides you to cut the binding tail ½" longer than the first line. Cut on this second line. To join the ends, place them right sides together. Offset the points so the strips match ¼" in from the edge and sew. Press the seam allowances open. Press the section of binding in half and then finish sewing it to the quilt. Trim away excess backing and batting in the corners only to eliminate bulk. Fold the binding to the back of the quilt, enclosing the extra batting and backing. Blind stitch the binding fold to the backing, just covering the previous line of stitching.

Bias Binding Bias binding strips are cut at a 45° angle to the grain of the fabric. They are stretchy and therefore ideal for binding curved edges. Make your first cut by aligning a 45° guideline on your acrylic ruler with the cut edge or selvage of your fabric. Use this new bias 45º edge to cut 21 ⁄4" strips for binding. Refer to “Binding” to finish the binding.


Log Cabin Blocks With a Twist! Join Kate Colleran in one of her helpful online workshops where she explores new techniques that take the traditional Log Cabin Block and innovate it into a creative and unique quilt. 3 Online Workshops to choose from! Log Cabin Blocks For Beginners Log Cabin Block Variations Log Cabin Quilts with a Modern Twist

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Quiltmaker • March/April ’20


Addicted to Scraps by

Bonnie Hunter

What do you do with all the scraps you save? “Use them!” declares Bonnie.

Jack’s Delight I can hear you now. “6¼" finished block size? You must be nuts!” I know, I know, I know–but ANY TIME you have a center unit of a block that is onpoint, it is going to either make the cutting for the whole block crazy so you can come up with a finished size that is “normal”–or–in this case, make the block with normal size units that turn to crazy-size when put on point within the block. I chose to work with normal sized units (A 3½" square in the center and half square triangles that finish at 1½" in the block) and let the block come out whatever size the crazy math deems it to be. I have 3½" squares in my Scrap User’s System a-plenty. And the use of 2" strips along with my Essential Triangle Tool made cutting the half-square triangles from matched light/dark pairs of 2" strips placed right sides together super quick. And because they are cut already right-sides-together, they are easy to sew. My inspiration? An antique quilt found in Abingdon, Virginia. I fell for this quilt hard. It was pieced in the early 1900’s from a scrap bag of plaids, stripes, and traditional muslin, set with an alternate block of plain tan squares. This quilt was quirky and charming in every sense of the word and I knew right away I wanted to hit my recycled fabric stash of plaids combined with civil war type shirtings and solid muslin and make my own variation my way. Other things to try–bright and modern prints! What about black corner triangles to give the block a more updated look? Of course, if you love reproduction fabrics as much as I do, give this a try in 1930’s prints, or civil war look fabrics. Any way you do it, this is a block you are going to love!

cutting

Join units and patches into diagonal rows as shown; join rows together and sew white D triangles corners to complete block.

Unit Make 8

D

C

Dark Purple Print 4 squares 2⅜” (A) 1 square 2⅜” cut to make 2 triangles (C) Cream Print 4 squares 2⅜” (A) 1 square 2⅜” cut to make 2 triangles (C) Medium Purple Print 1 square 3½” (B) White Solid 2 squares 3” cut to make 4 triangles (D)

To make Jack’s Delight, refer to “Triangle-Squares” in Basic Lessons. Use 1 dark purple print A and 1 cream print A to make unit as shown. Make 8 units total.

C

Finished Block: 6¼” For one block, cut the following:

B

Block Assembly

To learn more about Bonnie and see past blocks, visit quiltingcompany.com/ addicted-to-scraps-quiltmaker. Post pictures of your projects made with Bonnie’s blocks using #AddictedToScraps. Quiltmaker #192 • QuiltingCompany.com

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Vintage Vibe

Shasta Daisy Quilting

Posy

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This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


D Furever Friend This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


Rippling Waves Quilting

Cherry Surprise Pattern page 1 of 2 This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


C cut 2.5" circle for yo-yo

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Cherry Surprise Pattern page 2 of 2 This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


M&Mr

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Egg Hunt Pattern page 1 of 6 This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


C

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B

Egg Hunt Pattern page 2 of 6 This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


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Egg Hunt Pattern page 3 of 6 This line should measure 2".


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Egg Hunt This line should measure 2". Pattern page 4 of 6


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Egg Hunt Pattern page 5 of 6 This line should measure 2".


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Egg Hunt Pattern page 6 of 6 This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


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A E C D

Penny Vine Pattern page 1 of 2 This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020


E C D

Penny Vine Pattern page 2 of 2 This line should measure 2".

March/April '20 No. 192 QuiltingCompany.com Copyright 2020

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