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27th April – 2nd May 2014

Welcome to Malta! Â


Table of Contents PRACTICAL INFORMATION  

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PROGRAM

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LECTURES &  WORKSHOP  ABSTRACTS  

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MONDAY –  APRIL  28  

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COMMUNITY LEARNING  ANALYTICS   SHOW  ME  YOUR  PHD  AND  I’LL  SHOW  YOU  MINE   THE  POWER  OF  RESPONSIBILITY  THROUGH  TECHNOLOGY  ENHANCED  PEER  COACHING   GAMIFICATION  OF  LEARNING  DESIGN  ENVIRONMENTS   QUANTITATIVE  RESEARCH  METHODOLOGIES  AND  LEARNING  ANALYTICS  TO  EVALUATE  LEARNING  TOOLS  AND  PROCESSES   KEY  ACTIONS  TO  SUPPORT  AND  SHARE  YOUR  TEL  RESEARCH:  FROM  THEORY  TO  PRACTICE  (AN  INTERACTIVE  AND  COLLABORATIVE   LEARNING  ACTIVITY  FOR  EARLY-­‐  TO  MID-­‐STAGE  PHD  CANDIDATES)  

9 10   11   12   13  

TUESDAY –  APRIL  29  

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SUPPORTING SELF-­‐REGULATED  LEARNING  BY  PERSONAL  LEARNING  ENVIRONMENTS   16   TEL  FAILFAIRE  WORKSHOP   17   BASICS  OF  PAPER  WRITING  AND  PUBLISHING  IN  TEL   18   PERSONAL  LEARNING  ENVIRONMENTS  FOR  INQUIRY-­‐BASED  LEARNING   19   TEL  AROUND  THE  WORLD   20   WORK  WITH  THE  JTEL  COMMUNITY:  TRANSFORM  YOUR  IDEA  OF  TEL  INNOVATION  TO  WORK  COLLABORATION  (AN  INTERACTIVE   ACTIVITY  FOR  LATE  STAGE  PHD  CANDIDATES  &  EARLY  STAGE  RESEARCHERS)   21   WEDNESDAY  –  APRIL  30  

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FROM PLE  TO  CMOOCS   CREATE,  EXPERIMENT  &  COLLABORATE  ON  INQUIRY  LEARNING  WITH  ONLINE  LABS   DIGITAL  BADGES  IN  EDUCATION  

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THURSDAY –  MAY  1  

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VIRTUAL HOSPITALS  AS  A  TRAINING  ARENA  FOR  MEDICAL  STUDENTS:  CHALLENGES  AND  FUTURE  RESEARCH  DIRECTIONS   EDUCATIONAL  AUGMENTED  REALITY:  METHODOLOGY  AND  APPLICATION   THE  MOOCS’  (R)EVOLUTION:  A  POLICY  FRAMEWORK  ANALYSIS  AT  A  EUROPEAN  LEVEL   THE  USE  OF  USABILITY-­‐TESTING  IN  THE  DEVELOPMENT  OF  DIGITAL  GAME-­‐BASED  LEARNING  SCENARIOS   A  MOBILE  CONTEXT-­‐AWARE  LEARNING  SCHEDULE  FRAMEWORK  WITH  JAVA  LEARNING  OBJECTS   MOBILE  CONTEXTUALIZED  LEARNING  GAMES  FOR  DECISION  SUPPORT  TRAINING   INSTATECH  –  CONTEXTUAL  LEARNING  OR  MEANINGFUL  GAME-­‐PLAYING?  

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FRIDAY –  MAY  2  

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INNOVATION AND  EXPLOITATION  OUT  OF  RESEARCH:  HOW  TO  GET  A  KILLER  PRODUCT  FROM  A  SOLID  PROPOSAL  

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Practical Information Electricity The electrical supply is 230 volts /- 10%. The frequency of the supply is 50 hertz. The threepin rectangular plug system is used, as in Britain. Adapters are very easy to find.

Language The official languages of Malta are Maltese and English. Maltese, a language of Semitic origin written in the Latin script, is the national language of Malta. Over the centuries, it has incorporated many words derived from English, Italian and French. Italian is also widely spoken. The Maltese language is a source of fascination to both visitors and linguists. The Maltese speak a unique language, Malti, the only Semitic language written in Latin characters. Through the ages, many foreign words, particularly English and Italian, have become part of the language. English, which is also an official language, is widely and fluently spoken and is the language of international business. What is surprising is that the islanders managed to retain a unique language in face of so many others brought by various powers over the centuries. Maltese was largely only a spoken language until the latter half of the 19th century when its grammatical rules were defined and written down. The earliest written evidence of Maltese is a ballad by Pietro Caxaro, (d.1485). The Knights attempted to script it as well. The survival of the language is perhaps testament to the resilience of the Maltese to remain a distinct people and culture. Malti is thought to derive from the language of the ancient Phoenicians who arrived in Malta in 750 B.C. The influence of the Arabs who made the Islands home from the 9th to 13th centuries is clear in the Maltese language whose roots are closely akin to Arabic. Place names and numbers are the most obvious examples of Arabic influence on the language. Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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For non-native speakers trying to learn Malti, the most awkward sound is similar to the Arabic q - an almost silent, but difficult to master, glottal stop. If you are interested in learning Maltese, several language schools on the islands run courses in Maltese for nonnative speakers Some common words in Maltese: Good morning : Bonġu (pronounced as Bonju) Good evening: Bonswa Thank you: Grazzi (pronounced as Gratsi) Please: Jekk Jogħġbok (pronounced as yek yojbok) How are you?: Kif inti? (pronounced as kyf inti)

More information and audio clips of how Maltese is pronounced can be found here: http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/maltese.php

Driving In Malta and Gozo, driving is on the left. There are speed limits of 80 km/h on the open road and 50 km/h in built-up areas, unless otherwise indicated on relevant road signs. If you intend to rent a car or drive in Malta, it is advisable to take out comprehensive insurance. National or international driving licences are accepted.

Currency & Banks On 1st January 2008 Malta adopted the euro as its currency. On 1st February 2008 the euro became the only legal tender currency in Malta and Gozo. Banks are normally open until early afternoon from Monday to Friday, and until midday on Saturday. Some banks/branches work longer hours. Summer and winter opening hours may differ. Exchange bureaux at Malta International Airport are open 24 hours a day. International bankcards are accepted and foreign currency is easily exchanged. Banks, Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) and exchange bureaux can be found all over the Islands. The majority of hotels, larger shops and restaurants also accept payment in the main international currencies. Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Conversion charges may be applied where outlets opt to accept payment in currencies other than the euro. In line with EU legislation on controls of cash entering or leaving the Community, any person entering or leaving Malta carrying cash or other monetary value of which is equal to or in excess of €10,000 or equivalent is obliged to fill in the appropriate declaration form available from the Customs.

Health Medical care in Malta is available through both public and private hospitals and the quality of medical care in Malta is excellent. However we suggest that before you travel to the Maltese Islands, all necessary measures are taken to ensure that you, and anyone else travelling with you, is up-to-date on all routine and recommended immunizations according to schedules defined in your country of residence. Malta has an excellent health service. Hospitals are modern and supported by a regional network of health centres. Travellers do not normally require certificates of vaccination or immunization to enter the Maltese Islands. Visitors from EU member states should make sure that they have a European Health Insurance card. It is advisable that all visitors, irrespective of their nationality, take out a personal medical insurance policy. Malta has reciprocal health agreements with Australia and the United Kingdom. Nationals of these countries, visiting the Islands for no longer than one month, are entitled to free medical and hospital care in both Malta and Gozo. Visitors receiving special medical treatment should bring a medical prescription or a letter of introduction from their family doctor, in case they need to purchase particular medicines. Public General Hospitals Mater Dei Hospital B'Kara By-pass B'Kara MSD 2090 Tel: 356 25450000 Email: mdh@gov.mt Gozo General Hospital Victoria. Tel: 356 21561600 Fax: 356 21560881 For more information on health services click here. Pharmacies Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Pharmacies are found throughout the Maltese Islands and are open during normal shopping hours. On Sundays, chemists open on a roster from 09.00 until 12.30 in Malta and from 07.30 until 11.00 in Gozo. See pharmacy roster.

Swimming & Sunbathing The Maltese coastal waters are generally clean and safe for swimming as there are no tides. Some bays are exposed to north and north-easterly winds which do produce some strong undercurrents at times. If you are new to the Maltese Islands, swim where the locals do. Sun Bathing The Maltese Archipelago lies virtually at the centre of the Mediterranean and has a latitude more southerly than that of northern Tunisia. It is advisable to take precautions to ensure that you avoid over exposure to the sun. Even in winter it is recommended to wear sunscreen with a suitable factor for your skin type. This is important if you are out walking, or taking part in water sports. A sun hat is a must. Children and especially babies need extra protection from the sun. If you are sunbathing, it is advisable to avoid the strongest sunlight between the hours of 11am and 3pm in peak summer months. For more about safe and proper beach behaviour, consult our Code of Conduct here.

Wi-Fi The Malta Communications Authority, in collaboration with other entities, manages a number of free Wi-Fi hotspots across Malta and Gozo. Find out where these Wi-Fi hotspots are located by clicking here. You can also download a free app for your Android smartphone from here. A similar app for i-phone users can be downloaded from our Mobile Apps page.

Useful Numbers The following is a list of useful telephone numbers when you are visiting the Maltese Islands: -

Ambulance: 112 Consumer Protection: 21250221 Direct Dialling Code (Malta): 356 Directory Enquiries: 1182

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Directory Enquiries: (Go Mobile) 1187 Directory Enquiries: (Vodafone) 1189 Emergency: 112 Emergency Rescue by Helicopter: 21244371 Emergency Rescue by Patrol Boat: 21238797 Emergency Vet Services: 50043888 Fire Brigade: 112 Flight Information: 52302000 (rate per call €1.00) * Government Information Service: 153 Gozo Ferry: 21556114 Hospital - Gozo: 21561600 Hospital - Malta: 25450000 International Code (to make an overseas call): 00 Lost Property: 21224781 Overseas Operator: 1152 Passport Office - Gozo: 21560770 Passport Office - Malta: 21222286 Police: 21224001-7 Time Check: 195 Weather Information (basic): 52302021 (rate per call €1.00) Weather Information (detailed): 52502002 (rate per call €5.00)

[Flight and Weather information services are also available, free of charge, on www.maltairport.com or the Information Channels on local TV networks]

In case of emergency please feel free to contact the local organizer Vanessa Camilleri: 0035679065959

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Program

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Lectures & Workshop Abstracts Monday – April 28 Community Learning Analytics Ralf Klamma (RWTH Aachen University) Keywords: learning analytics, informal learning, communities of practice, workplace learning Lecture Abstract: Learning Analytics has become a major research area recently. In particular learning institutions seek ways to collect, manage, analyze and exploit data from learners and instructors for the facilitation of formal learning processes. However, in the world of informal learning at the workplace, knowledge gained from formal learning analytics is only applicable on a commodity level. Since professional communities need learning support beyond this level, we need a deep understanding of interactions between learners and other entities in community-regulated learning processes - a conceptual extension of self-regulated learning processes. In this presentation, we discuss scaling challenges for community learning analytics and give both conceptual and technical solutions. We report experiences from ongoing research in this area, in particular from the two EU integrating project ROLE (Responsive Open Learning Environments) and Learning Layers (Scaling up Technologies for Informal Learning in SME Clusters).

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Show me your PhD and I’ll show you mine Mikhail Fominykh (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Keywords: research presentations, slides, public speaking Workshop Abstract: The workshop will provide practical guidelines for (1) preparing for research presentations that includes extracting parts of the subject/data to the design the slides and the talk. Then (2), I will focus on conducting the presentation combining the talk, slides, demos, and handouts, interacting with the audience and handling questions. Finally (3), I will talk on creating the follow up of the presentation, including establishing contacts, calling for action, and curating the presentation contents. Each part will combine a 15-minutes presentation followed by discussions and presentations.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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The Power of Responsibility through technology enhanced Peer Coaching Pablo Franzolini (Polytechnic University of Catalunya) Carmen Wolf (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) Keywords: peer coaching, responsibility, motivation, awareness, resources Workshop Abstract: Responsibility reflects the notion of being accountable. In the case of PhD students, the accountability is linked with the goal of producing a thesis that contributes to the chosen area of knowledge in a timely manner and according to the common concept of good scientific work. But that is not a trivial task, as besides the time intensive tasks, there is the unrelated work that usually needs to be done to support the studies and a tight organization is needed to keep up with the schedule. On this scenario, motivation can decrease and the efforts can turn into an obligation without intention. Existing technology enhanced learning solutions can provide support to a variety of learning processes. One area that benefits from it massively are coaching processes, which empower groups and individuals with skills to allow them to make better use of their multiple resources. The focus of such coaching processes is directed towards the identification and conscious awareness of motivation, values and objectives in order to allow the coachee (or person receiving coaching) to align its existing intrinsic motivation, main values and identified objectives with the external and personal compromises he or she makes in order to achieve the identified objectives. In other words, coaching can help leverage responsibility by aligning the goals with individual motivation and values. This workshop will provide PhD students with a conceptual framework, as well as simple and practical tools so they can coach their peers and receive coaching from them in order to help them. The help contains of making the cognitive connections to trigger the coachees intrinsic motivation to sustain the intensive work necessary for performing and advancing in their PhD efforts in a timely and effective manner. PhD students assisting to this workshop will be able to rise their level of personal accountability in a natural manner and will be able to use the basic principles of coaching with other peers to spread such support among their community of PhD students.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Gamification of Learning Design Environments Michael Derntl, Milos Kravcik, Ralf Klamma (RWTH Aachen University) Jonathan Chacón, Davinia Hernández-Leo (Universitat Pompeu Fabra) Keywords: Gamification, Learning design, Design community Workshop Abstract: Objectives: Gamification is a buzz concept to exploit the advantages of gaming (e.g. fun, flow) for achieving objectives in non-entertaining contexts (e.g. business, education). The objective of this workshop is to strengthen students' understanding and the practical application of gamification by putting them in charge of gamifying different aspects of the learning design & deployment lifecycle. There is empirical evidence that there are many aspects like sharing, documentation, reuse, etc., that are desirable yet not practiced in educational institutions. The workshop also aims to foster creativity and also enhance students' understanding and appreciation of learning design as a professional practice. Target audience: This workshop addresses PhD researchers who are interested in learning design and/or gamification. Learning outcomes: A student will want to join this workshop if s/he wants to learn one or more of the following: -

understand and practically apply the concept of gamification gamify given non-game problems learning design life cycle from conceptualization via authoring to deployment explore reasons of non-adoption of learning design environments present, reflect, and give constructive comments

Workshop Schedule: The workshop will be split into two 90-minute sessions.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Quantitative research methodologies and learning analytics to evaluate learning tools and processes Pedro J. Muñoz Merino, Carlos Delgado Kloos (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Keywords: quantitative research methods, learning analytics, statistics, R, data analysis Workshop Abstract: This workshop aims at providing PhD students with knowledge to apply some statistical methodologies for evaluating their research hypotheses about learning tools and learning processes. The workshop will cover an introduction about how to design experiments, which statistical methodologies to use, meaning of the results, or the use of the R statistical tool. First, there will be a brief introduction about the application of experimental design to the technology enhanced learning field (research questions, generation of theories and hypothesis, collection of data, and analysis of the data). PhD students will be asked to think and present some research questions they would like to solve within the technology enhanced learning field. Next, some selected quantitative research and learning analytics techniques will be explained, including research cases where they can be applied, assumptions, application with the R statistical tool, analysis and interpretation. Students will be given some R scripts that they should load and execute during the explanation. The techniques are the following: -

Some techniques for comparison among different groups (e.g. t-test, ANOVA, Mann-Whitney or Kruskal Wallis) Some techniques for measuring the relationship between different variables (e.g. Pearson correlation) Some techniques for making prediction models (e.g. simple linear regression)

Finally, we will give PhD students some case studies within the technology enhanced learning field and including some proposed research questions as well as the correspondent datasets. PhD students should solve them using the proper statistical techniques and the R statistical tool. We will help PhD students to solve these case studies.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Key actions to support and share your TEL research: From theory to practice (an interactive and collaborative learning activity for early- to mid-stage PhD candidates) Maria Perifanou (National & Kapodistrian University of Athens & Pontydysgu) Mikhail Fominykh (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Ana Loureiro (Polytechnic Institute of Santarém & University of Aveiro) Keywords: TEL research, Web 2.0, dissemination strategies, content curation, presentation skills Workshop Abstract: Presenting and sharing research is, in most cases, a secondary task for a researcher. However, its importance cannot be underestimated, as obtaining research results is not enough – they should be contributed to the society. Social Media can support this process. Nowadays emerging technologies have changed the way that everyone finds, presents and communicates information opening up new forms of undertaking and disseminating research. Researchers have now the possibility to work in collaboration and communicate their research results in a highly efficient way making use of the power of Web 2.0 tools. It is though important to know which tools you will choose for each purpose, in which way and to what extend, in order to achieve successfully your goals. In fact, there is no single ’right way’ for researchers to use Web 2.0 tools in order to improve the way they work. How you use them will depend on you, your discipline, those around you and the research you are doing. There are though some important and useful “key-actions” that could support this process. Objectives of the workshop: The general goals of the proposed workshop is to provide the participants with practical guidelines and alternative perspectives on searching and selecting useful info for their research as well as presenting and sharing their research results. After the workshop, the participants should be able to consider various types of sharing and presenting their research and improve their skills in using them. More specifically, this workshop aims to: 1. introduce the idea (and its importance) of scientific publishing and sharing research results; 2. give useful advice on how to build a dissemination web strategy; 3. introduce useful social media tools for researchers; 4. give ideas on how to build up a network and how to curate and filter useful networks; 5. show how to manage information overload; 6. give practical tips on creating links between SNSs; Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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7. show how researchers can measure the impact of their digital footprint and choose the appropriate Web analytics tools 8. show how to maximize the traffic of a site or a blog and create viral effects; 9. give practical tips on how to prepare and where to publish research results. Brief description: audience & format The workshop is targeted for students interested in getting to learn about the basic principles of sharing research and the strategies and tools for that. Several ways of sharing and presenting research will be presented to illustrate the basic principles and the variety of the forms. Then, the strategies for using social media and content curation for enhancing research will be presented. The workshop will also include several practical activities. The workshop will include four major parts (90 min): a) Brief discussion facilitated by a list of guiding questions (1st part): The organizers will first explain the main reasons of sharing research and the importance of building a dissemination strategy. Then they will propose a list of useful ways/tools that participants could use to disseminate their research and curate the content (20 min). b) Brief discussion facilitated by a list of guiding questions (2nd part): The organizers will continue with the second round of the discussion. Participants will be invited to discuss about methodologies and tools that can help them prepare and publish (how/where) their research results (20 min). c) Choose between 2 activities: -Hands on session (1): Participants will work in groups of four or five. Each group will have the task to design a web strategy guide that could help researchers disseminate their research in the most efficient and creative way (50min: 30 min activity & 20 min group presentations). -Hands on session (2): The attendees will work again in groups of four or five. They will be invited to explore the tools and find ways to use them in order to prepare and publish their research presentations (50 min: 30 min activity & 20 min group presentations). Participants will be invited to publish their ideas, examples, findings of both practical sessions at the FB group “TEL support” that will be used by the organizers (creators of the online community) for the dissemination of the findings of this workshop to a wider PhD TEL community. Basics/Preparation needed: Access to a personal computer and Internet are mandatory. Basic skills on digital literacy are expected.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Tuesday – April 29 Supporting

Self-Regulated

Learning

by

Personal

Learning

Environments Milos Kravcik, Ralf Klamma (RWTH Aachen University) Keywords: Self-Regulated Learning, Personal Learning Environments Lecture Abstract: Studies have shown that applying Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) and related meta-cognitive learning strategies is an efficient way how to increase the learning progress. However, this is quite challenging to be facilitated with learning technologies, as such training requires an individualized approach and a right balance between the learner’s freedom and guidance. Personalisation and adaptive technologies have a high potential to support SRL and have been applied in Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) that can enable customization and guidance of various strength and at various levels. We present an approach and framework that integrates guidance and reflection support for SRL in PLEs. The ROLE project has elaborated an operational SRL model and implemented a system accordingly. Concrete examples following this design have been created and evaluated in various settings, involving both students and teachers. In the BOOST project we aim to elaborate this approach in order to support competence development and informal training in small companies. The lecture introduces a brief theoretical background from various perspectives including education, psychology and neuroscience. Then technological solutions are proposed and case studies from various projects presented. Finally evaluation challenges will be discussed.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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TEL FAILFaire Workshop Endrit Kromidha (Royal Holloway University of London) Sulafah Basahel (Royal Holloway University of London) Keywords: failure, learning, dialogue, participation, sharing, innovation Workshop Abstract: TEL Fail Faire is a celebration of failure. Audience participation is not only encouraged, it is mandatory via ignite-style presentations and discussion! We are all peers. None of us is perfect. We will share where we have all gone wrong in TEL research and practice. Yet, we will learn from failure. Failure is no reason to be ashamed. We encourage laugh and humour, but here is great value in examining our mistakes. In 90 minutes we will advance our critical thinking, research skills, and profession. Aims: 1. To draw lessons from research and practice experience from each other 2. To foster open dialogue and respond to TEL project challenges of various types 3. To critically investigate how open innovation can help us deal with failures

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Basics of Paper Writing and Publishing in TEL Michael Derntl, Milos Kravcik, Ralf Klamma (RWTH Aachen University) Keywords: Paper writing, Research, Publishing Workshop Abstract: Early-stage PhD researchers are often struggling when structuring and writing their first papers. Particularly in TEL the interdisciplinarity of the field produces a highly diverse body of literature in terms of paper focus, paper structure, paper presentation, and so forth. The main objective of this workshop is to facilitate students in improving their paper structuring skills, and to improve their skills in concisely presenting their research work and outcomes. The boost interactivity and active learning in this workshop during the summer school week, the proposed structure is as follows: (1) Early in the summer school week (on Tuesday) we plan to give a brief introduction to paper writing including guidelines, pitfalls and best practices, all based on examples from the TEL domain. We will outline the basic structure of a scientific paper and how the parts of a paper are written, depending on the type of paper (review, development, empirical, etc.), e.g. based on [1] and similar sources. We will put particular emphasis on examples from the TEL literature. (2) Students will then get the task to revise an abstract of one of their research papers until Wednesday. We will review the submitted abstracts and check whether they meet the guidelines given in the Tuesday session. During the writing process we will remain available to informally facilitate students at the summer school venue. (3) On Friday we plan to do a concluding workshop session where selected abstracts will be discussed. Like last year we also plan to have brainstorming and work sessions on publication strategies in TEL and "landmarks" in the students' subfields in TEL, respectively. This workshop consists of two 90-minute slots, one on Tuesday and one on Friday. [1] M. Derntl: Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing. International Journal on Technology Enhanced Learning, to appear (2014) http://is.gd/paperwriting

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Personal Learning Environments for Inquiry-Based Learning Alexander Mikroyannidis (The Open University) Keywords: Personal Learning Environment, Inquiry-Based Learning, Social Learning Workshop Abstract: Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) enables learners to take the role of an explorer and scientist as they try to solve issues they came across and that made them wonder, thus tapping into their personal feelings of curiosity. IBL leads to structured knowledge about a domain and to more skills and competences about how to carry out efficient and communicable research. A Personal Learning Environment (PLE) is a novel learning facility that allows learners to aggregate, manipulate and share digital artefacts of their ongoing learning experiences, within a flexible and versatile environment. The PLE follows a learner-centric approach, allowing the use of lightweight services and tools that belong to and are controlled by individual learners. The European project weSPOT (http://wespot.net) adopts a PLE-based approach in order to support learners and educators in IBL. The project focuses on IBL with a theoretically sound and technology supported personal inquiry approach. weSPOT supports the meaningful contextualization of scientific concepts by relating them to personal curiosity, experiences, and reasoning. weSPOT addresses several challenges in the area of science learning and technology support for building personal conceptual knowledge. This workshop will enable students to understand how a PLE can be used to support them in their learning and research tasks, following an IBL methodology. The participating PhD students will first be introduced to the concepts of IBL and PLEs and the related technologies. They will then be able to use the tools developed by the weSPOT project in order to carry out a research investigation. More specifically, they will be using the weSPOT inquiry space (http://inquiry.wespot.net), an online personal and social environment for performing scientific inquiries. The students will be asked to use this environment in order to build a PLE that will help them investigate their preferred research topic. They will have the opportunity to try out the tools offered in this environment and perform their inquiry either individually or collaboratively in groups. At the end of the workshop, there will be time for reflection and discussions on the weSPOT tools and IBL/PLEs in general.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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TEL around the world Tanja Kohn (Innsbruck University) Keywords: ICT4D, Education, Collaboration Workshop Abstract: TEL is around since many years – I don’t have to tell you that. People in educational institutions started thinking about how to integrate TEL into the school sector. They started elaborating main goals what to expect from a 10- or 14-year old student - at least in Austria. I want you to think and reflect about “How is it in your country? How is TEL integrated and is it accepted in primary, secondary and higher education?” Your task is to investigate and give the group participating in this workshop a short overview about TEL in the context of the school system in your country. Are there any specific project or programs in your country? In this workshop we will compare the approaches for and attempts of successful TEL. It will show us a variety of perspectives on integrating TEL, the use of TEL, the acceptance and the way different generations get along with TEL. One of the most interesting questions for me is: What can we learn from the youngest? How do they (naturally) use technology to enhance and facilitate their learning process? And why does it need so much effort to convince and teach most of the older ones how to integrate technology in their teaching? Don’t we try to make something fit in our “adult world” what already runs well among the younger ones? Why are students often not allowed to use their mobile devices in class? Do we really have to disconnect school from reality of students? You might ask yourself “And how does that help to get my PhD done?” – It will help you to focus one main aspect of your thesis/articles and get confronted with many different perspectives of your international colleagues. Then, abstracting from focusing TEL we will generate and discuss our (up-coming) ideas which might let us think differently afterwards.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Work with the JTEL Community: Transform your idea of TEL innovation to work collaboration (an interactive activity for late stage PhD candidates & early stage researchers) Maria Perifanou (National & Kapodistrian University of Athens & Pontydysgu) Ana Loureiro (Polytechnic Institute of Santarém & University of Aveiro)   Ana Torres (Polytechnic Institute of Santarém & University of Lisbon)     Antigoni Parmaxi (Cyprus University of Technology) Keywords: JTEL community, ICT research & Innovation, project, funding, work, collaboration Workshop Abstract: Worldwide research has shown that ICT not only has lead to improved student learning and better teaching methods but mainly has a big impact on the way that we communicate, we work, we learn and we live our lives. Emerging technologies have brought unique responses to society's challenges such as Innovative, inclusive and adaptive societies, Information and communication societies, Industrial renewal etc. ICT researchers from all over the world are invited to work on the direction of society’s progress and innovation creating the conditions for new growth and jobs. Nowadays there is a big number of new calls (International, National and European, like Horizon 2020, Erasmus+ etc.) for research and innovation in information and communication (ICTs) that have as overall aim the collaboration of researchers, practitioners and policy makers in order to bring the benefits of progress in these technologies to all the citizens of the world, to all the fields of education and business. Our Joint Technology Enhanced Learning community is a growing and a very promising community that can play a major role in bringing the progress of ICT research and innovation especially to European citizens. Every year numerous TEL experts and doctoral students from different disciplines are challenged to work and learn together, increasing their knowledge, developing research skills and discussing their innovative ideas. The aim of this workshop is to bring most of the JTEL participants together encouraging new working collaborations. The idea behind this workshop proposal is the need to give the chance to advanced TEL PhD students and early researchers to collaborate together on writing their own innovative project proposals and ask for national or EU funding. Being able to work in the field of your interest with people that you trust and admire is the dream of every young researcher especially in this period of economical crisis. This workshop could support this idea and offer the opportunity to experienced TEL experts to share their valuable knowledge with the new generation of TEL experts creating the basis of very promising working collaborations.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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More specifically, the general goals of the proposed workshop are the following: 1. Present basic info related to new calls for research proposals related to TEL especially in European level (Erasmus +, Horizon 2020, COST, etc.) or other research funding opportunities (ERC etc.). 2. Discuss with experts and describe the key tips for writing a successful project proposal. 3. Discuss with experts and co-create a step by step guide of how you organize and manage your project work. 4. Provide further useful resources related to project management principles and practices (links, open courses etc.). 5. Find collaborators and start organizing the writing of your project proposal. Brief description: audience & format The workshop is targeted mostly, but not exclusively, to late-stage PhD students and earlystage researchers that have a great interest in a) learning how to write a TEL project proposal for getting funds for their research and b) working as ICT researchers and project managers. The workshop will include 5 parts (1 week online pre-workshop activities +1,5 hour face to face activities): 1) ON LINE: Pre-workshop activities: The workshop organizers will share with all the JTEL14 participants an open document (googledoc) in which the participants will be able to add their questions το a list of questions that will be addressed to the TEL experts. In this way the workshop organisers will be able to put in groups the questions and support the TEL experts in answering the questions (a week before the workshop). 2) F2F: Presentation of the new calls for research proposals related to TEL (10min). 3) F2F: Open discussion with the ICT experts and update of the opendoc of the questions/answers by the workshop organisers (40 min). 4) F2F: Hands on session: Every ICT expert will coordinate a working group of 5/6 participants who will start planning their collaboration and writing about their project idea (40). 5) ON LINE: Post - workshop activities: The workshop organisers will create a FB group for all the participants who would like to find a project partner and share relative resources with the wider TEL community. Basics/Preparation needed: Access to a personal computer and Internet are mandatory. Basic skills on digital literacy are expected.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Wednesday – April 30 From PLE to cMOOCs Denis Gillet (EPFL) Keywords: Personal Learning Environment, MOOC Lecture Abstract: In this presentation, we will discuss how platforms initially designed to enable the construction of personal learning environments can help teachers and learners to aggregate their own MOOCs from resources freely available in the Cloud under Creative Commons licenses. Compare to the mainstream MOOC platforms like Coursera or EdX which are basically learning management systems open to external students, the proposed solution offers built-in social media features to boost opportunistic interaction and informal exchanges between students. The creation of inquiry learning spaces for STEM education at school using the same approach will also be discussed.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Create, Experiment & Collaborate on Inquiry Learning with Online Labs Yiwei Cao, Nils Faltin (IMC AG) Sten Govaerts, Denis Gillet (EPFL) Keywords: online labs, inquiry based learning, bartering, expert, hands-on, experiments, competition, collaboration Workshop Abstract: With JTEL’s motto “Access to experts Collaborate in research” in mind, our workshop will present the EU IP funded Go-Lab project (http://www.golab-project.eu) that aims to support STEM teaching and learning through the use of online labs and inquiry-based learning spaces. Afterwards, participants will have hands-on experiences with Go-Lab prototypes with which they create their own inquiry learning spaces using existing online labs and apps available on the Go-Lab portal (http://www.golabz.eu). Furthermore, the participants will use the Go-Lab bartering platform prototype where they will create a profile describing their expertise and will offer real-time support to their fellow participants and receive help from them, while creating their own inquiry-learning space. The workshop will conclude with a short session where participants showcase their results, discuss their experience and will rate each other’s inquiry learning spaces. The highest rated inquiry learning space will be awarded.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Digital Badges in Education Nikola Milikic (University of Belgrade) Ángel Del Blanco Aguado (Universitad Complutense Madrid) Keywords: digital badges, badges, credentials Workshop Abstract: Digital badges represent a judgment by an organization or individual regarding a person’s experiences, abilities, knowledge and qualifications. Comparing to physical certificate or credential, they can encompass a wealth of additional information about the assessment methods, examples or evidence of the earner’s work or the context in which they were earned. Since they are in a digital format, badges can be easily shared with multiple audiences, allow creation of specific collections of badges for different target communities and thus augment visibility of one’s badge portfolio. The purpose of this workshop will be to introduce PhD students from the TEL area with the notion of digital badges and their current use. The workshop will intend to can spark young TEL researchers with new ideas to enhance current methodologies and methods and apply it to different contexts.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Thursday – May 1 Virtual hospitals as a training arena for medical students: challenges and future research directions Ekaterina Prasolova-Forland Technology)

(Norwegian

University

of

Science

and

Keywords: virtual hospital, medical training, virtual worlds, 3D simulations, Oculus Rift Lecture Abstract: Much of the medical education is geared towards patient contact and practice in hospitals. However, as modern hospitals increase their effectiveness, the patients spend less and less time in hospitals, leading to a dramatically less time for contact between students and patients. As a consequence, students get less time on the task. One of the solutions to increase the student’s time on task is by offering online 3D virtual learning environments, ‘virtual hospitals’, that afford the learner to access cases, practices and team based learning at their own pace when the access to patients is becoming more difficult to achieve. There is evidence that providing practice opportunities for medical students (such as contact with patients, technical skills and communication) through 3D virtual learning environments enhances PBL based approach and facilitates self-regulated learning, “anytime, anywhere” in small tutor groups. The goal of this lecture is to provide an overview of research challenges and potentials of innovative technologies including virtual hospitals and virtual reality for practical medical training. The topic will appeal to a broad public, but will be especially relevant for students who work with serious games, health informatics and educational simulations. The identified issues are exemplified in detail with the ‘Virtual Operating room’ project where the existing operating room at St. Olavs hospital in Trondheim, Norway, has been recreated in the virtual world of Second Life. It has been successfully tested among surgical and anesthesia nursing students for training communication with patients while preparing them for a surgery, both in a desktop and Oculus Rift version. During the lecture, the participants will have a possibility of a hands-on session in the Virtual Operating room, paying the roles of patients and nurses (depending on the quality of Internet connection), with a subsequent discussion. The lecture is concluded by discussing implications for design of 3D learning environments/virtual hospitals for medical training, outlining directions for future work.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Educational Augmented Reality: Methodology and Application Victor Alvarez (KU Leuven) Sebastian Kelle (HdM Stuttgart) Keywords: Computers and Education, Artificial Augmented and Virtual Realities, Mobile Applications Workshop Abstract: Augmented Reality (AR) has garnered much research attention in recent years due to the rapid expansion in the use of wireless, mobile and wearable technologies. The application of augmented reality in the educational area has originated an interdisciplinary research field, where the combination of technological and pedagogical innovation requires the collaboration between the instructional and pedagogical team, technology designers, as well as the active participation of students. The characteristics of AR are strongly related with the senses of presence, immediacy and immersion. From an educational perspective, these features enable the activities to engage students cognitively and affectively and enhance the impact of learning based on real-world experiences. The combination of real and virtual elements facilitates the understanding of learning concepts, and contributes to increase students’ motivation, interest and orientation to learning goals. However, despite these advantages, the design of Educational Augmented Reality (EAR) activities remains a big challenge and present a clear need for defining the aspects that must be considered in a complete instructional design. This workshop addresses the current state of the art in EAR, and provides a forum in which participants may explore the benefits of using novel instructional design approaches and technologies to support learning, as well as discussing the methodology and application of augmented reality in education.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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The MOOCs’ (r)evolution: A policy framework analysis at a European level Rosanna De Rosa, Ruth Kerr (Federica Web Learning) Keywords: multi lingual MOOCs, personal learning environments, innovative platform Workshop Abstract: Described as a disruptive innovation (Christensen and Horn 2013), a tsunami (Brooks 2012, Bull 2012) and a revolution (Koller and Ng 2012), Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) have been a topic of great public debate over the last couple of years. Although the first MOOC courses were presented in 2008, it was in 2012, with the development of purpose-built platforms for MOOCs delivery, when the phenomenon really took off, prompting the New York Times to dub it the year of the Moocs (Pappano 2012). In 2013 the phenomenon reached even greater heights, especially in the USA, where Secondary Schools starter experimenting with MOOCs, the University consortiums forged ahead with more and more participating institutions and increased funding, and where both State and Federal government implemented policies in support of online learning. Many observers say that it is like being in the midst of a hype cycle (Coates 2013, Yang 2013), and some fear that this level of overstatement will prove the main obstacle to any normal development of the phenomenon. At the end of 2012-beginning of 2013, educational policymakers and stakeholders in Europe started to prepare their response as they realised that here was a form of innovation that might bring about real changes in Higher Education delivery, breaking down the organisational and funding structures that had been the stronghold of the system for centuries. It comes as no surprise, therefore, that MOOCs have been greeted with high expectations but also with apprehension regarding the future of public universities and the way competition is hotting up between old and new players for a position in this open and global education market. For Universities like Federico II, a public University in Naples, Italy, who have been present on the OER and web-learning stage for many years now (www.federica.unina.it), this renewed interest in online learning via MOOCs represents both a challenge and an opportunity. These institutions are faced with the decision of either remaining with their own model and approach or integrating their content within the new framework. Federico II is currently updating its courseware on a new European platform and is also leading a European consortium for the delivery and piloting of multi-lingual, cross-border MOOCs, showcasing MOOC production from around the continent and using learner analytics to identify best practice and a European model. Our workshop could be of interest to your Summer School candidates as it offers an empirical approach to the organisational issues behind e-learning and to innovation within the online learning process.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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The Use of Usability-Testing in the Development of Digital Gamebased Learning Scenarios Tina Harms, Sandra Buron (Charité - University Medicine Berlin) Keywords: digital game based learning, serious game, usability-test, interaction-design Workshop Abstract: Usability testing is an important step in the successful design of Digital Game-based Learning Scenarios (Serious Games). This is to avoid barriers and to ensure that even a heterogeneous population will be able to interact with your new scenario easily. Especially participants who are not comfortable with computers in general will benefit from this method, as we evaluated in our Projects TRACY and SimMed. TRACY (Gamebased Training for Disaster and Emergency Scenarios) is a project to develop a game based learning environment for the continuing education of medical and nursing staff, which is funded by the German Federal Department of Education and Research. In cooperation with the Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft (HTW) the Charité Medical Faculty develops a serious game that simulates internal disaster management. SimMed means Simulation of Medical treatment and it displays a virtual child on a multi touch table top to simulate a treatment table at a doctor’s office or hospital. The system is able to imitate various diseases that have been assessed by medical students to learn how to deal with diagnostic tasks in a team oriented working environment. It is thus possible for a group of learners to interact with the VP simultaneously. This makes it possible to train complex situations such as performing treatments that require more than one person. Virtual examination and treatment instruments can be used by each learner in the team. Both of those projects did benefit from the usability-test-method during development. In this lecture we will show the advantages of the method and successful examples of use in the development of two digital game based learning scenarios at the Charité Berlin.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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A mobile context-aware learning schedule framework with Java learning objects Jane Yau (Malmö University) Keywords: Mobile Learning, Research Methodology, Pedagogical Usability and Technical Evaluation Lecture Abstract: In this lecture, I will present a summary of my thesis which was focused on a theoretical mobile context-aware learning schedule framework which I had derived and designed from an extensive literature review, as part of my doctoral research. Its objective is to recommend appropriate learning materials to students based on their current locations and circumstances. The context of this research was on mobile learning i.e. learning in different locations and under various contextual situations from the perspective of university students. The framework uses a learning schedule (i.e. electronic-based diary) to inform the location and available time a student has for learning/studying at a particular location. Thereafter, a number of factors are taken into consideration for the recommendation of appropriate learning materials. These are the student’s learning styles, knowledge level, concentration level, frequency of interruption at that location and their available time for learning/studying. I conducted five studies to evaluate and determine the potential deployment of the framework and the results showed that (a) a learning schedule approach is successful to an extent in obtaining location and available time information to indicate accurate values of these contexts, (b) different learners may require different personalization strategies when selecting appropriate learning materials for them in mobile environments, (c) the proposed suggestion rules are effective in recommending appropriate materials to learners in their situation, in order to enhance their learning experiences, and overall that (d) the framework can potentially be used by students in different locations and situations, and appropriate learning materials can be selected to them, in order to enhance their learning experiences. Specifically, I will be addressing some of the problems and challenges I faced whilst working on this thesis due to having to consider interdisciplinary issues namely pedagogical aspects (such as learning experiences, learning outcomes), usability aspects (such as user interface and interaction design), and technical aspects (such as design, implementation and evaluation of a system). This lecture will be around 45 minutes and will be interactive – students may ask questions at any time relating to aspects of their interests or research problems or research methodologies.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Mobile Contextualized learning games for decision support training Roland Klemke (Open University of the Netherlands) Keywords: Context, contextualization, mobile learning, serious games, ARLearn, decision support Workshop Abstract: This interactive workshop session covers: 1. 2. 3.

Contextualization: contextualization techniques used in modern mobile devices as well as application scenarios for decision support trainings. Mobile Learning: presentation of the mobile learning tool suite ARLearn and experimentation with a small scale scenario. Future Trends: Discussion of emerging technologies as well as benefits and risks.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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InstaTech – contextual learning or meaningful game-playing? Vanessa Camilleri (University of Malta) Ruthi Aladjem (Tel Aviv University) Keywords: Instagram Workshop Abstract: This hands-on workshop will provide the participants with the possibility to experience different perspectives, as learning is taken to a higher dimension in a contextualized environment. During the workshop, the participants will be invited to join into groups of 2 or 3 and embark upon a journey of discovery as they document the theme of technology enabled learning in a given span of time. Participants will be encouraged to employ their mobile devices and photography applications to document their serendipitous encounters with the theme, showing different constructions to the meaning of the theme. The images uploaded and shared via Instagram, will provide the point of departure and basis for a discussion that will focus on the deeper meaning of TEL. During the session, participants will have the opportunity not only to create content, but also to review, comment and engage in a meaningful discourse with peers’, thus reflecting on their content. The scope of this workshop is to help participants glimpse at some broader insights into this new culture of learning, where meaning making and play become interconnected, and where the usual practice of the linear translation of information is transformed by the networked community. The leading discussion will focus on the activity outcomes and will debate terms such as ‘questing dispositions’, ‘contextual learning’, and ‘digital empowerment’ in a world that is mostly driven by technologies that enable content creation and sharing, rather than passive consumption.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Friday – May 2 Innovation and Exploitation out of Research: How to get a killer product from a solid proposal Daniel Burgos (Universidad Internacional de La Rioja) Keywords: Proposal production, Project management, Innovation, Product Exploitation, Creative process, Active funding, Time-to-market strategy, Intellectual Property Rights Lecture Abstract: What makes an idea, a brilliant project? What makes a brilliant project, a successful outcome? What makes a successful outcome, a killer in the market? Everything starts with a draft: maybe produced by a single person, maybe out of a collaborative exercise with others, maybe as part of a multi-genesis process. However, the idea has to follow a clear step-to-step process to design a solid proposal, a strong project, and furthermore, a clear and viable result to be exploited in real markets. In this session, we will analyze every single step, from the doodle to the impact on the market, and we will provide clear guidelines, along with applied use-cases. Because research is not just writing papers.

Joint European  Summer  School  in  Technology  Enhanced  Learning  2014  

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Brochure JTEL Summer School 2014  

28th April-2nd May 2014, Malta